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Publication numberUS3870471 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 11, 1975
Filing dateJan 28, 1974
Priority dateSep 4, 1973
Also published asCA1004468A1
Publication numberUS 3870471 A, US 3870471A, US-A-3870471, US3870471 A, US3870471A
InventorsSangster Arlon G, Tepas Jr Joseph J
Original AssigneeOlin Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dissolving apparatus
US 3870471 A
Abstract
An improved apparatus for dissolving and dispensing soluble material including a container having an upper and a lower chamber. The upper chamber is separated into a first and a second compartment. A rotary receptacle in the first compartment receives liquid through an inlet in the first compartment and is periodically emptied, releasing precisely the same amount of liquid each cycle. The second compartment contains a magazine which holds soluble solids to be dissolved by the liquid. A control valve regulates the amount of liquid contact with the solid. The lower chamber receives the solution from the second compartment and thru valve means releases the solution into the liquid system to be treated.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Tepas, Jr. et a1.

1 1 Mar. 11, 1975 DISSOLVING APPARATUS [75] Inventors: Joseph ,1. Tepas, Jr., Easton, Conn.;

Arlon G. Sangster, Sterling, Mass.

[73] Assignee: Olin Corporation, New Haven,

Conn.

[22] Filed: Jan. 28, 1974 [2]] Appl. No.: 437,077

Related U.S. Application Data [63] Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 394,007, Sept. 4,

[52] U.S. Cl 23/267 E, 23/2727, 23/2728, 248/157, 239/310, 210/169, 137/268, 222/71 [51] Int. Cl 801d 11/02, 8011 l/OO [58] Field of Search 23/267 E, 272.7, 272.8;

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,578,776 5/1971 Schneider 23/267 E 3,595,786 7/1971 Horvath 23/267 E 3,802,845 4/1974 Tcptls 23/267 E FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 806 0/1901 Great Britain 248/157 Primary ExaminerA. Louis Monacell Assistant Examiner-S. J. Emery Attorney, Agent, or FirmDonald F. Clements; Thomas P. ODay; James B. Haglind [57] ABSTRACT An improved apparatus for dissolving and dispensing soluble material including a container having an upper and a lower chamber. The upper chamber is separated into a first and a second compartment. A rotary receptacle in the first compartment receives liquid through an inlet in the first compartment and is periodically emptied, releasing precisely the same amount of liquid each cycle. The second compartment contains a magazine which holds soluble solids to be dissolved by the liquid. A control valve regulates the amount of liquid contact with the solid. The lower chamber receives the solution from the second compartment and thru valve means releases the solution into the liquid system to be treated.

The improvement comprises providing means for vertically adjusting the magazine to control the dissolving of soluble solids.

The novel vertical adjustment means is comprised of a bracket attached to a wall of the magazine, a cam engaging the bracket and a wheel engaging the cam. The configuration of the cam is a continuous non-circular curve of from 0 to about 340. The cam allows a wide range of solution concentrations to be produced by controlling the amount of contact between the liquid and the soluble solid in the magazine.

15 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures rur ynvr LA rrvu YALI DISSOLVING APPARATUS This is a continuation-in-part of co-pending application Ser. No. 394,007, filed Sept. 4, 1973.

This invention relates to apparatus for the preparation and controlled feeding of aqueous solutions of solid particulate material. More particularly, the apparatus provides means for preparing aqueous solutions of water-soluble solids and dispensing said solutions at controlled rates. Still more particularly, this invention relates to apparatus for supplying solutions containing available chlorine over a wide range of concentrations from solid hypochlorite compositions in conveniently handled granular, pressed or tabletted forms at accurately controlled rates for use in a variety of chlorination and water treating applications differing widely in the concentration of the solution required In the treatment of water including particularly swimming pools, a supply of aqueous solution of an available halogen compound, preferably a hypochlorite, is commonly metered into a flowing body of the liquid to be treated. Sodium hypochlorite solutions are available commercially at concentrations not exceeding 15 percent of available chlorine but such solutions deteriorate rapidly during shipment and storage. Solid sodium hypochlorite compositions are not available because they are very unstable. Calcium hypochlorite, on the other hand, can be shipped as a relatively stable solid containing up to about 85 percent or more of available chlorine and can be stored for long periods without appreciable loss of available chlorine.

