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Publication numberUS3870427 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 11, 1975
Filing dateJul 26, 1972
Priority dateJul 26, 1972
Publication numberUS 3870427 A, US 3870427A, US-A-3870427, US3870427 A, US3870427A
InventorsAllen Thomas E
Original AssigneeCmi Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Surface finishing method and apparatus
US 3870427 A
Abstract
A method and apparatus for finishing concrete surfaces or the like having a first and a second surface finisher transversely movable between predetermined positions across the surface to be finished, pivotally movable into sequential engagement with the surface to be finished, and a pair of augers having a portion rotatingly supported between the first and the second surface finishers, the surface finishers angularly oriented in a vertical plane such that the forward ends thereof are disposed slightly below the horizontal plane of the finished surface. Vibrators are disposed near the slip forms, and a vibrator is angularly and pivotally disposed in the surface to be finished near each surface finisher. A remote controller is positioned such that the operator controls the transverse, pivotal and rotational movement of surface finishers and augers from a remote position wherein the finishing operation is observable via the operator. A drive apparatus moving the surface finishers between the predetermined positions is connected to pivot the surface finishers and provide the driving impetus for rotatingly driving the surfaces finishers.
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O United States Patent 1191 1111 3,870,427

Allen Mar. 11, 1975 SURFACE FINISHING METHOD AND APPARATUS Primary Examiner-Nile C. Byers, Jr. [75] Inventor: Thomas E. Allen, Mustank, Okla. Attorney Agent or FlrmDunlap & Coddmg [73] Assignee: CMI Corporation, Oklahoma City, [57] ABSTRACT Okla. A method and apparatus for finishing concrete sur- Flledl y 1972 faces or the like having a first and a second surface [211 APPL NC: 275,232 finisher transversely movable between predetermined POSlIlOl'lS across the surface to be finished, prvotally movable into sequential engagement with the surface U-S. CI. to be finished and a pair of angers having a e -[ion Cl. rotatingly upported between the first and the econd Field of Search 404/96, 1 1 101, surface finishers, the surface finishers angularly ori- 404/105, 118, 119, 120, 2 ented in a vertical plane such that the forward ends thereof are disposed slightly below the horizontal References Cited plane of the finished surface. Vibrators are disposed UNITED STATES PATENTS near the slip forms, and a vibrator is angularly and piv- 9 1.467,243 9/1923 Fitzgerald 404/98 Otally disposed in the surface to be finished ff- 1,987,398 l/1935 Gardiner 404/101 surface finisher. A remote controller is positioned 2,084,068 6/1937 Vinton 404/119 such that the operator controls the transverse, pivotal 2.138,l03 l1/1938 lorgensen 404/118 X and rotational movement of surface finishers and au- 2,334,7l7 Long gers from a remote position wherein the finishing 2543966 3/1951 404/119 eration is observable via the operator. A drive apparafn tus moving the surface finishers between the predeterl ir mined positions is connected to pivot the surface fin- 3,094,048 6/1963 Hudrs 404/96 h d h d f 1 3,251,281 5/1966 lannetti 404/120 F 6 t rotatmgy 3,270,634 9/1966 Borges 404/122 dflvmg the Surfaces finlshefs- 3,528,348 9/1970 Rowe 404/120 r 3,541,931 11/1970 Godberson 404/122 28 Clams 18 Draw F'gures x //0 I 50 30 4e 1 72 m 12 52 M F: 4? M 44 78 I52 54 74 40 55 2 94 m /02 I08 52 40- M 1 l E. 84 I i 54 i i i 92 34 i l 1 I I08 1 194 w 104 so 104 52 5a 42 192 I? 2 as 54 a0 8 23 52" 66 4 378 are FATENTEU 1 I 5 SHEET 2 [If 9 PATENTED NARI 1 I975 SHEET 5 BF 9 ml h 3 NQN T w Q mm 36 n r r QM Q g ,r QN a? 9% PATENTEB NARI 1 I975 sum 6 0f 9 PATENTEDHARI 1 I975 1870,42?

SHEET 7 0F 9 JP /0a HF m1 PATENTEDHARI 1197s 7 Y 3.870.427

sum 8 or 9 SURFACE FINISHING METHOD AND APPARATUS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates generally to improvements in apparatus for moving assemblies between predetermined positions and, more particularly, but not by way of limitation, to a method and an apparatus for finishing concrete surfaces or the like wherein a pair of surface finishers are movable transversely across the surface to be finished.

2. Description of the Prior Art In the past there have been various types of apparatus constructed to effect a predetermined surface finish to roadways constructed of a concrete material or the like. The concrete has been generally poured between two slip forms, and the apparatus has then been moved into finishing engagement with the concrete.

There have been constructed, inthe past, some finishing machines having a carriage member transversely movable across the surface wherein a rotating finishing member was secured to a portion of the carriage member. In one instance, the axis of rotation of the finishing member was angularly oriented with respect to the longitudinal axis of the slab or, in other words, with respect to the direction of travel of the machine. A surface finisher of this type was disclosed in the U.S. Pat. No. 3,541,93l, issued to Godbersen, this patent disclosing a pair of finishing members, in one embodiment. The U.S. Pat. No. 3,450,011, issued to Godbersen, disclosed a similar type of surface finishing apparatus.

Some of the finishing machines of the type referred to above have included a drive mechanism to move the carriage over the surface to be finished. In some instances, the drive mechanism has consisted of a plurality of motor driven wheels, the wheels being drivingly supported on a portion of the finishing apparatus.

Some ofthe salient problems which have existed with respect to apparatus constructed to finish concrete surfaces or the like have been to construct a finishing apparatus capable of finishing substantially the entire transverse width of the surface generally between the two slip forms, and to control and monitor the surface finish being effected.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION An object of the invention is to increase the efficiency of a surface finishing apparatus for finishing concrete surfaces or the like.

Another object of the invention is to provide a surface finishing apparatus wherein the surface to be finished is finishingly engaged by a surface finisher apparatus across substantially the entire transverse width of the surface.

A further object of the invention is to provide a more efficient means for moving a surface finisher apparatus between predetermined positions generally transversely over a surface to be finished.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a more efficient and economical apparatus for drivingly moving apparatus between predetermined positions.

Another object of the invention is to provide a finishing apparatus having more than one surface finisher, wherein each surface finisher sequentially engages the surface to be finished in a manner assuring that substantially the entire transverse width of the surface is finishingly engaged by a finisher member.

One other object of the invention is to provide a finishing apparatus capable of finishingly engaging the edges of a surface to be finished in a manner assuring the structural integrity of the finished surface.

A still further object of the invention is to provide an improved finishing apparatus wherein the operator controls the various finishing apparatus from a position wherein the surface being finished is operatorobservable.

One other object of the invention is to provide an improved control of the surface material of the surface being finished.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide a finishing apparatus which is economical in construction and operation.

Another object of the invention is to provide a more efficient and economical method for finishing concrete surfaces or the like wherein the surface is finishingly engaged across substantially the entire transverse width thereof.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be evident from the following detailed description when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings which illustrate the various embodiments of the inventron.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. I is a top elevational view ofa finishing apparatus constructed in accordance with the present inventron.

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view of the finishing apparatus of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged partially fragmentary, side elevational view of the finisher assembly of the finishing apparatus of FIG. 1, having portions thereof cut away to show the driving connection between the hydraulic motors and the surface finishers and to show the movable connection between the finisher assembly and the transverse frame assembly.

FIG. 4 is an enlarged, end elevational view of the fin isher assembly of FIG. 3, showing the end of the finisher assembly generally opposite the end thereof shown in FIG. 3, and having a portion thereof cut away to show the disposition of some of the apparatus supported on the finisher assembly.

