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Publication numberUS3872021 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 18, 1975
Filing dateNov 13, 1972
Priority dateNov 13, 1972
Publication numberUS 3872021 A, US 3872021A, US-A-3872021, US3872021 A, US3872021A
InventorsMcknight Audrey M
Original AssigneeMcknight Audrey M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cleaning composition
US 3872021 A
Abstract
A dry cleaning pre-spotter composition including soap, anionic and nonionic detergents, and organic dry cleaning solvents.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Siam 1191 1111 3,872,021 McKnight Mar. 18, 1975 [5 CLEANING COMPOSITION 3,272,754 9/1966 Jaccard 252/559 3,630,935 12/1971 Potter 252/170 X 176] Inventor (key McKmght 3524 East 3,642,644 2/1972 01016 Eta] 252/170 x Avenue R, 96, Palmdale, Callf- 3,655,572 4/1972 Straus 252/558 x 93550 3,689,211 9/1972 Giz mpalmi et a1 252/170 x Filed: Nov. 1972 3,776,693 12/1973 Smith et a] 252/170 X 21 Appl. No.1 305,931

Primary ExaminerStephen J. Lechert, Jr. [52] US. Cl 252/121, 252/122, 252/126, 252/127, 252/170, 252/172, 252/173, 252/558, 252/559 51 Int. Cl ..Cl1d 9/32 1571 ABSTRACT [58] Field of Search 252/121, 127, 122, 126,

252/558, 559, 170, 172, 173 A dry. cleaning pre-spotter composition including soap, anionic and nonionic detergents. and organic [56] References Cited dry cleaning solvents.

UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,222,286 12/1965 Barnes 252/559 5 Claims, N0 Drawings CLEANING COMPOSITION This invention relates to a dry cleaning pre-spotter formulation for treating textile materials before they are subjected to conventional dry cleaning operations.

Previously, considerable difficulty had been experienced in providing a pre-spotting formulation that will effectively remove a wide spectrum of spots from textile materials. Such spots on textile materials may be formed by paints, greases, oils, beverages, inks, chemicals, and the like. All of these stains may be found on one garment or in a random sampling of garments that come through a dry cleaning establishment during the course of a day. It is very difficult to determine in some instances precisely what the stain on the textile was caused by. If pre-spotting agents are used that are effective against one stain but are not effective in removing other types of stains, there is a risk that the wrong cleaner will be used, and the stain will remain or, worse, it will be fixed in place so that it will be impossible to remove it. There is a need for a universal prespotting composition.

According to the present invention, a substantially universal pre-spotting composition for use in dry cleaning is provided.

The pre-spotting composition of this invention is an admixture including a liquified soap, an anionic synthetic detergent, a nonionic detergent, and certain organic solvents.

The vehicle for providing the composition in an homogeneous liquid admixture is a conventional dry cleaning solvent; such as, the petroleum distillate solvents identified as Stoddards solvent or 140 Fahrenheit solvent or the chlorinated solvents; such as, carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethylene, and perchloroethylene. The chlorinated solvents are preferred, and perchloroethylene is the most preferred solvent vehicle.

The pre-spotting composition includes a substantial proportion of an amyl acetate which is an effective solvent for a wide variety of organic materials that frequently occur in spots on textiles.

The soaps that are suitable for use in this composition are conventional soaps that are used as dry cleaning detergents, including generally the sodium, ammonium, and potassium salts of fatty acids containing from 12 to 18 carbon atoms. Typical soaps include sodium, potassium, and ammonium stearate; sodium, potassium, and ammonium palmitate; sodium, potassium, and ammonium oleate; sodium, ammonium, and potassium abietate; sodium, potassium, and ammonium ricinoleate; and the like. Also, the soap must be liquified in order to be incorporated in the pre-spotting composition. Conventional liquification procedures are employed and include, for example, admixing the soap with an organic solvent, a coupling agent, and water. As used herein, the term soap is intended to refer to the liquified sodium, potassium, and ammonium salts of the fatty acids containing from about 12 to 18 carbon atoms.

Synthetic anionic detergents that are suitable for inclusion in the pre-spotting composition of this invention include the sodium, potassium, and ammonium salts ofthe alkyl aryl sulfonates in which the aryl group is generally benzene, and the alkyl group contains about to I5 carbon atoms. As used herein, the term anionic alkyl benzene sulfonate is intended to include the compounds wherein the cation is sodium, potassium, or ammonia, and the alkyl group contains about 10 to 15 carbon atoms.

