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Publication numberUS3871544 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 18, 1975
Filing dateOct 24, 1972
Priority dateOct 24, 1972
Also published asCA1010821A, CA1010821A1, DE2350973A1, DE2350973C2
Publication numberUS 3871544 A, US 3871544A, US-A-3871544, US3871544 A, US3871544A
InventorsPeyser Harry A
Original AssigneeContinental Can Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Child-proof closure cap
US 3871544 A
Abstract
This disclosure relates to a child-proof, tamper indicating closure having as a conventional component thereof a "U-PRESS-IT" cap formed with an end panel and a peripheral skirt terminating in a locking curl with the peripheral skirt being movable between generally frusto-conical unlocked and generally cylindrical locked positions in a conventional manner, the improvement comprising means for moving the peripheral skirt between the unlocked and locked positions carried by an annular wall in external telescopic relationship to the peripheral skirt, the annular wall further having means for confiningly housing the inner cap in its unlocked position and further including means for retaining the peripheral skirt in the locked position after having been moved thereto by said moving means.
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D United States Patent r1 1 3,871,544

Peyser Mar. 18, 1975 CHILD-PROOF CLOSURE CAP [75] Inventor: Harry A. Peyser, Olympia Fields, 111. [57] ABSTRACT [73] Assignee: Continental can Company, Inc. Th s disclosure relates to a child-proof, tamper indi- New York NY eating closure having as a conventional component thereof a U-PRESS-IT" cap formed with an end [22] Filed: Oct. 24, 1972 panel and a peri heral skirt terminating in a lockin l'hh hlkb' blb g cur wit t e pertp era s trt emg mova e etween [2]] Appl' 300146 generally frusto-conical unlocked and generally cylindrical locked positions in a conventional manner, the [52] US. Cl 215/225, 215/251, 215/272, improvement comprising means for moving the pe- 220/6O A ripheral skirt between the unlocked and locked posi- [51] Int- CI. 365d 55/02, 365d 5/56, 61j /00 tions carried by an annular wall in external telescopic 1 Field 0f Search 15/9, 46 relationship to the peripheral skirt, the annular wall /60 A further having means for confiningly housing the inner 1 cap in its unlocked position and further including [56] References Cited means for retaining the peripheral skirt in the locked UNITED STATES PATENTS position after having been moved thereto by said mov- 1,609,453 12/1926 Atwood v. 215/95 X mg means- 2.347,605 4/1944 Magnesenw 215/95 X The annular wall further includes a panel frangibly 3,718,230 2/1973 James .i 215/9 onnected thereto in overlying relationship to the Primary E.\'aminerGeorge T. Hall Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Diller, Brown, Ramik & Wight inner cap end panel to indicate tampering should the frangible connections be fractured.

3 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures CHILD-PROOF CLOSURE CAP So-called U-PRESS-IT- caps are well known and normally include an end panel and a peripheral skirt terminating in an inwardly directed locking bead, lip, curl or the like. The caps are constructed from resilient metallic material with the peripheral skirt being slit axially to form a plurality of locking lugs or segments. The end panel of the cap in one condition bows convexly outwardly at which time the peripheral skirt is of a generally cylindrical configuration. This is the locked position of the cap when positioned upon an associated container with the locking segments disposed beneath and in locking engagement with a bead of the container finish. In order to remove the cap from the container an axial force is applied against the convex end panel progressively moving the same to a flattened or outwardly opening concave condition at which time the peripheral skirt and particularly the locking segments thereof flex radially outwardly thereby bringing each locking segment out of engagement from beneath the container bead resulting in the eventual release of the closure from the container. In this the unlocked condition of the cap the peripheral skirt is generally of a frusto-conical configuration enlarging in a direction away from the end panel, and this configuration is maintained by the flattened or outwardly opening concave condition of the end panel after the removal of the axial force. In order to reclose the container the cap is re placed upon the container finish and radially inwardly directed pressure is applied against the segments resulting in the return of the cap to its locked condition. In other words, in both the locked and unlocked conditions the cap retains its particular configuration until axial or radial pressure is applied thereto.

U'PRESS'IT caps, as defined above, are essentially child-proof as a child generally does not have the physical power to apply sufficient axial force to depress the end panel to achieve an unlocking of the locking lugs. The brief application of slight pressure may temporarily deflect the locking lugs radially outwardly but to reach the unlocked condition of the cap the axial pressure must be sustained for a sufficient time to result in the flattening or concaving of the cap end panel. Most children simply lack sufficient power, and the physical dexterity or coordination which is required to successfully open such U'PRESS'IT caps.

