Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3871128 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 18, 1975
Filing dateApr 12, 1974
Priority dateApr 12, 1974
Publication numberUS 3871128 A, US 3871128A, US-A-3871128, US3871128 A, US3871128A
InventorsGrooms George V
Original AssigneeAnimal Fair Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Eye construction for soft stuffed toys
US 3871128 A
Abstract
A stuffed figure has its eyes recessed in permanent sockets formed in the covering of the figure. This is accomplished by means of an eye socket simulation inside the covering and a headed eye simulation outside the covering. The socket simulation is outwardly concave and receives a stem extending inward from the eye simulation, which when pressed into the socket simulation through the covering draws the latter into the former to produce a recess which is not filled when the figure is stuffed. An additional disc simulating the sclera of the eye can be held between the enlarged head of the eye simulation, which is representative of the pupil and iris of the eye, and the covering in the socket.
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 1 Grooms [111 3,871,128 51 Mar. 18, 1975 EYE CONSTRUCTION FOR SOFT STUFFED Primary E.\'aminerLouis G. Mancene Assistant Examiner-R. F. Cutting Attorney, Agent, or FirmMerchant, Gould, Smith & Edell [57] ABSTRACT A stuffed figure has its eyes recessed in permanent sockets formed in the covering of the figure. This is accomplished by means of an eye socket simulation inside the covering and a headed eye simulation outside the covering. The socket simulation is outwardly concave and receives a stem extending inward from the eye simulation, which when pressed into the socket simulation through the covering draws the latter into the former to produce a recess which is not filled when the figure is stuffed. An additional disc simulating the sclera of the eye can be held between the enlarged head of the eye simulation, which is representative of the pupil and iris of the eye, and the covering in the socket.

7 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to the general field of toys, and more particularly to stuffed figures. Such figures in the past have had glass eyes secured to the surface of the head by hand sewing methods. These arrangements are not considered completely safe by existing toy-safety regulations, and accepted practice is now to use an unbreakable plastic eye having a portion which extends through the fabric or skin of the figure and is held by a lock washer. The result of this process is an eye lying on the surface of the head or actually protruding from it, which is a highly unnatural appearance.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is a principal object of this invention to provide an improved eye structure for stuffed figures whereby the eye is recessed in a natural appearing socket, which is permanent and does not disappear when the head is stuffed.

Another object of the invention is to provide such an eye structure in which not only the socket, the iris, and the pupil but the sclera as well are simulated with verisimilitude, and which is well adapted to the usual toy making procedures.

A more specific object is to provide an eye structure for a stuffed figure including an outwardly concave socket simulation inside the cover of the figure and an eye simulation outside the covering which includes a stem passing through the covering and the socket simulator to draw the covering into the concavity of the latter.

A further specific object is to provide a structure as just described which includes a sclera simulation between the eye simulation and the covering in the recess.

Various other objects, advantages, and features of novelty which characterize my invention are pointed outwith particularity in the claims annexed hereto and forming a part hereof. However, for a better understanding of the invention, its advantages, and objects attained by its use, reference should be had to the drawing which forms a further part hereof, and to the accompanying descriptive matter, in which there is illustrated and described a preferred embodiment of the invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING In the drawing,

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a portion of a stuffed figure embodying my invention;

FIG. 2 is a partial section along the line 22 of FIG. 1; I

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary view, portions being in section along the line 3-3 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is an exploded view of the eye structure before being assembled;

FIG. 5 is a plan view of a socket simulator; and

FIG. 6 is a section along the line 66 of FIG. 5.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now to the drawing, reference numeral 10 identifies a stuffed figure having my improved eye structure. The figure has a covering or skin 11 of acrylic pile fiber into which a nose and ears of contrast- 2 ing fabric are inserted and maintained in a desired configuration by suitable stuffing 12.

The eye structure 13 of the figure comprises a socket simulation 14 in the form of an outwardly concave cup member 15 having a rolled rim l6, and of elliptical out line, although ovals, circles, and irregular outlines may be used at the will of the designer as suggested by FIGS. 5 and 6.