FIG. 5 is a sectional view of the finisher assembly of FIGS. 3 and 4, showing the gearing connection between the chain and the finisher assembly, and the connection of the chain to the finisher assembly to pivot the finisher assembly to a first pivot position and to a second pivot position.

FIG. 6 is a partial diagrammatic, partial schematic view showing the connection between the chain and the hydraulic pump to provide power fluid to drive the various hydraulic motors on the finisher assembly and the connection of the control sensors to the chain drive to controllingly move the finisher assembly of the finishing apparatus of FIG. 1 between predetermined positions.

FIG. 7. is a partial sectional, partial schematic view showing the control connections between the chain drive, the power fluid supply and the control sensors of the finishing apparatus of FIG. 1 to control the movement of the finisher assembly between the predetermined positions.

FIG. 8 is a diagrammatic-schematic view showing the operational sequence of the surface finishers of the finishing'apparatus of FIG. 1.

FIG. 9 is a top elevational view of a modified finisher assembly, constructed similar to the finisher assembly of the finishing apparatus of FIG. 1, but having vibrators secured thereon and diagrammatically showing one preferred connection between the power supply and the vibrators.

FIG. 10 is an enlarged, end elevational view, similar to FIG. 4, but showing another modified finisher assembly.

FIG. 11 is a diagrammatical, top elevational view of the surface finishers and augers of the modified finisher assembly of FIG. 10.

FIG. 12 is an enlarged, partial end elevational view of yet another modified finisher assembly, similar to the modified finisher assembly of FIG. 10, but showing a pair of vibrators and vibrator support assembly, the surface finishers not being shown for the purpose of clarity.

FIG. 13 is an enlarged, partial top elevational view of a modified finishing apparatus, similar to the finishing apparatus of FIG. 1, but showing a final finish assembly attachable to the finishing apparatus of FIG. 1.

FIG. 14 is an enlarged, partial side elevational view of the modified finishing apparatus of FIG. 13.

FIG. 15 is a partial, enlarged perspective view of a modified slip form support for utilization with the finishing apparatus of FIG. 1.

FIG. 16 is a partial, enlarged side elevational view of the finishing apparatus of FIG. 1 showing a removable surface finisher member positioning assembly.

FIG. 17 is an enlarged, diagrammatical side elevational view showing a modified surface finisher disposition.

FIG. 18 is a diagrammatical, schematic view of a remote controller for utilization with the finishing apparatus of the present invention and, more particularly, the finishing apparatus of FIGS. 10, 11 and 12.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring to the drawings in general, and the FIGS. 1 and 2, in particular, shown therein and designated by the general reference character 10 is a finishing apparatus which generally includes a finisher assembly 12 movably supported on a transverse frame assembly 14, having a power end portion 16 and an adjustable end portion 18, such that the finisher assembly 12 is movable across the transverse frame assembly 14 in a first transverse direction 20, generally toward the adjustable end portion 18 of the transverse frame assembly 14, and in a second transverse direction 22 generally toward the power end portion 16 of the transverse frame assembly 14. The finisher assembly 12 generally includes a first surface finisher 24, a second finisher 26 and an auger member 28, each of which are rotatingly 3 supported on a portion of the finisher assembly 12, in

a manner to be described in greater detail below.

As shown more clearly in FIG. 1, the finishing apparatus 10 also includes four support assemblies 30, the support assemblies 30 being disposed generally at fourcorner supporting positions about the transverse frame assembly 14. The support assemblies 30 are constructed and connected to the transverse frame assembly 14 to adjustably support the transverse frame assembly 14 in a predetermined horizontal plane in such a manner that the transverse frame assembly 14 extends generally transversely over a surface to be finished (the surface to be finished being shown in FIG. 2 and designated therein by the general reference numeral 32). Two of the four support assemblies 30 are also connected on one end thereof to an endless track member 34 and the other two support assemblies 30 are connected to one other endless track member 36, for reasons to be made more apparent below.

The endless track member 36 is drivingly connected to a power unit 38, which is supported generally between the two adjacent support assemblies 30 near the power end portion 16 of the transverse frame assembly 14. The power unit 38 is sized to provide the primary operating power for the finishing assembly 10, and is drivingly connected to the endless track member 36 to controllingly and rotatingly drive the endless track member 36 in a forward direction. and a reverse direction. The power unit 38 thus provides the driving impetus to move the finishing apparatus 10 in a forward direction and in a reverse direction along the roadway. The power unit 38 may be of a conventional design such as, for example, a diesel powered engine, and the construction and operation of such a power unit, and the various interconnecting components and operation thereof to drivingly connect the power unit 38 to the endless track member 36 are well-known in the art and a detailed description thereof is not required herein.

A first sensor assembly 40 is secured to one of the support assemblies 30, generally near the adjustable end portion 18 of the transverse frame assembly 14, and a second sensor assembly 42 is connected to one of the support assemblies 30, generally near the power end portion 16 of the transverse frame assembly 14. The first sensor assembly 40 has a portion thereof which is disposed to sense a portion of the finisher assembly 12 and to actuatingly control the movement of the finisher assembly 12 in the first transverse direction 20, and the second sensor assembly 42 has a portion thereof which is disposed to sense a portion of the finisher assembly 12 and to actuatingly control the movement of the finisher assembly 12 in the second transverse direction 22. In one sense, the first sensor assembly 40 and the second sensor assembly 42 define predetermined positions, the finisher assembly 12 being controllingly moved therebetween in a manner which will be described in detail below.

As shown in FIG. 1 and 2, the finishing apparatus 10 also includes a first slip form 44 and a second slip form 46. The first slip form 44 and the second slip form 46 are each adjustably secured to two of the support assemblies 30 via an adjustable member 48 which is reciprocatingly disposed in a stationary member 50. The horizontal disposition of each slip form 44 and 46 is ad justably controlled via a hand crank 52 such that by turning the hand cranks 52 the operator can cause the first slip form 44 and the second slip form 46 connected thereto to be moved in a vertically downwardly and in a vertically upwardly direction. Each slip form 44 and 46 is constructed to form one of the edges of the roadway being finished and to retain the surface material therebetween during the surface finishing operation, which will be described in greater detail below.

The finishing apparatus 10 which has been generally described above, and which will be described in greater detail below, is constructed to finishingly engage the surface to be finished 32 and to finish that surface to a predetermined specification. Although the apparatus of the present invention will be described below, more particularly with respect to a finishing apparatus, it should be particularly noted that, in one aspect, the present invention contemplates an apparatus for moving hydraulically operated components between predetermined positions and providing operating power fluid therefor in a more efficient and more economical manner, as will become more apparent below.

It should be initially noted that the various directions of movement and the relative positions of the various components and assemblies of the finishing apparatus 10, as generally described above and as will be described in greater detail below, are, more particularly, described with reference to a horizontal plane formed by the surface to be finished 32. Thus, a direction or a position referred to above and below as being vertically upwardly" and vertically downwardly refers to a direction or a position in a plane generally perpendicular to the surface to be finished 32, for example. A direction and a position referred to above and below as forward" refers, more particularly, to a direction or a position moving generally from a finished portion of the surface toward an unfinished surface, and a reverse direction or a position refers, more particularly, to a direction or a position generally opposite that described above with respect to a forward direction or a position. The term lengthwise along the roadway will be used below to generally designate a movement or a direction generally along the length of the surface to be finished 32. The term transversely is used above and below to designate a direction of movement or a position generally transverse to the length of the roadway or, in other words, a movementor a direction generally across the width of the roadway or the surface to be finished 32 generally between the edges thereof.

Broadly speaking, the finishing apparatus is utilized to finish surfaces of a roadway constructed of a concrete material in a faster, more efficient, and more positive manner. In the operation of the finishing apparatus 10, which will be described in greater detail below, the concrete is initially poured generally between the first slip form 44 and the second slip form 46, in a manner well-known in the art. After the concrete has been poured, the finisher assembly 12 is actuated to sequentially move in a first transverse direction and in a second transverse direction 22 generally across the transverse width of the surface to be finished 32.

