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Publication numberUS3872639 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 25, 1975
Filing dateNov 1, 1973
Priority dateNov 1, 1973
Also published asCA1009012A1
Publication numberUS 3872639 A, US 3872639A, US-A-3872639, US3872639 A, US3872639A
InventorsJohn H Crumbaugh, Maurice J Marchello
Original AssigneeUnited States Gypsum Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fire-resistant shaft wall
US 3872639 A
Abstract
A fire-resistant wall comprising studs and metal pans extending between the studs, disposed on one side of the wall, the studs and pans cooperating to form a temporary wall which may be finished by the inclusion of gypsum panels disposed between the pans and the studs, and other panels attached to the side of the studs opposite to the pan side of the wall.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 Crumbaugh et al.

[ Mar. 25, 1975 FIRE-RESISTANT SHAFT WALL [75] lnventors: John H. Crumbaugh, Des Plaines;

Maurice J. Marchello, Hickory Hills,

21 Appl.-No.: 411,935

[52] US. Cl. 52/495, 52/481 [51] Int. Cl E04b 2/78 [58] Field of Search 52/495, 481, 281, 241,

11/1965 Downing 52/495 X 3,217,460 3,623,290 11/1971 D0wnlng.... 52/481 3,707,818 1/1973 Nelsson 52/481 X Primar E.\'anzim'r-Price C. Faw, Jr. Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Samuel Kurlandsky; Stanton T. Hadley; Kenneth E. Roberts [5 7] ABSTRACT A fire-resistant wall comprising studs and metal pans extending between the studs, disposed on one side of the wall, the studs and pans cooperating to form a temporary wall which may be finished by the inclusion of gypsum panels disposed between the pans and the studs, and other panels attached to the side of the [56] References Cited studs opposite to the pan side of the wall.

UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,164,138 6/1939 London 52/481 X 6 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures /0 30 3o 30' 52 1 1 i 48 l I J l v J -33 w ,flg r'tf' /flfifiXfi/ AP/QZW q 1 FIRE-RESISTANT SHAFT WALL BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention Shaft walls are required for the enclosure of elevator shafts, smoke towers, air supply ducts and returns, and the like, particularly in tall buildings. These may be constructed either by a wet process, or a dry process using wallborad. The invention pretains to the latter, and specifically to a method for rendering the shaft side of the wall sufficiently fireresistant to give the wall a -0 fire hazard classification that is, zero flame spread, zero fuel contributed, and zero smoke developed as determined by the Method of Test of Surface Burning Characteristics of Building Materials, ASTM E 84.

2. Description of the Prior Art The oldest technique for building such shaft walls was by the use of masonry. As disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 3,702,044, such techniques were time consuming, required the delivery of heavy materials to high altitudes, and required dangerous scaffolding on the shaft side of the wall. The other wet process, the use of plaster, generally suffered the same disadvantages. An early patent disclosing metal pans in the construction of a plastered or concrete wall in U.S. Pat. No. 2,164,138. A recent development in plastering techniques did, however, eliminate the need for shaft-side processing. This was achieved by the use of metal pans on the shaft side of the wall, the other, accessivle side of the pans being attached to wire-web studs and metal lath. Plaster was then sprayed into the space between the pan and the lath. However, as with masonry, the weight of the finished wall and the materials therefor is excessive, and the plastering technique is a slow processs requiring highly paid labor.

In walls prepared from gypsum wallboard, conventional gypsum panels alone have been faced with paper cover sheets which invariably smoke, if not form flames, in a fire. Such smoke generation may no longer be acceptable in municipalities having the strictest fire codes for shaft walls.

Metal pans have been laminated to the outside of the 4 gypsum panels for walls designed for general use. U.S. Pat-Nos. 3,548,557 and No. 3,623,290 are representative ofsuch structures. The disadvantages of these constructions have been that they generally require a complicated stud to cooperate with the metal pans. Furthermomre, the lamination of the pans to the gypsum panels is an additional processing step which prevents the pans from being used along to create a temporary enclosure of the shaft.

A recently filed, copending U.S. application Ser. No. 298,3 14 filed on Oct. 5, 1972, commonly owned with the instant application, discloses a type of metal pan that completely eliminates studs entirely, thereby eliminating one of the above-enumerated disadvantages. However, the pan is still laminated to the panel.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The invention pertains to a dry-assembled paneled wall designed to be assembled from one side only, thereby making it suitable for installation as a shaft wall. Further, it pertains to a pan and a wall assembled therefrom with the metal pan disposed on the shaft side of the wall, thereby providing non fire-hazardous shaft lining. More specifically, there is provided a dryassembled wall one side of which has the minimum fire hazard classification, comprising a plurality of spacedapart, elongate studs having longitudinal axes which are substantially parallel, each stud comprising a web portion having side margins, and a panel support member protruding from one face of the web portion intermediate the side margins, the opposite face of the web portion being provided with a pocket, and plurality of metal pans, each pan extending between two adjacent and spaced-apart studs, respectively, the pans being disposed on one exposed side of the wall, said pans each comprising a generally flat sheet and two opposing side margins, one of said side margins being disposed adjacent to and in contact with one of the panel support members, the other of said side margins having a portion inserted within one of said pockets. A pan particularly suited for. this construction is provided, comprising a generally flat sheet having a pair of opposed side margins disposed at an angle to said sheet, one of said margins having a first portion thereof disposed so as to extend generally parallel to and away from said sheet and a second portion thereof extending in a direction which is skewed to the direction of extension of said first portion, said second portion being hinged about a line which is spaced from said sheet a distance sufficient to accommodate a panel therebetween.

