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Publication numberUS3872280 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 18, 1975
Filing dateApr 25, 1973
Priority dateMay 2, 1972
Also published asCA985873A1, DE2320573A1
Publication numberUS 3872280 A, US 3872280A, US-A-3872280, US3872280 A, US3872280A
InventorsDalen Cornelis Jan Van
Original AssigneeIntergadgets Ag
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Device for vaporizing substances
US 3872280 A
Abstract
An electrically heated vaporizer comprises a base and an annular container removably mounted thereon. The base has means for connection to an electrical power supply and includes a broad lower portion and a narrower upper portion. The lower and upper base portions constitute an enclosed housing wherein an electrical resistance heating means is mounted and connected to the connection means. The container has an inner and an outer wall defining therebetween an interior annular chamber wherein an annular carrier for a substance to be vaporized is arranged. The inner wall of the container fits over the upper base portion and a bell-shaped rotary member is mounted on the upper end of the container. The upper end of the outer container wall defines outlet port means for the substance vaporized by electrical heating and the rotary member defines corresponding port means arranged to be moved into register with the container wall port means by rotation of the rotary member whereby the latter port means may be gradually opened and closed upon rotation.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

O United States Patent 11 1 1111 3,872,280 Van Dalen 1 1 Mar. 18. 1975 [54] DEVICE FOR VAPORIZING SUBSTANCES 2.813.187 11/1957 Riba Rovira 21/119 X x 3.006.042 10/1961 Calandra 21/119 [75] lnventor: 0rnel1s .lan Van Dalen, Doorn.

. Ntthelldndb Primary E.1'un1ir1crC. L. Albritton [73] Assignee: lntergadgets AG. Zug. Switzerland [22 Filed: Apr. 25. 1973 [57] ABSTRACT [31] A L N 354.231 An electrically heated vaporizer comprises a base and an annular container removably mounted thereon. The base has means for connection to an electrical [3O] Forelg Apphcatmn Pnomy Data power supply and includes a broad lower portion and y 1972 SWiIZQflflnd 6529/73 a narrower upper portion. The lower and upper base M y 1972 Switzerland 7266/72 portions constitute an enclosed housing wherein an 111110 211973 swillcrlllml 9396/73 electrical resistance heating means is mounted and connected to the connection means. The container l l Cl 1, 1/119. 12 /1 2. has an inner and an outer wall defining therebetween 2l9/274;275 an interior annular chamber wherein an annular car- [5 lnt. rier f r a substance to be vaporized is arranged The [58] Field Of Search 219/271. 274276; inner wall of the ontainer fits ver the upper base i 120 portion and a bell-shaped rotary member is mounted on the upper end of the container. The upper end of l l References Cited the outer container wall defines outlet port means for UNITED STATES PATENTS the substance vaporized by electrical heating and the 1.732.707 10 1929 Winsboro 21/120 member corresPondlng P means 1908055 5/1933 ranged to he moved 1nto reglster with the container 2.557.501 6/1951 wall port means by rotation of the rotary member 2.608.993 2/1954 whereby the latter port means may be gradually 2.690.501) 9/1954 \lVinherg et :11. it 21/1 I) X Opened and Closed upon rotation 2.737.572 3/1956 l-rnst 21/11) 31 Claims, 14 Drawing Figures ik-ITENTED I 8575 872 280 SHEET 1 [If 9 PATENTED MAR 18 I975 SHEET 3 [1F 9 PATENTEDHAR I 8 m5 SHEET 6 [IF 9 FIG. 8.

mgmggmxems 7 3872.280

SHEET 8 0f 9 I l DEVICE FOR VAPORIZING SUBSTANCES The present invention relates to a device for vaporizing substances by means of electrical heating, particularly for disinfection of and medical treatment in rooms.

It is desirable for many purposes to add certain substances to the air ina highly dispersed form, by way of example substances such as scents or disinfectant substances. With highly volatile substances this may be effected by arranging porous bodies soaked in the substances involved in a given room so that the evaporation occurring at normal room temperature ensures the distribution of such substances in the atmosphere. Naturally, such an evaporation process highly dependent on room temperature and other factors is very indeterminate in respect of the quantity of substances so vaporized so that the method of spraying such substances into the atmosphere has largely been adopted, commonly using spray containers under internal gas pressure. However, this requires that the substances involved are present in the spray container is liquid or dissolved form in a highly gas-generating liquid, which is on the one hand inadmissible for many substances and, on the other, results in corresponding quantities of the gas-propelling liquid entering the atmosphere.