During the operation of the finishing apparatus 10, the auger member 28 will engage a portion of the unfinished surface material and provide an initial, rough finishing or smoothing prior to that portion being finishingly engaged by the first surface finisher 24 and the second surface face finisher 26 to provide a final, predetermined surface finish thereto. As the finisher assembly 12 is moved in a first transverse direction 20 and a second transverse direction 22 across the surface to be finished 32, the first surface finisher 24 and the second surface finisher 26 are sequentially pivoted into finishing engagement with the surface to be finished 32 in a controlled, predetermined manner so that the entire transverse width of the surface to be finished 32 generally between the first slip form 44 and the second slip form 46 is finishingly engaged, in a manner which will be described in greater detail below.

Referring more particularly to the details of construction of the finishing apparatus 10, described generally above, the transverse frame assembly 14 has a forward side 54 and a rearward side 56, as shown in FIG. 1 and 2. The forward side 54 and the rearward side 56 each include a stationary structural member 58, one end of each stationary structural member 58 being securedly connected to one of the support assemblies 30, generally near the power end portion of the transverse assembly 14.

The end of each stationary structural member 58, opposite the end thereof secured to one of the support assemblies 30, has a flange adaptor 60 secured thereto, as shown in FIG. 1 and 2. Each flange adaptor 60 is constructed to cooperatingly provide the interconnection between each of the stationary structural members 58 and a movable structural member 62. A flange adaptor 64 is securedly connected to one end of each movable structural member 62 and, in an assembled position as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, each flange adaptor 60 is boltingly connected to the flange adaptor 64 of one of the movable structural members 62.

Since each side of the transverse frame assembly 14 is basically constructed utilizing a pair of boltingly connected structural members, as described above, the length of the transverse frame assembly 14, generally between the power end portion 16 and the adjustable end portion 18 thereof, can be easily, quickly and efficiently increased by adding like intermediate structural sections to the forward side 54 and the rearward side 56, generally between eact stationary structural member 58 and the adjoining movable structural member 62. As will become more apparent below, the only substantial modification required when increasing the length of the transverse frame assembly 14, as described above, would be to lengthen the chain utilized to drivingly and pivotingly move the finisher assembly 12.

Each support assembly 30 includes a housing 66 and a leg 68 which is reciprocatingly disposed therein. More particularly, one end of each leg 68 is connected to the endless track member 34 or 36 via a support structure 70, and each leg is hydraulically disposed in one of the housing 66. Thus, each housing 66 and the respective leg 68 thereof basically comprises a hydraulic cylinder arrangement connected and controlled such that each leg 68 can be controllingly moved in a vertically outwardly or vertically inwardly direction with respect to the housing 66 connected thereto. Each support assembly 30 is thus constructed to be of an independently variable length, such that the horizontal disposition of the transverse frame assembly 14 with respect to the endless track members 34 and 36 and with respect to the surface to be finished 32 is controllable via the four support assemblies 30.

In one form each support assembly 30 or, in an alternate form, some of the support assemblies 30 can be controllingly connected to control sensor arms which are adapted to sense the position of the finishing apparatus 10 relative to a string-line, and automatically adjust the horizontal disposition of the transverse frame assembly 14 relative thereto. In this manner, the engagement of the finisher assembly 12 with the surface to be finished 32 is controllingly adjusted to maintain a predetermined grade and slope. Control sensing arms and the cooperation and the interconnection thereof with the hydraulically actuated type support assemblies, such as the support assemblies 30, has been described in detail in US. Pat. No. 3,423,859, which is assigned to the assignee of the present invention, and therefore a detailed description of the interconnection and operation thereof is not required herein.

As shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, the first sensor assembly 40 and the second sensor 42 are each, more particularly, secured to one of the stationary members 50 via a support extension 72. A first trip switch 74 and a second trip switch 76 are secured to each support extension 72. Each support extension 72 is shaped and constructed to support one of the first trip switches 74 and one of the second trip switches 76 in a predetermined vertical plane and in a predetermined horizontal plane so that, in the assembled position of the finishing apparatus 10, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, the first trip switches 74 and the second trip switches 76 are each disposed to engage an actuating boss 78 formed on one end of the finisher assembly 12, when the finisher assembly 12 is moved to predetermined positions on the surface to be finished 32, for reasons and in a manner to be made more apparent below.

It should also be noted that the first trip switch 74 and the second trip switch 76 are disposed on the first sensor assembly 40 such that the actuating boss 78 of the finisher assembly 12 will initially, actuatingly engage a portion of the first trip switch 74 as the finisher assembly 12 is moved in a first transverse direction across the surface to be finished 32. The first trip switch 74 and the second trip switch 76 are disposed on the second sensor assembly 42 such that the actuating boss 78 of the finisher assembly 12 will actuatingly, initially engage a portion of the first trip switch 74 of the second sensor assembly 42 as the finisher assembly 12 is moved in a second transverse direction 22 across the surface to be finished 32. The first trip switch 74 of the first sensor assembly 40 and the first trip switch 74 of the second sensor assembly 42 are each connected to a control circuit to actuatingly slow the rate of travel of the finisher assembly 12 in the first transverse direction 20 and in the second transverse direction 22, and the second trip switch 76 ofthe first sensor assembly 40 and the second trip switch 76 of the second sensor assembly 42 are each connected to a control circuit to actuatingly reverse the direction of travel of the finisher assembly 12, for reasons and in a manner to be described in greater detail below.

Each support assembly disposed generally near the adjustable end portion 18 of the transverse frame assembly 14 is, more particularly, securedly and movably connected to an adjacent portion of the transverse frame assembly 14 via a frame connector portion 80. As shown more clearly in FIG. 2, one frame connector 80 is secured to one of the support assemblies 30, and one frame connector 80 is secured to the one other support assembly 30. More particularly, each frame connector 80 is generally U-shaped and constructed to supportingly receive an adjacent portion of the transverse frame assembly 14 (only the top portion of each frame connector 80 is shown in FIG. 1). Each frame connector 80 is adjustably connected to a portion of the transverse frame assembly 14 via a plurality of rollers 82, each roller 82 being rollingly supported on one of the frame connectors 80, and each roller 82 havingv a portion thereof in rolling engagement with an adjacent portion of the transverse frame assembly 14 (only the top two rollers being shown in FIG. 1).

It will be apparent in those skilled in the art from the foregoing, that the forward side 54 of the transverse frame assembly 14 can be rollingly moved in the first transverse direction 20 and in the second transverse direction 22 relative to the support assembly 30 connected thereto, and the rearward side 56 of the transverse frame assembly 14 can also be rollingly moved in the first transverse direction 20 and the second transverse direction 22 relative to the support assembly 30 connected thereto. Thus, by rollingly moving the transverse frame assembly 14 in a first transverse direction 20 and in a second transverse direction 22 relative to the support assemblies 30 rollingly connected thereto. the transverse width of the finishing apparatus 10, generally between the endless track member 34 and the endless track member 36 can be increased and decreased, respectively. Further, since the first slip form 44, the second slip form 46, the first sensor assembly 40 and the second sensor assembly 42 are each secured in a stationary position with respect to the support as sembly 30 connected thereto, the relative positions of the first sensor assembly 40, the second sensor assembly 42, the first slip form 44, and the second slip form 46 are maintained constant as the transverse width of the finishing apparatus 10 is adjustingly increased and decreased, in a manner as described above. The finishing apparatus 10 can thus be quickly and easily adjusted to be utilized to finish roadways having varying transverse widths in a manner which substantially eliminates having to adjust any of the control apparatus associated with the finishing apparatus 10.

