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Publication numberUS3869999 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 11, 1975
Filing dateOct 3, 1973
Priority dateOct 3, 1973
Publication numberUS 3869999 A, US 3869999A, US-A-3869999, US3869999 A, US3869999A
InventorsRichter Herbert
Original AssigneeRichter Herbert
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tape slitting and metering device
US 3869999 A
Abstract
A tape-slitting device which slits rubber tape to form a plurality of relatively narrow strips and meters and guides said strips under tension to a sewing machine. Adjusting means are provided to adjust the tension. Folding means are provided to fold a strip of knitted material or the like around at least some of the rubber strips and to guide the folded knitted material together with the rubber strips to the sewing machine. Guide means are provided to guide the individual rubber strips in relation to the individual needles of the sewing machine.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

I United States Patent 11 1 1111 3,869,999 Richter 1 1 Mar. 11, 1975 [54] TAPE SLITT ING AND METERING DEVICE 3,204,590 9/1965 Rockerath et a1. 112/121,15 [76] lnventor: Herbert Richter, PO. Box 206, Kew FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIQNS Gardens 940,949 11/1963 Great Britain 112/12126 22 Filed; Oct 3 1973 1,041,071 9/1966 Great Britain 112/121.26

[21] Appl' No: 4031l7 Primary Examiner-Werner H. Schroeder Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Stoll and Stoll [52] US. Cl 112/121.26, 83/434, 83/502, 83/505, 112/124, 112/152 51 1m. 01 D05b 23/00 [571 ABSTRACT Field of Search A tape-slitting device which slits rubber tape to form a 112/262, 124, 122, 3 plurality of relatively narrow strips and meters and 242/562, 56.7 guides said strips under tension to a sewing machine. Adjusting means are provided to adjust the tension. [56] Refer nces Cit Folding means are provided to fold a strip of knitted UNITED STATES PATENTS material or the like around at least some of the rubber 789 465 5/1905 Varley et aL N 83500 strips and to guide the folded knitted material together 1.1301909 3/1915 Kremer 83/506 with the rubber strips 10 the Sewing machine Guide 1,255,243 2/1918 Stengel 112/139 m ans are provided to guide the individual rubber 2,053,032 9/1936 Hubbard 83/506 X strips in relation to the individual needles of the sew- 2,506,343 5/1950 Casagrande 83/500 X ing machine, 3,064,269 ll/l962 Scheitlin 1 2/237 X 3,150,621 9/1964 Warnock 112/12l.27 10 Claims, 20 Drawing Figures 10 I02 19/ i m; 1 12 11 1 ii I PATENTED 1 I975 SHEET 2 0f 5 PM I m1 1 I975 I! IIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIII/ 1 TAPE SLITTING AND METERING DEVICE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention.

The invention relates mainly but not exclusively to the manufacture of elastic waistbands for pajama pants, boxer shorts, and like articles of wearing apparel. The invention has other applications wherein rubber tape and the like are slit into relatively narrow strips, and the strips are then guided to a multineedle sewing machine for sewing attachment to various articles made of textile material.

2. Description of the Prior Art.

The closest prior patent art known to applicant consists of the following US. Pat. Nos:

1,442,387 Davis 1,882,642 Jung, .lr. 2,289,777 Hazell 2,761,401 Dolney 2,901,991 Reimer 2,922,166 Peachey 1,493,452

Rubber tape slitting devices are, of course, known to the art. Tensioning or metering devices are also known to the art. This is equally true of folding attachments. However, in all of the prior art known to applicant there is no rubber tape slitting device which is adapted to be mounted as an attachment to a sewing machine. Nor is the particular slitting device herein described and claimed known to the art regardless of where it is mounted and whether or not it is operated in immediate juxtaposition and conjunction with a sewing ma chine. The prior art does not show the combination of a tape slitting device and a metering or tensioning device mounted as an attachment on a sewing machine. The prior art does not show a knitted material folder and a rubber strip guide corresponding to the folder and guide of the present invention.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention comprises a tape slitting device which is intended mainly to slit rubber tape and to produce a plurality of relatively narrow rubber strips from the tape. Combined with the tape slitting device is a tape tensioning or metering device which feeds the slit material to a sewing machine under predetermined tension. The tensioning or metering device is adjustable to adjust the tension on the material.

