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Publication numberUS3872342 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 18, 1975
Filing dateMay 1, 1972
Priority dateNov 22, 1971
Publication numberUS 3872342 A, US 3872342A, US-A-3872342, US3872342 A, US3872342A
InventorsDankert Carolyn H
Original AssigneeDankert Carolyn H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cabinet
US 3872342 A
Abstract
There is disclosed a cabinet of the type-used in a kitchen. The top of the cabinet is in the form of two adjacent cutting boards hinged, respectively, to the side walls of the cabinet. The boards, in a closed position, provide a continuous and uninterrupted work surface. Within the cabinet is a waste receptacle which is so positioned as to receive waste with at least one of the boards in an open position. The receptacle may be removed from the cabinet through the top with both boards in an open position. The cabinet also provides separate lockable compartments for holding such items as washing compounds, drugs, and the like.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Dankert Mar. 18, 1975 I 41 (7111mm 3.421.689 1/1909 Reina/.1111.. 232/412 3,531,169 9/1970 Hoffman et ul 312/290 X 1761 memo fi- Banker" Muller 0215,73 1 10/1969 Durando D6/l67 Ave.-, Highland Falls, N.Y. 10928 1 1 Filed! y 1972 Primary ExaminerRichard E. Moore 21 pp No: 249 2 AHOY/18y, Agent, or Firm-Philip Furgang Related US. Application Data [63] Continuation-in-part of Ser. No. 200,939, Nov. 22,

1971, abandoned.

[52] US. Cl. 312/290, 312/212 [51] Int. Cl A47b 81/02 [58] Field of Search 312/212, 290; D6/167, 169, D6/l70, 168

[561 References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,710,123 4/1929 Toops 232/432 2,058,682 10/1936 Green 312/290 X 2,690,870 10/1954 Harman 232/432 2,786,337 3/1957 Spring 232/432 X [57] ABSTRACT There is disclosed a cabinet of the type-used in a kitchen. The top of the cabinet is in the form of two adjacent cutting boards hinged, respectively, to the side walls of the cabinet. The boards, in'a closed position, provide a continuous and uninterrupted work surface. Within the cabinet is a waste receptacle which is so positioned as to receive waste with at least one of the boards in an open position. The receptacle may be removed from the cabinet through the top with both boards in an open position. The cabineta1so ra'viaes"'s' amte lockableoniparfrnfits for holding such items as washing compounds, drugs, and the like. a

W 3 Claims. 1)rawing F igures CABINET This application is a continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 200,939, filed Nov. 22, 1971, now abandoned.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention is directed to cabinets and more particularly to cabinets of the type used in kitchens or similar work areas.

In the prior art various attempts have been made to provide cabinet structures which efficiently use the limited space available in kitchens or other work areas and, at the same time, provide a surface for one to work upon, means for storing refuse, and if possible to store other objects in addition to the waste. Many of these prior art devices have, however, intrinsic disadvantages.

One such device was proposed by Harman in U.S. Pat. No. 2,690,870. Harman disclosed a cabinet with a top work surface. Refuse collected on the work surface of such a cabinet is swept into a drawer (which is extended without the cabinet for that purpose). Upon closing the drawer into the cabinet, a trap door in the drawer is released, dropping the refuse into a storage area below.

The device disclosed by Harman has certain disadvantages. The user may work at the cabinet with the drawer pulled out. In this way refuse may be dropped into the drawer at any time. The drawer, however, remains continually in the users way. If, on the other hand, the user waits until a sufficient amount of refuse is collected before opening the drawer, there is added a further work step thereby decreasing the users efficiency. In addition, the sweeping of the refuse across the outer or exterior edges of the cabinet top invites the thermore, Harmans device requires mechanically interrelated parts which adds to the cost of manufacturing the cabinet.

Another device has been suggested by Spring in U.S. Pat. No. 2,786,337. Spring disclosed a cabinet having a cutting board work surface on the top thereof. Access to a waste receptacle within the cabinet is provided through an aperture in the cutting board (which is aligned with a similar aperture in a lower support wall). However, the apertures remain continually open. Clearly, objects placed on the work surface may accidentally fall into the waste receptacle. In addition, waste odors are free to emanate from the aperatures at all times.

Still another device was suggested by Taylor in U.S. Pat. No. 2,796,309. This device provides for waste. receptacles within a cabinet. Access to the waste receptacles is through a lid which must be pivoted upwards, away from the plane of the top surface of the cabinet. Thus, if one were to work on the surface of the device disclosed by Taylor, waste objects on that surface would be dropped to the floor before the user could sweep them into the receptacle.

