Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3871051 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 18, 1975
Filing dateSep 12, 1973
Priority dateSep 12, 1973
Publication numberUS 3871051 A, US 3871051A, US-A-3871051, US3871051 A, US3871051A
InventorsSidney Wellington Collier
Original AssigneeCollier Co Ltd Syd W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Machine for cleaning carpets and the like
US 3871051 A
Abstract
A rug cleaning machine of the type having means for applying cleaning fluid to a rug, means for brushing said rug immediately after application of the cleaning fluid, and means for applying vacuum to the rug immediately after the brushing, characterized in that the means for brushing the rug comprises a rotary brush adjustably movable towards and from the rug pile, and the machine is provided with means for adjusting the brush.
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

O United States Patent 11 1 1111 3,871,051 Collier 1 Mar. 18, 1975 [54] MACHINE FOR CLEANING CARPETS AND 3,402,420 9/1968 Schaeffer .1 15/320 THE I 3,663,984 /1972 Anthony et a1. 15/321 3,699,607 /1972 Putt l5/320 [75] Inventor: Sidney We ingt Co Norval, 3.711391 1/1973 Conway /322 x Ontario Canada FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS [73] Assignee: Syd W. Collier Co. Ltd., 892 658 3/1962 181'. HR Mississauga, Ontario, Canada led l'l I111 1 Filedl 2, 1973 Primary Examiner-Harvey C. Hornsby 2 Appl. 39 547 Assistant Examiner-C. K. Moore 52 US. Cl 15/321, 15/368, 15/415 ABSTRACT [51] Int. Cl A471 7/00 A w l g c eamng machine of the type havmg means for [58] Fleld of Search l5/320, 321, 322, 368, applying cleaning fluid to a rug, means for brushing 15/3721 422 said rug immediately after application of the cleaning fluid, and means for applying vacuum to the rug im- [56] References C'ted mediately after the brushing, characterized in that the U TED STATES PATENTS means for brushing the rug comprises arotary brush 1,711,380 4/1929 Giampolini 15/320 adjustably mo able to ard n ro e ug p e, and 1,752,882 4/1930 Boutwell 15/320 the machine is provided with means for adjusting the 1,975,380 10/1934 Streich et a1 15/320 bru h, 2,893,048 7/1959 Martinecu. 15/422 2,997,730 8/1961 Dierks 15/368 8 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures rrn I 4 1 L///////I/!/:' ,7 23 III l Q l5 1: ,1m\\. 4 I l 1 o *1 1 Ag \ti 5'- i [1! k2... 4 I I l I' l. I 32 2"5 MACHINE FOR CLEANING CARPETS AND THE LIKE I FIELD OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a novel rug and carpet cleaning head or machine for both domestic and commercial application.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION With the increased use of carpeting on floors both in homes and in offices, the problem of keeping the carpets and rugs clean efficiently and inexpensively has been greatly accentuated. In the past, there have been a variety of methods used to clean carpets and rugs which heretofore have proven to be unsatisfactory. Some of these unsatisfactory methods such as using a shampoo and scrubbing were time consuming since it required a number of steps before the cleaning operation was completed. It also left the cleaning solution in the rug to dry which is detrimental to the life of the rug. Other methods were unsatisfactory when used on thick or shag carpets since the dirt at the bottom of the pile would remain essentially untouched while the dirt at v the top was merely washed further down into the pile. Further, these old methods left the rugs and carpets with a shabby appearance and reduced their life expectancy due to the moisture and dirt being left in the pile. With the increased use of rugs and carpets, the need for a better cleaning method has been greatly increased, which need has not been satisfactorily met prior to the present invention.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Accordingly, it is an object of the invention to provide a very efficient cleaning head or machine which applies hot cleaning solution to the rug in a manner to penetrate to the full depth of the rug pile, vigorously brushes the pile irrespective of its depth and vacuums the dirt and moisture (to leave a clean, essentially dry rug) in a single passage of the machine.

It is another object of the invention to provide a brush which is very easily adjusted to suit the height of pile.

It is a further object of the invention to provide jet stream outlet nozzles which provide a predetermined deep penetrating spray pattern over the carpet surface irrespective of the brush adjustment.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the cleaning machine with part of the outer casing cut away to show the brush and pulley arrangement.

FIG. 2 is a bottom perspective view of the cleaning machine showing the relationship between the vacuum nozzle, the reel-type brush and the solution-applying tube and nozzle.