An important feature of this invention resides in the strip-guiding means which guides the rubber strips to the individual needles of a multi-needle sewing machine. This makes it possible to utilize relatively narrow rubber strips and to space them from each other, thereby producing a saving of material and providing ventilation between the individual rubber strips for the comfort of the wearer.

Included in the present invention is a folding device which folds knitted material around at least some of the rubber strips and guides the folded knitted material to the sewing machine needles.

Another important feature of the invention resides in the nature of the slitting device, which is adapted to compensate for uneven or unequal wear of the cutting blades. The cutting blades are pivotally mounted for pivotal movement about two perpendicularly intersecting pivotal axes to equalize the pressure which they exert upon the tape and the tape-supporting roller. This pivotal mounting compensates not only for unequal wear in the cutting blades, but also unequal wear in the tape-supporting roller.

Still another important feature of the invention resides in the fact that the cutting blades may readily be disengaged from the rubber tape, so that the tape would be fed to the sewing machine under tension and unsllt.

A further important feature of the invention resides in the guide means for the individual strips of rubber which are produced by the slitting operation. Individual guides are provided for each rubber strip, and they are individually adjustable both laterally relative to each other and angularly relative to each other to guide the individual rubber strips in precise paths relative to the sewing machine needles.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is a fragmentary side view of a tape-slitting and metering or tensioning device made in accordance with one embodiment of this invention, showing it installed on a multi-needle sewing machine and operatively connected to the sewing machine drive mechanism, said view also showing a strip guiding and knitted material folding means associated with said tapeslitting and tensioning device and said sewing machine.

FIG. 2 is a front view of said tape-slitting and tensioning device, also showing it operatively connected to a multi-needle sewing machine in association with stripguiding and knitted material folding means.

FIG. 3 is a top view of the tape-slitting and tensioning device and strip-guiding and knitted material folding means shown in FIGS. 1 and 2.

FIG. 4 is a vertical section on the line 4-4 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 5 is a horizontal section on the line 5-5 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 6 is a horizontal section on the line 66 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 7 is a vertical section on the line 7-7 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 8 is an exploded perspective view showing the component parts of the tape-slitting mechanism.

FIG. 9 is a longitudinal section through the back-up or pressure roller against which the cutting wheels operate.

FIG. 10 is a fragmentary transverse section through said back-up or pressure roller.

FIG. 11 is a front view with various parts removed to expose the cutter assembly and to show the rubber tape and knitted material which are fed through the device.

FIG. 12 is a plan view of the strip guiding means.

FIG. 13 is an under-side view of one ofthe strip guiding elements.

FIG. 14 is a similar view of another strip guiding means.

FIG. 15 is a fragmentary section on the line 15-15 of FIG. 13. FIG. 16 is a section on the line l6-16 of FIG. 13.

FIG. 17 is a sectional view on the line l7-l7 of FIG. 3.

FIG. 18 is a view of a shearing assembly which may be used in the place and stead of the cutter assembly shown, for example, in FIG. 7.

FIG. 19 is a view of another shearing assembly which may be used in the place and stead of the cutter assembly of FIG. 7 or the shearing assembly of FIG. 18.

FIG. 20 is a view of a drive assembly which can be used in the place and stead of the drive assembly shown, for example, in FIG. 1.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION Referring now to one preferred form of the invention as illustrated in the drawing, it will be observed that it comprises a combination tape-slitting and metering or tensioning device 10 and a strip-guiding device 12, both mounted on a multi-needle sewing machine 14. Additionally, there is a folding attachment 16 which may be used in conjunction with the strip-guiding means 12. As appears in FIG. 1 of the drawing, the strip-guiding means 12 and the folder 16 are interconnected with each other and mounted on sewing machine cloth plate 18 immediately in front of and directed to the sewing machine needles 20, sewing machine foot 22, and toothed feed dog 24.