Accordingly, it is an object of the invention to provide a fire-resistant wall and metal pans therefor which are suitable for use as shaft walls.

More specifically, it is an object of the invention to provide such a wall and metal pan which can be assembled from one side only, which permit a temporary enclosure of the shaft, and which eliminate the smoke generation that is otherwise characteristic of conventional gypsum panels.

It is a related object of the invention to provide such a wall and metal pan therefor which require the use of only relatively simple stud constructions.

Other objects and advantages will become apparent upon reference to the following description of the drawings and of the detailed embodiments.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a fragmentary horizontal sectional view through a wall constructed in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view illustrating the temporary wall resulting from the first stage of the construction;

' FIG. 3 is a fragmentary elevational view of a metal pan used in the embodiment of FIGS. 1 and 2;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary sectional view similar to FIG. 1, but illustrating an alternate embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary sectional view taken generally along the line VV of FIG. 4, with the panel omitted; and

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary perspective view of the stud of FIG. 5.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Although the wall is described hereinafter as particularly suited for a shaft wall enclosing elevator shafts, stair wells, air return shafts, and the like, it can be used as any kind of wall, particularly where a 0-0-0 fire hazard classification is required on the shaft side, or where the capability of a temporarily finished wall is required.

Referring now to FIG. 1, the wall comprises elongate, spaced-apart studs 12, metal pans 30 having an exposed outer face 31 and an inner face 32, gypsum panels 42 releasibly and removably disposed adjacent to side 32 of the pans, and wall panels 50 conventionally secured to the studs 12 on the side of the wall opposite the pans. The gypsum panels 42 and 50 are conventional, rehydrated gypsum cores with or without a paper cover sheet or envelope. The longitudinal axes of the studs are preferably substantially parallel.

In accordance with the invention, the studs comprise a web portion 14 having side margins 16 and 18, and exposed faces 20 and 22. A panel support member or rib 24 protrudes from face 20 intermediate the side margins. Two side flanges 26 and 28 may be formed so as to extend from the side margins, preferably from the face 20. The face 22 is provided with a pocket 29. The overall configuration of stud 12 is thus one which appears in cross section as an E.

As shown, stud 12 is formed by roll-forming, so that the pocket 29 is a natural result of the double fold of the web portion 14 which creates the rib 24. Alterna tively, the stud may be extruded or otherwise manufacturcd.

Metal pans 30 are positioned so as to extend between the studs 12, thus forming one side 33 of the wall. In the use of the wall as a shaft wall, side 33 is the shaft side. As best shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, the pans each comprise a flat sheet 34 having opposed side margins 36 and 38. Both side margins are bent approximately perpendicularly to the sheet, and margin 38 includes a portion 39 which is bent again so as to extend generally parallel to the sheet 34 and away therefrom. This portion 39 is inserted into the pocket 29, while side margin 36 is disposed or positioned adjacent to, and in contact with, the rib 24, within the side flange 26.

The wall depicted by the solid lines in FIG. 2 thus represents a temporarily completed enclosure, particularly suited for closing off shafts. At a later date, the panels 42 may be removably inserted, in the direction of arrow 44, with one edge 46 thereof being positioned between the pans 30 and the rib 24 of the stud. The opposite edge 48 is positioned adjacent to side margin 38 of the pan. To hold edge 48 in this position, tab portions 49 may be provided, extending from the portions 39 of the pan 30. Prior to the insertion of the panels 42, these tabs are disposed so as to be approximately parallel to side margin 38, as shown in solid lines, FIG. 2. In this position, they do not interfere with the insertion of the panels. After the panels 42 are properly positioned, tab portions 49 are bent about a line 51 to the phantom position shown in FIG. 2, thus extending in a direction opposite to that of portion 39. In the phantom position, the tabs are spaced from sheet 34 by the distance which accommodates the panel 42 between the tab and the pan. As will be appreciated, the tabs may be readily formed by a lancing operation.

At end 52 of the wall 10, the pans may be modified to take into account the termination of the wall at a conventional channel 54. Thus, side margin 38 may be eliminated altogether, creating a shortened pan 30'.

