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Publication numberUS3873080 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 25, 1975
Filing dateOct 3, 1973
Priority dateOct 3, 1973
Publication numberUS 3873080 A, US 3873080A, US-A-3873080, US3873080 A, US3873080A
InventorsJames A Bostic
Original AssigneeJames A Bostic
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stamp soaker
US 3873080 A
Abstract
A stamp soaking unit comprising a pan providing a shallow cavity having a generally flat bottom, a sponge disposed in the cavity and having a thickness significantly greater than the depth of the cavity, a generally flat top for the pan disposed to cover and close the cavity, and a hinge for connecting the top to the pan for movement to and from its closing position which is generally parallel with the bottom of the cavity. The pan and the top are perforated, and the sponge is effective to hold envelope sections on which stamps are glued flat against the bottom and the top while the unit is held under a stream of hot water or steam.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

[451 Mar. 25, 1975 United States Patent [191 Bostic STAMP SOAKER Inventor: James A. Bostic, 2329 Gable Dr., Primary Examiner ROnald Feldbaum Indianapolis, Ind. 46229 Attorney, Agent, or Firm-William R. Coffey T C A R T S B A H 5 3 7 9 3 3 m 3 0 0.4 o N L p mn. FA V 1 22 .l[

A stamp soaking unit comprising a pan providing a shallow cavity having a generally flat bottom, a sponge disposed in the cavity and having a thickness significantly greater than the depth of the cavity, a generally flat top for the pan disposed to cover and close the cavity, and a hinge for connecting the top to the pan for movement to and from its closing position which is generally parallel with the bottom of the cavity. The

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pan and the top are perforated, and the sponge is ef References Clted fective to hold envelope sections on which stamps are UNITED STATES PATENTS glued flat against the bottom and the top while the unit is held under a stream of hot water or steam.

7 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures Lofgren Berger 1 STAMP SOAKER The present invention relates to soaking units, and more particularly to the provision of a unit ideally suited for soaking stamps from envelope sections.

Stamp collectors conventionally obtain large quantities of envelope sections having stamps glued thereon.

Such stamp collectors usually place the envelope sections in a container of warm water to soak the stamps loose from the envelope section. This process is timeconsuming and quite messy. Stamps are soaked for too great a period of time in some instances using such'conventional techniques.

Additionally, when stamps are soaked loose in a container of warm water, it is difficult to keep the stamps flat.

Soaking units of all types have been provided and suggested for various soaking functions. However, to my knowledge, no one has provided or suggested a soaking unit which is ideal for use by the great numbers of stamp collectors. I presently understand there are approximately nine million stamp collectors in the United States.

Thus, it is an object of the present invention to provide a stamp soaking unit which is simple in structure, easyto use and inexpensive, and yet very effective for the purpose intended. In meeting this object, the stamp soaking unit of the present invention comprises a pan providing a shallow cavity having a generally flat bottom, sponge means disposed in the cavity, a generally flat top for the pan disposed to cover and close the cavity, and means for connecting the top to the pan to be generally parallel with the bottom in its cavity closing position. The pan and the top are perforated, and the sponge means has a thickness substantially greater than the depth of the cavity such that, when the top is in its closing position, the sponge is compressed securely to hold envelope sections on which stamps are glued flat against the bottom and the top while the unit is held under a stream of hot water or steam.

The stamp soaking units of the present invention may be varied in size from, for instance, an 8 inch square pan to a pan which is] 6 ft. square.

Other objects and features of the present invention will become apparent as this description progresses.

To the accomplishment of the above and related objects, this invention may be embodied in the form illustrated in the accompanying drawings, attention being called to the fact, however, that the drawings are illustrative only, and that changes may be made in the specific construction illustrated and described, so long as the scope of the appended claims is not violated.

IN THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective'view of the stamp soaking unit of the present invention'showing the sponge means thereof partially cutaway;

FIG. 2 is a sectioned elevational view of the unit;

FIG. 3 is afragmentary sectional view showing a hingeconnection using a conventional and commercially available hinge to connect the top to the pan; and

FIG. 4'is a fragmentary elevational view of the pan showing the sponge means in its uncompressed condition.

