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Publication numberUS3871557 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 18, 1975
Filing dateAug 2, 1973
Priority dateAug 2, 1973
Also published asCA1038621A1, DE2436887A1, DE2436887B2, DE2436887C3
Publication numberUS 3871557 A, US 3871557A, US-A-3871557, US3871557 A, US3871557A
InventorsSmrt Thomas J
Original AssigneeSmrt Thomas John
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Spraying apparatus
US 3871557 A
Abstract
A compact spraying apparatus for spraying the contents of aerosol spray cans includes an elongated frame having a spraying end and a handle end. The spraying end is equipped with wheels which permits the spraying end to be rolled over the surface to be sprayed, and the spraying end is provided with a spraying enclosure which moves over the surface to protect the spray from wind. An aerosol spray can is mounted in the frame with its valve within the spraying enclosure. The valve is maintained stationery, and the can is mounted for pivotal movement about the valve to permit the valve to be opened when the can is moved laterally relative thereto. The can is maintained in a non-actuated position by an elastic band, and the can can be pivoted into a acuated position in which the valve is opened by an elongated filament which extends through a portion of the periphery of the can so that tensioning the filament pivots the can.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Smrt [ Mar. 18, 1975 1 SPRAYING APPARATUS [76] Inventor: Thomas J. Smrt, 31 W. 300 West Bartlett Rd, Bartlett, 111. 60103 [22] Filed: Aug. 2, 1973 [21] Appl. No; 385,168

[52] U.S. Cl 222/162, 222/176, 222/191, 239/150 [51] Int. Cl B67d 5/64 [58] Field of Search 222/176, 174,470,471, 222/472, 473, 474, 183, 394, 402.15, 177, 160, 162, 164, 191; 239/150, 146, 286, 578; 280/472 {56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 506,312 10/1893 Fleming et a1. 222/174 X 2,602,700 7/1952 Ryan 222/162 2,602,700 7/1962 Ryan 222/304 X 2,812,211 11/1957 Gardner 239/150 3,017,056 l/l962 Bishop 222/164 3,127,065 3/1964 Stevensonm. 222/182 X 3,247,655 4/1966 Jacob 222/162 X 3,254,803 6/1966 Meshberg 222/183 X 3,473,700 10/1969 Batistelli 222/174 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 1,400,446 4/1965 France 239/150 512,279 12/1952 Belgium ..280/47.2

Primary E.\aminer-Robert B. Reeves Assistant E.\'aminer--Charles A. Marmor [57] ABSTRACT A compact spraying apparatus for spraying the contents of aerosol spray cans includes an elongated frame having a spraying end and a handle end. The spraying end is equipped with wheels which permits the spraying end to be rolled over the surface to be sprayed, and the spraying end is provided with a spraying enclosure which moves over the surface to protect the spray from wind. An aerosol spray can is mounted in the frame with its valve within the spraying enclosure. The valve is maintained stationery, and the can is mounted for pivotal movement about the valve to permit the valve to be opened when the can is moved laterally relative thereto. The can is maintained in a non-actuated position by an elastic band, and the can can be pivoted into a acuated position in which the valve is opened by an elongated filament which ex tends through a portion of the periphery of the can so that tensioning the filament pivots the can.

2 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures SHEEI 2 0f 2 FIG. 4

FIGS

SPRAYING APPARATUS BACKGROUND This invention relates to a spraying apparatus, and more particularly, to a spraying apparatus for spraying the contents of an aerosol can over a surface to be sprayed or marked, such as pavement, athletic fields, and the like.

The spraying apparatus described herein is a modification of the apparatus described in my prior US. Pat. No. 3,700,144, issued Oct. 24, 1972. As explained in my patent, it is often desirable to apply an indicating line or stripe to a surface. For example, stripes may be applied to a pavement to indicate parking spaces, directional signals, etc., to floors to indicate walkways, to athletic fields to indicate out-of-bounds, goals, etc, and to other surfaces. Such spraying devices can also be used to apply materials other than marking material, for, e.g., herbicide, insecticide, etc.

It is desirable that spraying devices used for these purposes be relatively economical, easy to operate and accurate. In many cases the stripe should extend right up to an obstacle, such as a wall, a parking barricade, heavy machinery or the like, and it is desirable that the spraying device be capable of spraying a strip in a continuous line right up to or adjacent such an article.