Additional components of the pre-spotting composition include nonionic synthetic detergents; such as, fatty acid-alkanolamine condensates formed by condensing fatty acids with amines, such as diethanolamine; ethylene oxide-fatty acid condensate formed by the condensation of from about 12 to 15 mols of ethylene oxide with 1 mol of a fatty acid; and alkyl aryl polyether alcohols formed by the condensation of from about 9 to 12 mols of ethylene oxide with an alkyl phenol; various other surfactant glycols and ethers; and the like.

Throughout this specification parts and percentages are by weight unless otherwise indicated.

A very effective and substantially universal prespotting composition of this invention is prepared according to the following formulation.

This formulation is tested on a wide variety of stains and fabrics, including oil, carbon black, paint, blood, and ink on silk, cotton, wool, rayon acetate, nylon, polyesters, and the blends of wool and polyester.

The sodium oleate in this example is liquified by premixing it with the water, Cyclohexanol, and methyl iso butyl ketone before admixing it with the balance of the composition.

The composition set forth in this example is the preferred composition, however, substitutions and alterations may be made therein without adversely affecting the spot removal capabilities of the composition. For example, carbon tetrachloride or trichloroethylene may be substituted for the perchloroethylene, and the proportion of the solvent may be varied from approximately 35 to 80 weight percent. Various soaps, such as ammonium stearate and potassium ricinoleate, may be substituted for the sodium oleate; and the proportion of the soap in the composition, including the agents required to liquify it, may range from about 4 to 15 percent by weight. Various liquification materials may be used; for example, methylcyclohexanol may be used instead of Cyclohexanol and various ketones; such as, methylamyl ketone, ethylbutyl ketone methylcyclohexanone, may be used if desired. ln general the quantity of materials required to liquify the soap are approximately equal to the weight of the solid soap before it is liquified for use in the composition of this invention. The proportion of amyl acetate in the composition may be varied from approximately 5 to 20 percent and is preferably employed in the range of from about 5 to 15 percent. Various nonionic surfactant materials may be utilized, such as polyalkylene oxide phenolic andv fatty acid condensates. In general the nonionic materials are present in amounts ranging from approximately I percent to 10 percent and preferably from about 3 to 8 percent by weight. lfdesired, admixtures of various materials may be employed. For example, a mixture of sodium and ammonium oleate could be employed if desired. Likewise, admixtures of anionic or nonionic detergents may be used. The anionic alkyl benzene sulfonate may be present in amounts ranging from about 5 to 20 weight percent and is preferably employed in quantities ranging from about 8 to 15 weight percent of the composition.

What is claimed is:

1. A dry cleaning agent for textiles and the like comprising about 4 to 15 weight percent of a high molecule weight fatty acid soap, about 5 to 20 weight percent of anionic alkyl benzene sulfonate wherein the alkyl group contains from about 10 to carbon atoms, about 5 to weight percent amyl acetate, about 1 to 10 weight percent of a nonionic detergent, and from about 35 to 80 weight percent dry cleaning solvent.

2. The dry cleaning agent of claim 1 wherein the high molecular weight fatty acid soap is sodium stearate.

3. The dry cleaning agent of claim 1 wherein the anizene sulfonate.

4. The dry cleaning agent of claim 1 wherein the nonionic detergent comprises 2,3-bis(alkoxy)-l-proponal wherein the alkoxy group contains from about 10 to 15 carbon atoms.

5. A dry cleaning agent for textiles and the like comprising a formulation having the ingredients and approximate weight percentage concentrations as follows:

Water 0.0); Methyl lsohutyl Kctonc 0.8 /1 Cyclohcxanol 2.9% Sodium Olcatc 2.4)? 2-Methylnaphthalcnc 0.9% 2,3-Bis(Dodcoxy)-l-Proponal 4.8% Amyl Acetate 12.5% Ammonium Dodecylbenzcne Sulfonate 10.8% Neopcntylcne Glycol 0.3% Perchloroethylene 640%