In spite of the advantages of solid calcium hypochlorite over other sources of available halogen for use as a sterilizing agent, there is a problem in applying the solid continuously and directly to water in such a manner that only a few parts per million of available chlorine are ultimately present in the water. In conventional methods of application in swimming pools, granular calcium hypochlorite is sometimes added directly to the water in the pool or tablets are placed in the skimmer or in dissolving baskets around the pool. Preferably, however, solid calcium hypochlorite is' dissolved in water to form a solution of desired concentration which is metered into the water in the circulating system at a rate to maintain residual chlorine concentration generally from about 0.3 to about 1.5 parts per million in the pool.

Many devices have been devised to control dissolution of soluble materials but which are not satisfactory for use with calcium hypochlorite or other substances having similar solubility and solution characteristics.

US. Pat. No. 1,216,051 shows a dispensing device having a solute-containing magazine covered at one end by a perforated disk and supported at a fixed elevation in the total stream of flowing water to be treated. The flow of the total stream promotes turbulence in the region of the perforated end of the magazine and extensive wetting of undissolved solute. Contact between solute and liquid and hence the degree of liquid treatment is dependent on liquid pressure.

US. Pat. No. 2,971,825 shows a dispenser for dissolving and dispensing solutes by passing a variably controlled portion of the inflowing fluid into and out of a mixing chamber which contains the solute and which is partially covered by a screen. Turbulent flow in the region of the perforated end and extensive wetting and mixing of solvent and undissolved solute are encouraged by the structure of the device of thispatent. The range of concentrations for treated solutions is limited by the extent stream deflection is permitted by the controls. The uniformity of concentrations of treated solutions is dependent on liquid pressure.

The dispensing device of U.S. Pat. No. 3,107,156 comprises a solute containing magazine suspended into a container into which a constant flow-of'water enters. The magazine has a water soluble plastic film at the lower end which dissolves in contact with water and exposes the solute to the dissolving action of water. The extent of contactof solute with water is adjusted by raising or lowering the magazine. A siphon tube determines the upper and lower liquid levels in the container and periodically releases a quantity of treated water.

In contrast to the above dispensers, a recently developed dispensing apparatus provides for accurately controlled concentrations of treated solutions which are substantially independent of changes in the pressure conditions in the system being treated. The dispenser provides controlled tubulence in the area of liquidsolute contact and prevents undesired contact between the liquid and the soluble material. Continuous immersion of the soluble material in the liquid is avoided by the dispensing apparatus. Periodic release of a controlled quantity of liquid from the receptacle permits liquid-solute contact which is essentially unaffected by changes in liquid flow rates. The dispensing apparatus permits a zero feed rate of soluble material while maintaining a continuous flow of liquid through the apparatus under normal operating conditions.

This recently developed dispenser, disclosed in U.S. application Ser. No. 368,899, filed June 11, 1973, by Joseph J. Tepas, Jr., includes a closed container having an upper chamber and a lower chamber and at least one partition separating the two chambers. The upper chamber is separated into a first and a second compartment by a divider. The first compartment contains an inlet for liquid in its upper part and a rotary receptacle for receiving the liquid from the inlet. When filled, the receptacle rotates and discharges the liquid and returns to its original position to receive additional liquid. A channel in the divider between the first and second compartments permits the liquid to flow into the second compartment, the flow being regulated by a valve. A magazine in the second compartment for holding soluble solid materials has a grid at the lower end. Liquid flowing into the second compartment, rises up thru the grid and contacts of soluble solid, forming a solution. The concentration of the solution is controlled by the valve setting regulating liquid fiow rate. The solution formed passes thru an opening between the second compartment and the lower chamber. A valve in the lower chamber regulates the flow of solution from the dispenser to the body of liquid to be treated.