Referring nowparticularly to thedrawings, it will be seen that theillustrated soaking unit, indicatedgenerally by the reference numeral 10, comprises a pan 12 providing a shallow cavity 14 having a generally flat bottom 16, and upwardly extending side walls 18. The

pan-is generally rectangularly shaped with the cavity 14 being generally rectangularly shaped and centrally located within the pan to provide a boundary portion 20 extending perimetrally about the cavity and generally parallel to the bottom 16. In other words, the pan 12 is formed to provide a perimetrally and outwardly ex tending flange portion 20 boundingthe cavity 14.

The pan may be supported on legs 24 whichmay be riveted or otherwise securely fastened to the panto extend downwardly therefrom. Inthe illustrated embodiment, each leg 24 is an angle strip riveted to the corner of the pan as indicated at 26.

The top 30 for the unit is preferably hinged to the pan 12 as indicated at 32 so that the top is movable between its opening position and its closing position covering the cavity 14. Thetop 30 is shown in its cavity closing position in FIG. 2. Preferably, the top 30 will be of the same shape and size as the pan 12 so that,'in its closing position, the top 30 is resting uniformly against the flange portions 20. In the embodiment of FIGS. 1 and 2, the hinge connection 32 is provided by integrally forming rolled hinge portions on the pan l2 and top 30 and then connecting such portions together by means of a hinge pin. It will be appreciated that a standard commercially available hinge may be obtained and riveted or otherwise securely fastened to the pan l2 and top 30 to provide the hinge connection indicated at 32' in FIG. 3. In FIG. 3, rivets 38, 40 are shown attaching a conventional hinge to the pan 12 and top 30.

Then, handles 44, 46 may be attached respectively to the top 30 and pan 12 to extend outwardly from the edges opposite to the edges providing the hinge connection 32. Thesehandles 44, 46 may be riveted or otherwise securely fastened to the top 30 and pan 12. In the illustrative embodiment, rivets 48, 50 connect the handles to the unit.

One or more sponges 56 may be placed in the cavity 14 to hold envelope sections 60 against the bottom 16 and other envelope sections 62 against the top 30 when the top is in its-closing position illustrated in FIG. 2. Preferably, the sponge 56 will have a thickness greater than the depth of the cavity 14 such that, when the top 30 is in its open position, the upper surface of the sponge 56.will be significantly above the upper surface of the flange portions 20. Then, when the top 30 is in its closing position, the sponge 56 is compressed securely to hold the envelope sections 60, 62 respectively against the bottom and top. Thefree or uncompressed condition of the sponge 56 is shownin FIG. 4.

With the envelope sections 60, 62 firmly held against the bottom 16 and top 30 as illustrated inFIG. 2, the unit 10 can be placed under a hot water tap which conventionally would provide a stream of hot water at a temperature of, for instance, F. to F. By applying such a stream of hot water against the top 30 for a period of time of, for instance, 10 to 15 seconds, the stamps will be thoroughly soaked from the envelope sections'60, 62.'The sponge 56 distributes the heat and water uniformly to all of the envelope sections such that, when thetop 30 is opened after a 10 to 15 second hot water application, the stamps will almost fall off the envelope sections. It is not necessary, for instance, to direct the stream of hot water against the bottom as well as the top. By just applying the hot water stream to the top, and generally to the central portion of the top, all stamp sections will be uniformly soaked.

The legs 24 are provided so that the unit can be rested on the bottom of a conventional kitchen sink.

By holding the two handles 44, 46, the user of the unit 10 can assure that the sponge 56 will be uniformly compressed. Locking means (not shown) may well be provided for locking the top 30 in its cavity closing position shown in FIG. 2. For instance, one of the handles 44, 46 may be provided with a spring clip or other such device for gripping and holding the other handle.