Many marking devices are operated out of doors, for example, when marking a parking plant or parking lot or when spraying herbicide, and wind conditions are often such that the sprayed material is blown by the wind it is sprayed toward the surface so that the resulting stripe is uneven and ragged.

SUMMARY The invention provides an economical, compact spraying apparatus which may be wheeled over the surface to be sprayed so that a sprayed strip can be made right up to or adjacent an obstacle in front of the apparatus. The apparatus is equipped with a wind screen or spraying enclosure which is positioned slightly above the surface to protect the sprayed material from wind as it is sprayed toward the surface. The apparatus has wheels to support the apparatus on the surface which is to be sprayed, and the wheels are movable from a use position in which the wind screen is supported adjacent the surface to a storage position which permits the apparatus to be stored in a compact manner. The apparatus utilizes an aerosol spray can, and the can is actuated by a filament which extends around a portion of the perfiphery of the can to the handle portion of the apparatus so that the can can be pivoted by pulling the filament which with one or more fingers as the apparatus is pushed. An elastic band resiliently urges the can to return to the non-actuated position so that spraying is stopped when the tension on the filament is released. The apparatus is extremely simple and economical and has a minimum of parts which require maintainence or replacement.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING The invention will be explained in conjunction with an illustrative embodiment shown in the accompanying drawing, in which:

FIG. 1 is a rear perspective view of the spraying apparatus with the rear wheels in the use position;

FIG. 2 is a front perspective view of the apparatus with the wheels in the storage position;

FIG. 3 is an elevational sectional view showing the spraying container in the non-actuated position and the wheels in the storage position;

FIG. 4 is an elevational sectional view showing the wheels in the use position and the can in the spraying or actuated position; and

FIG. 5 is a sectional view taken along the lines of 5-5 of FIG. 4.

DESCRIPTION OF SPECIFIC EMBODIMENT Referring to the drawing, the numeral 10 designates generally a spraying apparatus which includes an elongated frame 11 having a spraying end 12 and a handle end 13. Two pairs 14 and 15 of wheels permit the frame to be pushed over the surface which is to be sprayed, and the frame holds an aerosol can 16 in position for spraying the contents thereof onto the surface.

The frame can advantageously be formed of from two parts, a generally channel-shaped body 18 and a generally L-shaped panel 19, each of which can be molded from plastic in a two part mold. The body 18 includes a front Wall 20, a pair of side walls 21 and 22, and a top end wall 23. The side walls 21 and 22 include laterally outwardly flared portions 24 and 25, respectively, adjacent the spraying end of the frame and end portions 26 and 27 which extend parallel to the portions of the side walls above the flared portions.

The front wheels 14 are mounted on an axle 29 which extends through the end portions 26 and 27 of the side walls, and the wheels 15 are mounted on a generally U- shaped rod frame 30 for movement between a use position illustrated in FIG. 1 and a storage position illustrated in FIG. 2. The rod frame 30 includes an axle por tion 31 which rotatably supports the wheels 15 and a pair of arm portions 32 and 33, each of which terminate in an inwardly extending end portion 34.

Each of the inwardly turned end portions 34 is rotatably received in an opening provided in the outwardly flared portions 24 and 25 ofthe side walls of the frame. and when the rod frame 30 is in the storage position illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3, the axle portion 31 thereof is positioned within notches 35 which are provided in the side walls 21 and 22. Each of the notches 35 has a restricted mouth portion having a width slightly less than the diameter of the axle portion 31 of the rod frame which retains the rod frame within the notch. When the rod frame is to be moved to the use position, the axle portion can be removed from the notches by exerting a slight pulling force on the axle portion sufficient to overcome the frictional retention provided by the mouth portion of the notches.

Each of the outwardly flared portions 24 and 24 of the side walls of the frame is provided with a pair of spaced-apart outwardly extending ribs 36 and 37, and the arm portions of 32 and 33 of the rod frame are releasably secured in the use position by the ribs. The arm portions can be inserted between the ribs by withdrawing the inwardly turned end portions 34 sufficiently from the side walls of the frame to permit each arm portion to pass over the upper rib. Thereafter, the tension on the arm portions can be released and the arm portions can be snapped into place between the ribs, which frictionally retain the arm portions. The length of the inwardly turned end portions 34 ofthe rod frame permits sufficient withdrawal of the end portions to permit the arm portions to be inserted between the ribs without having the portions completely withdrawn from the side walls of the drame.