The present invention has for its object to eliminate the said disadvantages and relates to a device for vaporizing substances by means of electrical heating, particularly for disinfection of and medical treatment in rooms, characterized by a base designed for connection to an electrical power supply and provided with an electrical resistance heating element located in a fully enclosed housing comprising a broad lower portion and a narrower upper portion, by an annular container removably mounted on the base. The container is completely closed save for at least one opening in its exterior wall but possesses an interior encased chamber extending almost over the entire length of the container, into which the upper portion of the base fits, the container havingits interior provided with annular carrier members for the substances to be vaporized while being equipped with a rotary member enclosing its upper end and the upper portion of its exterior wall with the opening in the manner of a bell, the rotary member having its jacket provided with at least one corresponding opening which can be brought to register more or less with the opening in the exterior wall of the container by rotation so as to increasingly open, starting from a zero position in which the opening in the exterior wall of the container is fully closed by the rotary member, the opening through which the vaporized substances can emerge to the outside from the interior space of the container.

A number of embodiments of the present invention will now be discussed in greater detail with reference to FIGS. 1 through 14 in the drawing in which FIG. .1 is a diagrammatic perspective view of the twopiece device accor'ding to the invention; I

' FIG. 2 is anelevation, shown insection on the right, of the embodiment ofthe complete'device according to this invention as shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a diagrammatic perspective view of the connection of the device according to FIG. 2 to a power socket;

FIG. 4 is an electrical circuit diagram of a further embodiment of the base of the device according to FIG.

FIG. 5 is a plan view of the cylindrical container of FIG. 6;

FIG. 6 is an elevation, shown in section on the right, of an interchangeable container of the device according to FIG. 2;

FIG. 7 is an elevation, shown in section on the right, of another embodiment of the complete device according to this invention;

FIG. 8 is a view corresponding to FIG. 7 of a further embodiment of the base of the device;

FIG. 9 is a plan view of the cylindrical container of FIG. 10;

FIG. 10 is an elevation, shown in section on the right, of an interchangeable container of the device according to FIG. 7;

FIGS. 11 through 13 are diagrammatic views of symbols for various substances contained in the container according to FIGS. 6 and 10;

FIG. 14 is an elevation, shown in section on the right, of another embodiment of the device.

A characteristic of the present devices for vaporizing substances by means of electric heating is the fact that they are formed of two principal portions diagrammatically indicated in FIG. 1. One portion is a base 10 and the other an annular container 11 which may be attached to the base. This design of the present device offers the advantage that the same base 10 may be used for various removably attachable containers 11 holdingdifferent substances to be vaporized.

FIG. 2 is an elevation of a two-piece device in assembled condition, the base 10 being located below and the container 11 above the dot-dash line in the outside view on the left of the vertical centre line. The base is designed for connection to the electrical power supply and is provided, in the embodiment of FIG. 2, with circular plugs 12 designed for insertion in a socket 13 of an electric current system which is diagrammatically shown in FIG. 3. If desired, the two plugs 12 may also be complemented by a third plug designed for grounding if the socket 13 is equipped with a third bush designed for grounding as indicated in FIG. 3. While being arranged in parallel with the centre axis in FIG. 2, the plugs 12 may, if formed of a sufficiently elastic material, be somewhat inclined towards the centre axis 14 in order to provide mechanical prestressing which ensures reliable attachment of the device to the socket 13. It is obvious that, for use of the present device in countries with differently standardized sockets for the current system, plugs of appropriately different design may be provided on the base 10, by way of example flat plugs 15 (FIG. 8). However, if the device is by way of example intended for use in vehicles, the base is provided with an appropriate plug-in connection for the current supply so that, by way of example in automobiles, the base 10 can be equipped with a plug-in connectionforinsertion in place. of the cigar lighter.