With the unit 10 used as described above, it is not necessary to soak the stamps for any appreciable period of time after removing the unit from the stream of hot water. The 10 or seconds under the hot water stream usually will be sufficient to permit removal of the stamps from the envelope sections.

As discussed above, both the pan 12 and thetop 30 are perforated for the passage of water therethrough. The pan 12 and top 30 may be fabricated from, for in stance, 22 gauge perforated sheet steel or 0.050 perforated aluminum sheet. Sheet stock which contains /8 inch perforations set on 3/16 inch staggered centers has proven to be satisfactory for constructing the unit 10.

Both the steel stock and the aluminum stock may be finished by covering the stock with a silicone polyester finish which is a very hard and durable finish. Such a finish is conventional and commercially available. It is tough enough such that the pan 12 may be formed to provide the cavity 14 after the pan 12 is finished with the silicone polyester finish.

In the illustrative embodiment which depicts an 8 inch square unit, the cavity 14 is inch deep while the sponge 56 is l inch thick,

l have found that foam plastic sponges which are commonly sold for use in cleaning operations are completely satisfactory for the purpose described. Such sponges are available in supermarkets and conventionally purchased for use around kitchens and bathrooms of a home.

I claim:

l. A stamp soaking unit comprising a pan providing a shallow cavity having a generally flat bottom, sponge means disposed in said cavity, a generally flat top for said pandisposed-to cover and close said cavity, and means for connecting said top to said pan to be generally parallel with said bottom in its cavity closing position, said pan and said top being perforated, said sponge means being effective to hold envelope sections on which stamps are glued flat against said bottom and said top while said unit is held under a stream of hot water or steam.

2. The'unit of claim 1 in which said pan is generally rectangularly shaped with said cavity being generally rectangularly shaped and centrally located within said pan to provide a boundary portion extending perimetrally about said cavity and generally parallel to said bottom, said connecting means including hinge means connecting said top to said pan for movement between a closing position against said boundary portion and an opening position away from said boundary portion.

3. The unit of claim 2 in which the thickness of said sponge means is such that, when said top is in its closing position, said sponge means is compressed securely to hold such envelope sections, respectively, against said top and bottom.

4. The unit of claim 3 in which said pan and top provide adjacent parallel edges joined together by said hinge means and opposite edges, handle means on said pan and top and extending outwardly, respectively, from said opposite edges.

5. The unit of claim 4 including downwardly extending leg means for supporting said pan.

6. The unit of claim 1 in which said sponge means has a thickness greater than the depth of said cavity such that, when said top is in its closing position, said sponge means is compressed securely to hold such envelope sections, respectively, against said top and bottom.

7. A stamp soaking unit comprising a perforated pan providing a shallow cavity having a bottom, sponge means disposed in said cavity, a perforated top for said pan disposed to cover and close said cavity, and means for connecting said top to said pan for movement to and from its cavity closing position, said' sponge means having a thickness greater than the depth of said cavity such that, when said top is in its cavity closing position, said sponge means is compressed securely to hold envelope sections on which stamps are glued against said bottom and said top while said unit is held under a stream of hot water or steam.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1026154 *Jan 2, 1912May 14, 1912Howard W DoughtyHumidor.
US3326180 *Dec 27, 1963Jun 20, 1967Sanford Res CompanyStamp pad and reserve ink supply therefor
US3790429 *Jun 9, 1971Feb 5, 1974R BergerArticulated, unit cast case system for ungluing documents
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4892295 *Dec 7, 1988Jan 9, 1990Keller Jeanne NPaper cutting assist
US5772842 *Nov 22, 1995Jun 30, 1998Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki KaishaApparatus for stripping pellicle
US20110011870 *Jul 15, 2009Jan 20, 2011Patricia NashHolder for a Cleaning Implement
Classifications
U.S. Classification269/237, 269/287, 134/201, 269/310, 269/909, 156/755
International ClassificationB43M99/00
Cooperative ClassificationY10S269/909, B43M99/00
European ClassificationB43M99/00