US. application Ser. No. 394,007, filed 'Sept. 4, 1973, by the present Applicants, discloses an improved means to control liquid flow from the first compartment to the second or dissolving compartment. This flow control means is a rotary member having a cup and an aperture permitting a variable portion of the liquid from the rotary receptacle to pass directly to the lower chamber without passing thru the dissolving compartment.

When a highly concentrated solution is to be dis pensed, a large portion of the liquid contacts the soluble solid. When dispensing a solution of low concentration, a small portion of the liquid contacts the soluble solid. This small portion, however, must dissolve sufficient solid to form a relatively concentrated solution in the dissolving compartment. This concentrated solution is then diluted to the desired concentration in the lower chamber and dispensed to the body of liquid to be treated. Improved operation is attained by allowing a large portion or all of the dissolving liquid to pass thru the dissolving compartment to provide better mixing in the dissolving compartment.

It is desirable therefore to provide a dispensing apparatus which permits a large portion or all of the liquid to pass thru the dissolving compartment while maintaining the concentration of the solution dispensed at the desired level.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a novel control means for providing a less concentrated solution in the dissolving compartment while maintaining the desired concentration of solution dispensed.

An additional object of the invention is an improved cover for the dispenser magazine.

It is another object of this invention to provide an improved apparatus for dissolving solid material to form a solution and dispensing the resulting solution into a liquid to be treated.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved apparatus for feeding active chlorine solutions to swimming pool water.

These and other objects of the invention will be apparent from the following detailed description of the invention.

It has now been discovered that the foregoing objects are accomplished in a novel control means which vertically adjusts the magazine to control the dissolving of the soluble solid. In a preferred embodiment of the invention the control means comprises a bracket attached to said magazine, a cam engaging the bracket, and a rotary member engaging the cam.

This novel control mens is especially useful in an apparatus for dissolving and dispensing soluble material to form an improved novel dispensing apparatus which includes in combination a closed container having an upper chamber and a lower chamber and at least one partition separating the chambers. The upper chamber is separated into a first and a second compartment by a divider. An inlet in the upper part of the first compartment introduces liquid from an external source into a rotary receptacle housed in the first compartment. The receptacle is located below the inlet and is attached to the sidewalls of the first compartment by a pair of trunnions. Means are provided for periodically emptying liquid from the receptacle. Liquid flow is regulated by a first flow control means associated with at least one opening for controlling liquid flow between the first compartment and the second compartment. A magazine in the second compartment for holding soluble solids has a pervious lower end permitting liquid from the receptacle to contact the solids. At least one opening is provided in the second compartment permitting liquid to flow between the second compartment and the lower chamber. An outlet in the lower chamber is equipped with a second flow control means which permits the regulation of liquid flow thru the outlet.

FIGS. 1-5 show various embodiments of the novel dispenser of this invention. Corresponding parts have the same identifying numbers in FIGS. 1-5. FIG. 6

shows a diagram utilizing the dispenser of this invention in a swimming pool installation.

FIG. 1 is a partial vertical cross section of one embodiment of the apparatus of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a front view of the embodiment of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a front view of one embodiment of the cam employed in FIGS. 1 and 2.

FIG. 4 is a side view of one embodiment of the cover of the magazine employed in FIG. 1.

FIG. 5 is a top view of the embodiment of FIG. 4.

FIG. 6 is a diagrammatic plan ofa swimming pool filtering system incorporating the dispensing apparatus of the present invention.

The dispensing apparatus of this invention, as shown in FIG. 1, is divided into upper chamber 1 and lower chamber 2 by partition 3. Upper chamber 1 is separated into first compartment 4 and second compartment 5 by divider 6. Liquid from an external source enters the apparatus by way of tube 7 passing thru flow indicator 8 and inflow valve 9 into inlet 10 attached to the upper part of wall 14 of first compartment 4 and below cover 61. Deflector is inserted at the dis charge end of inlet 10 to deflect the liquid into rotary receptacle 11, which is attached to the side walls of first compartment 4 by means of a pair of trunnions 12. Re ceptacle 11 empties itself when the liquid volume reaches a predetermined level by pivoting on trunnions l2 stopping when the front edge of receptacle 1] contacts protuberance 71. Baffle 48 reduces splashing when liquid is released from receptacle 11.

