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Publication numberUS3871037 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 18, 1975
Filing dateJan 4, 1974
Priority dateJan 4, 1974
Publication numberUS 3871037 A, US 3871037A, US-A-3871037, US3871037 A, US3871037A
InventorsFrederick Lane Willington
Original AssigneeFrederick Lane Willington
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Incontinence pads
US 3871037 A
Abstract
An incontinence pad is made up from several layers. Uppermost is a permeable membrane, followed in descending order by a thin absorbent layer, an impervious layer, a thick absorbent layer and a base impervious layer. The central impervious layer has a window therein to allow the majority of fluid to pass to the thick absorbent layer, which is preferably impregnated with a colloid.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 1 Willington 1 INCONTINENCE PADS [76] inventor: Frederick Lane Willington,

Plas-y-Felin, Cefnpennar, Mountain Ash, Glamorgan, England [22] Filed: Jan. 4, 1974 [2]] Appl. N0.: 430,654

[52] US. Cl. 5/91, 5/92, 5/334 R, 128/287, 128/292 [51] Int. Cl A613 7/02, G6lg 9/00 [58] Field of Search 5/9l 92, 334, 335, 345 R; 128/284, 287, 292, 296

[561 References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2.7853119 3/1957 Walker 5/91 1416522 12/1968 Yeremian 128/296 1 1 Mar. 18, 1975 3,461,872 8/1969 McConnell ct u]. 7. 128/287 3.654929 4/1972 Nilsson et al. 128/287 3.658.064 4/1972 Pociluyko 1 128/287 3.658,065 4/1972 Hirsch 128/296 3,670,345 6/1972 D011 l l l l 5/91 Primary Examiner-Casmir A. Nunberg Attorney, Agenl, 0r Firm-Young and Thompson [57] ABSTRACT 13 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures INCONTINENCE PADS This invention relates to incontinence pads.

An incontinence pad for a patient in bed should have several properties. It must be absorbent for a considerable quantity of liquid, it must not leak, either downwards or sideways and it should prevent as far as possible the discomfort to the patient of sitting or lying in a pool or even on a damp-feeling surface. The first two properties are not too difficult to achieve, but the third one does present problems. No matter how absorbent a material is, when the weight of a human body is placed on it even a small amount of liquid will tend to concentrate or puddle at the pressure area. While there are hydrophobic materials such as polypropylene which, when knitted for example, will pass liquid and continue to feel dry, and highly absorbtive materials of multi-ply absorptive paper or wood pulp, their use in combination cannot alone overcome this puddling problem.

A known incontinence pad which has this defect is shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 of the accompanying drawing, in plan and cross-section respectively. This pad is cut from a roll and comprises an upper permeable layer 1, of paper or man-made fibre, an intermediate absorbent layer 2, of lO-ply crepe absorbent paper for example, and a bottom impervious layer 3, for instance of polythene or polythene and paper. The longitudinal edges of this layer 3 are folded up and inwardly to be bonded to the corresponding edges of the layer 1, so trapping the intermediate layer 2. As well as being subject to the defects noted above, by being cut from a roll the ends are left open and there can be leakages through them.

According to the present invention there is provided an incontinence pad comprising a permeable layer or membrane, normally uppermost, an upper absorbent layer, an upper impervious layer, but with an aperture or window formed therein, the upper absorbent layer not extending over this aperture or window, a lower absorbent layer to which fluid has access through the window and, normally lowermost, a complete impervious layer, the edges of the pad being sealed.

ln a preferred form the scaling is achieved by the edge portions of the bottom impervious layer being folded up and inwardly and bonded over the edge portions of the permeable membrane. The pad is conveniently of rectangular plan form and the window is preferably central of one of the longer sides. lt too may be rectangular or square, although other shapes are quite possible.

ln order to contain the liquid to a greater capacity, to alter its fluidity to a gel, and to abolish the offensive odour of stale warm urine, it is proposed to instill a colloid in the form of cellulose into the absorbent material. This need not be done throughout the pad in order to achieve these advantages but only in a central band spanning the windows at least. The upper absorbent layer, which will generally be thinner than the lower absorbent layer, also need not be so treated. The presence of cellulose also makes the pad more readily combustible, and therefore makes destruction after use easier. It is expected that this pad will lead to a considerable reduction in the frequency of bed soiling. and hence lessen the cost of treatment.

For a better understanding of the invention one constructional form will now be described, by way of example, with reference to the remaining figures of the accompanying drawing, in which:

FIG. 3 is a plan view, partly cut away, of an incontinence pad according to the invention. and

FIG. 4 is a section on the line lV-lV of FIG. 3.

The pad comprises a permeable layer 11 of hydrophobic fabric such as knitted polypropylene, for example, below which are, in order, an upper absorbent layer 12, an intermediate impermeable layer 13, a lower absorbent layer 14 and a bottom impermeable layer 15. The upper layer 12 consists of a few (two or three) layers of absorbent paper and is effective to contain any spillage. The intermediate layer l3 may be of polythene and has a square window l6 cut from the centre of one of the longer sides. This may be 6 by 6 ins., and a typical pad size is 18 X 24 ins. A window of this size is sufficient immediately to pass the urine of an average micturation. The upper layer 12 does not extend over the window and so the urine is not normally absorbed into it but passes directly to the lower absorbent layer 14 which is much thicker than the layer 12 and may be of l0-ply absorptive paper or wood pulp, for example. The permeable layer ll may also be formed with a window overlying the window 16 so that the layer 14 would be exposed over that area. A central band 17 of the layer 14, and of the layer 12 if desired, between the two longer sides and spanning the window 16 is impregnated with a colloid, such as methyl cellulose, which promotes the advantages mentioned above. The bottom impermeable layer may be of non-slip polythene or polythene and paper mixed and its edge portions 18 are folded up and inwardly to be bonded to the edges of layer 11. This seals off all four sides and prevents lateral leakage. The total pad capacity should generally not be less than 500 ml.