A still further suggestion is that of Safford in U.S. Pat. No. 3,510,055. Safford disclosed a cabinet for storing garbage pails. Access to the pails is through doors pivotally secured to the top wall of the cabinet. In addition, the openings in the top wall are framed. Thus, if waste is collected on the cabinet disclosed by Safford, it must be lifted from the work surface to be entered into the garbage pails. Thus, the work surface of Safspreading of the refuse onto the surrounding floor. Fur- I ford is inconvenient and promotes the addition of work to the user.

SUMMARY OF THE DISCLOSURE In accordance with the teachings of the invention, there is provided a cabinet of the type used in a kitchen. This cabinet has a substantially hollow housing. Within the housing there is provided means for storage. The top wall of the housing is made of a plurality of members each pivotally secured to the remainder of the housing. The top wall members have open and closed positions with respect to the housing suchthat with any of the members in an open position, there is provided access to the storage means and with the top members closed, there is provided a continuous unitary work surface.

In the embodiment of the invention disclosed herein,. the cabinet housing has therewithin a removable receptacle for receiving waste. This receptable is removable through the top (with the members in the open position). The front and two adjacent sides have doors for access to the interior of the housing. The interior of the housing is adpated for storage purposes. In addition, below the top surface, and lieing parallel thereto, are secondary top shelves which may be used to rest objects. These shelves are made available when the members are in an open position. The cabinet is so shaped that it may conveniently be placed in a line of kitchen cabinets or stand alone. Compart rnay be provided in the cabinet for locking away dangerous substances such as detergents or drugs.

Thus, it is an object of this invention to provide a kitchen cabinet with the facility of storing waste and objects.

It is another object of this invention to provide a kitchen cabinet having a top work surface upon which one may efficiently work and, at the same time, provide easy access to waste dis'posal receptacles.

It is a further object of this invention to provide an attractive cabinet with a removable waste receptacle.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a means for removing waste from the top surface of a cabinet without moving such waste adjacent the exterior edges of the top surface.

It is still another object to provide a cabinet which is efficient in use, economical in manufacture, and useful in any number of varied work areas. I

The above objects and other will become more apparent when the foregoing and following description is taken together with the drawing and claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is a left-front perspective view of a cabinet constructed in accordance with the teachings of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a left-front perspective view of the cabinet of FIG. 1 with the doors and top work surface walls partially opened to expose the interior of the cabinet;

FIG. 3 is another view of the cabinet of FIG. 1 and shows the waste receptacle partially removed from the cabinet; and

FIG. 4 is a sectional view'of the cabinet of FIG. 2 taken along line A-A and looking in the direction of the arrows. I

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The drawing discloses a cabinet 1 which may be used in a kitchen or other work area. The cabinet 1 may be in the form of a credenza, as shown, or may have legs or other means of support (not shown). The cabinet 1 has a generally hollow housing (indicated generally by 1) which may be constructed of any structural material such as wood, metal, plastics, or the like. The housing 1 has a rear wall 13 (partially shown in FIG. 2). Secured to the rear wall 13 are two side walls 2 and 3, respectively (side wall 3 is shown in edge view in FIG. 4). These side walls 3 and 4 (as well as all other parts of the housing 1) may be secured to the rear wall 2 by such fastening means as nails, glue, and (in the case of metal-like materials) welding, soldering or the like. It should be further understood that all'walls of the housing 1 may be secured to a frame (not shown) as is well known in the art.

Secured to the side walls 2 and 3 may be two corner walls 6 and 8 respectively. The corner walls 6 and 8 have a principal axis lieing parallel to the side walls 6 and 8. The corner walls 6 and 8 are disposed at an obtuse angle with respect to the side walls 2 and 3 respectively to which they are affixed. The purpose of the corner-walls 6 and 8 will be more fully understood from the discussion provided hereinafter.

The side walls of the cabinet 1 are completed by front walls 7 which is secured to the corner walls 6 and 8. The corner walls6 and 8 and the front wall may have therein rectangularly shaped apertures or door ways 30, 34, and 32, respectively. Secured to the walls 6, 8, and 7 (in a manner well known in the art) are doors 36, 40, and 38, respectively. The doors 36, 40, and 38, when closed enclose the door ways 30, 34, and 32, respectively. The doors 36 and 38 secured to the angular walls 6 and 8 may have shelves 42 secured thereto for the storage of objects such as bottles of detergent for example. The shelves 42 may be made of a similar material as that of the walls of the cabinate 1 and secured to the doors 36 and 38 by means well known in the art. It is also to be understood that the doors 36 and 38 may be fitted with locks to prevent children or others from entering the cabinet. In this way, dangerous substances ordinarily used about a work area, such as the home, may be secured out of reach of children or unauthorized adults. h

Another shelf 44 may be provided attached to the center door 40 (i.e. the door 40 affixed to the front wall 7). This shelf 44 may be used to store, for example, flexible waste containers 46 which may be made of, for example, paper, plastic or the like.