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3222286 *Oct 19, 1962Dec 7, 1965Shell Oil CoDry cleaning composition
US3272754 *Jul 9, 1962Sep 13, 1966Sandoz LtdDry cleaning agents for textile materials
US3630935 *Dec 16, 1969Dec 28, 1971Procter & GambleDry cleaning composition
US3642644 *Dec 16, 1969Feb 15, 1972Procter & GambleStable dry cleaning compositions
US3655572 *Jan 21, 1970Apr 11, 1972Chevron ResWater-containing dry cleaning compositions
US3689211 *Mar 5, 1970Sep 5, 1972Dow Chemical CoDry cleaning method
US3776693 *Jan 24, 1972Dec 4, 1973Dow Chemical CoDry cleaning composition and process
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4093418 *Mar 23, 1977Jun 6, 1978Basf Wyandotte CorporationNonionic surfactant of ethylene and/or propylene oxides reacted with fatty alcohol, isoparaffinic solvent
US4124542 *Aug 25, 1977Nov 7, 1978Devine Michael JSpot cleaning composition for carpets and the like
US4199482 *Oct 11, 1978Apr 22, 1980Colgate-Palmolive CompanyLaundry pre-spotter composition and method of using same
US4289644 *Jun 4, 1980Sep 15, 1981Armour-Dial, Inc.For removal of stains before laundering
US4378968 *Jun 17, 1981Apr 5, 1983Chloe ChimieProcess for preventing the redeposition of soil during dry cleaning, and composition for carrying out this process
US4414128 *Jun 8, 1981Nov 8, 1983The Procter & Gamble CompanyLiquid detergent compositions
US4620946 *Mar 5, 1985Nov 4, 1986Montefluos S.P.A.Compositions based on 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane for industrial washing
US4738791 *Jun 20, 1986Apr 19, 1988Ertle Raymond TAnti-wicking agent
US4738792 *Jun 20, 1986Apr 19, 1988Ertle Raymond TMixture of surfactant, amide, humectant, and anti-wicking compound
US5503778 *Nov 30, 1994Apr 2, 1996Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyCleaning compositions based on N-alkyl pyrrolidones having about 8 to about 12 carbon atoms in the alkyl group and corresponding methods of use
US5531927 *Sep 21, 1994Jul 2, 1996Bio-Safe Specialty Products, Inc.Stain removing compositions and methods of using the same
US5573710 *Jan 16, 1996Nov 12, 1996Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyMultisurface cleaning composition and method of use
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US5637559 *Nov 18, 1994Jun 10, 1997Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyMixture of a phenyl substituted alkyl alcohol, coupler and water
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US5811383 *Jan 27, 1997Sep 22, 1998The Dow Chemical CompanyWater, ionic surfactant, organic solvent mixtures for degreasing metal surface; low viscosity, low conductivity
US5922665 *May 28, 1997Jul 13, 1999Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyComprising a nonionic surfactant, a very slightly water soluble organic solvent, water and optional additives
US6150320 *Sep 12, 1997Nov 21, 20003M Innovative Properties CompanyConcentrated cleaner compositions capable of viscosity increase upon dilution
US6471945 *Dec 20, 2000Oct 29, 2002Warner-Lambert CompanyStain removing chewing gum and confectionery compositions, and methods of making and using the same
US6479071 *Jan 28, 2002Nov 12, 2002Warner-Lambert CompanyChewing gum and confectionery compositions with encapsulated stain removing agent compositions, and methods of making and using the same
US6485739 *Sep 6, 2001Nov 26, 2002Warner-Lambert CompanyStain removing agent selected from anionic and non-ionic surfactants contianing chewing gum or a confectionary; useful to remove stains from dental material including teeth
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US6849589Oct 10, 2001Feb 1, 20053M Innovative Properties CompanyCleaning composition
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US7851000May 23, 2006Dec 14, 2010Cadbury Adams Usa Llccontrol the release profile of taste potentiators; allows the quantity of natural or artificial sweetener in an orally delivered product to be reduced without affecting flavor
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US7851006Aug 8, 2006Dec 14, 2010Cadbury Adams Usa Llcinclude an active substance such as a sweetener, and a taste potentiator which may increase the perception of the active substance upon consumption; reducing the cost of production and the calorie content of the beverage product, but avoids adverse effects on flavor
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US7955630Aug 17, 2005Jun 7, 2011Kraft Foods Global Brands LlcThermally stable, high tensile strength encapsulated actives
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US8389031May 23, 2005Mar 5, 2013Kraft Foods Global Brands LlcCoated delivery system for active components as part of an edible composition
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Classifications
U.S. Classification510/282, 510/430, 510/342, 510/412, 510/338
International ClassificationD06L1/04, D06L1/00
Cooperative ClassificationD06L1/04
European ClassificationD06L1/04