Upon emptying, receptacle 11 returns to its original position, stopping when protuberance 72 on receptacle 11 contacts the edge of opening 73. Opening 73 allows liquid to flow directly between first compartment 4 and lower chamber 2 in the event of a build-up of liquid in first compartment 4. Liquid from receptacle ll flows down partition 3 thru opening 74 in partition 3. Cup 76, attached to partition 3, directs the flow of liquid from first compartment 4 down through opening 74 into cup 76 and from cup 76 up thru opening 79 in partition 3, the liquid passing thru channel and into second compartment 5.

Magazine 18 is housed in second compartment 5 having removable cover 60. Magazine 18 has a lower pervious end comprising grid 19 which supports a liquid soluble particulate material (not shown).

Yoke 30 is attached to wall 31 of magazine 18. Dial 32 is engaged by cam 33 thru opening 35 in wall 34 of compartment 5. Cam 33 engages yoke 30 thru an opening (not shown) in the plate 36 of yoke 30. The rotation of dial 32 turns cam 33 which moves yoke 30 and thus magazine 18 vertically. Soluble solid particulate materials are introduced into magazine 18 thru removable cover 38. Dial control settings (not shown) are indicated along the circumference of dial 32. From second compartment 5 the solution formed passes down thru drain 21 into lower chamber 2.

FIG. 2 illustrates a frontal view of the novel vertical adjustment means of FIG. 1. Yoke 30 is comprised of plate 36 attached to and spaced apart from wall 31. Cam 33 is inserted between wall 31 and plate 36. Cam 33 engages dial 32 thru opening 37 in plate 36 and opening 35 (not shown) in wall 34 of compartment 5.

FIG. 3 represents one embodiment of cam 33 employed in the present invention.

FIGS. 4 and 5 depict a side view and front view respectively of an embodiment of cover 38 of magazine 18. Cover plate 39, having opening 40 and 42 at each end and opening 41 at the center, rests on the top of magazine 18. Handle 43 has grips 44, 45 and 46 and latches 47, 48 and 49, respectively. Latch 47, attached to grip 44, is inserted thru opening 40 and secured to a wall of magazine 18. Latch 48 is attached to grip 45 and is inserted thru opening 42 and secured to cover plate 39. Latch 49 is attached to grip 46 and inserted thru opening 42 and is secured to a wall of magazine 18. Of the three grips, only grip 46 has sufficient flexibility to bend enough to release latch 49 and permit latch 47 to be released and inner cover 38 to be removed. A lifting force applied to either of grips 44 or 45 will not remove inner cover 38 but will instead remove magazine 18 from compartment 5.

FIG. 6 illustrates the use of the present invention in supplying chlorinated water to a swimming pool system including swimming pool 50, a pump 51 with its low pressure or suction side connected by conduit 52 to pool 50 and with its high pressure or outlet side by conduit 53 to filter S4. A portion of the water discharged from filter 54 through conduit 55 passes through conduit 56 into dispenser apparatus 57. For example, when magazine 18 of the dispenser of this invention contains calcium hypochlorite and pool water is contacted with the calcium hypochlorite contained therein, the resulting chlorine-containing solution formed by dispenser apparatus 57 is discharged through outlet 24 (not shown) to conduit 58 to pump 51, through conduit 53 to filter 54 and through conduit 55 to pool 50.

The dispensing apparatus of this invention is suitable fabricated of metal or plastic depending on the solute and liquid with with it is to be used. When solid hypochlorites, for example, calcium hypochlorite, or solutions of hypochlorites are employed, the materials of construction are preferably those resistant to its action. Particularly suitable for this purpose are a considerable number of plastic compositions, for example, Lucite which has the additional advantage of transparency. The apparatus may also be constructed of other resins, for example, acrylonitrile-butadienestyrene, Bakelite, nylon, polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, and polystyrene and of suitable metals including copper, brass, stainless steels, and titanium.