However, though essentially child-proof such U" PRESS'IT caps have two defects in use, namely, difficulty for an arthritic person, a woman, or the like to reseal the cap after opening because of the manner in which radial forces must be applied to deflect the segments inwardly while at the same maintaining the cap and closure in desired relationship, and secondly, such caps generally pop open upon impact as the normally convex end panel transforms to the planar or concave configuration.

In addition, the conventional U'PRESSIT caps lack means for indicating the surreptitious opening of the container and access to the contents which in many cases is not only undesired but prohibitive particularly in the use of one-way, disposable, or no-return articles. This is particularly true in the pharmaceutical and/or medical fields, and in accordance with this invention tamper-indicating means is provided to indicate the probable or actual removal of the cap.

In keeping with theforegoing, it is a primary object of this invention to provide in combination with a conventional U-PRESS-IT cap an overcap therefor which is child-resistant and tamper-indicating, prevents the cap from opening through impact forces when dropped, and provides means facilitating the locking of the cap to a container finish and particularly the lip thereof by imparting uniform radially inwardly directed forces to the locking segments.

A further object of this invention is to provide means for moving the peripheral skirt and particularly the locking segments thereof radially inwardly from their unlocked to their locked position by relative telescopic motion between the overcap and the U-PRESS'IT or inner cap.

Still another object of this invention is to provide a novel overcap associated with an inner cap in the manner heretofore set forth wherein the overcap includes an annular wall having means for confining housing the inner cap when the latter is in the unlocked position thereof, and the annular wall further including means for retaining the peripheral skirt in its locked position after having been moved thereto by the lattermentioned moving means.

Another object of this invention is to provide a novel overcap in combination with a conventional inner cap wherein the annular wall is spanned by a panel frangibly connected thereto in overlying relationship to the inner cap end panel whereby rupture of the overcap panel indicates tampering of the closure.

With the above and other objects in view that will hereinafter appear, the nature of the invention will be more clearly understood by reference to the following detailed description, the appended claimed subject matter, and the several views illustrated in the accompanying drawing.

IN THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a novel overcap constructed in accordance with this invention, and illustrates the manner in which the same is removed from an associated container finish.

FIG. 2 is an axial sectional view of the overcap of FIG. 1 with the inner cap and container finish being illustrated in side elevation, and illustrates the inner cap in its locked condition and held therein by surface portions of the overcap conformed to portions of the end panel and peripheral skirt.

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary sectional view similar to FIG. 2, but more clearly illustrates the manner in which the peripheral skirt of the inner cap terminates in a plurality of locking segments whose terminal curls lock beneath a lip of the container finish.

FIG. 4 is a sectional view similar to FIG. 3, and illustrates the manner in which forces are applied to the inner cap and the overcap resulting in the unlocking of the locking segments and the subsequent removal of the inner cap and overcap in unison from the container finish.

FIG. 5 is a sectional view similar to FIG. 4 but illustrating the inner cap and overcap removed from the container finish.

Reference is first made to FIGS. 1 and 2 of the drawing in which a container 10 has a neck or finish l1 terminating in a radially outwardly directed lip or bead 12 (FIG. 3). The container is shown being constructed from glass, but the same may be formed of synthetic plastic material, such as polyethylene or similar polymers and copolymers, as well as metal.

A conventional inner cap 13 most commonly known as a U'PRESS'IT cap is illustrated as being attached and locked to the container finish 11 in FIGS. 2 and 3. The inner cap 13 includes an end panel 14 and a peripheral skirt 15 which has a plurality of axial slits 16 resulting in the formation of a plurality of axially extending locking segments 17 each terminating in a radially inwardly upwardly and outwardly directed locking curl 18 (FIG. 3). The inner cap 13 is constructed from resilient metallic material and is so constructed that upon axial pressure being applied against the convex end panel 14 (FIG. 3) the convexity thereof is reduced causing an increase in the diameter resulting in the end panel flattening or becoming slightly concave in an outwardly opening direction whereupon the peripheral skirt which is normally of a generally cylindrical configuration (FIG. 3) is deflected to a generally frusto-conical configuration with the diameter thereof enlarging in a direction away from the end panel 14. Once deflected to the position or condition shown in FIG. 4 the end panel 13 retains such configuration until radially inwardly directed pressure is applied against the peripheral skirt l and particularly the locking segments 17 thereof. In other words, when either is in the position or condition shown in FIG. 3 (locked condition) it will be self-retained in this condition and likewise when in the condition (unlocked) of the inner cap 13 shown in FIG. 4 the same will likewise be self-retaining.

An overcap, generally designated by the reference numeral 20 includes an annular wall 21 flared radially outwardly at 22 to facilitate the gripping of the overcap 20 during capping and uncapping operations, as will be described more fully hereinafter. The annular wall 21 includes from bottom-to-top a frusto-conical surface 23, a generally cylindrical surface 24, an annular upwardly facing surface 25, a circumferential surface 26, a generally annular nose or shoulder 27, and a curved surface 28.

