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Publication numberUS3874538 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 1, 1975
Filing dateMar 29, 1974
Priority dateMar 29, 1974
Publication numberUS 3874538 A, US 3874538A, US-A-3874538, US3874538 A, US3874538A
InventorsGetz John E, Kessler Eugene S
Original AssigneeFruehauf Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Restraint for conveyorized trailers and the like
US 3874538 A
Abstract
A vehicle-mounted roller conveyor has three parallel sets of rollers with two aisles therebetween. A restraining member in each aisle movable laterally and downwardly is biased to a raised position in which it is interengageable with the side of a container which overlies only two of the sets of rollers. If a container completely overlies the aisle itself, an inclined actuating shoe engageable by the container moves the restraining members out of the way.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Kessler et al. Apr. 1, 1975 RESTRAINT FOR CONVEYORIZED 2.956.835 10/1900 Rogers et 296/35 A TRAILERS AND THE LIKE 3.l25.035 3/l964 L00mis............... 296/35 A X 3,399,921 9/1968 Trost et al. 296/35 A {751 entors: gen S- sle Westland; John 3,612,3l6 10/1071 Baldwin 2l4/5l6 E. Getz, Grosse Pointe Farms, both of Primary Examiner-Leo Friaglia [73] Assignee: Fruehauf Corporation, Detroit Attorney. Agent, or FirmHarness, Dickey & Pierce Mich. [22] Filed: Mar. 29, I974 [57] ABSTRACT [Zll Appl. No.: 456,307 A vehicle-mounted roller conveyor has three parallel sets of rollers with two aisles therebetween. A restraining member in each aisle movable laterally and downg? i ZMISM 2936/35 2 wardly is biased to a raised position in which it is inl B" F p 1/6 terengageable with the side of a container which over- [58] earch 296/35 A lies only two of the sets of rollers. If a container completely overlies the aisle itself. an inclined actuating [56] References cued shoe engageable by the container moves the restrain- UNI STATES PATENTS ing members out of the way.

[B38538 [ll/I932 B water 2l4/5l6 2.351.314 0/1944 A rio 296/35 A Clams 5 Drawmg hgum PATENTEB APR 7 SHEET 1 [IF 2 RESTRAINT FUR (ONYI'IYURIZI'III TRAILERS AND THI'i LIKE Rapid handling and transferring ot containerired and palleti/cd cargo at air terminal and spccialiyed air freight facilities makes it increasingly desirable to use vehicles having power-driven conveyors mounted thereon. (ontainers of \arying width and containers oriented differently on the con\e \or sy stem. may o\ei lie less than the full width of the con\e vor stein. It is nevertheless necessary to restrain all such containers against shifting while the v ehicle is in motion, The present invention has a its obiect to pro\ ide improved restraining apparatus which cl'l'ccth el iestrains containers which occupy less than the full width of the con- \eyor sy stem. but which is automatically moved to a non-interfering position by a container ot'grcater width or which must occupy the same area as the restraining apparatus itsell'. Related ohjects are to pro\ ide restrainmg means of the indicated character which is simple. rugged and positive in operation. compact. light in weight and low in cost.

Other objects and ad\antages will become apparent upon consideration of the present disclosure in its entirety.

FIG. I is a perspective view ol a eomcyorircd semi trailer with cargo containers thereon and typit'ying an emironment in which the invention is adapted to he used.

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary perspective view on a larger scale showing the improved restraining means and adjacent portions of the \ehicle and conveyor system;

FIG. 3 is a sectional elevation-a] view taken substan tially as indicated by the line lll' lll in FIG. 2 and looking in the direction of the arrows. showing the improved restraining means as viewed from the rear and in raised position. also fragmentarily showing a portion of a cargo container restrained thereby;

FIG. 4 is a view taken on the same line showing the restraining unit in retracted position; and

FIG. 5 is a top plan view thereof.

Dli'lAllliD DFSLRIP'IION ()l" 'lHl-i PREFERRED FORM OF 'l'HF. lNVliN'IlON Reference character designates generally a semitrailcr illustrated as typifying a vehicle in connection with which the invention is adapted to he used. The

semi-trailer has a tlat bed containing three parallel lines ot'convcyor rollers. generally designated ll. l2 and I3.

extending lengthwise thereof. The rollers l5 may be of conventional construction and are freely journaled in suitable longitudinal frame rails as l6. l7. 18 of the vehicle. The three lines of conveyor rollers are spaced apart to provide two longitudinal aisles 24. therehe' tween. As shown in FIG. 2 the aisles may he provided with walkway gratings as 27 and similar gratings may of course he installed between the rollers. if desired.

The aisles accommodate conveyor chain 30 and hook-like components (not shown) attached thereto for moving cargo along the rollers. Such actuating means form no part ot'thc present invention and the details thereof need not he considered herein.