The front wall of the frame extends or rearwardly above the outwardly flared portions of the side walls to provide upper and lower can-positioning or bumper walls and 41 (FIGS. 3 and 4). Each of these walls is provided with an arcuate recess 42 (FIG. '5) therein, and the walls 40 and 41 are joined by longitudally extending side walls 43 and 44 and end walls 45 and 46 which extend from the rear ends of the side walls 43 and 44 to the arcuate recess 42. The walls 40 and 41 are not joined along the periphery of the arcuate recesses so that a slot is provided through the frame therebetween.

The front wall of the frame extends inwardly again below the can-positioning walls 40 and 41 to provide rearwardly extending walls 48 and 49 and a laterally extending end wall 50 which provides an abutment or bumper for the valve of the aerosol can as will be explained more fully hereinafter.

The L-shaped panel 19 of the frame includes a top wall 51 and a rear wall 52 which extends at an obtuse angle from the top wall 51. The rear edges of the side walls 21 and 22 of the frame extend rearwardly adjacent the rear portion 52 of the panel 19, and the panel 19 cooperates with the body 18 to provide a spraying enclosure or chamber. The forward end of the top wall 51 of the panel is supported by a shoulder 53 (FIG. 4) provided by the inwardly extending wall 48 of the frame, and the panel can be suitably secured to the side walls of the frame as by adhesive, heat welding, and the like.

The aerosol can 16 is conventional and includes a cylindrical body 54 and a dome-shaped top 55. The dome-shaped top of the can is rotatably received in a circular opening 56 formed in the top wall 51 of the panel 19, and the radius of the opening 56 is less than that of the dome top so that the cylindrical body of the can is spaced above the top wall 51 sufficiently to permit the can to pivot from the non-actuated position illustrated in FIG. 3 in which the axis of the can extends parallel to the front wall of the frame to the actuated position illustrated in FIG. 4 in which the axis of the can extends angularly with respect to the front wall of the frame.

The arcuate recesses 42 in the can-positioning walls 40 and 41 have a radius substantially the same as the radius of the cylindrical body of the can and the can is normally maintained in the non-actuated position of FIG. 3 by an elastic band or strap 58 which extends between the side walls of the frame 'above the canpositioning wall 40. The elastic band 58 can be secured to the side walls of the frame by passing the ends of the band through openings in the side walls and fastening anchors 59 thereto which prevent the ends of the band from being drawn through the openings.

The aerosol can is equipped with a conventional valve which includes a valve stem 60 and a spray nozzle 61. The valve is of the type which is open when the valve stem is moved laterally with respect to the axis of the can, and when the can is in the non-actuated position of FIG. 3, the spray nozzle engages the bumper 50, and the valve stem is aligned with the axis of the can so that the valve is closed. The can is normally maintained in the non-actuated position by the elastic band 58 which provides a forward force on the upper end of the can which tends to maintain the can within the arcuate recesses 42 of the can-positioning walls 40 and 41.

A hand-gripping recess 63 is provided adjacent the upper end of the frame by rearwardly extending upper and lower walls 64 and 65 which extend inwardly from the front wall 20, a rear wall 66, and side walls 67 and 68. The bottom wall 65 includes a U-shaped central portion 69 which extends upwardly from the remainder of bottom wall.

The can is moved from the non-actuated position of FIG. '3 to the actuated position of FIG. 4 by the cord or filament 17. The particular filament illustrated is in the form of an elongated endless cord which extends inwardly through openings provided in the side walls 43 and 44 which extend between the can-positioning walls 40 and 41 and around approximately one-half of the perifphery of the can when the can is positioned in the arcuate recesses 42. The cord extends upwardly from the side walls 43 and 44 and extends through openings provided in the side walls 67 and 68 of the fingergripping recess and through the raised central portion 69 of the bottom wall 65.

Referring to FIG. 2, the portions of the filament between the side walls 67 and 68 of the finger-gripping recess are spaced from the bottom wall 65, and one or more fingers can be inserted between the filament and the bottom wall 65 on one or both sides of the raised central portion 69. When an upward force is exterted on the filament by the fingers, the portion of the filament which extends around the periphery of the can is pulled through the openings in the side walls 43 and 44, and the tensioning of the filament between the side walls forces away from the arcuate recesses 42 against the resilient bias of the elastic band 58. The dome top of the can is rotatably mounted within the circular opening in the top wall 51 of the panel 19, and the force exerted on the can by tensioned filament pivots the can rearwardly. However, the spray nozzle 61 is prevented from pivoting with the can by the bumper 50, and the valve stem 60 is thereby moved laterally with respect to the axis of the can to open the valve and to permit the contents of the can to be sprayed. The can does not include a dip tube, and when the can is inverted as illustrated the propellant within the can sprays the contents of the can when the valve is opened.