When a patient is incontinent, the liquid passes directly to the lower absorbent layer 14 and gradually spreads over the full, or almost full, area of the pad. The pad will be arranged in relation to the patient so that there will be no pressure over the window area and hence no possibility of puddling there. The liquid within the lower layer cannot escape in any quantity, being trapped by the layer 13. Any spillage or seepage through the window 16 is absorbed by the upper layer 12, and there will not be sufficient of that to cause puddling.

1 claim:

1. An incontinence pad comprising a permeable membrane, normally uppermost, an upper absorbent layer, an upper impervious layer, but with a window formed therein, the upper absorbent layer leaving said window exposed, a lower absorbent layer to which fluid has access through said window, a complete impervious layer, normally lowermost, and means sealing the edges of the pad the window being of lesser area than said absorbent layers.

2. A pad as claimed in claim 1, wherein the sealing means comprise edge portions of the bottom impervious layer folded up and inwardly and bonded over the edge portions of the permeable membrane.

3. A pad as claimed in claim 1, wherein the pad is of substantially rectangular plan form.

4. A pad as claimed in claim 3, wherein said window is substantially central of one of the two longer sides.

5. A pad as claimed in claim I, wherein at least the lower absorbant layer has a colloid impregnated therein.

10. A pad as claimed in claim 1, wherein the lower absorbent layer is of plied absorbent paper.

11. A pad as claimed in claim I, wherein the lower absorbent layer is of wood pulp.

12. A pad as claimed in claim 1, wherein said permeable membrane is of hydrophobic fabric.

13. A pad as claimed in claim 12. wherein said permeable membrane is of knitted polypropylene

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2785419 *Oct 2, 1953Mar 19, 1957Walker Lee Roy HRing cushions for use in conjunction with invalid rings
US3416522 *Dec 6, 1966Dec 17, 1968Parke Davis & CoStabilized non-adherent pad
US3461872 *May 17, 1966Aug 19, 1969Scott Paper CoDiaper retaining garment
US3654929 *Nov 9, 1967Apr 11, 1972Svenska Cellulosa AbBody-fluid absorption article
US3658064 *Jan 21, 1971Apr 25, 1972Scott Paper CoDisposable diapers and supporting garment therefor
US3658065 *Jul 14, 1969Apr 25, 1972Weck & Co Inc EdwardBandage having an integral reservoir
US3670345 *Feb 2, 1970Jun 20, 1972Cellu Prod CoPatient underpad
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3952347 *Dec 13, 1973Apr 27, 1976Personal Products CompanyBiodegradable barrier film and absorbent pad utilizing same
US4055184 *May 10, 1976Oct 25, 1977Colgate-Palmolive CompanyAbsorbent pad
US4097943 *Dec 3, 1976Jul 4, 1978Johnson & JohnsonAbsorbent pad
US4589877 *Jun 27, 1985May 20, 1986E. R. Squibb & Sons, Inc.Male incontinence device
US4592751 *Jun 29, 1984Jun 3, 1986E. R. Squibb & Sons, Inc.Incontinence pad
US4643726 *Jun 29, 1984Feb 17, 1987E. R. Squibb & Sons, Inc.Incontinence insert
US4961982 *Mar 15, 1989Oct 9, 1990Standard Textile Company, Inc.Liquid-absorbing pad assembly and method of making same
US5009650 *Aug 6, 1987Apr 23, 1991Kimberly-Clark CorporationAbsorbent structure designed for absorbing body fluids
US5092008 *Apr 6, 1989Mar 3, 1992Esu-Oh Giken Co., Ltd.Absorbent sheet like mat
US5125121 *Sep 10, 1991Jun 30, 1992Wroble Ida BCushion protection system for the incontinent
US5176668 *Sep 19, 1989Jan 5, 1993Kimberly-Clark CorporationAbsorbent structure designed for absorbing body fluids
US5221273 *Mar 28, 1991Jun 22, 1993Medical Disposables CompanyUnderpad
US5304161 *Aug 17, 1992Apr 19, 1994The Procter & Gamble CompanyAbsorbent article having rapid acquiring, multiple layer absorbent core
US5439458 *Aug 18, 1993Aug 8, 1995The Procter & Gamble CompanyAbsorbent article having rapid acquiring, multiple layer absorbent core
US5669895 *Nov 6, 1992Sep 23, 1997The Procter & Gamble CompanyAbsorbent article having rapid distribution strip
US5728084 *Sep 13, 1996Mar 17, 1998The Proctor & Gamble CompanyAbsorbent article with controlled distribution of liquid
US6341393 *Oct 17, 1998Jan 29, 2002Ergodyne CorporationPatient transfer and repositioning system
US6651278 *Oct 12, 2001Nov 25, 2003Darlene Diak GhanemQuick change bedsheet set
US7291763 *Mar 20, 2006Nov 6, 2007The Procter And Gamble CompanyAbsorbent barrier structures having a high convective air flow rate and articles made therefrom
Classifications
U.S. Classification5/500, 604/368, 5/484
International ClassificationA61F13/15, A61F5/48
Cooperative ClassificationA61F13/511, A61F2013/53782, A61F13/534, A61F2013/53445, A61F5/485, A61F13/537
European ClassificationA61F5/48B