Tape-slitting and metering device 10 is mounted on a suitable support bracket 26, which is mounted on the sewing machine base. A connecting linkage 28 is provided between the sewing machine drive and the tapeslitting and metering device 10. Specifically, linkage 28 comprises a crank arm 280, a bellcrank 28b, a yoke 280, a connecting rod 28d, and an end bearing 28e. Crank arm 28a is connected at one end to eccentric 29 on sewing machine drive 30 and at its opposite end to bellcrank 28b. Connecting rod 28d is connected at one end, by means of yoke 280, to bellcrank 28b, and at its opposite end it is connected, by means of end bearing 28e, to crank arm 32 on the tape-slitting and metering device. Bellcrank 28b is rockably mounted on the sewing machine base by means of screw 31. The sewing machine drive (including the eccentric) operates through connecting linkage 28 to cause crank arm 32 to reciprocate about the axis of shaft 34 on which said crank arm is mounted and to which it is secured by means of clamp screw 36. It is this crank arm 32 which operates the tape-slitting and metering device, as will shortly be described.

It will be observed that shaft 34 is rotatably mounted in bearings 38 on frame or housing 40. It is this frame or housing 40 which is secured to supporting bracket 26 in order to support the tape-slitting and metering device on the sewing machine. Mounted on shaft 34 is a back-up or pressure roller 42. Between said back-up or pressure roller 42 and shaft 34 is a pair of over-running clutches 44 which lock when crank arm 32 is moved in one angular direction (counterclockwise as viewed in FIG. 1) and which release and rotate freely when the crank arm 32 is moved in the opposite angular direction' (clockwise as viewed in FIG. 1). Since crank arm 32 reciprocates in alternate clockwise and counterclockwise directions by reason of the reciprocal action of connecting rod 28, the effect on back-up or pressure roller 42 will be to cause it to move in intermittent counterclockwise direction as viewed in FIG. 1.

Rotatably mounted adjacent back-up or pressure roller 42 on opposite sides thereof is a pair of spring-urged idler rollers 46 and 48, respectively. More particularly, idler rollers 46 and 48 are rotatably mounted on pivotally mounted arms 50 and 52, respectively. There is one pair of arms 50 for idler roller 46, one arm at each end of said roller, and one pair of arms 52 for idler roller 48, one arm 52 at each end of said roller 48. Pins 54 rotatably support idler roller 46 on arms 50, and pins 56 rotatably support idler roller 48 on arms 52.

It will now be noted that arms 50 are pivotally mounted on frame or housing 40 by means of stud bolts 58, and arms 52 are similarly pivotally mounted on said frame or housing 40 by means of stud bolts 60. Coil springs 62 and 64 interconnect arms 50 with arms 52 and exert a spring action upon them. urging them toward each other. It will be observed that these springs 62 and .64 normally cause idler rollers 46 and 48 to engage back-up or pressure roller 42 under spring tension.

In the use of the device as thus far described, a rubber tape or the like is threaded through a guide 72 and thence between idler roller 48 and back-up or pres sure roller 42, thence across approximately of said back-up or pressure roller 42 and between said roller and idler roller 46. The tape is then led to guide means 12, thence along said guide means and between the sewing machine foot 22 and sewing machine feed dog 24. Operation of the sewing machine will cause connecting rod 28 to reciprocate in synchronization with the reciprocation of the feed dog 24. Back-up or pressure roller 42 will thereby be caused to rotate in intermittent fashion, thereby intermittently feeding the tape 70 to the sewing machine foot 22 and feed dog 24, as well as to needles 20.

The tape-metering or tensioning component of the invention, as illustrated in the drawing, involves the crank arm 32 and the connecting linkage 28. It will be observed that crank arm 32 has a longitudinal slot 74 formed therein, and it will further be noted that a bolt 76 projects through said slot. It is bolt 76 which pivotally secures linkage 28 to the crank arm, and by adjusting the position of bolt 76 along slot 74 the crank arm is effectively or constructively lengthened or shortened. The effective length of the crank arm will determine the angular speed and range of angular movement of shaft 34 in relation to the angular speed of drive mechanism 30 of the sewing machine. As will be understood, the angular speed of drive shaft 30 determines the speed of operation of the feed dog 24, and this, of course, is synchronized with the operation of the sewing machine needles 20. In other words, there is complete synchronization between the sewing machine (feed dog and needle mechanism), on the one hand, and the tape-slitting and metering device, on the other hand.