The walls 2, 3, 6, 7, 8, and 13 may be secured to a bottom wall 48 in a manner well known in the art as previously referred to. As disclosed in the drawing, the walls 2, 3, 6, 7, 8, 13, and 48 of the housing 1 may rest upon a pedestal or credenza base 50. The credenza base 50 may be recessed to provide a toe space 12. It will be appreciated, however, that a credenza base 50 may be replaced bylegs or other support means well known in the art. It is to be further understood that the cabinates shape may be altered from its disclosed configuration to rectangular, cylindrical, or the like. However, the shape of the preferred embodiment offers certain advantages. These advantages will be more fully discussed below.

Within the cabinet 1 are two compartment walls 26 and 27-respectively (shown in edge view in FIG. 4). These walls 26 and 27 are made of any of the aforementioned well known structural materials. They are affixed to the rear wall 13, the bottom wall 48 and at the juncture of the corner walls 6 and 8 with the front wall 7. The compartment walls 26 and 27 separate the interior of the housing 1 into three compartments 9, l0 and 11. It will be immediately apparent that such compartments 9, I0, and 11 may be used for the convenience of storage but may be omitted. One such use of the compartments 9 and 11 would be for storage of drugs or washing compounds for example. It will be noted that items placed in these compartments 9 and 11 are kept separate from the third compartment 10.

The plane defined by top edge of the left compartment wall 26 in conjunction with the corner wall 6, side wall 2 and back wall 13 may be more fully defined by a fixed shelf 15. In the same manner a shelf 16 may be affixed at the top edge of the right compartment wall 27, side wall 3, back wall 13 and corner wall 8. These shelves 15 and 16 are spaced somewhat below the upper most edges of th side walls 2 and 3, corner walls 6 and 8 and rear wall 13.

A substantially rectangular receptacle 23 is so dimensioned as to fit within the housing 1 between the compartment walls 26 and 27. The receptacle 23 may take any other convenient shape with a complimentary interior compartment walls or other means in support thereof. The receptacle 23 may be constructed of any well known structural material such as plastic, fiberboard, wood, or the like. Extending laterally from opposed side walls 52 and 54 are flanges 20. These flanges 20 are employed to engage the shelves 15 and 16 and thereby support the receptacle 23 within the housing 1. It will be understood, however, that any other means for supporting the receptacle 23 may be used including the extension of the receptacle dimensions so that it rests on the bottom wall 48.

The receptacle 23 may have therewithin a divider wall 56. This divider wall 56 may serve to separate the receptacle 23 into two compartments suitable for receiving waste or garbage in bags 46. The divider wall 56 may have a handle aperture 58 to aid in lifting of the receptacle from the housing 1. It will be understood that the orientation of the divider wall 56 with respect to the walls 2, 3, 6, 7, 8, and 13 of the housing 1 is arbitrary and may, for example, be turned and thereby be perindicular to the rear wall 13.

The top wall 60 of the cabinet 1 may comprise a plurality of members. As shown in the drawing, there are two such members 4 and 5 which may, for example, be in the form of cutting boards. The cutting boards 4 and 5 are hingedly secured to the housing 1 for pivotal movement with respect thereto. More particularly, the cutting boards 4 and 5 are secured by hinges to the side walls 2 and 3, respectively. The boards 4 and 5 in a closed position present a uniform and continuous work surface. An alternative (not shown) could, for example, hinge the cutting boards to the rear wall 13 and might have two side shelves affixed to the side walls 2 and 3 on either side of the cutting boards 4 and 5. As disclosed in the drawing, FIG. 2, the boards 4 and 5 are secured by a piano hinge 29 at each wall 2 and 3, respectively.

In use, garbage bags 46 are placed in the receptacle 23. The receptacle 23 is then lowered, by grasping the handle aperture 58, in the housing 1. The garbage bags 46 may, however, be removed without removing the receptacle 23. With one of the cutting boards 4 in a closed position there is provided a convenient work surface. If the other cutting board 5 is in the open position, then waste may be swept into the garbage bags 46 without passing the waste to the outer edges of the cutting board 4. The side shelf 16 may be used for placing objects thereon. Upon closing the cutting board 5, the unit is closed and odors are kept from emanating from the cabinet.