The frusto-conical surface 23 tapers upwardly and inwardly as viewed in FIGS. 2through 5 of the drawing and as such facilitates the introduction of the inner can 13 into the overcap 20 by relative telescopic motion therebetween. During such motion the thinnest wall portion as defined by the surface 26 and the exterior surface (unnumbered) of the overcap 20 permit outward deflection such that the peripheral skirt will pass beyond the surface 24 when in the locked position, it being noted that in the latter condition the exterior diameter of the peripheral skirt 15 is slightly greater than the diameter of the circumferential surface 24. The latter dimensional relationship is best illustrated in FIG. 3. Thus, whether in its locked or unlocked condition the inner cap 13 cannot be accidentally and/or inadvertently removed from the overcap since such movement is opposed by the annular upwardly facing surface 25.

The lower surface (unnumbered) forming the nose 27, the surface 26, and the surface 25 constitute an inwardly opening circumferential chamber (unnumbered) confiningly housing the inner cap 13 in the overcap 20 when the inner cap is in its unlocked condition, as shown in FIG. 4.

The annular nose 27 constitutes means for moving the peripheral skirt l5 and particularly the locking segments 17 thereof from the unlocked condition (FIG. 4) to the locked condition (FIG. 3) upondownward axial movement of the overcap 20 in the manner clearly evident between the latter-mentioned figures.

Finally, the surface 28 constitutes means conforming to portions of the inner cap end wall 14 and the peripheral skirt 15 for retaining the peripheral skirt l5 and particularly the locking segments l7, 17 in the locked condition thereof shown in FIG. 3.

The final feature of the overcap 20 is that of a central generally circular panel 30 which is integrally formed with the annular wall 21 and is connected thereto by frangible webs 31 spaced from each other by slots 32. The fracture or rupture of any of the webs 31 indicates the possibility of tampering to the extent of the inner cap having at least once been removed with access to the contents being achieved thereby.

The operation of the invention will be described by first assuming that the components are in the position shown in FIG. 2, namely, the inner cap 13 is fully seated upon the container finish 11 with the locking curl 18 of the locking segments 17 being locked beneath the finish lip 12 and being retained thereat by the seating of the end panel 14 and the peripheral skirt 15 against the like-contoured surface 28.

In order to gain access to the contents of the container 10 the frangible webs 31 are broken by, for example, inserting a knife, spoon or similar tool into the slot or slots 32 and imparting an upward prying movement. The rupture of anyone web 31 or the total removal of the panel 30 is a tamper-indicating feature of the invention, but when used in a permissible manner, the removal of the panel 30 forms an access opening 0 (FIG. 3) into which can be inserted the thumb T (FIG. 1) of a person whose index and next finger underlie in an upwardly facing manner the flared portion 22 of the overcap 20. While applying upward force with the index and adjacent finger to control the position of the overcap relative to the container 10 the thumb T is depressed against the end panel 14 of the inner cap 13 resulting in the performance of the two stages shown in FIG. 4. The first stage opening is that of the axial force applied to the end panel 14 causing little if any deflection thereof and instead the overcap 20 is drawn upwardly with the surface 28 continuously moving away from the inner cap 13. Eventually there is a complete removal of the inner cap 13 from the area defined by the surface 28 and upon continued application of forces in the manner graphically illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 4 the end panel 14 will be deflected from its convex configuration (FIG. 3) to a flat or generally shallow upwardly opening concave configuration (FIG. 4) during which the locking lugs 17 progressively move radially outwardly until reaching the position shown in FIG. 4. At this point the inherent nature of the inner cap precludes the locking segments 17 from rebounding and the elements shown in FIG. 4 maintain the configuration shown until the overcap 20 with the inner cap confined therein are removed from the container finish, in the manner shown in FIG. 5. Thereafter the contents of the container 10 may be used as seen fit and the container closed by reversing the operation just described. In so doing the overcap 20 and the inner cap 13 when in the relative relationship illustrated in FIG. 5 are merely moved axially downwardly until eventually the position shown in FIG. 4 is reached, after which continued downward motion of the overcap 20 results in the nose 27 acting against the unlocking segments 17 until the same cause the locking curls 18 to snap beneath the lip 12 of the finish 11 and the end panel 14 again achieving its convex configuration (FIG. 3).

From the foregoing it will be noted that the panel 30 not only serves as a tamper-indicating feature, but also creates the opening 0 for applying a force to the end panel 14 in the manner heretofore described. It is, of course, considered within the scope of this invention to totally eliminate the tamper-indicating feature by simply eliminating the panel 30 and the thin frangible connecting webs 31.