The dispensing apparatus is designed to operate with liquid supplied at suitable pressures and may be operated without controlling means for liquid flow rates. In systems with highly variable liquid flow rates, it may be desirable, however, to equip the inlet with means to regulate liquid flow. In the case of treating swimming pool water, for example, control means combining a visual flow indicator and a valve member are useful in indicating a pressure build-up in the filter or at the hair and lint screen and to provide visible check valve function when the filter pump stops. An example of a suitable inlet liquid flow control means is a combination of a ball flow indicator and a tee valve.

The receptacle for the liquid is self-emptying and provides for the release of liquid on a periodic basis, controlled, for example, by a predetermined volume or weight of liquid. It can, for example, be shaped generally cylindrical, ellipsoidal or circular, having at least one opening for liquid to enter and be discharged. In one embodiment, a tear drop shaped receptacle is attached to the walls of the container, for example, by a pair of trunnions or pivot pins and is carefully balanced so that upon emptying the liquid it returns by gravity to its original position. A stopping mans for maintaining the receptacle at a suitable position for filling may be provided by the appropriate length of the inlet tube or by appropriately located protuberance as shown in FIG. 1.

One or more openings can be provided in the first compartment to permit flow of liquid directly to the lower chamber. A suitable example is an opening or overflow tube which prevents the build-up of liquid in the first compartment.

The novel vertical adjustment apparatus for controlling the height of the tabled magazine permits a wide range of solution concentrations to be dispensed. The cam may have any suitable configuration which permits the desired change in the height of the magazine in the dissolving compartment. It is preferred that the configuration of the cam permit change in the height of the magazine over any selected distance. In one embodiment the configuration of the cam is a non-circular continuous curve increasing in slope from 0 to about 340. Its design therefore permits a continuous altering of the magazine height and thus the amount of contact with the soluble solid. The concentration of the solution to be dispensed can be varied by any degree and is not limited to specific intervals of change. The bracket attached to the magazine may be of any design which provides suitable means of engagement with the cam. In one embodiment, the bracket is a yoke which houses the cam and frictionally engages the cam along a face of a plate of the yoke. It will be readily understood that the vertical adjustment of the magazine cam also be made by any engagement of the cam with a wall of the magazine.

The novel vertical adjustment apparatus of the present invention can be used in combination with the first flow control means of US. application Ser. Nos. 368,899 and 394,007. Where this is done, it is preferred that the first flow control means permit a large volume of liquid to flow into the second compartment. In a preferred embodiment, the first flow control means is a nonrotatable cup permitting all of the liquid to flow into the second compartment.

By permitting a large portion or all of the liquid to flow from the first compartment thru the second or dissolving compartment, the desired concentration of solution is obtained while providing for adequate mixing.

The concentration of solution formed in the dissolving compartment does not need to be inordinately high as the concentration of the solution in the lower chamber of the dispenser is close to or the same as that formed in the dissolving compartment.

The supply magazine has the form, for example, of a hollow rectangular or cylindrical solid having a pervious lower end. The magazine is insertable into the second compartment of the upper chamber and stop means are provided to establish the level of the pervious lower end of the magazine at an appropriate distance above the bottom of the compartment. The pervious lower end can be, for example, a grid of suitable mesh attached to the magazine and made integral therewith. The magazine can be removable from or made integral with the second compartment.

In a preferred embodiment, the magazine is tapered, the cross sectional area at the top being slightly smaller than the cross sectional area at the bottom, or pervious end. Such tapering is particularly desirable when tabletted materials are employed in the magazine. The tapering enhances the downward movement of unwetted tablets to replace wetted tablets being dissolved by the liquid and prevents bridging of the tablets when they are first contacted by the liquid.