When the upward force on the filament is released, the can will be returned to the non-actuated position by the elastic band 58 and the valve will be close.

When the wheels 15 are in the use position, the bottom edge 70 of the frame extends generally parallel to the surface S (FIG. 4) which is to be sprayed. The lower portion of the body 18 of the frame and the panel 19 provide a wind screen to protect the sprayed material from the wind, and the wheels 14 and 15 are advantageously located on the frame so that the lower edge 70 thereof will be positioned just slightly above the surface which is being sprayed to minimize the possibility that the wind will affect the spray before it reaches the surface. The frame is supported in an inclined position relative to the vertical when the wheels are in the use position, and the wheels 14 are positioned rearwardly of the fromt wall 20 of the frame so that the bottom edge of the front wall can be wheeled directly up to a wall or other obstacle in front of the spraying apparatus. The bumper 50 and the can-positioning opening 56 in the panel 19 can be positioned relative to the bottom edge of the front wall so that the contents of the can will be sprayed onto the surface just below the bottom edge of the front wall. This permits the contents of the can to be sprayed very close to an obstacle in front of the frame.

The spraying apparatus can be wheeled over the surface to be sprayed by gripping the upper end of the fram with one hand so that the fingers extend into the recess 63. When the can is to be sprayed, one or more fingers can pull the filament upwardly while the frame is qon nu to 29 YlClIEQlF IQYQ t e s ies Although I have described the elastic band as providing the return means for returning the can from the actuating position to the non-actuating position, other forms of spring means can be used to provide the desired resilent bias on the can. The filament 17 is advantageously formed of relatively inelastic material. While I have described the filament as extending upwardly from both of the side walls 43 and 44, the filament can be secured to one of these side walls and extend upwardly from only the other side wall and be suitably anchored at the upper end of the frame.

While in the foregoing specifications a detailed description ofa specific embodiment ofthe invention was set forth for the purpose of illustration, it is to be understood that many of the details herein given may be veried considerably by those skilled in the art without de' parting from the spirit and the scope of the invention.

I claim:

1. A spraying apparatus comprising a valve-equipped aerosol can having contents to be sprayed and an elongated frame having a spraying end and a handle end, holding means on the frame pivotally mounting the can for pivotal movement between an actuated position and a non-actuated position, the holding means including arcuately extending bumper means receiving the can in the non-actuated position and having a pair of side walls, valve abutment means on the frame engaging the valve of the can, the valve being of the type which is opened by lateral movement of the valve relative to the can whereby pivoting movement of the can from the non-actuated position to the actuated position opens the valve, a cord mounted on the frame and extending arcuately around a portion of the periphery of the can between the side walls of the bumper means when the can is in the non-actuated position, the cord extending from the can through each of the side walls to the handle end of the frame, tensioning of the cord at the handle end causing straightening of the cord between the side walls of the bumper means and causing pivoting of the can relative to the valve from the nonactuated position to the actuated position to open the valve, resilient return means mounted on the frame and engaging the can and urging the can into the nonactuated position, a casing portion surrounding the valve abutment means and providing a spraying chamber, the casing portion extending adjacent the surface to be sprayed whereby the contents being sprayed are protected from the wind, and wheels mounted on the frame for supporting the casing portion adjacent the surface to be sprayed.

2. The apparatus of claim 1 in which the wheels include a first pair of wheels rotatably mounted on the spraying end of the frame and a second pair of wheels rotatably mounted on a wheel frame movably mounted on the frame for movement between a storage position and a use position in which the first and second pairs of wheels support the casing portion adjacent the surface to be sprayed.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification222/162, 222/609, 239/150, 222/191
International ClassificationE01C23/00, B05B9/08, B05B9/04, B65D83/16, E01C23/22
Cooperative ClassificationB65D83/203, B05B9/0805, B65D83/267, E01C23/227
European ClassificationB65D83/26D, B65D83/20B2B, E01C23/22E, B05B9/08A
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jan 25, 1990ASAssignment
Owner name: FOX VALLEY MARKETING SYSTEMS, INC.,
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:SMRT, THOMAS J.;REEL/FRAME:005238/0213
Effective date: 19881116