However, synchronization does not necessarily imply, in the present case, identical speeds of operation. In order to apply tension upon the tape (primarily for the sewing operation), what is done in the present case is to cause the tape-slitting mechanism to lag behind the operation of the sewing machine. This is readily accomplished by adjusting the effective length of the crank arm 32, as has above been described. It is not suggested that this is the only means for applying tension upon the tape. On the contrary, the guide means themselves (including the idler rollers) may provide frictional retardation upon the forward movement of the tape (and the strips slit therefrom), and this alone would produce tension in the tape and the strips slit from the tape. Other conventional tension-applying means and methods may be utilized in the present invention. However, in the embodiment of the invention now being described the method and means above set forth are preferred.

What has thus far been described is mainly the tapemetering or tensioning component of the invention. What remains to be described is the tape-cutting or slitting component, as well as the strip-guiding and knitted material folding elements 12 and 16. It should be understood that the scope of the basic invention which is herein claimed encompasses the various forms of conventional tape-slitting or cutting means. The embodiment of the invention now being described incorporates a preferred form of tape-slitting or cutting means, but, as has above been indicated, it is not intended that the invention be limited to this form. Indeed, two additional tape-slitting or cutting systems are also shown in the drawing of this case, and they too are intended to be included within the scope of the invention and the appended claims.

The tape-slitting or cutting component comprises a floating housing 80 and a plurality of cutting wheels 82, 84 and 86, respectively. More specifically, housing 80 is pivotally mounted by means of screws 88 and 90 on a second floating housing 92. These two screws 88 and 90 are coaxially aligned, their common axis being parallel to the axes of the three cutting wheels 82, 84 and 86. The second floating housing 92 is itself pivotally mounted by means of bolt 94 on bracket 96, and said bracket is pivotally mounted by means of screws 98 and 100 on the side walls of fixed housing 40. It will be observed that screws 98 and 100 occupy a common axis which is parallel to the axes of screws 88 and 90 and cutting wheels 82, 84 and 86. Bolt 94, on the other hand, defines an axis which is perpendicular to the common axis of screws 98 and 100.

It will be understood from the foregoing that bracket 96 is free to pivot or rotate relative to housing 40 about the common axis of screws 98 and 100. Floating housing 92 is pivotable about the axis of bolt 94, and since this bolt pivots with bracket 96 about the common axis of screws 98 and 100, said floating housing 92 will itself be pivotable about said common axis. Since the first mentioned floating housing 80 is pivotally mounted on the second floating housing 92 by means of screws 88 and 90, it will be evident that said first mentioned floating housing 80 is free to pivot about the axes of screws 88 and 90, screws 98 and 100, and bolt 94.

At the opposite end of fixed housing 40 from pivotally mounted bracket 96 is a second bracket 102. This bracket 102 is an angle bar with components 102a and 102b which extend perpendicularly to each other. Bracket 102 is removably pinned to the fixed housing 40 by means of pins 104, which project through component 102a of said bracket 102. Although bracket 102 is detachable from housing 40, when said bracket is pinned to said housing it functions as an integral part of the housing. There are three unthreaded holes 108, 110 and 112 that are formed in bracket component 102b, hole 108 being centered between holes 110 and 112.

To the left of bracket component 102b, as viewed in FIG. 1, is a plate 114, and it will be noted that secured to said plate are two screws 116 and 118, respectively. The upper ends of these screws need not be threaded, and it will be observed that they project through holes 110 and 112 of bracket component 102]). The heads of these two screws 116, 118 prevent dislodgement from these two holes 110 and 112, and function as limiting elements to prevent movement of plate 114 in the direction away from bracket component 102b. Thus far, however, plate 114 is free to move toward bracket component 102b, screws 116, 118 being free to move through holes 110, 112. As will shortly be seen, however, a coiled compression spring 120 is mounted between plate 114 and bracket component l02b in alignment and registration with hole 108, and this spring urges plate 114 away from bracket component 1021;.