In addition to achieving the tamper-indicating feature just described, opening is performed simply by the use of the thumb and two fingers with manual dexterity or coordination being relatively negligible since the forces are distributed relatively uniformly over the inner cap 13 and the overcap by the very design thereof. Likewise, the closing operation is quite similar since the nose 27 acts against all segments 17 substantially equally.

While preferred forms and arrangements of parts have been shown in illustrating the invention, it is to be clearly understood that various changes in detail and arrangement of parts may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the disclosure.

I claim:

l. A closure comprising an inner-cap defined by an end panel and depending peripheral skirt terminating in means for releasable clamping securement to a container, said peripheral skirt being deflectable between an unlocked position at which the peripheral skirt is of a generally frusto-conical condition enlarging in a direction away from said end panel and a locked position at which the diameter of the peripheral skirt is lessened as compared to its maximum in said frusto-conical condition, means for moving said peripheral skirt from said unlocked to said locked position, said moving means being carried by a annular wall in external telescopic relationship to said peripheral skirt, said annular wall 6 having confining means for entirely confiningly housing said inner-can within the axial length of said annular wall in said unlocked position, said confining means also constituting means for contact with said inner cap to aid positively in the urging of said inner-cap into said unlocked position during the raising of said cap from said container, and said annular wall further including means for retaining said peripheral skirt in said locked position after having been moved thereto by said moving means.

2. A closure comprising an inner-cap defined by an end panel and a depending peripheral skirt terminating in means for releasable clamping securement to a container, said peripheral skirt being defectable between an unlocked position at which the peripheral skirt is of a generally frusto-conical condition enlarging in a direction away from said end panel and a locked position at which the diameter of the peripheral skirt is lessened as compared to its maximum in said frusto-conical condition, a one-piece plastic over cap defined by an end panel and an annular wall, means for moving said peripheral skirt from an unlocked to said locked position, said moving means being carried by said annular wall in external telescopic relationship to said peripheral skirt, said annular wall having confining means for confiningly housing said inner-cap in said unlocked posi' tion, said annular wall further including means for retaining said peripheral skirt in said locked position after having been moved thereto by said moving means, and said over cap end panel including a plastic panel frangibly connected to said annular wall in overlying relationship to said inner cap end panel.

3. The closure as defined in claim 2 wherein said confining means also constitutes means for aiding positively in the urging of said inner-cap into said unlocked position during the raising of said cap from said con-

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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US2347605 *Apr 18, 1940Apr 25, 1944Magnesen Charles DClosure for bottles, jars, and similar containers
US3718230 *May 13, 1971Feb 27, 1973Quartz Investments LtdChild-proof containers
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4068696 *Nov 19, 1976Jan 17, 1978Baxter Travenol Laboratories, Inc.Supplemental additive indication cap for containers and the like having auxiliary sleeve
US4157762 *Dec 2, 1977Jun 12, 1979Imperial Chemical Industries LimitedOpen-mouth containers
US4157766 *Jul 18, 1978Jun 12, 1979Blau Kg Fabrik Fur KraftfahrzeugteileArrangement for cap-like closure covers
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US7918359May 10, 2007Apr 5, 2011Crown, Packaging Technology, Inc.Opening device
US8231020Jul 31, 2012Silgan White Cap LLCImpact resistant closure
US8240498Oct 31, 2006Aug 14, 2012Crown Packaging Technology, Inc.Resealable closure
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US8360256Mar 23, 2007Jan 29, 2013Packaging Innovation LimitedStorage and drinking container having cap and retaining ring
US8584877 *Nov 15, 2010Nov 19, 2013Rev 8 Inc.Pour cap for fluid containers having open or closed position communication structure with sound and visual features
US8672158Jun 27, 2012Mar 18, 2014Silgan White Cap LLCImpact resistant closure
US8833585May 22, 2009Sep 16, 2014Crown Packaging Technology, Inc.Resealable beverage can ends
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US20060124501 *Sep 23, 2005Jun 15, 2006Mcneely KevinDosage reminder cap
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US20070262079 *May 10, 2007Nov 15, 2007Alexandre ParisOpening device
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US20090179033 *May 8, 2007Jul 16, 2009Crown Packaging Technology , Inc.Can opening device
US20100200535 *Oct 18, 2007Aug 12, 2010D Angelico AngeloContainer closure comprising a sound producer
US20100294768 *May 22, 2009Nov 25, 2010Crown Packaging Technology, Inc.resealable beverage can ends
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USD633386Mar 1, 2011Silgan White Cap LLCClosure
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Classifications
U.S. Classification215/225, 215/272, 215/251
International ClassificationB65D50/04, B65D50/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65D50/045
European ClassificationB65D50/04F