The corner walls 6 and 8 add to the decorative appearance of the cabinet 1 and make a valued functional contribution to the work area. As shown in the drawing, the corner walls 6 and 8 provide a finished furni ture look to the cabinet. The cabinet 1 can be placed in a line of cabinets with cabinets placed on either side of the cabinet 1 adjacent the side walls 2 and 3 respectively. On the other hand, if the cabinet 1 is placed at the end of a line of cabinets, either side 2 or 3 may be arranged as the front of the cabinet 1 with the opposed side as the rear and the rear wall 13 placed adjacent the exposed side of the line of cabinets. Finally, the cabinet 1 may be placed along a wall to stand alone.

The garbage receptacle 23 may replace ordinary garbage pails in a kitchen. In use, one of the cutting boards 4 or 5 can remain open thereby providing access for waste disposal whether or not associated with the work surfaces of the cabinet 1.

It will be observed that shelves 1S and 16 serve both as a resting place for objects and a cover for the compartments 9 and 11 respectively, in the cabinet 1. Thus, waste which misses the receptacle 23 might land upon a shelf 15 or 16 and not enter the compartment 9 or 11 or fall upon the floor. It will be understood, however, that the receptacle 23 may be so proportioned that it will encompass the area now occupied by the shelves 15 and 16. In addition, it is within the scope of this invention that there be provided runners or glides (not shown) by which the receptacle 23 may be removed through the compartment 10 (as in the manner of a drawer)'instead of the top of the cabinet 1.

What is claimed is:

1. A cabinet of the type used in a kitchen comprising:

a. a substantially hollow housing;

6. b. storage means within said housing comprising a generally rectangular housing and a removable rectangular receptacle within said rectangular housing;

c. said receptacle comprises a plurality of compart:

ments, said receptacle having handle means for removing said receptacle from said housing;

d. a top wall comprising at least two top members each pivotally secured to said housing, with at least one of said members having opened and closed positions such that with said one member in said open position, said top wall is thereby partially removed exposing said storage means to provide access to the top of said housing into said storage means, and with said one member in said closed position there is provided, from one of said members to the other of said members, a continuous and uninterrupted work surface; and

e. shelves lying parallel to said top wall, affixed to said housing, and spaced below said top wall such that with one of said members in said open position, at least one of said shelves is accessible to said top, said receptacle has flange means for engaging said shelves, said shelves support said receptacle.

2. A cabinet as recited in claim 1 wherein said housing comprises at least one front wall having a door way therein and a door hinged thereto for covering said doorway, said door comprises storage shelf means.

3. A cabinet as recited in claim 2 wherein said housing comprises a bottom wall; a rear wall affixed to said bottom wall; a pair of side walls affixed to said rear wall and said bottom wall; a pair of corner walls standing perpindicularly with respect to said bottom wall and affixed to said bottom wall and said side walls respectively at either side of said front wall and affixed to said front wall; each of said corner walls having therein a door way and a door hinged to said corner wall for covering said door way; said cabinet further comprises a recessed credenza base, said housing is upon said base and affixed thereto; said housing comprises at least one internal compartment wall for separating said corner wall and adjacent side wall from the remainder of said housing.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1710123 *Feb 19, 1925Apr 23, 1929Toops Charles PSmoking pedestal
US1765111 *Mar 25, 1929Jun 17, 1930Warren Tool HaroldCorncob container
US2058682 *Mar 17, 1936Oct 27, 1936Elizabeth Green NelliePortable receptacle conveyer
US2690870 *Jul 18, 1952Oct 5, 1954Harman Oakley VDisposal device
US2786337 *Oct 27, 1954Mar 26, 1957Leitner Equipment CompanySalad refrigerator
US3421689 *Aug 8, 1966Jan 14, 1969Reinzan Harry PReceptacle for bag-like container means
US3531169 *Aug 1, 1968Sep 29, 1970Carter Hoffmann CorpFood service cart
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3986757 *Apr 21, 1975Oct 19, 1976Whirlpool CorporationRefuse compactor bag storage means
US4008934 *Feb 25, 1976Feb 22, 1977Vice George AChild proof cabinet
US4057309 *Jul 6, 1976Nov 8, 1977Fragale Eleanor MClothes hamper
US4111505 *Feb 14, 1977Sep 5, 1978Vice George AChild-proof cabinet
US4285556 *Feb 25, 1980Aug 25, 1981Emil LoeffelTool chest
US5447366 *Apr 19, 1994Sep 5, 1995Cole; Lawrence N.Apparatus for dispensing discrete articles
US6119631 *Apr 1, 1999Sep 19, 2000Markoll; RichardCoil cabinet for treating animals with magnetic field therapy
US20110220654 *Mar 11, 2011Sep 15, 2011Vincent Eugene GrayTrash can with an adjustable draft compartment apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification312/290, 312/212
International ClassificationA47B77/04
Cooperative ClassificationA47B77/04
European ClassificationA47B77/04