The novel removable cover permits the magazine to be filled with soluble material in a form which is suitable for dissolving in the liquid being supplied to the apparatus of the invention. lts construction however prevents the cover from being readily removed and access gained to the soluble solid, for example, by young children. While a magazine is a preferred emobodiment for containing the soluble solids it will be recognized that other supports or holders having suitable openings for liquid may be used.

The novel cover of the magazine is comprised of a plate which contacts the magazine and a handle. The handle has at least two grips for grasping the cover. At least one of these grips has latching means attached. Where the plate is separate from the handle, the plate has at least two openings to permit entry of at least two latching means to secure the cover to the magazine, for example, by attaching to the walls of the magazine. If desired, the plate may be attached to the handle, for example, by the same latching means used to attach the handle to the magazine. Where this is the case, one of the latching means may be directly attached to the plate and the other to a grip on the handle. Of the grips on the handle, only one is able to release a latching means and permit the cover to be removed. In a preferred embodiment, one of the grips has sufficient flexibility to flex or bend when raised to release the latching means and permit the handle to be moved releasing any other latching means and free the cover from the magazine.

The lower portion of the magazine is periodically submerged in liquid, with the volume of the submerged portion usually being no greater than about percent of the total volume of the magazine. The extent of contact is regulated by the magazines vertical adjustment means.

The vertical adjustment apparatus of the present invention is able to vary the height of the magazines grid above the partition separating the second compartment from the lower chamber. The grids height can be adjusted over any suitable range. The desired grid height being determined by the nature of the soluble solid employed, the liquid used as the solvent, and the size of the apparatus.

As soluble material dissolves at the pervious end of the magazine and is removed, the soluble material originally in the air space above and not wetted by liquid, gradually descends to the pervious end to replace that dissolved. Only soluble material about to be dissolved is contacted by liquid flowing across the pervious end of the magazine.

At least one opening, is provided to permit the flow of solution between the second compartment and the lower chamber. This may comprise, for example, a drain with a suitable dam to maintain liquid level nearr the grid at its lowest position. In addition, drain means suitably notched to minimize plugging by non-dissolved particles can be employed. If desired, drain means with a variable size orifice can be advantageously used especially where particulate materials of differing degrees of solubility are employed with a common solvent.

Release of solution from the lower chamber through outlet 24 to the liquid to be treated is controlled by a second flow control means, a float valve, for example, so arranged that air is prevented from being drawn into the pump suction line causing undesired introduction of air into the recirculating system.

The dispenser is designed to operate with liquid supplied at suitable pressure and to discharge the solution at or below atmospheric pressure into the liquid to be treated.

The rotary receptacle accumulates a volume of liquid and periodically instantaneously releases this liquid to a dissolving zone wherein the liquid contacts a soluble material in the lower end of the magazine to form a solution containing a carefully controlled amount of the soluble material. By releasing precisely the same amount of liquid during each cycle, accurately controlled solution concentrations are consistently obtained for a particular setting of the dial control. A wide range of concentrations are provided by the apparatus of this invention. For example, when dissolving solid calcium hypochlorite, available chlorine in amounts of from 0 to greater than about 4,000 grams per day can be supplied. In contrast, most currently available erosion type dispensing devices for chlorinating swimming pools cannot provide a zero feed rate of available chlorine while operating, nor can they feed more than approximately 300 grams of available chlorine per day when dissolving the prescribed available chlorine-containing compound.

The device of the present invention is used particularly advantageously when it is desired to dispense solutions of soluble solid materials supplied in a suitable form at accurately controlled rates. These rates are varied by controlling the volume of liquid in contact with the soluble material. The dispenser of this invention is particularly useful in the application of solid hypochlorites, for example, calcium hypochlorite, to bodies of water, for example, in treating water in swimming pools, water plants in small municipalities, bottling plants, dairies and cooling systems where the addition of a sterilizing agent or other'chemical is desirable. The device also can be advantageously used in the'treatment of industrial wastes to'destroy color, odor and toxic constituents, and for odor and bacterial control in sewage effluents. Pressed tablets of calcium hypochlorite are especially suitable in the present apparatus, but granular shapes and sizes of particles are also suitable. The apparatus can be used for dissolving and feeding other chemcials, for example, sodium fluoride in minor amounts for water supplies, polyphosphates and compositions containing them for water softening, soda ash furnished as briquettes or fused soda ash for adjusting the alkalinity of aqueous bodies, sodium chloride, alum and available chlorine compounds other than hypochlorite include, for example, dichlorocyanuric acid and alkaline salts thereof, trichlorocyanuric acid and alkaline salts thereof, tetrachloroglycoluril, 1,2- dichloro-S,S-dimethylhydantoin and l-chloro-3- bromo-5,3-dimethylhydantoin.