FIG. 3 is a view tak along the line 3 3 of FIG. 2.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS Referring now to the drawings, there is shown a cleaning head or machine generally designated at having a outer casing 11, a handle 12 pivotally connected at 13 at the end 29 of machine 10. Also adjacent end 29 of the machine 10 are wheels 14 for easier manoeuvering and handling of the machine to position the machine for the cleaning operation. At the opposite end 15 of machine 10 is located a narrow elongated vacuum nozzle 16 running the width of the machine. As can be seen from FIG. 3, the nozzle extends below the wheels 14 and brush 21 and is shaped to form a skid on which the free end of the head rides to ensure positive pile penetrating contact with the carpet to maximize the effect of the vacuum. The nozzle has two parallel spaced apart walls 15 and 17 which are joined on three sides to form a chamber and the fourth side which is open forms a narrow elongated opening 18 adjacent the rug. Fitted over opening 18 is a channel shaped nozzle shoe 30 with opening 31 matching opening 18. Shoe 30 is held in place by bolts 32 and is sealed by a silicone sealant to prevent leakage therearound so that the full effect of the vacuum is felt at opening 18. Shoe 30 aids in the smooth passage of the nozzle over the carpet surface as it presses into the pile. Centrally located on the closed side opposite opening 18 is a hose 19 which is in communication with nozzle 16 through which the spent cleaning fluid and dirt is vacuumed into a recovery tank (not shown).

Located in the cavity of outer casing 11 is a platform 20 which is parallel to and spaced apart from the top of outer casing 11. Located on platform 20 is a reeltype brush 21, a motor 22 and belt drive 23 connecting motor 22 and reel-type brush 21.

Platform 20 is pivotally mounted on outer casing 11 by means of pins 26 and the angle at which the platform is positioned with respect to the carpet is determined by adjusting knob 27 which adjusts the tilt of the platform 20 and locks it in place. Thus it can be seen that the reel-type brush 21 may be adjusted to accommodate different thicknesses of carpets and since the reeltype brush 21 and motor 22 are fixed on platform 20, belt 23 will remain taut regardless of the height at which brush 21 is set with respect to the carpet. Platform 20 has an elongated rectangular opening 33 to accommodate cylindrical tube 24 which is mounted on the underside of casing 11. Also located on platform 20 and at one edge of opening 33 is a splash guard 34 which protects the motor 22 from the sprays from outlet nozzles 25 and the brushing action.

Solution-applying cylindrical tube 24 is fixedly mounted on the under side of outer casing 11 and has located thereon spaced apart outlet nozzles 25, each adapted to eject a fine high velocity pile penetrating spray. In mounting the tube 24, brackets 35 are first secured to the outer casing, then tube 24 is adjusted until the sprays from the nozzles form a predetermined pattern, at which time adjusting bolts 36 are tightened. The ideal position is when the spray tangentially contacts the periphery of the brush when the brush is in its lowermost position 37. The spray pattern is such that no liquid is applied beyond the limits of the brush and vacuum nozzle to ensure that no streaking takes place due to the solution being left in the rug. Solutionapplying tube 24 is connected to a pressurized source of cleaning solution by means of inlet tubes 28. As can be seen from FIG. 2, and, more specifically, FIG. 3, the outlet nozzles are arranged to direct their jet spray in diverging directions so that the jets from adjacent nozzles do not interfere with each other. If interference is allowed to take place, the diverging streams will collide with each other, thereby interrupting their velocity and creating excessively wet rug surface areas instead of penetrating uniformly deep into the carpet pile. Again, this would tend to leave streaks in the rug.

be cleaned. To maximize the vacuum pressure, the operator lifts the machine slightly to direct the weight of the machine on the vacuum nozzle which gives a more positive contact between the vacuum nozzle and the carpet. In order to reduce snagging between the sharp edges of the vacuum nozzle and the carpet piles, shoe 30 is fitted over the vacuum nozzle. Located on handle 12 is a trigger mechanism (not shown in the drawings) which controls the flow of pressurized cleaning solution from the storage tank (also not shown) to outlet nozzles 25. Immediately after the application of the hot cleaning solution and as the machine is pulled further along the path, the reel-type brush 21, which is powered by means of motor 22 and drive belt 23, brushes the carpet surface to aid in the extraction of the dirt which is caught in the pile. This brushing action also tends to massage and revitalize the carpet pile to give it a fresh look. As machine is further pulled along the surface being cleaned, vacuum nozzle 16, which is in communication with a vacuum source and recovery tank through nozzle 19, draws up the spent cleaning fluid and dirt. Thus, in one sweep of the cleaning machine the carpet is washed, brushed and vacuumed dry.