As shown more clearly in FIG. 1, a platform 84 and a step platform 86 are securedly supported on a portion of the transverse frame assembly 14, generally near the power end portion 16 thereof. The step platform 86 is positioned to assist the operator in gaining access to the platform 84 and in gaining access to an operator control seat 88 which is securedly connected to one of the support assemblies 30 and disposed generally near an operator control unit 90. The operator control unit 90 contains the control actuating elements for the'finishing apparatus 10, and is constructed and adapted such that the operator can easily control, for example, the forward and reverse movement of the finishing apparatus 10, and the operation of the finisher assembly 12, in a manner which will become more apparent below.

As shown more clearly in FIG. 1, a chain 92 is drivingly supported on a portion of the transverse frame assembly 14, and extends generally between the power end portion 16 and the adjustable end portion 18 thereof. More particularly, the chain 92 is drivingly supported on the transverse frame assembly 14 via a pair of gears (shown in FIG. 6), one gear being disposed generally near the adjustable end portion 18 and one gear being disposed generally near the power end portion 16, for reasons and in a manner to be described in greater detail below.

The chain 92 has a portion thereof which is connected to the finisher assembly 12 to move the finisher assembly 12 generally between predetermined positions on the transverse frame assembly 14 in a controlled manner and in a manner sequentially pivoting the first surface finisher 24 and the second surface finisher 26 into finishing engagement with the surface to be finished 32. A portion of the chain 92 also engages a portion of the finisher assembly 12 to provide the driving impetus for a power fluid supply to rotatingly drive the first surface finisher 24 and the second surface finisher 26, in a manner which will be described in detail below.

As mentioned before, the finisher assembly 12 is movably supported on the transverse frame assembly 14 to be moved generally back and forth between the power end portion 16 and the adjustable end portion 18 or, more particularly, between two predetermined positions as the first surface finisher 24 and the second surface finisher 26 sequentially and finishingly engage the surface to be finished 32. As shown more clearly in FIGS. 3, 4 and 5, the finisher assembly 12, includes a support frame 94 which is moveably connected to the transverse frame assembly 14 via a plurality of grooved wheels 96, each grooved wheel 96 being rollingly and bearingly supported on a portion of the support frame 94, as shown more clearly in FIGS. 1, 2 and 3. A retaining wheel 98 is also rollingly and bearingly supported on a portion of the support frame 94, one retaining wheel 98 being disposed generally near each of the grooved wheels 96, and in a horizontal plane generally below the respective grooved wheel 96 (two of the grooved wheels 96 and the two respective retaining wheels 98 associated therewith which are disposed on one side of the support frame 94 are shown more clearly in FIGS. 4 and Each retaining wheel 98 has a resilient liner 100 bonded thereto and extending about the outer periphery thereof, for reasons which will be made more apparent below.

As shown more clearly in FIG. 3, the two grooved wheels 96 on one side of the support frame 94 rollingly, supportingly, and retainingly engage a rail 102, which is secured to and extends generally along the rearward side 56 of the transverse frame assembly 14 generally between the power end portion 16 and the adjustable end portion 18 thereof. The two grooved wheels 96 on the opposite side of the support frame 94 rollingly, supportingly, and retainingly engage a rail 104, which is secured to and extends generally along the forward side 54 of the transverse frame assembly 14 generally between the power end portion 16 and the adjustable end portion 18 thereof.

Each rail 102 and 104 thus extends transversely across substantially the entire width of the transverse frame assembly 14, and the rails 102 and 104 cooperate to provide a guide path for the finisher assembly 12 as the finisher assembly 12 is moved in the first transverse direction and the second transverse direction 22, during the operation of the finishing apparatus 10, as will be described in greater detail below.

Each rail 1102 and 104 is, more particularly, secured to one side of the transverse frame assembly 14 via a plurality of L-shaped brackets 108, as shown more clearly in FIG. 1. In an assembled position of the finisher assembly 12, a portion of each rail 102 and 104 is disposed generally within the grooved portion of the adjacent grooved wheels 96, and the outer periphery of each retaining wheel 98, formed by the resilient liners 100, retainingly engages a portion of one of the L- shaped brackets 108, as shown more clearly in FIG. 3. The retaining wheels 98 thus engage a portion of the L-shaped brackets 108 to resiliently limit movement of the finisher assembly 12 in a vertically upwardly direction, during the operation of the finishing apparatus 10, as will be described in detail below.

As shown more clearly in FIGS. 3, 4 and 5, the first surface finisher 24 and the second surface finisher 26 are each bearingly and rotatingly supported on a portion of a rocker support arm 110 via a pair of support plates 112 and 114. One end of each of the support plates 112 and 114 is secured to a portion of the rocker support arm 110, and the opposite end of each of the support plates 112 and 114 is constructed to bearingly and supportingly receive a portion of one of the shafts (not shown) extending through the first surface finisher 24 and the second surface finisher 26, respectively. It should be noted that the first surface finisher 24 and the second surface finisher 26 are each generally cylindrically shaped and have an outer periphery shaped to finishingly engage the surface to be finished 32.

As shown more clearly in FIG. 3, 4, and 5, the rocker support arm 110 is rotatingly and pivotally secured to the support frame 94 via shaft 115, and includes a base 116, having a first angled portion 118 and a second angled portion 120. In the assembled position of the finisher assembly 12, the first surface finisher 24 is, more particularly, rotatingly and bearingly secured to the first angle portion 118 of the base 116, and the second surface finisher 26 is, more particularly, secured to the second angle portion of the base 116, for reasons which will be made more apparent below.

The base 116 of the rocker support arm 110 is, constructed such that, in the first pivot position of the finisher assembly 12 or, more particularly, the rocker support arm 110, the first angled portion 118 of the base 116 is disposed a distance vertically above the surface to be finished 32 and in a horizontal plane substantially coplanar with the surface to be finished 32. ln the first pivot position of the finisher assembly 12, as shown in FIG. 2, 3, 4 and 5, the second angled portion 120 is angularly oriented with respect to the surface to be finished 32, and extends generally angularly from the first angled portion 118 in a direction generally above or away from the surface to be finished 32.

The rocker support arm 110 is also constructed such that, in the second pivot position of the finisher assembly 12, the second angled portion 120 is disposed a distance vertically above the surface to be finished 32 and in a horizontal plane substantially coplanar with the surface to be finished 32. In the second pivot position of the finisher assembly 12, the first angled portion 118 is angularly disposed with respect to the surface to be finished 32 and extends generally angularly from the second angled portion 120 in a direction generally above or away from the surface to be finished 32.

The first angled portion 118 and the second angled portion 120 are thus, more particularly, constructed and disposed on the finisher assembly 12 such that, in the first pivot position of the finisher assembly 12, the first surface finisher 24 is disposed in finishing engagement with the surface to be finished 32 and the second surface finisher 26 is disposed in a horizontal plane a distance generally vertically above the surface to be finished 32. In the second pivot position of the finisher assembly 12, the second surface finisher 26 is disposed in finishing engagementwith the surface to be finished 32 and the first surface finisher 24 is disposed in a horizontal plane a distance generally vertically above the surface to be finished 32.

As shown more clearly in FIGS. 3 and 4, the auger member 28 is, more particularly, adjustably, rotatingly and bearingly supported on an auger frame 122. An upper portion 124 of the auger frame 122 is secured to a lower portion of the support frame 94, as shown more clearly in FIG. 4, and an adjustable portion 126 of the auger frame 122 is adjustably secured to the upper portion 124 via a hand wheel 128. More particularly, the hand wheel 128 is connected to the adjustable portion 126 to move the auger member 128 in a vertically upwardly and vertically downwardly direction by rotating the hand wheel 128. It will be apparent to those skilled in the art from the foregoing, that by adjusting the auger member 28 in a vertically upwardly and vertically downwardly direction, the depth of engagement of the auger member 28 with respect to the surface to be finished 32 can be controllingly adjusted, which may be desirable when finishing surfaces constructed of different materials or materials of differing constituencies.