Formed in the center of plate 114 is a threaded hole 122, and it will be seen that this hole is aligned with unthreaded hole 108 in bracket component 102b. Extending through hole 108 and in screw-threaded engagement with hole 122 is clamp screw 124. This clamp screw includes a knob or head 126 which may be manually engaged to rotate the screw. The opposite end or tip 128 of the screw is rounded for engagement with a rounded recess 130 in a bracket 132 which is secured to floating frame 92. It will be apparent from this description that when clamp screw 124 is manually rotated in threaded hole 122, it will be caused to move axially of itselfin one direction or the other, depending on its direction of rotation. Rotating clamp screw 124 in the direction to cause it to drive more deeply into threaded hole 122 will cause the rounded tip 128 of said screw to apply pressure (in leftward direction as viewed in FIG. 1) upon bracket 132 of floating frame 92, causing said floating frame to move in counterclockwise direction (also as viewed in FIG. 1) about the common axis of screws 98 and 100. Since floating frame is carried by floating frame 92 (by means of screws 88, whatever pressure clamp screw 124 applies to bracket 132 of floating frame 92 will also be exerted upon floating frame 80. And since floating frame 80 carries cutting elements 82, 84 and 86, the same pressure which clamp screw 124 applies to bracket 132 of floating frame 92 will be transmitted to these cutters and cause them to engage tape-supporting roller 42 with sufficient pressure to slit a tape supported thereby.

The function of compression spring will now be apparent. This spring encircles clamp screw 124 and is mounted between bracket component l02b of bracket 102 and plate 114. The predetermined resistance of spring 120 to compression will determine the limit of the pressure of cutters 82, 84, 86 upon roller 42. In this sense, spring 120 functions in the manner ofa governor which prevents excessive pressure between the cutters and the roller which they engage. Additionally, spring 120 functions as a safety factor to prevent damage to the cutters and roller and their respective bearings in the event a hard object is accidentally brought into position between the cutters and the roller. In such event, spring 120 will yield sufficiently to enable the cutters to pass over such hard object, and damage to the unit will thereby be averted.

At this point it will be understood that conventional cutters and conventional bearings therefor may be used in the present invention. In the preferred form of this invention each cutter is individually provided with a bearing 131, there being three such bearings for the three cutters shown in the drawing. This means that the cutters are individually rotatable on their respective shafts, shaft 133 supporting the bearing of cutter 82 and shaft 134 supporting the bearings of cutters 84 and 86. These two shafts 133 and 134 may be secured to the side walls of floating frame 80 or, if desired, they may bejournaled therein by means of suitable bearings.

In such case, there would be no need of the individual bearings 131 between the cutters and their respective shafts.

It will also be observed that appropriate spacers 136 are provided to space cutter 82 from the walls of floating frame 80 and to space cutters 84 and 86 from each other. It will be understood that cutter 82 is centered with respect to cutters 84 and 86, and the spacing between cutter 82 on the one hand and cutters 84 and 86, on the other hand, will determine the width of the strips which the three cutters will cut into the tape. Two strips will be cut between cutter 82, on the one hand, and cutters 84 and 86, on the other hand, one strip between cutters 82 and 84 and the other strip between cutters 82 and 86. It will shortly be seen that the tape which these three cutters are intended to slit will normally be wider than the distance between the cutting edges of cutters 84 and 86. Thus, if the three cutters are centered on such tape, four strips will be slit, two on the outside of cutters 84 and 86 and two on the inside thereof, and between said cutters and cutter 82. As an illustration, if tape 70 is one inch wide and if cutters 84 and 86 are spaced half an inch from each other, and if (as is the case) cutter 82 is centered between cutters 84 and 86, and if (as is the case) the three cutters are centered with respect to the one inch tape 70, these cutters will slit the tape into four equal strips 70a, 70b, 70c and 70d, each one quarter of an inch wide.

What is significant in the foregoing is the use ofa pair of floating frames and a three-point cutter-roller Contact arrangement to assure uniform pressure of the cutters upon the roller and hence against the tape. This arrangement compensates for uneven wear in either the cutters or the roller, and it also compensates for imprecise machining of the component parts of the unit. The three-cutter assembly is free to rock on two axes, one of which is parallel to the cutter axes and the other of which is perpendicular thereto.

An important feature of the foregoing resides in the fact that disenagement of clamp screw 124 renders it possible to swing the entire cutter assembly with its two floating frames away from tape-supporting roller 42 and idler rollers 46 and 48. This exposes the three rollers to the operator of the machine and makes it possible to thread the tape between them in the manner above described. Also, the three rollers may be utilized as a tape feeding and tensioning device for feeding the tape in unslit condition to the folder and sewing machine needles. Swinging the cutter assembly away from the rollers also facilitates maintenance and repairs.