While the ebmodiment of the invention has been par ticularly described, it will be understood that variations may be made, as will be apparent to those skilled in the art, without departing from the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A machine for cleaning rugs and the like comprising a horizontal elongated cylindrical tube for applying cleaning fluid to a rug, a reel-type brush parallel to and spaced apart from said cylindrical tube, and driven by a drive belt and a motor for brushing said rug immediately after application of said cleaning fluid, and an intake nozzle in communication with a vacuum source for applying vacuum to said rug immediately after said -brushing, said horizontal elongated cylindrical tube having at least one inlet means in communication with a pressurized cleaning fluid source and a plurality of axially spaced apart outlet means along the side of said tube adjacent said rug, said motor and said brush being mounted on an adjustable platform for adjusting said brush to the thickness of said rug while maintaining the distance between said brush and said motor constant at all times, irrespective of brush adjustment, said tube being fixedly secured at all times, whereby during brush adjustment the distance between horizontal tube and the rug surface remains constant; said platform being mounted on said machine to rotate about a horizontal axis, means for rotating said platform a limited distance about said horizontal axis to effect height adjustment of said brush relative to the rug surface and means for securing the platform in the adjusted position; and intake nozzle having an elongated rectangular intake opening parallel to and spaced apart from said brush and adjacent said rug, said intake nozzle being in communication with a vacuum source.

2. A machine as claimed in claim 1 wherein said outlet means are arranged such that adjoining outlet means provide diverging jet sprays such that the cleaning fluid jet spray from one outlet means does not interfere with the cleaning fluid jet spray from another outlet means while the cleaning fluid is being applied to said rug in a predetermined pattern.

3. A machine as claimed in claim 1 wherein said tube for applying cleaning fluid, said brush and said intake nozzle cover substantially the same width of rug.

4. A machine for cleaning rugs and the like comprising means for applying cleaning fluid to a rug. means for brushing said rug immediately after application of said cleaning fluid, and means for applying vacuum to said rug immediately after said brushing; said means for brushing the rug comprising a motor and a brush which are mounted on an adjustable platform in spaced relation, the distance between said motor and said brush being constant at all times, irrespective of brush adjustment; said brush being adjustable to the thickness of said rug, while the distance between said means for applying cleaning fluid and the rug surface remains constant, said platform being mounted on said machine to rotate about a horizontal axis, means for rotating said platform a limited distance about said horizontal axis to effect height adjustment of said brush relative to the rug surface and means for securing the platform in the adjusted position.

5. A machine as claimed in claim 4 in which said means for applying cleaning fluid comprises a longitudinal hollow bar having a horizontal axis and spaced a predetermined distance from said means for applying vacuum to said rug, said bar having an inlet passage and provided with a plurality of outlet nozzles spaced therealong, said bar being rotatable about its horizontal axis to adjust its spray pattern; said nozzles being arranged so that adjacent nozzles are directed in different radial directions with respect to the axis of said hollow bar.

6. A machine as claimed in claim 4 wherein said means for applying cleaning fluid, means for brushing and means for applying vacuum cover substantially the same widthof rug.

7. A machine as claimed in claim 4 wherein said means for applying cleaning fluid comprises a horizontal elongated cylindrical tube, having at least one inlet means in communication with a pressurized cleaning fluid source and a plurality of axially spaced apart outlet means along the side of said tube adjacent said rug through which said cleaning fluid is applied to said rug; said outlet means being nozzles which are arranged such that adjoining outlet means provide diverging jet sprays in different radial directions with respect to the axis of the tube such that the cleaning fluid jet spray from one outlet means is proximate to the cleaning fluid jet spray from another outlet means without interference between the two jet sprays while the cleaning fluid is being applied to said rug in a predetermined manner.