The first surface finisher 24 and the second surface finisher 26 are rotatingly driven via a first finisher drive 130 and a second finisher drive 132, respectively, as shown in FIG. 1. The first finisher drive 130 and the second finisher drive 132 are, in a preferred form, hydraulic motors, and the first finisher drive 130 and the second finisher drive 132 are each securedly mounted on one end portion of the rocker support arm 110, generally near one of the support plates 114, as shown more clearly in FIG. 3. I

The first finisher drive 130 and the second finisher drive 132 are each gearingly connected to the first surface finisher 24 and the second surface finisher 26, respectively, to rotatingly drive the surface finisher 24 or 26 connected thereto, and, as shown in FIG. 3, the first finisher drive 130 has been removed from the finisher assembly 12 to more clearly indicate the driving connection between each finisher drive 130 and 132 and one of the surface finishers 24 and 26 connected thereto. As shown in FIG. 3, the second finisher drive I 132 has been removed from the. finisher assembly 12, for the purpose of clarity of description, it being under- :stood that the first finisher drive 130 is driving connected to the first surface finisher 24 in a manner similar to that shown in FIG. 3 with respect to the second finisher drive 132 and the second surface finisher 26.

The first finisher drive 130 and the second finisher drive 132 are each drivingly connected to the first surface finisher 24 or the second, surface finisher 26, respectively via a pair of gears 134 and 136, the gears 134 and 136 being gearingly interconnected via an endless chain 138, as shown in FIG. 3, with respect to the second surface finisher 26 and the second finisher drive 132. The first finisher drive 130 is connected to the first surface finisher 24 to drivingly rotate the first surface finisher 24 in a rotational direction 140, and the second finisher drive 132 is connected to the second surface finisher 26 to drivingly rotate the second surface finisher 26 in a rotational direction 142, as shown more clearly in FIGS. 2 and 3.

The direction of rotation 140 of the first surface finisher 24 is generally opposed to the direction of transverse movement of the finisher assembly 12 (the first transverse direction 20), during that portion of the operation of the finishing apparatus when the first surface finisher 24 is in finishing engagement with the surface to be finished 32. The direction of rotation 142 of the second surface finisher 26 is generally opposed to the direction of transverse movement of the finisher assembly 12 (the second transverse direction 22), during that portion of the operation of the finishing apparatus 10 when the second surface finisher 26 is in finishing engagement with the surface to be finished 32.

As shown more clearly in FIG. 5, one end portion of the chain 92 is secured to the support frame 94 via a first pivoting jaw assembly 144, and the opposite end portion of the chain 92 is secured to the support frame 94 via a second pivoting jaw assembly 146. Each jaw assembly 144 and 146 includes a base member 148 and a jaw member 150, each jaw member 150 being pivotally secured to one of the base member 148 via a connecting pin 152.

Each jaw member 150 is constructed and connected to one of the base members 148, such that each jaw member 150 can be pivoted in a release direction 154 to releasingly position each jaw member 150 with respect to the base member 148 connected thereto, and such that each jaw member 150 can be pivoted in a lock direction 156 to securedly and lockingly position each jaw member 150 with respect to the base member 148 connected thereto. As shown in FIG. 5, each jaw member 150 has been pivoted in the lock direction 156 to a locking position, that is a position wherein each jaw member 150 lockingly engages the base member 148 pivotally connected thereto to securedly position a portion of the chain 92 therebetween. It will be apparent to those skilled in the art from the foregoing, that by pivoting each jaw member 150 in a release direction 154 to a releasing position, each jaw member 150 will be positioned with respect to the base member 148 pivotally connected thereto such that a portion of the chain 92, generally near one end thereof, can be inserted generally between the base member 148 and the jaw member 150 or removed therefrom.

Each base member 148 is pivotally connected to a flange 158 via a connecting pin 160. Each flange 158 is secured to a portion of the support frame 94 of the finisher assembly 12, such that the first jaw assembly 144 and the second jaw assembly 146 are each pivotable in a finisher engaging direction 162 and in a finisher disengaging direction 164, for reasons and in a manner which will be made more apparent below.

As shown more clearly in FIG. 5, the first jaw assembly 144 and the second jaw assembly 146 are each connected to a portion of the rocker support arm via an adjustable connector 166. More particularly, one end of one of the adjustable connectors 166 is pivotally secured to one end of the base member 148 of the first jaw assembly 144 via a connecting pin 168, and the opposite end of that adjustable connector 166 is pivotally secured to the first angled portion 118 of the rocker support arm 110 via a connecting pin 170. One end of the other adjustable connector 166, more particularly, is pivotally secured to one end portion of the base member 148 of the second jaw assembly 146 via a connecting pin 172, and the opposite end of that adjustable connector 166 is pivotally secured to the second angled portion of the rocker support arm 118 via a connecting pin 174. The first jaw assembly 144 and the second jaw assembly 146 and the adjustable connectors 166 pivotally connected thereto will sometimes be referred to below as a first pivot linkage 176 and a second pivot linkage 178, respectively, for the purpose ofclarity of description.

The chain 92 is disposed on the transverse frame assembly 14 and connected to the finisher assembly 12 or, more particularly, the first pivot linkage 176 and the second pivot linkage 178, and the first pivot linkage 176 and the second pivot linkage 178 are each connected to the rocker support arm 110 such that, as the chain 92 is driven in a first rotating direction 180, the second jaw assembly 146 is pullingly pivoted by the chain 92 in the finisher disengaging direction 164, thereby pivoting the rocker support arm 110 in a first pivot direction 184 via the pivoting interconnection between the second jaw assembly 146 and the rocker support arm 110 provided by the adjustable connector 166 therebetween. As the rocker support arm 110 is pivoted in the first pivot direction 184, the firstjaw assembly 144 will be pullingly pivoted in the finisher engaging direction 162 via the interconnection between the first jaw assembly 144 and the rocker support arm 110 provided by the adjustable connector 166 therebetween. Thus, as the chain 94 is driven in the first rotating direction 180, the first surface finisher 24 is pivotingly moved into finishing engagement with the surface to be finished 32 via the pivoting connection between the chain 94 and the rocker support arm 110 provided by the first pivot linkage 176 and the second pivot linkage 178. This position of the finisher assembly 12, when the chain 92 is being driven in the first direction 180, is referred to generally above and below as the first pivot position of the finisher assembly 12, for the purpose of clarity of description.

The first pivot linkage 176 and the second pivot linkage 178 are also connected to the support frame 94 and to the rocker support arm 110, such that, as the chain 92 is driven in a second rotating direction 182, the rocker support arm 110 will be pivoted in a second pivot direction 186 to a position wherein the second surface finisher 26 finishingly engages the surface to be finished 32. More particularly, as the chain 92 is driven in the second rotating direction 182, the chain 92 will pullingly pivot the first jaw assembly 144 in the finisher disengaging direction 164, thereby pivoting the rocker support arm 110 in the second pivot direction 186 via the pivoting interconnection between the first jaw assembly 144 and the rocker support arm 110 provided by the adjustable connector 166 therebetween. The pivoting of the rocker support arm 110 in the second pivot direction 186 will pullingly pivot the second jaw assembly 144 in the finisher engaging direction 164 via the pivoting interconnection between the second jaw assembly 146 and the rocker support arm 110 provided by the adjustable connector 166 therebetween. The driving of the chain 92 in the second rotating direction 182 will thus cause the second surface finisher 26 to be pivotally moved into finishing engagement with the surface to be finished 32, and will pivotingly move the first surface finisher 24 to a position wherein the first surface finisher 25 is disposed in a horizontal plane a distance generally vertically above the surface to be finished 32. This position of the finisher assembly 12, when the chain 92 is driven in the second rotating direction 182, is referred to generally above and below as the second pivot position of the finisher assembly 12, for the purpose of clarity of description.