The base 10 is provided with a fully enclosed housing that comprises a broad lower portion 16 and a narrower upper portion 17. Arranged-in the broad .lower portion 16 are the electrical resistance heating elements 18 which are connected to one of the two connecting pins 12. Further arranged in the lower portion 16 is a rheostat 181 connected, in series with the resistance heating elements 18, to other pin 12. The upper portion 17 is formed of a heat-resistant noninflammable material, by way of example a suitable nylon material such as Makrolo'n. The resistance heating element 18 is so designed that an elevated temperature is generated in the upper portion 17 of the base when the device is operated by the electrical power supply, the temperature being dependent on the setting of the rheostat 181. The power input from the current supply. is preferably in the range between 1 and 10 Watts. By way of example', two resistance heating elements 18 of 14,000 Ohms each and a rheostat 181 with a range of adjustment from to 4,000 Ohms for a power supply system of 220 Volts have proved suitable. The selection of the resistance heating elements 18 and the 'rheostat18l also depends on the temperature that is desired to be-obtained in the upper portion 17, the substance to be vaporized in the container 11 and its volatilization temperature being the decisive factors. At all events the heating elements 18 and the rheostat 181 may, by selection of the electrical resistance values, readily be adjusted to all requirements for the volatilization of the substances contemplated.

The lower portion 16 advantageously consists of a transparent material and has its interior provided with a light source 23 connected to the plugs 12. In the embodiment according to FIG. 2 this electrical light source 23 consists of a'glow-discharge lamp which is in the usual fashion connected, via a resistance 24, to the plugs 12.-ln the operation of the device according to FIG. 2 in connection with an electric current system this glow-dischargelamp 23 will light up after connection to the socket, which may be clearly observed through the wallof the lower portion 16 and the outer ring 21 which are both formed of a transparent mate rial. On the one hand, the light serves as a signal and indicates that the device is in operation to vaporize substances. On the other hand, this light enables the base ways assume a very definite position relative to one another also if the container 11 and the rotary member 36 are removed from'the base as described in greater detail below, and replaced by another appropriate container 11 with a similar rotary, member 36.

Provided in the base 10 of the device according to FIG. 2 for the improvement of heat conduction from the resistance heating elements 18 to the upper portion 17 is a duct formed of a material which is highly heatconducting, such as a copper alloy commercially sold under the name of LATAN. The duct consists of an umbrella 187 covering the resistance heating elements 18 and continues in the shape of a tube 188 which extends into the narrow upper portion 17 on the interior surface of which it rests.

In order to shield the light source 23 against the heat of the adjacent resistance heating elements 18, the em- 10 to be used as a night light or auxiliary light source alone, i.e., without connected container 11. If desired, the rheostat 181 may also be combined, as shown in the circuit diagram according to FIG. 4, with an ON/OFF switch whichconsists, by way of example, of the OFF contact 182 and the ON contact 183 of the slide 184. In the position on the OFF contact 182 the circuit for the heating elements 18 and the light source 23 is then completely interrupted. Only in the position on the ON contact 183 of the slide 184 will the light source 23 begin to glow and theminimum power be supplied to the heating elements. However, it is also possible to connect the circuit for the light source 23 not to the ON contact 183 as shown in FIG. 4 but to the connecting line between the rheostat 181 and the two resistance heating elements 18 arranged in parallel; the brightness of the light source 23 will then be increased as the heating elements 18 are supplied with a higher voltage, i.e., more intensely heated. Instead of the design of the rheostat 181 with the ON/OFF contacts 183 and 182 shown in FIG. 4, any other design with an ON/- OFF switch of the rheostat may be employed.

bodiment of the device according to FIG. 2 is provided with a wall 190 which is advantageously reflecting. Again, a reflecting shield 189 is provided between the rheostat181 and the resistance heating elements 18, the shield being so designed that the heat enamating from the rheostat 181 may pass into the duct 188.

The base 10 to be connected to the power supply system must be designed, in respect of material and construction, so as to comply'with the official regulations in force. The underside 25 of the base 10 may be used to bear appropriate data relating to the safety factor and other instructions.