The following examples are presented to illustrate the invention more fully. All parts and percentages are by weight unless otherwise specified.

EXAMPLE I A dispensing apparatus, substantially as shwon in FIGS. 1, 2 and 3, was fabricated substantially of acrylo nitrile-butadiene-styrene resin. Tear drop shaped receptacle 11 had a capacity of approximately one quart of liquid. Magazine 18 had a grid forming the previous end and was filled with calcium hypochlorite briquettes containing 70 percent Ca(OCl) Magazine height control wheel 32, which controls the amount of contact between the liquid entering the second compartment and the soluble solid on grid 119, was set at 2. At this setting, the grid was at a height of about 1.8 inches above the partition forming the bottom of the second compartment.

The dispensing apparatus was connected to a test stand simulating a swimming pool installation to test uniformity in maintaining available chlorine levels.

The test stand included a stirred tank having a capacitty of 150 gallons of water.

Fresh water at a temperature of 85F. was added to the dispensing apparatus at the rate of gallons per hour.

At a control setting of 2, the dispensing apparatus was operated for a period of 3.25 hours. Analyses of the treated solution, taken at intervals of 1, 2 and 3.25 hours after starting liquid flow to the dispensing apparatus, showed an average available chlorine concentration of 71 parts per million, with the highest reading being 75 parts per million and the lowest reading 67 parts per million.

The example shows the accurate control of concentration of available chlorine in an aqueous solution attained during operation of the improved dispensing apparatus utilizing the improved vertical adjustment means of the present invention.

EXAMPLE ll Using the apparatus of Example 1, fresh water at a temperature of 85F. was added to the dispensing apparatus at the rate of 15 gallons per hour. The magazine was filled with tableted calcium hypochlorite containing 70 percent Ca(OCl) At a control setting of 4, the grid height was about 1.63 inches. The dispensing apparatus was operated for a period of about 5 hours. Four analyses of the treated solution taken at intervals during the period of operation showed an available chlorine concentration from 196 to 256 parts per million was maintained, the average being 242 parts per million.

EXAMLE 111 Using the apparatus of Example 1, fresh water at a temperature of 85F. was fed to the dispensing device at a rate of 7.5 gallons per hour. At a control setting of 6, the grid height was about 1.4 inches. The dispenser was operated for a period of about 4.5 hours. Four analyses of the treated solution taken at intervals during the period of operation showed an available chlorine concentration ranging from 477 to 505 parts per million.

What is claimed is:

1. In an apparatus for dissolving and dispensing soluble solid material including in combination a closed container having an upper chamber and a lower chamber and at least one partition separating said chambers, said upper chamber having a first and a second compartment separated by a divider; an inlet for liquid in the upper part of said first compartment, a rotary receptacle in said first compartment and attachment means therefore comprising a pair of trunnions, said receptacle receiving said liquid from said inlet and upon rotation periodically emptying said receptacle;

first flow control means associated with at least one opening for controlling liquid flow between said first compartment and said second compartment; a magazine in said second compartment to hold soluble solids, said magazine having a pervious lower end permitting said liquid to contact the lower portion of said solids, at least one opening for liquid flow between said second compartment and said lower chamber, an outlet in said lower chamber and second flow control means for liquid flow through said outlet, the improvement which comprises said magazine having vertical adjustment means comprising:

a. a bracket attached to and spaced apart from a wall of said magazine,

b. a an eccentric cam having the configuration of a continuous curve housed in said bracket,

c. a rotary member engaging said cam,

d. said cam frictionally engaging said bracket on said wall of said magazine and upon rotation of said rotary member to control said dissolving of said soluble solids by adjusting the height of said magazine in contact with said liquid.