When the cutter assembly is in operative position with respect to the rollers, as illustrated in FIG. 1, the tape will, of course, be slit into the individual strips 70a, 70b, 70c and 70a. These strips will be threaded, respectively, through channels 140a, 140b, 1400 and 140d of the guiding means 12. It will be seen that in crosssection these channels define a four-sided enclosure of generally rectangular shape, having a bottom wall 142, side walls 142a and 142b, respectively, and a pair of relatively narrow top walls 142a and 142d, which are spaced from each other to define a slot 144. It is through slot 144 that the individual strips are inserted edgewise into the channels. Once the strips enter the channels, they lie flat against the bottom wall 142, and are confined to the channels between said bottom wall and two top walls 1420 and 142d.

It will also be observed that the four channels a-140d are respectively secured to bars 146a, 146b, 1466' and 146d. Bars l46a-146d are provided, respectively, with slotted end pieces 148a, 148b, 1480 and 148d. It is through these slotted end pieces that clamp screws 150 extend, and by which said bars 146a-146a' are adjustably secured to arms 151 of plate 152 of the guide means 12. Plate 152 may be secured by conventional means to the sewing machine cloth plate. When these clamp screws 150 are loosened, bars l46a-146d are free to move, together with their respective channels 140 -14041, both longitudinally of their respective slotted end pieces and also angularly about the axes of the clamp screws. This makes it possible to adjust the several channels in relation to the sewing machine needles, so that the strips which pass through the channels will be centered with respect to the needles.

Folder 16 may also be secured to plates 152 and by meansof said'plates and screws 153 to the sewing machine cloth plate. As the drawing clearly shows, folder 16 extends under channels 140a, 140b, 1400 and 140d, as well as around and across the top of the two outer channels 140a and 140d. If desired, the folder may also extend across the two inner channels l40b and l40c. This, however, is a matter of choice and design, depending upon the nature of the product which is being made. The folder may be entirely conventional, and as such it is not claimed herein as the invention, except insofar as it is combined with other elements of the invention. The function of the folder is conventional, and that is to feed a strip of knit fabric or other suitable material to strips 70a-70d and to fold it around said strips before they are engaged by the sewing machine needles. It will be understood that strips 160 will func tion in the manner of a sheath with respect to strips 70a-70d and that the sewing machine needles will stitch the said strips 70a-70d to the sheath strip 160.

The foregoing mechanism is predicated on the use of a roller clutch 42a in roller 42, said clutch engaging the roller when the roller shaft 34 rotates in one direction and releasing the roller when the shaft rotates in the opposite direction. Other conventional clutches of this general nature, for example, gravity pawl clutches, may be used in the place and stead of roller clutch 42a. In principle, what we have is a reciprocating generally linear motion (in the linkage which connects with the sewing machine drive) converted to a rotational intermittent motion in roller 42. This rotational motion is uni-directional, whereas the linkage motion is twodirectional.

FIG. 20 shows a different kind of drive mechanism which may be used in the place of the reciprocating drive mechanism above described. Briefly stated, FIG. 20 shows a conventional gear box which is connected by means of a belt 172 to a pulley drive 174 on the back of the sewing machine which drive is synchronized with the operation of the sewing machine needles and feed mechanism. In other words, the sewing machine pulley drive 174 operates only when the sewing machine needles and feed mechanism operate. The gear train (not shown) in gear box 170 is, of course, driven in conventional manner by belt 172 and the usual pulley and shaft on which the belt is mounted.

Extending outwardly from gear box 170, on the opposite side thereof from belt 172, is a shaft 176 which is driven by the gear train in the gear box. A universal joint or coupling 178 is connected on one side to shaft 176, a connecting shaft 180 is connected to the opposite side of universal joint or coupling 178, and a second universal joint or coupling 182 is connected on one side to shaft 180 and on the opposite side to a shaft 184 on which roller 186 is mounted. This roller 186 is the equivalent or counterpart of roller 42, except that it is mounted on shaft 184 instead of on shaft 34. As has above been described, a roller clutch 42a is interposed between roller 42 and roller shaft 34. However, there is no roller clutch between roller 186 and shaft 184, which are secured to each other for integral movement with each other.