8. A machine as claimed in claim 4 wherein said means for applying vacuum comprises an intake nozzle having an elongated rectangular intake opening adjacent said rug, said nozzle in communication with a vac-

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1711380 *Feb 4, 1926Apr 30, 1929Giampolini Victor JVacuum washer and cleaner
US1752882 *Jun 29, 1927Apr 1, 1930Boutwell Harry OScrubbing machine
US1975380 *May 31, 1932Oct 2, 1934Schulx Bruno JPortable rug washing and cleaning device
US2893048 *Apr 21, 1955Jul 7, 1959Health Mor IncSuction cleaner nozzle construction for cleaning cotton rugs
US2997730 *Dec 8, 1958Aug 29, 1961Fritz DierksSurface cleaning apparatus for removing old paint coats
US3402420 *Oct 15, 1965Sep 24, 1968Daniel D. SchaefferCarpet cleaning device
US3663984 *Apr 3, 1970May 23, 1972Carpetech CorpPortable vacuum carpet and upholstery cleaning apparatus
US3699607 *Jul 7, 1970Oct 24, 1972Town & Country Cleaners FranchCarpet cleaning apparatus
US3711891 *Aug 3, 1971Jan 23, 1973J ConwayJet-vibrator-vacuum system and method
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4139922 *Aug 19, 1977Feb 20, 1979Chester FitchCarpet cleaning device
US4272861 *Sep 28, 1979Jun 16, 1981Wetrok, Inc.Carpet cleaning device
US4279056 *Nov 30, 1979Jul 21, 1981Crafco, Inc.Pavement joint and crack cleaning machine
US4375117 *Nov 24, 1980Mar 1, 1983Whirlpool CorporationFloor cleaner motor mount
US4392270 *May 11, 1981Jul 12, 1983Magee Enterprises Ltd.Surface cleaning apparatus
US4399577 *Oct 5, 1981Aug 23, 1983Pyle Clayton CMachine for cleaning grating over barn manure trough
US4413372 *Nov 12, 1981Nov 8, 1983Shop-Vac CorporationShoe attachment for wet/dry electric vacuum cleaner
US4475265 *Jun 13, 1983Oct 9, 1984Shop-Vac CorporationShoe attachment for wet/dry electric vacuum cleaner
US4521935 *Aug 29, 1983Jun 11, 1985Container Products Corp.Vacuum spray head
US4577366 *Jun 13, 1984Mar 25, 1986Shop-Vac CorporationVacuum cleaner nozzle having rotating brush
US4633541 *Sep 6, 1984Jan 6, 1987Cooper IndustriesFloor treating machine
US4757566 *Jul 27, 1987Jul 19, 1988Tennant CompanyControl of torque in floor maintenance tools by drive motor load
US5367740 *Jul 21, 1993Nov 29, 1994Mccray; Kimothy R.Hand-held surface cleaning apparatus
US5782415 *Aug 10, 1995Jul 21, 1998Kepiro; JosephFloor washer
US5819370 *Feb 16, 1996Oct 13, 1998Stein & Co. GmbhFloorcare machines such as vacuum cleaners
US6030464 *Jan 28, 1998Feb 29, 2000Azevedo; StevenConcurrently dry brushing and vacuuming the fibrous material upwardly, thereby removing some of the contamination, spraying the fibrous material on its uppermost surface with a cleaning fluid, toweling the fluid onto dry absorbent surface
US6261379 *Jun 1, 1999Jul 17, 2001Fantom Technologies Inc.Floating agitator housing for a vacuum cleaner head
US6263539 *Dec 23, 1999Jul 24, 2001Taf BaigCarpet/floor cleaning wand and machine
US6406514 *Jan 11, 2001Jun 18, 2002Royal Appliance Mfg. Co.Motor holding bracket
US6530117Feb 12, 2001Mar 11, 2003Robert A. PetersonWet vacuum
US7870638 *Dec 18, 2008Jan 18, 2011Bissell Homecare, Inc.Bare floor cleaner with agitator lift
US7967914Aug 12, 2009Jun 28, 2011Tennant CompanyMethod and apparatus for cleaning fabrics, floor coverings, and bare floor surfaces utilizing a soil transfer medium
EP0727171A2 *Nov 14, 1995Aug 21, 1996Stein & Co. GmbHDevice for floor treating machines
WO1981000805A1 *Sep 25, 1980Apr 2, 1981Wetrok IncCarpet cleaning device
WO2005053498A1 *Nov 9, 2004Jun 16, 2005Tennant CoMethod and apparatus for cleaning fabrics, floor coverings, and bare floor surfaces utilizing a soil transfer cleaning medium
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/321, 15/415.1, 15/368
International ClassificationA47L11/20, A47L11/34, A47L9/04
Cooperative ClassificationA47L11/4041, A47L11/34, A47L9/0411, A47L9/0494, A47L11/4088, A47L11/4044, A47L11/20
European ClassificationA47L11/40F4, A47L11/40F6, A47L11/40N6, A47L11/20, A47L11/34, A47L9/04B2, A47L9/04F