Simulation 14 is located inside the covering 11 ofthe figure. An eye simulation 20 in the general form of a stud 21 has an enlarged head 22 outside covering 11, and a stem 23 which passes through an opening 24 in covering 11 and an opening 25 in member 15. Opening 25 is slightly smaller than stem 23, and has a plurality of inwardly extending resilient teeth 26, which resiliently pass the stem but firmly grip it after insertion, which is ordinarily accomplished as a machine process. As best seen in FIG. 4, the outer surface of head 21 is representative of the pupil and iris of an eye.

A disc 27 of comparatively stiff, resilient material of light color is apertured at 30 to pass stem 23, so that the disc is firmly held between head 22 and member 15. Disc 27 may be circular or non-circular, and the apertures 24, 25 and 30 may be in the center of the socket or displaced therefrom. I

It will be realized that disc 27 simulates the sclera of the eye, and for some figures may not be desired. In such a case the disc is simply omitted. The head 22 of stud 21 is sufficiently large to contact covering 11 and hold it firmly against member 15, so as to prevent any raveling of the fabric around aperture 24.

In the practice of my invention the eye structures are assembled, with or without the sclera simulation, before the figure is stuffed: the nature of the covering is such that when stud 21 is pressed tightly into member 15 a smooth recess in the covering is produced. Stuffing material is then added to the figure to give the desired outline, and the opening left for stuffing is sewed up to complete the figure.

Numerous objects and advantages of my invention have been set forth in the foregoing description, together with details of the structure and function of the invention, and the novel features thereof are pointed out in the appended claims. The disclosure, however, is illustrative only, and changes may be made in detail especially in matters of shape, size and arrangement of parts, within the principle of the invention, to the full extent indicated by the broad general meaning of the terms in which the appended claims are expressed.

What is claimed is:

1. An eye structure for a stuffed figure having a fabric covering comprising:

an eye simulation comprising a stud member having an enlarged head outside said covering and an inwardly extending stem passing through said covering;

and an eye socket simulation within said covering,

comprising an outwardly concave cup member sized, relative to said head of said eye simulation, in the proportion of an eye socket to an eye, said socket simulation comprising an outwardly concave cup member having means in the bottom thereof for receiving and securing the stem of said eye simulation after it is passed inwardly through said covering so that said enlarged head engages the outside of said covering to draw the latter into 3 4 said cup member; whereby to give the appearance through the cup at a location displaced from the center of an eye naturally located in a recessed socket. th f,

The Structure of claim 1 in which Said P member 5. The structure of claim 3 in which the stem passes has a roller rim rolled is apertured to receive said stem, through the Cup and the disc at locations displaced the aperture being toothed to resiliently pass and grip- 5 from the Centers thereof pmgly hold sald Stem 6. The structure of claim 1 in which said cup member 3. The structure of claim 1 in which said eye simulation further includes a disc of comparatively stiff, resilient material of light color held between said head and said covering within the rim of said cup, to simulate the sclera of the eye. an eye.

4. The structure of claim 1 in which the stem passes is of metal and said stud is of plastic.

stud is outwardly representative of the pupil and iris of 7. The structure of claim 1 in which the head of said

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2763031 *Aug 2, 1952Sep 18, 1956Sun Rubber CoProcess for making hollow articles with inserts
US3482350 *Apr 14, 1964Dec 9, 1969Wolf TobinMovable doll eye including crossed slots carrying rotation causing means
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4233776 *Jun 6, 1978Nov 18, 1980Suzusei Co., Ltd.Artificial eye structure for use in a doll
US4392279 *Sep 14, 1981Jul 12, 1983Mattel, Inc.Self-locking two-part fastener
US4737132 *Feb 24, 1986Apr 12, 1988Ace Premium Co., Ltd.Eyeball device for stuffed toys and dolls
US4798556 *Jul 30, 1986Jan 17, 1989U.S. Creative ConceptsArticle having a changeable-expression face
US5540612 *Feb 7, 1995Jul 30, 1996Mattel, Inc.Simulated eyes for toys having convex lens body
US7641535 *Jul 12, 2006Jan 5, 2010Hasbro, Inc.Artificial eye assemblies
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/372
International ClassificationA63H3/00, A63H3/38
Cooperative ClassificationA63H3/38
European ClassificationA63H3/38