As appears from the longitudinal section on the right in FIG. 2, the upper portion 17 forms a unitary body with the broadlower portion 16, this bodybeing locked with thebase 1t1.in El. 2.- This.. ontainer Lliiofann lar configuration and fully closed save for a slot 35 in the exterior wall '30. Inner wall 32 of container 11 defines interior recess 31 which extends over almost the entire length of the container and interior chamber of the container is annular incross-section. The recess 31 is-so designed thatthe upper portion 17 of the base fits into it. In order to obtain the best possible heat transfer from the upper portion 17 of the base 10 to the inner wall 32 of the container 11, the inner surface of the wall 32 of the container should contact the outside surface of the upper portion 17 of the base without forming an air gap (the air gap indicated in FIG. 2 is shown only for better identification of the upper portion 17 and the inner wall 32 but should not be present in reality). The exterior wall 30 of the container 11 projects somewhat from its bottom 34 and forms a skirt 22 which serves, as previously stated with reference to FIG. 2, for insertion of the container in the gap between the lower portion 16 and the outer ring 21 of the base 10. Since the lower portion of the container 11 may be somewhat compressed owing to the extended inner recess 31, proper dimensioning of the outer ring -21 at the base 10 may ensure that the container 11 is 21 may be provided, at a suitable location, with a projection and a groove so that thecontainer 11 can be inserted in the base only in a certain position relative to the base.

Provided at a certain point in the outer wall 30 of the container 11 is a slot 35 with a width of between 2 and 8 mm, and a length not less than mm, indicated by broken lines in FIG. 6. This slot serves for communication of the interior chamber 33 of the container 11 with the outside, but is normally closed by the rotary member 36 which covers the upper side 37 of the container 11 and the upper part of its outside wall 30 as a bell would do. The rotary member 36 is also equipped with an opening 41 so that, if the rotary member 36 is rotated, its opening4l can be caused more or less to register with the slot 35 in the outside wall 30 of the container in order that, starting from a zero position in which the slot 35 in the outside wall 30 0f the container is fully closed, first a fraction, then an increasing portion and finally the entire slot in the outside wall 30 of the container will be opened for the emergence of the substances to be vaporized from the interior space 33 of the container 11.

Provided on the upper edge of the rotary member 36 are a gripping ring 38 and detent recesses which cooperate with corresponding detents on the outer .wall 30 of the container 11 so as to define both the zero position and the maximum position in which the opening 41 of the rotary member 36 completely closes and, respectively, completely opens the slot 35 in the exterior wall 30 of the container 11. The rotary member 36 may advantageously be provided with an indicator 39 which moves, together with the rotary member 36 when he latter is rotated, past suitable marks on the outside wall 30 of the container 11 and shows both the zero position and the maximum position of the rotary member 36. If desired, marks other than the zero position may be provided with numerals such as for the quantity of vaporized substance supplied to the atmosphere per hour in any one position.

As shown in FIGS. 5 and 9, the upper side of the rotary member 36 is provided with an indicator 40 in the form of a circular mark index which shows what kind of substance to be vaporized the container 11 holds. This indicator may, by way of example, consist of a symbol, such as an insect as shown in FIG. 5 which is designed to indicate that the container holds an insecticide to be vaporized. The borders of the symbol may be in a color that corresponds to the color of the gripping ring 38. Another suitable symbol is shown in FIG. 11 which, by way of example, identifies a container with a flower scent. The symbol according to FIG. 12 is designed to characterize a forest scent while the symbol in FIG. 13 would indicate herb, peppermint and similar scents.

Located in the interior chamber 33 of the container 11 are annular carrier members 42 for the substances to be vaporized which consist, by way of example, of a porous plastic material or a cellulosic material and are soaked in the substance involved. While generally all porous carrier materials which do not themselves vaporize are suitable for scents, vaporizable medical substances and insecticidal or disinfectant substances frequently impose special demands on the carrier material. By way of example, mineral porous materials such as asbestos have proven suitable for this purpose. Carrier rings 42 formed of asbestos have also proved their suitability for soaking in dimethyl 2.2 dichlorovinyl phosphate which represents an insecticidal substance to be vaporized. It is also of advantage for the outside wall 30 of the container 11 to be formed of a transparent material at least in its lower portion which projects from the rotary member 36 since carrier rings 42 may then be used of which the colour gives an indication of the quantity of the substance to be vaporized which is still available. If carrier rings formed of light asbestos are employed, they will commonly assume a darker coloration after being soaked in the substance to be vaporized, and resume their originally lighter colour only when the substance involved has been largely consumed.-