2. The apparatus of claim 1 in which said cam has the configuration of a continuous curve of from 0 to about 340.

3. The apparatus of claim 1 in which said first flow control means is a cup having a lip of sufiicient diameter to encompass said openings in said first and said second compartment.

4. The apparatus of claim 1 in which said receptacle is a tear drop shaped vessel haaving at least one opening therein.

5. The apparatus of claim 4 in which said partition separating said upper and said lower chambers comprises an inclined section, a substantially vertical section and a substantially horizontal section.

6. The apparatus of claim 5 in which said opening between said second compartment and said lower chamber is comprised of a drain having a liquid retaining dam.

7. The apparatus of claim 6 in which said second flow control means for controlling said outlet is a float valve.

8. The apparatus of claim 7 in which said magazine is removable from said compartment.

9. The apparatus of claim 7 in which said pervious end of said magazine is a grid.

10. The apparatus of claim 8 in which said magazine has a cover comprising a plate having at least one opening, a handle having at least two grips, two latching means for securing said cover to said magazine, one of said latching means being attached to said grips and passing thru said opening, and only one of said grips having releasing means to release said latching means from said magazine.

11. The apparatus of claim 10 in which said handle is attached to said plate by said latching means.

12. The apparatus of claim 7 in which said inlet has control means comprising a flow indicator tube attached to valve means.

13. The apparatus of claim 1 .2 in which said magazine is filled with soluble solids selected from the group consisting of calcium hypochlorite,.dichlorocyanuric acid and alkaline salts thereof, trichlorocyanuric acid and akaline salts thereof, tetrachloroglycoluril, 1,3- dichloro-S,S-dimethylhydantoin, and l-chloro-3- bromo-S,S-dimethylhydantoin.

14. The apparatus of claim 13 in which said soluble solid is calcium hypochlorite.

15. The apparatus of claim 7 in which said magazine is tapered, the cross sectional area at the top being slightly smaller than the cross sectional area at the per-

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4208376 *Mar 13, 1978Jun 17, 1980Olin CorporationWater treatment chemical dispenser with control tube
US4986902 *Jun 29, 1988Jan 22, 1991Societe Nationale Elf Aquitaine (Production)Chlorination system for a water to be treated
US4992208 *Apr 18, 1989Feb 12, 1991Cargill, IncorporatedStabilization of solid sodium chloride against mushing in an aqueous medium
US5218983 *May 4, 1992Jun 15, 1993King Joseph ADispersal valve and canister
US5389344 *Oct 5, 1993Feb 14, 1995Ecolab Inc.For detergents used in laundering, dishwashing and hard floor cleaning; visual indication of concentration setting is provided, with concentration settings corresponding to nozzle to eroding surface distance
US5411716 *Dec 17, 1993May 2, 1995Ecolab Inc.Solid detergent dispenser for floor scrubber machine
US5413280 *Sep 20, 1993May 9, 1995Taylor; William S.Apparatus and method for dissolving and dispensing soluble compounds
US5505915 *Feb 14, 1995Apr 9, 1996Ecolab Inc.To adjust concentration of cleaner
US7014781 *Jul 12, 2005Mar 21, 2006Vanson Halosource, Inc.Methods and articles for maintaining hydantoinylated polymers in a biocidally active state
US8387516 *Nov 6, 2006Mar 5, 2013D. Michael ReynoldsCoffee maker
Classifications
U.S. Classification422/106, 210/167.11, 422/264, 137/268, 239/310, 222/71, 248/157
International ClassificationB01F15/04, E04H4/00, E04H4/12, B01F1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB01F15/045, B01F1/0033, E04H4/1281, C02F2103/42
European ClassificationE04H4/12B, B01F1/00F2B, B01F15/04H3B