It will be seen from the above that shaft 184 is caused to rotate in only one direction by means of universal joint or coupling 182, connecting shaft 180, universal joint or coupling 178, shaft 176, gear box 170, belt 172, and the sewing machine pulley drive 174. The rotation is uni-directional but intermittent in the sense that rota tion occurs only when the sewing machine needles and feed mechanism are in operation. When the sewing machine needle and feed mechanism stops, so does roller 186. In all other respects the tape-slitting and tensioning mechanism first above described would apply to the drive mechanism shown in FIG. 20. It will be observed that a speed change control lever 188 is provided on gear box 170, and it will be understood from the foregoing discussion that varying the speed of operation of roller 186, in relation to the speed of operation of the sewing machine, will determine and control the tension applied to the tape.

FIG. 18 illustrates a shearing assembly 190 which may be substituted for the cutting assembly illustrated, for example, in FIG. 7. Shearing assembly 190 consists of one set of shearing cutters 192 and 194 mounted on shaft or arbor 196 and a second set of shearing cutters 198 and 200 mounted on shaft or arbor 202. As will be seen in the drawing, these two sets of shearing cutters cooperate with each other to slit a rubber or other tape between them in order to produce a plurality of strips. The two arbors are interconnected by means of gears 204 and 206. Universal joint or coupling 182 is secured to arbor 202, since the rotary drive shown in FIG. 20 is best suited for the shearing assembly under discus sion.

What has been said concerning the shearing assembly of FIG. 18 is equally pertinent to the shearing assembly of FIG. 19. A set of shearing cutters 210, 212 and 214 is mounted on an arbor 216, and a second set of shearing cutters 218, 220 and 222 is mounted on a second arbor 224. A pair of gears 226 mounted on arbors 216 and 224 interconnect the two arbors for synchronization in opposite directions. Universal joint or coupling 182 is secured to arbor 224. Hence the drive mechanism of FIG. 20 may be applied to drive the shearing assembly of FIG. 19.

The foregoing is illustrative of the present invention, including variations in certain of its components. What is shown is intended to illustrate and not to limit, except insofar as the scope of the invention is limited by the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

I. A tape slitting and tensioning device for slitting tape made of rubber or other slittable material and feeding the slit tape under tension to a sewing machine having a plurality of needles, a work feed mechanism, and a drive mechanism operatively connected to said needles and work feed mechanism, said tape slitting and tensioning device comprising:

i a. rotary tape slitting means adapted to slit tape into a plurality of separate strips,

5 b. said rotary tape slitting means being operatively connected to said sewing machine drive mechanism,

c. whereby the rotary tape slitting means operates in synchronization with the operation of the sewing machine needles and work feed mechanism,

(1. tensioning means adapted to apply tension to the strips slit by the rotary tape slitting means, and

e. guide means adapted to guide the individual tensioned strips to the individual needles and work feed mechanism of the sewing machine,

f. said rotary tape slitting means comprising a first roller adapted to support tape,

g. a pair of idler rollers mounted on opposite sides of said first roller to hold the tape thereon in tensioned condition for the slitting operation,

h. a.plurality of rotary cutters mounted for engagement with said first roller to slit a tape supported thereon into a plurality of strips,

. said rotary cutters being mounted on parallel shafts which are parallel to the axis of the first roller, and

. pressure means exerting equalized pressure upon said cutter shafts to equalize the cutting pressure of said rotary cutters against the first roller.

2. A tape-slitting and tensioning device in accordance with claim 1, wherein:

a. the drive mechanism which is operatively connected to the needles and work feed mechanism of the sewing machine includes a drive shaft,

b. the rotary tape-slitting means includes a rotary unidirectional drive elutch, and

c. reciprocatory drive means is provided between the drive shaft of the sewing machine and the rotary uni-directional drive clutch of the rotary tapeslitting means,

40 (1. whereby rotary motion of the sewing machine drive shaft is converted to reciprocatory motion by the reciprocatory drive means and into intermittent rotary motion by the rotary unidirectional drive clutch of the rotary tape-slitting means.