The base 10 of the embodiment according to FIG. 7 is provided with a fully enclosed housing that comprises a broad lower portion 16 and a narrower upper portion 17. The narrow upper portion 17 encloses the electrical resistance heating element 18 which is connected, via the lead 19, to the right-hand one of the two connecting pins 12. This upper portion 17 consists of a heatresistant non-inflammable material, by way of example a suitable nylon material such as Makrolon. The resistance heating element 18 is so designedthat a temperature higher than about 120C is generated in the upper portion 17 of the base when the device is operated by the electrical power supply. The power input from the current supply system is preferably in the range between 1 and 5 Watts. By way of example, a heating element 18 with a resistance of 33,000 Ohms has proved appropriate for a power supply system of 220 Volts. In connection with a power supply system with a voltage of Volts a heating element with about 15,000 Ohms may be employed while a heating element with a resistance of 56,000 Ohms is appropriate for power supply systems with a voltage of 440 Volts. The selection of the resistance heating element 18 also depends on the temperature that is desired to be obtained in the upper portion 17, the substance to be vaporized in the container 11 and its volatization temperature being the decisive factors. At all events the heating element 18 may, be selection of its electrical resistance, readily be adjusted to all requirements for the volatilization of the substances contemplated.

As appears from the longitudinal section on the right in FIG. 7, the upper portion 17 here forms a unitary body with the broad lower portion 16, this body being locked in a suitable groove in the outer ring 21 by means of a bolt 20. Located between the lower portion 16 and the outer ring 21 is a gap which is open in the upward direction and serves for insertion of the lower edge 22 of the container 11. The lower portion 16 advantageously consists of a transparent material and has its interior provided with a light source 23 connected to the plugs 12. In the embodiment according to FIG. 7 this electrical light source 23 consists of a glowdischarge lamp which is in the usual fashion connected, via a resistance 24, to the plugs 12. In the operation of the device according to FIG. 7 in connection with a current system this glow-discharge lamp 23 will light up after connection to the socket, which may be clearly observed through the wall of the lower portion 16 and the outer ring 21 which are both formed of a transparent material. On the one hand, the light serves as a signal and indicates that'the device is in operation to vaporize substances. On the other hand, this light enables the base 10 to be used as a nightlight or auxiliary light source alone, i.e., without connected container 11.

Provided in the outer wall 30 of the container 11 at a predetermined regular distance from one another are four holes 35 with a diameter of between 3 and 6 mm, indicated by broken lines in FIG. 10. These holes serve for connection of the interior chamber 33 of the container 11 with the outside, but are normally closed by the rotary member 36 which coversthe upper side 37 of the container 11 and the upper part of its outside wall 30 as a bell would do. The rotary member 36 is also equipped with four passage holes (not visible in FIG. 10) so that, if the rotary member 36 is rotated, its holes can be consecutively brought into register with the holes 35 in the outside wall 30 of the container in order that, starting from a zero position in which all holes of the outside wall 30 of the container are closed, first one hole, then two holes, then three holes and finally four holes in the outside wall 30 of the container can be opened for the emergence of the substances to be vaporized from the interior chamber 33 of the container 11. i

Provided on the lower edge of the rotary member 36 i are a gripping ring 38 and detent recesses which cooperate with corresponding detents on the outer wall 30 of the container 11 so as to define both the zero por tion of the rotary member 36 and those positions in which one or several holes of the rotary member 36 are in register with the holes 35 in the exterior wall 30 of the container 11. The gripping ring 38 may advantageously be provided with an indicator which moves, together with the rotary member 36 when the latter is rotated, past the marks 39 on the outside wall 30 of the container 11 and shows both the zero position of the rotary member 36 and the number of the holes 35 in the container 11 which have been opened. If desired, the zero position and the marks 39 may be designated by numerals 0, 1,2, 3, 4 or in some other suitable manner.

The two-piece devices for the vaporization of substances as disclosed above may be used not only for vaporizing scents or insecticides but suitable carrier materials may also be soaked in medicinal substances which, when vaporized, enable prophylactic treatment of the respiratory system or treatment for disorders in the respiratory system to be effected. Vaporizable germicidal and disinfecting substances may also be employed with the present invention. Since container 11 can be removed from the base 10 when and as desired, it is also possible to remove a container not yet-exhausted, to close it by rotating the rotary member 36 into its zero position, to store it and to use the base 10 with some other container 11 of different content.