FIGS. 4-6 illustrate an alternate embodiment of the invention, wherein the studs and the pans have been modified in shape, providing, however, the same resulting wall construction. Parts similar to those previously described bear the same reference numeral to which the distinguishing suffix a has been added. Thus, wall 10a comprises studs 12a, metal pans 30a defining side 33a of the wall, and gypsum panels 42a positioned adjacent to side 32a of the pans. The studs comprise, as before, a web portion 14a, a panel support member 24a, and side flanges 26a and 28a. Unlike the previous embodiment, the pocket 29a comprises the space between an additional side flange 60 extending in the opposite direction from web portion 14a, and in the same plane, as extends flange 26a, and support members 62. Support members 62 preferably comprise tabs lanced out of the web (FIG. 5). As best shown in FIGS. 4 and 6, the tabs 62 originally are disposed so as to project slightly out of the plane of the web. This disposition permits the ready insertion of panels 42a. Subsequently, the tabs 62 are bent from the phantom position, FIG. 4, to the solid position, completing the pocket 290. I

I The complementarypans 30a of this embodiment omit the portions 39 of the side margin 38. Instead, side margins 36a and 38a comprise simply the terminal edges of the sheet 34a which extend at an angle of about to the sheet. Side margin 36a is disposed between side flange 26a and rib 24a, while side margin 38a is inserted within the pocket 29a.

As with the previous embodiment, anchoring means are provided (FIG. 5) for securing the studs in proper horizontal position with respect to the horizontal surfaces 68 at which the ends of the stud terminate. This may be achieved by the conventional use of L-shaped floor and ceiling runners 70, which may be conventionally secured to the surfaces 68.

It will also be appreciated that additional rows of gypsum panels may be secured to flanges 28a, as in the previous embodiment, to provide the opposite, room side of a completed wall.

The metal used to form the pans is not critical. The appropriate gauge depends upon the size of the panel and conditions of use, and will be readily apparent based on these design factors.

Although the invention has been described in connection with certain preferred embodiments, it is not limited thereto. Rather, it is intended that it cover all equivalents, alternate arrangements, and embodiments as may be included within the scope of the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A dry-assembled wall, one side of which has the minimum fire hazard classification, comprising a plurality ofspaced-apart, elongate studs having longitudinal axes which are substantially parallel, each stud comprising a web portion having side margins, and a panel support member formed as a double fold protruding from one face of the web portion intermediate the side margins, the opposite face of the web portion being provided with a pocket defined by the inner surface of said double fold, and a plurality of metal pans, each pan extending between two adjacent and'spaced-apart studs, respectively, the pans being disposed on one exposed side of the wall,

said pans each comprising a generally flat sheet and two opposing side margins, one of said side margins being disposed adjacent to and in contact with one of the panel support members, the other of said side margins having a portion inserted within one of said pockets.

2. The wall as defined in claim 1, and further including gypsum panels disposed removably adjoining the pans, contained between the sheet and the side margins of said pans,

said panels each having opposed edges, one of said edges being positioned between one of said pans and one of said studs,

and additional panels secured to said studs along one side margin thereof, defining the other exposed side of the wall.

3. The wall as defined in claim 2, wherein each of said studs further includes a side flange projecting from one of said side margins and from the same web portion face as projects said member, said one pan side margin and said one gypsum panel edge being releasibly positioned between said member and said side flange.

4. The wall as defined in claim 1, wherein said side rnargin portion extends generally parallel to said sheet.

5. The wall as defined in claim 2, and further including a second portion of said other pan side margin extending in a direction opposite to the direction of the portion inserted within one of the pockets, the other of said vertical edges of each of said panels being disposed and retained between one of said pans and said second side margin portion.

6. The wall as defined in claim 2 and further including a second portion of said other pan side margin extending in a direction parallel to said sheet and opposite to the direction of extension of said portion inserted within one of the pockets, whereby said other pan side margins assist in retaining said pannels adjoining said pans.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2164138 *Mar 5, 1938Jun 27, 1939Bernard LondonBuilding construction
US3217460 *Sep 7, 1962Nov 16, 1965Donn Prod IncWall supporting structural beam
US3623290 *Jul 25, 1969Nov 30, 1971Downing Lucien R JrPartition wall
US3707818 *Nov 10, 1970Jan 2, 1973United States Gypsum CoShaft cavity wall and stud
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4715153 *May 8, 1986Dec 29, 1987Schlegel CorporationPanel mounting building wall construction
US5950385 *Mar 11, 1998Sep 14, 1999Herren; Thomas R.Interior shaft wall construction
US6047508 *Mar 10, 1998Apr 11, 2000Steelcase Development Inc.Wall panel partition system
US6212839 *Nov 3, 1995Apr 10, 2001Macgregor (Swe) AbDesign element for building structures
US6330775 *Jul 20, 1999Dec 18, 2001Richard L. HubbardPrefabricated building wall structure
US20050218029 *Apr 1, 2005Oct 6, 2005Mobile Shelter Systems Usa, Inc.Insert for containers
EP0841443A1 *Oct 28, 1997May 13, 1998Richter-System GmbH & Co. KGAutomatic door sealing device
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/479, 52/781, 52/506.3
International ClassificationE04B2/78, E04B2/74
Cooperative ClassificationE04B2/7411, E04B2/7854
European ClassificationE04B2/74C2F, E04B2/78C