As shown more clearly in FIG. 5, a stop flange 188, having a first stop surface 190 and a second stop surface 192, is secured to a portion of the rocker support arm 110. The stop flange 188 extends a distance generally vertically upwardly from the rocker support arm 116, and an upper portion of the stop flange 188 is disposed in a pivot aperture 194 formed in a portion of the support frame 94 of the finisher assembly 12. A first stop pad 196 is secured to the support frame 94, generally near one end portion of the pivot aperture 194, and

a second stop pad 198 is secured to a portion of the support frame 94, generally near the end of the pivot aperture 194 opposite the end thereof having the first stop pad 196 secured thereto.

The stop flange 188, the pivot aperture 194 and the first and the second stop pad 196 and 198 comprise what is sometimes referred to below as a pivot positioning assembly 200." The pivot positioning assembly 200 is thus constructed and disposed on the finisher assembly 12 such that, as the rocker support arm is pivoted in the first pivot direction 184, the first stop surface of the stop flange 188 will engage the first stop pad 196 to limit the pivotal movement of the rocker support arm 110 and positively position the rocker support arm 110 in the first pivot position thereof. The pivot position assembly 200 is also constructed and disposed on the finisher assembly 12 such that, as the rocker support arm 110 is pivoted in the second pivot direction 186, the second stop surface 192 of the stop flange 188 will engage the second stop pad 198 to limit the pivoting movement of the rocker support arm 110 and positively position the rocker support arm 110 in the second pivot position thereof. It will be apparent from the foregoing to those skilled in the art, that the pivot positioning assembly 200 thus provides a positive means of assuring that, in the first pivot position of the finisher assembly 12, the first surface finisher 24 is positively positioned in a predetermined horizontal plane to finishingly engage the surface to be finished 32 and a positive means of assuring that, in the second pivot position of the finisher assembly 12, the second surface finisher 26 is positively positioned in a predetermined horizontal plane to finishingly engage the surface to be finished 32.

As shown more clearly in FIG. 4 and 5, a gear support frame 202 is centrally disposed in an upper portion of the finisher assembly 12 and is secured to a portion of the support frame 94. An idler drive gear 204 is rotatingly and bearingly supported in a portion of the gear support frame 202, as shown more clearly in FIG. 5, and a pair of idler gears 206 and 208 are also bearingly and rotatingly supported in a portion of the gear support frame 204 via bearing supports 210 (the bearing supports 210 disposed on one side of the gear support frame 202 being shown more clearly in FIG. 4). As shown more clearly in FIG. 5, the idler gears 206 and 208 are disposed on opposite sides of the idler drive gear 204, and each idler gear 206 and 208 is disposed in a horizontal plane a distance generally vertically above the idler drive gear 204.

The idler gears 206 and 208 and the idler drive gear 204 are each constructed to gearingly engage a portion of the chain 92, during the operation of the finishing apparatus 10. More particularly, a portion of the chain 92 is in gearing engagement with an upper portion of each of the idler gears 206 and 208, and a portion of the chain 92 is in gearing engagement with a lower portion of the idler drive gear 204, as shown in FIG. 5. The two idler gears 206 and 208 are thus disposed with respect to the idler drive gear 204 to maintain the gearing engagement between the chain 92 and the idler drive gear 204 during the operation of the finishing apparatus 10, as will be described in greater detail below.

The idler drive gear 204 is drivingly connected to a gear 212 via a shaft 214, the shaft 214 being bearingly and rotatingly supported in a portion of the gear support frame 202. The gear 212 is drivingly connected to a reversible hydraulic pump 216 via an endless chain belt 218 which connects the gear 212 to a pump input shaft 220 through a gear 222. Thus, the driving impetus for the reversible hydraulic pump 216 is provided by the driving rotational movement of the idler drive gear 204 which is connected to the pump input shaft 220 via the interconnecting gear arrangement of the gears 212 and 222 and the endless chain belt 218 therebetween. Since the idler drive 204 is in driving engagement with the chain 92, as described above, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that the reversible hydraulic pump 216 will be driven to pump power fluid therefrom by the driving movement to the chain 92 in the first rotating direction 180 and in the second rotating direction 182, in a manner and for reasons which will become more apparent below.

As diagramatically shown in FIG. 6, both sides of the reversible hydraulic pump 216 are connected to a power fluid reservoir 224 via a pair of inlet conduits 226 and 228. A check valve 230 is disposed in each of the inlet conduits 226 and 228, generally between the power fluid reservoir 224 and the reversible hydraulic pump 216, and oriented therein to allow the flow of fluid generally from the reservoir 224 toward the reversible pump 216 and to check the flow of fluid generally from the reversible pump 216 toward the reservoir 224, for reasons which will become more apparent below.

As diagramatically shown in FIG. 6, both sides of the reversible hydraulic pump 216 are also connected to the inlet of the second finisher drive 132 via a pair of outlet conduits 232 and 234. A check valve 236 is disposed in each of the outlet conduits 232 and 234, and each check valve 236 is oriented in the respective outlet conduit 232 and 234 to allow the flow of power fluid generally from the reversible hydraulic pump 216 toward the second finisher drive 132 and to check the flow of power fluid generally in the opposite direction, for reasons which will be made more apparent below.

The outlet or discharge side of the second finisher drive 132 is fluidically connected to the inlet side of the first finisher drive 130 via an interconnecting conduit 237, and the outlet of the first finisher drive 130 is fluidically connected to the inlet of the auger hydraulic motor 238 via an interconnecting conduit 240. The first finisher drive 130, the second finisher drive 132 and the auger hydraulic motor 238 are thus connected in fluidic series, and the outlet of the auger hydraulic motor 238 is fluidically connected to the reservoir 224 via a conduit 242.

It should be noted that, since the first finisher drive 130 and the second finisher drive 132 are each, in a preferred form, hydraulic motors, the first finisher drive 130 is shown in FIG. 6 and sometimes designated below as the first finisher hydraulic motor 130, and the second finisher drive 132 is shown in FIG. 6 and sometimes designated below as the second finisher hydraulic motor 132, for the purpose of clarity of description.

The conduit 242 is fluidically connected to the inlet of the second finisher drive 132 via a bypass conduit 244. A check valve 246 is interposed in the bypass condult 244, and is oriented therein to bypass the flow of power fluid in a direction generally from the auger hydraulic motor 238 to the inlet of the second finisher drive 132, for reasons which will be made more apparent below.

As diagramtically shown in FIG. 6, the chain 92 is, more particularly, rotatingly supported and driven via a pair of gears 248 and 250. In a preferred form, the gear 248 is rotatingly and bearingly supported on a portion of the transverse frame assembly 14, genrally near the adjustable end portion 18 thereof, and the gear 250 is rotatingly supported on a portion of the transverse frame assembly 14, generally near the power end portion 16 thereof. The gear 250 is connected to a chain drive 252 via a shaft 254. The chain drive 252 is constructed to rotatingly drive the gear 250, in a controlled manner, to drive the chain 92 in the first direction and in the second direction 182, as will be described in greater detail below.

As schematically shown in FIG. 6, the first sensor assembly 450 and the second sensor assembly 42 are each connected to the chain drive 252, such that the first trip switches 74 and the second trip switches 76, of the first sensor assembly 40 and the second sensor assembly 42, each provide an actuating signal to control the chain drive 252 or, in other words, to control the direction of movemnt of the chain 92, in a manner which will be described in greater detail below. The hydraulic and electric control circuit which controlling interconnects the chain drive 252, the first sensor assembly 40, and the second sensor assembly 42 is schematically and diagramatically shown in greater detail in FIG. 7. As shown in FIG. 7, and in a preferred form, the control components of the finishing apparatus 10 basically comprise a hydraulic motor 256, which is drivingly connected to the shaft 254 to rotatingly drive the chain 92; a pump 258, which is fluidically connected to the hydraulic motor 256; and a relief valve 260, a variable resistance valve 262 and a spring centered, threeposition, four-way solenoid valve 264, each of which are interpsoed generally between the pump 258 and the hydraulic motor 256.