In the shown embodiments of the device for vaporizing substances it is a particular advantage that the in tensity of vaporization can be adjusted by the rheostat 181 actuated by the rotary member 36, the opening 41 for the emergence of the vaporized substances from the slot 35 in the container being increased at the same time. This measure has proved to be of advantage par-l ticularly in the disinfection of rooms and in preparing incandescent lamp 18 which is connected, via the leads 19, to the two connecting pins 12. This upper portion 17 consists of a heat-resistant, non-inflammable material, by way of example a suitable nylon material such as Makrolon. Theincandescent lamp 18 is so designed that a temperature about 5-l0C higher than the room temperature is generated in the upper portion 17 of the base when the device is operated by the electrical power supply. The power input from the current supply system is preferably in the range between 1 and 5 Watts. If desired, the incandescent lamp 18 can be connected to the connecting pins 12 via a series resistance.

The selection of the lamp 18 also depends on the tcmperature that is desired to be obtained in the upper portion 17, the substance to be vaporized in the container and its volatilization temperature being the decisive factors. At all events the lamp 18 may, by adequate selection of its electrical resistance, readily be adjusted to all requirements for the volatilzation of the substances contemplated.

As appears from the longitudinal section on the right in FIG. 14, the upper portion 17 forms a unitary body with the broad lower portion 16, this body being locked in a suitable groove in the outer ring 21 by means of a bolt 20. Located between the lower portion 16 and the outer ring 21 is a gap which is open in the upward direction and serves for insertion of the container 11. The upper portion 17 advantageously consists of a transparent material. In the operation of the device in connection with a current system this incandescent lamp 23 will light up after connection to the socket, which light may be clearly observed through the wall of the lower portion 16 and the outer ring 21 when both are formed of a transparent material. On the one hand, the light serves as a signal and indicates that the device is in operation to vaporize substances. On the other hand, this light enables the base 10 to be used as a night light or auxiliary light source alone, i.e., without connected container 11.

In the latter embodiment the lamp 18 is attached to the inner wall of the upper portion by means of a bridge piece. It is also possible to provide the lower ring portion 21 of the base 10 with a lamp holder (socket), into which the incandescent lamp is screwed or inserted, after which the upper portion 17 is placed over the lamp l8 and is attached to outer ring 21 bymeans of the edge 20. It is. advantageous to use on oblong lamp 18 which fills substantially the full inner room of the thin neck of the upper portion. It is also possible to use an oblong lamp 18 which is mounted in a lamp holder upper portion, the lower and upper portions constituting an enclosed housing, and

b. an electrical resistance heating means mounted in the enclosed housing and connected to the connection means,

2. an annular container and having an upper end and a lower end removably mounted on the base, the

container having an inner and an outer wall defining therebetween a closed interior annular chamber extending substantially the length of the container,

a. the inner wall of the container fitting over the upper portion of the base,

b. annular carrier means carrying a substance to be vaporized arranged in the interior annular chamber of the container, and

c. a bell-shaped rotary member mounted on the upper end of the container,

d. the upper end of the outer wall of the container defining outlet port means for the substance vaporized by electrical heating and the rotary member defining corresponding port means arranged to be moved into register with the port means in the container wall by rotation of the rotary member whereby the latter port means may be gradually opened and closed upon said rotation.

2. The vaporizer of claim 1, wherein the connection means comprises a plug-in connection capable of being connected to the electrical power supply in a vehicle.

3. The vaporizer of claim 1, further comprising a control circuit connecting the heating means to the connection means for controlling the temperature of the heat generated by the heating means, the control circuit comprising arheostat.

4. The vaporizer of claim 3, wherein the heating means comprises two electrical resistance heating elements connected in parallel to each other and connected in series to the rheostat and the connection means.

5. The vaporizer of claim 4, wherein the heating elements are capable of consuming a maximum power of 10 watts in dependence on the setting of the rheostat.

6. The vaporizer of claim 3, wherein the rheostat is arranged in the lower portion of the base and further comprising a rotary pin affixed to the rheostat and extending therefrom through the upper portion of the base to the rotary member, the rotary pin being coupled to the rotary member for rotation therewith.

7. The vaporizer of claim 6, further comprising a highly heat-conducting duct mounted in the enclosed housing of the base, the duct comprising an umbrellashaped portion covering the heating means and a tubular portion extending from the umbrellashaped portion into the upper portion of the base.

8. The vaporizer of claim 3, wherein the rheostat is arranged in the lower portion of the base and comprises an ON/OF F switch, and further comprising a rotary pin affixed to the rheostat for adjusting the rheostat between positions of increased and reduced resistance, the rotary pin extending from the rheostat through the upper portion of the base to the rotary member, the rotary pin being coupled to the rotary member for rotation therewith and corresponding adjustment of the rheostat between said positions, and the switch being arranged to assume its OFF position when the rheostat has been adjusted to the position of greatest resistance and its ON position when the rheostat is rotated in the direction of reduced resistance.