3. A tape-slitting and tensioning device in accordance with claim 2, wherein the reciprocatory drive means comprises:

a. an eccentric connected to the drive shaft of the sewing machine,

b. a crank connected to the rotary unidirectional drive clutch of the rotary tape-slitting means, and

c. connecting means between said eccentric and said crank,

d. whereby the rotary motion of the drive shaft of the sewing machine is converted to intermittent rotary motion of the rotary tapeslitting means.

4. A tape-slitting and tensioning device in accordance with claim 3, wherein the tensioning means com- 6 prises:

a. a radial adjustment on the crank to adjust the rotational speed of the rotary tape-slitting means in relation to the rotational speed of the sewing machine drive shaft,

b. whereby the operation of the rotary tape-slitting means can be adjusted to lag behind the operation of the sewing machine needles and work feed mechanism,

c. thereby applying tension upon the strips as they are fed to the sewing machine needles.

5. A tape-slitting and tensioning device in accordance with claim 1, wherein:

a. the drive mechanism which is operatively connected to the needles and work feed mechanism of the sewing machine includes a drive shaft,

b. the rotary tape-slitting means includes a second drive shaft, and

c. connecting drive means is provided between the drive shaft of the sewing machine and the drive shaft of the rotary tape-slitting means to drive the rotary tape-slitting means in synchronization with the operation of the sewing machine needles and work feed mechanism.

6. A tape-slitting and tensioning device in accordance with claim 5, wherein the connecting drive means comprises:

a. a pulley connected to the sewing machine drive shaft,

b. transmission gears, including a pulley operatively connected therewith,

c. a drive belt interconnecting the two pulleys, and

d. drive shaft connecting means between said transmission gears and the drive shaft of the rotary tapeslitting means.

7. A tape-slitting and tensioning device in accordance with claim 6, wherein the tensioning means comprises:

a. a speed-changing adjustment on the transmission gears to adjust the rotational speed of the rotary tape-slitting means in relation to the rotational speed of the sewing machine drive shaft,

b. whereby the operation of the rotary tape-slitting means can be adjusted to lag behind the operation of the sewing machine needles and work feed mechanism,

c. thereby applying tension upon the strips as they are fed to the sewing machine needles.

8. A tape-slitting and tensioning device in accordance with claim 1, wherein:

a. the idler rollers are spring-urged in the direction of the first roller,

b. whereby the idler rollers are adapted to hold the tape under spring tension against the first roller.

9. A tape-slitting and tensioning device in accordance with claim 1, wherein the guide means comprises:

a. a plurality ofindividual channels, one for each tensioned strip,

b. said channels being mounted for adjustment relative to each other and to the sewing machine necdles.

10. A tape-slitting and tensioning device in accordance with claim 9, wherein:

a. a folder is provided at least partly around the stripguiding channels,

b. said folder being adapted to feed a relatively wide strip of material to the sewing machine needles to sheathe the strips slit from the tape.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5775193 *Jun 25, 1996Jul 7, 1998Pratt; Donald P.Crush-slitting structure
US6736078 *Mar 1, 2002May 18, 2004L&P Property Management CompanySoft goods slitter and feed system for quilting
US6984279Nov 25, 2002Jan 10, 2006Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Process to make boxer shorts with an absorbent core
US7086095Nov 21, 2002Aug 8, 2006Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Boxer-style absorbent underpant and method of making same
US7198688Jun 2, 2005Apr 3, 2007Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Process to make boxer shorts having a contracted crotch region
US7669540Dec 27, 2007Mar 2, 2010L&P Property Management CompanySoft goods slitter and feed system for quilting
US7673575Apr 25, 2007Mar 9, 2010L&P Property Management CompanySoft goods slitter and feed system for quilting
US8147642Sep 30, 2004Apr 3, 2012Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Process of making boxer shorts from a web
US8176573Sep 30, 2004May 15, 2012Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Boxer shorts and process of making boxer shorts from one or more webs
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US8361049Sep 30, 2004Jan 29, 2013Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Boxer shorts and process of making boxer shorts with expandable material
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Classifications
U.S. Classification112/470.32, 83/502, 112/122.3, 112/152, 83/434, 83/505
International ClassificationD05B35/06
Cooperative ClassificationD05B35/062
European ClassificationD05B35/06B