One side of the pump 258 is connected to a fluid reservoir 268 via a conduit 270, and the other side of the pump 258 is connected to a port 272 of the relief valve 260 via a pair of conduits 274 and 276. The conduits 274 and 276 are each connected to a port 278 in the variable resistance valve 262 via a commonly connected conduit 280. Thus, one side of the pump 258 is connected to the relief valve 260 and to the variable resistance valve 262 via the conduits 274, 276, and 280, for reasons which will become more apparent below.

A port 282 in the relief valve 260 is connected'to the solenoid valve 264 via a pair of conduits 284 and 286, and a port 288 in the variable resistance valve 262 is connected to the conduits 284 and 286 via a conduit 290. The port 282 of the relief valve 260 and the port 288 of the variable resistance valve 262 are thus each connected to the solenoid 264, for reasons which will be made apparent below.

As shown in FIG. 7, the solenoid valve 264 has a deenergized position 292, a first energized position 294 and a second energized position 296. In the deenergized position 292 of the solenoid valve 264, as shown in FIG. 7, the conduit 286 is connected to the fluid reservoir 268 through the solenoid valve 262 via a conduit 298.

The solenoid valve 264 is connected to one side of the hydraulic 'motor 256 via a conduit 300, and the solenoid valve 264 is connected to the other side of the hydraulic motor 256 via a conduit 302. Thus, in the first energized position 294 of the solenoid valve 264,

the conduits 286 and 300 are in fluidic communication and, in the second energized position 296 of the solenoid valve 264, the conduits 286 and 302 are in fluidic communication, for reasons to be made apparent below.

One coil in the solenoid valve 264 is connected to an energizing power source 304 via a pair of conductors 306 and 308. As shown in FIG. 7, the second trip switch 76 of the first sensor assembly 40 is interposed between the conductors 306 and 308 and, in the open position of the second trip switch 76, as shown in FIG. 7, the electrical continuity is interrupted between the power source 304 and the one coil of the solenoid valve 264.

The other coil of the solenoid valve 264 is connected to the energizing power source 304 via a pair of conductors 310 and 312. The second trip switch 76 of the second sensor assembly 42 is interposed between the conductors 310 and 312 and, in the open position of the second trip switch 76, as shown in FIG. 7, the electrical continuity is interrupted between the power source 304 and the one coil of the solenoid valve 264.

It will be apparent to those skilled in the art from the foregoing, and as schematically indicated in FIG. 7, that the closing of the second trip switch 76 of the first sensor assembly 40 will energize one of the coils of the solenoid valve 264 to position the solenoid valve 264 in the first energized position 294 thereof. The closing of the second trip switch 76 of the second sensor as sembly 42 will energize the other coil of the solenoid valve 264 to position the solenoid valve 264 in the second energized position 296, in a manner and for reasons which will be made more apparent below.

As shown in FIG. 7, a latching relay network 313 is connected in electrical parallel with the second trip switch 76 of the first sensor assembly 40 and in electrical parallel with the second trip switch 76 of the second sensor assembly 42. The latching relay network 313 comprises a predetermined number of relays and holding coils constructed and connected such that when the second trip switch 76 of the first sensor assembly 40 or the second sensor assembly 42 is actuated to the closed position, thereby energizing one of the coils of the solenoid valve 264, the latching relay network 313 holds the electrical continuity thus established between the power source 304 and the energized coil of the solenoid valve 264 until the second trip switch 76 of the first sensor assembly 40 or the second sensor assembly 42 is subsequently actuatingly closed. Thus, when the second trip switch 76 of the first sensor assembly 40 is actuatingly closed, thereby energizing the solenoid valve 264 to the first energized position 294, the latching relay network 313 maintains the solenoid 264 in the first energized position 284 until such time as the second trip switch 76 of the second sensor assembly 42 is closed. When the second trip switch 76 of the second sensor assembly 42 is actuatingly closed, thereby energizing the solenoid 264 to the second energized position 296, the latching rellay network 313 maintains the solenoid valve 264 in the second energized postion 296 until such time as the second trip switch 76 of the first sensor assembly 40 is once again actuated, during the operation of the finishing apparatus 10, for reasons which will be made apparent below. Relay networks of the type functionally described above are well known in the art and detailed description of the various components and the interconnections therebetween is not required herein.

As shown in FIG. 7, a charge pump 314 is connected to a port 316 of the variable resistance valve 262 via a conduit 318. The suction or inlet side of the charge pump 314 is connected to a power fluid supply (not shown).

An orifice 320 and a solenoid valve 322 are each interposed in the conduit 318 generally between the charge pump 314 and the port 316 ofthe variable resistance valve 262. As shown in FIG. 7, the solenoid valve 322 is in a de-energized position and, in that position, the port 316 is connected to the reservoir 268 through the solenoid valve 322.

The coil in the solenoid valve 322 is connected to the energizing power source 304 via a conductor 324. The first trip switch 74 of the first sensor assembly 40 and the second sensor assembly 42 are each interposed in the conductor 324, generally between the solenoid valve 322 and the energizing power source 304, the first trip switch 74 of the first sensor assembly 40 and the second sensor assembly 42 being disposed in electrical parallel, as shown in FIG. 7. It will be apparent to those skilled in the art from the foregoing, that the actuating or closing of the first trip switch 74 of the first sensor assembly or the first trip switch 74 of the second sensor assembly 42 will establish electrical continuity between the coil of the solenoid valve 322 and the energizing power source 304, thereby energizing the solenoid valve 322. In the energized position of the solenoid valve 322, the charge pump 314 is in fluidic communication with the port 316 of the variable resistance valve 262 via the solenoid valve 322, for reasons which will be made more apparent below.

As shown in FIG. 7, a port 326 formed in the relief valve 260 is connected to the fluid reservior 268 via a conduit 328, and a port 330 formed in the variable resistance valve 262 is connected to the fluid reservoir 268 via a conduit 332.

The relief valve 260 includes a valve member 334 which is slidingly disposed in a chamber 336 of a valve body 338. A bias spring 340 is disposed in a portion of the chamber 336 in biasing engagement with a portion of the valve member 334 of the relief valve 260 to bias the valve member 334 to a spring biased position as shown in FIG. 7. In the spring biased position ofthe relief valve 260, the valve member 344 is disposed therein such that the ports 272 and 362 are not in fluidic communication.

An opening 342 is formed in a portion of the valve member 334. A portion of the opening 342 communicates with the port 272, the opening 342 being shaped such that fluid entering the relief valve 260 via the port 272 will bias the valve member 334 in a direction generally opposed to the biasing force of the bias spring 340. A portion of the opening 342 generally adjacent to the outer periphery of the valve member 334 is shaped to provide fluidic communication between the port 272 and the port 326 when the relief valve has been biased to a predetermined position by the pressure of the fluid entering the port 272. In other words, when the pressure of the fluid entering the relief valve 260 via the port 272 reaches a predetermined actuating pressure level, the valve member 334 is biased by the fluid to a relief position wherein the port 272 and the port 326 are in fluidic communication via a portion of the opening 342, thereby establishing fluidic communication between the conduit 276 and the fluid reservoir 268, for reasons and in a manner to made more apparent below.