9. The vaporizer of claim 8, wherein the lower portion of the base is transparent and further comprising a glow discharge lamp and a barrier resistance arranged in the transparent lower base portion, the glow discharge lamp and barrier resistance being connected in series to the electrical power supply and to the ON contact of the switch.

10. The vaporizer of claim 8, wherein the lower portion of the base is transparent and further comprising a glow discharge lamp and a barrier resistance arranged in the transparent lower base portion, the glow discharge lamp and barrier resistance being connected in series to the electrical power supply and to a'connecting line between the rheostat and the heating means.

11. The vaporizer of claim 1, wherein the lower portion of the base is transparent and further comprising a light source arranged in the transparent lower base portion and connected to the electrical power supply.

12. The vaporizer of claim 11, wherein the light source is a glow discharge lamp and further comprising a barrier resistance connected in series with the glow discharge lamp.

13. The vaporizer of claim 11, further comprising a heat-insulating wall shielding the light source from the heating means.

14. The vaporizer of claim 1, further comprising a control circuit connecting the heating means to the connection means for controlling the temperature of the heat generated by the heating means, the control circuit comprising a rheostat, and a copper alloy duct mounted in the enclosed housing of the base, the duct comprising an umbrella-shaped portion covering the heating means and a tubular portion extending from the umbrella-shaped portion into the upper portion of the base.

15. The vaporizer of claim 1, further comprising an outer ring surrounding the lower portion of the base and defining a gap with the lower base portion, the gap being arranged to receive the lower end of the annular container.

16. The vaporizer of claim 15, further comprising a skirt projecting from the outer wall of the container and fitting into the gap.

17. The vaporizer of claim 1, wherein the inner wall of the container contacts the upper portion of the base for good heat transfer therebetween.

18. The vaporizer of claim 1, wherein the annular carrier means consists of a pluralaty of rings of a porous synthetic resin material soaked in the substance to be vaporized.

19. The vaporizer of claim 1, wherein the annular carrier means consists of a plurality of rings of a cellulosic material soaked in the substance to be vaporized.

20. The vaporizer of claim 1, wherein the annular carrier means consists of a plurality of rings of a porous mineral material soaked in the substance to be vaporized.

21. The vaporizer of claim 1, wherein the annular carrier means consists of a plurality of rings soaked in the substance to the vaporized.

22. The vaporizer of claim 21, wherein the substance is a vaporizable scent.

23. The vaporizer of claim 21, wherein the substance is a vaporizable insecticide.

24. The vaporizer of claim 21, wherein the substance is a vaporizable medicinal substance.

25. The vaporizer of claim 21, wherein the substance is a vaporizable germicide and disinfectant.

26. The vaporizer of claim 21, wherein the rings are of asbestos and the substance is dimethyl 2,2- dichlorovinyl phosphate.

the marks to indicate the relative positions of the port means in the outer wall and the rotary member.

30. The vaporizer of claim 1, further comprising a gripping ring at the lower edge of the rotary member and cooperating detent means on the gripping ring and the outer wall of the container.

31. The vaporizer of claim 1, further comprising indicating means on top of the rotary member for designating the substance to be vaporized.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4002880 *Aug 13, 1975Jan 11, 1977Gte Sylvania IncorporatedEvaporation source
US4340053 *Oct 22, 1980Jul 20, 1982Kiichiro SaruiMolded body comprising vegetable oil for generating aerosol for treating athlete's foot
US4370300 *Nov 24, 1981Jan 25, 1983Duskin Franchise Kabushiki KaishaAromatic odorant emitting device
US4556539 *Mar 21, 1983Dec 3, 1985Donald SpectorDisc-playing aroma generator
US4675504 *Jun 20, 1986Jun 23, 1987S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Electric fogger
US4695434 *Aug 27, 1982Sep 22, 1987Donald SpectorAroma-generating unit
US4853517 *Mar 28, 1988Aug 1, 1989John G. BowenVaporizing unit
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Classifications
U.S. Classification392/390, 392/395, 422/305, 422/124, 128/203.27, 422/306, 422/108, 422/125
International ClassificationA61L9/03, B01D1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61L9/03
European ClassificationA61L9/03