The variable resistance valve 262, as shown in FIG. 7, includes a valve member 344 which is slidingly disposed in a chamber 346 formed in a valve body 348. A bias spring 350 is disposed in a portion of the chamber 346 of the variable resistance valve 262, and a portion of the bias spring 350 biasingly engages the valve member 344 to a spring biased position, as shown in FIG. 7. An opening 352 is formed in a portion of the valve member 344, the opening 352 being shaped to provide fluidic communication between the port 278 and the port 288 of the variable resistance valve 262 in the spring biased position of the variable resistance valve 262.

The variable resistance valve 262 and, more particularly, the valve member 344 disposed therein, is constructed such that fluid entering the variable resistance valve 262 via the port 316 will bias the valve member 344 in a direction generally opposed to the biasing force of the bias spring 350. The opening 352 formed through the valve member 344 is shaped such that as the valve member 344 is biased in a direction generally opposed to bias spring 350, fluidic communication between the ports 278 and 288 will become increasingly restricted, thereby increasing the pressure drop across the variable resistance valve 262 generally between the conduit 280 and the conduit 290, for reasons which will be made more apparent below.

As generally mentioned above, the chain drive 252, the first sensor assembly 40 and the second assembly 42 are each connected to the finishing apparatus to control the movement of the finisher assembly 12 in the first transverse direction and in the second transverse direction 22 and the controllingly pivot the finisher assembly 12 to the first pivot position when the finisher assembly 12 reaches one predetermined position and the pivot the finisher assembly 12 to the second pivot position when the finisher assembly 12 reaches one other predetermined position. In the finishing apparatus 10, the predetermined positions are, more particularly, defined by the first slip form 44 and the second slip form 46, and the control functions mentioned above are thus particularly adapted to move the finisher assembly 12 in the first transverse direction 20 and in the second transverse direction 22 and to controllingly pivot the finisher assembly 12 to the first pivot position and the second pivot position in such a manner that the first surface finisher 24 and the second surface finisher 26 each cooperate to finishingly engage the surface to be finished 32 across substantially the entire transverse width thereof.

A preferred arrangement of the control functions, mentioned above, is diagrammatically shown in FIG. 8 and, for the purpose of clarity of description, the various control positions of the finisher assembly 12 during the operation of the finisher apparatus 10 are described below with reference to the center lines of the first surface finisher 24 and the second surface finisher 26, the center lines being disposed in a horizontal plane generally coplanar with the surface to be finished' 32. It should also be noted that, as diagrammatically shown in FIG. 8, the finishing apparatus 10 is moving in a forward direction 354, and finishingly engaging the surface to be finished 32 generally between the first slip form 44 and the second slip form 46.

When the finisher assembly 12 is being moved in a first transverse direction 20, the first surface finisher 24 is finishingly engaging the surface to be finished 32, and the second surface finisher 26 is disposed a distance generally vertically above the surface to be finished 32. The first sensor assembly 40 is disposed with respect to the finisher assembly 12, such that when the first surface finisher 24 has been moved to a transition actuating position, generally-designated in FIG. 8 by the reference numeral 356, the actuating boss 78 of the finisher assembly 12 will actuatingly enage the first trip switch 74, thereby causing the rate at which the chain 92 is being driven in a first rotating direction 180 to linearly decrease. The function of the various control components connected to the first trip switch 74 to lin- 7 early decrease the rate at which the chain 92 is driven will be described in greater detail below.

The finisher assembly 12 will continue to move in the first transverse direction 20 through the transition actuating position 356, to a position wherein the first surface finisher 24 is disposed in a reverse actuating position, designated in FIG. 8 by the general reference numeral 358. The first sensor assembly 40 is disposed with respect to the finisher assembly 12 such that, when the first surface finisher 24 is moved to the reverse actuating position 358, the actuating boss 78 of the finisher assembly 12 will actuatingly engage the second trip switch 78 of the first sensor assembly 40.

The second trip switch 76 is connected to the chain drive 252 in such a manner that, when the second trip switch 76 is actuatingly engaged by the actuating boss 78, the driving impetus provided by the chain drive 252 will be reversed, thereby driving the chain 92 in the second rotating direction 182. The reversing of the driving impetus by the chain drive 252 will cause the finisher assembly 12 to be pivoted to the second pivot position and will drivingly move the finisher assembly 12 in the second transverse direction 22 across the surface to be finished 32.

As shown in FIG. 8, the first surface finisher 24 is disposed a predetermined transverse distance from the first slip form 44 when the first surface finisher 24 is disposed in the reverse actuating position 358. In the preferred form, the second surface finisher 26 is disposed on the finisher assembly 12 such that, when the first surface finisher 24 is moved to the reverse actuating position 358, the second surface finisher 26 is disposed in a predetermined horizontal plane g'e neralIy above the first slip form 44. More particularly, the second surface finisher 26 is disposed on the finisher assembly 12 such that, when the finisher assembly 12 is pivoted to the second pivot position, the second surface finisher 26 is moved into an initial surface engaging position, designated in FIG. 8 by the general reference numeral 360, generally over a portion of the first slip form 44. In the initial surface engaging position 360 of the second surface finished 26 and, in a preferred form, the second surface finisher 26 is disposed such that the center lines generally therethrough intersect at a position generally over the first slip form 44, for reasons which will be made more apparent below.

After the finisher assembly 12 has been pivoted to the second pivot position and the finisher assembly begins to move in the second transverse direction 22, the actuating boss 78 will be moved from engagement with the first trip switch 74 and the second trip switch 76 of the first sensor assembly 40. The finishing apparatus 10

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Classifications
U.S. Classification404/103
International ClassificationE01C19/29, E01C19/40, E01C19/38, E01C19/22
Cooperative ClassificationE01C19/29, E01C19/407, E01C19/38
European ClassificationE01C19/29, E01C19/38, E01C19/40E
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jan 21, 1992ASAssignment
Owner name: CMI CORPORATION A CORP. OF OKLAHOMA, OKLAHOMA
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Jan 21, 1992AS06Security interest
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Owner name: CONGRESS FINANCIAL CORPORATION (SOUTHWEST) A CORP.
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Sep 8, 1988ASAssignment
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Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:CMI CORPORATION, A CORP. OF OK;REEL/FRAME:004946/0363
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Owner name: FIRST INTERSTATE BANK OF OKLAHOMA, N.A., OKLAHOMA
Jun 12, 1984ASAssignment
Owner name: BANK OF AMERICA NATIONAL TRUST AND SAVINGS ASSOCIA
Owner name: BANK OF PENNSYLVANIA
Owner name: COMMERCE BANK
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Owner name: CONTINENTAL ILLINOIS NATIONAL BANK AND TRUST COMPA
Free format text: ;ASSIGNORS:CMI CORPORATION;CMI INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION;CMIOIL CORPORATION;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:004281/0001
Effective date: 19840301
Owner name: FIDELITY BANK N.A.
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Owner name: MANUFACTURERS HANOVER TRUST COMPANY
Owner name: MERCANTILE NATIONAL BANK AT DALLAS
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May 24, 1984ASAssignment
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Sep 13, 1982ASAssignment
Owner name: BANK OF AMERICA NATIONAL TRUST AND SAVINGS ASSOCIA
Owner name: BANK OF PENNSYLVAIA
Owner name: COMMERCIAL BANK,N.A.
Owner name: CONTINENTAL ILLINOIS NATIONAL BANK AND TRUST COMPA
Owner name: FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION AS RECEIVER
Owner name: FIDELITY BANK N A.
Owner name: FIRST NATIONAL BANK AND TRUST COMPANY OF OKLAHOMA
Owner name: FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF CHICAGO, THE
Owner name: HIBERNIA NATIONAL BANK IN NEW ORLEANS THE
Free format text: MORTGAGE;ASSIGNORS:CMI CORPORATION;CMI INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION;CMI OIL CORPORATION;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:004036/0894
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Owner name: REPUBLICBANK DALLAS,N.A.