Containers. pallet and the like with which this .i pa ratus i intended to he used are provided with laterally extending hottom flanges. one of which is shown at 33 in FIG. 3. and such cargo containers. pallets and the like are constructed in trans\crse dimensions which are standardized to the e\tent that they are either appro\i mately two-thirds the width of the vehicle. or the full width of the vehicle.

Carried by each of the longitudinal side rails l6. ll of the vehicle are guard rails 34. 35 which pre\ent lateral movement ol cargo members off of the bed. l'he guard rails 34. 35 are carried by posts 36 w eldcd to the side frame rails. The posts have inturned top hook portions 38 adapted to overengagc the llanges 33 ot' the cargo members.

Containers and the like which are of less than the full width. such a the container 40 shown in FIG. I. are always placed in engagement with one or the other of the side rails 34. 35. so that top hook portions 38 meren gage the bottom t'lange along the outer side. and at such time the other end of the base of the staiulardi/ed partwidth container merlies the farther aisle (aisle 25. as

shown in FlG. l 1 while a mid portion of the bottom of the container overlies the other aisle (24 l.

In each ot'the aisles. at suitably longitudinally spaced positions. restraining assemblies are installed in wells 65 in the aisleways as by being welded to the frame structure otthe vehicle. As all of the restraining assentblies are alike. description of one will suffice. Each assembly includes a hook-like restraining member 42 hi ased upwardly and inwardly. toward the opposite aisle. in such manner that the container bottom flange far thest from the side rail which the container abuts will slide under the restraining hook 42 as the container is moved along the conveyor system. and will be restrained thereby when the container is at rest.

The restraining hook 42 is pivoted on a longitudinally extending pin 44. An arm 45 fixed with respect to the hook 42 is urged by a tension spring 46 in a direction to rock the hook upwardly and inwardly. the farther end of the spring 46 being engaged in an abutment portion 48 carried hy the frame 52 of the restraining mechanism. The pin 44 is mounted in the side walls of the restraining mechanism frame 52. which is L -shaped when viewed in plan. as in FIG. 5.

The frame 52 carries at a position spaced laterally from pin 44 a second pivot pin 54 serving as a pi\otal mounting for a shoe assembly generally designated 55 having top tapered portions generally designated 50. 5| at each end. The tapered portions include top sloping surfaces 56 57. which incline downwardly from the central portion of the shoe. and front sloping surfaces 58. 59. which incline laterally away from the eenterline of the vehicle as they diverge from the central portion of the shoe. The shoe assembly has a centrally relieved area 60 to provide clearance for the restraining hook 42. arm 45 and related parts. the relieved area being bridged by a bar 62 fast in the two end portions 56. 58 and extending through and close to the interior of the hook portion 42 as best shown in FIGS. 3 and 4. The relationship between the path of movement of the bar 62 as the shoe assembly swings about the axis of pin 54. and the shape and are of movement of the hook 42 are such that when the shoe assembly is forced downwardly. the bar 62 in moving from the raised position in which the parts are shown in FIG. 3 to the lowered position of FIG. 4 swings the hook outwardly away from the container llangc 33 and downwardly to the re traeted position in which the hook lies entirely below the top plane of the roller l5. hen the shoe is ele atcd. its central portion pro ects abo\ e the top plane of the rollers. a shown. but the tapered end portions incline downwardly toward the front and rear to an ele \ation below such plane.

A partavidth container such as the container 40 is so placed on the trailer bed that it closely abuts one of the rails 34. 35 (left rail 34 when oriented as shown i. It then completely o\erlies one aisle (left aisle 24. a shown), As it rides toward tltc front or rear of the trailer. the bottom of the container engages the sloping shoe portions 56 and 57 of the restraining mechanisms contained in aisle 24. thereby automatically mov ing the restraining books 42 thereof downwardly out of the way into the well area 65 in which the restraining assemblies are installed. The end of the base portion of the container 40 which is over the aisle 25. however. will be positioned so that its bottom flange 33 will slide under the hook portions 42 of the raised restraining mechanisms in the aisle 25. The restraining mechanisms are spaced closely enough so that when the container comes to test. the flange will be oyerlaitl by at least one of the hooks 42. while its opposite outer flange will also he o erengaged by one of the holding portions 38.

ll' the container is positioned too far from the side of the \ehiele to properly underengage the books 42. the front sloping surfaces 58 or 5) will cam the container into proper alignment.

When the shoe and hook parts are in raised position to confine a part-width container. the container is confined against lateral displacement by the outer rail as 34 along its outer side. and by the integral nose wall portions 66. 68 ofthe central area of the shoe along its other side.

It is sometimes desirable to move a shoe and its hook 42 to their depressed/released positioning to enable lifting a container upwardly off the vehicle. as for example by means of a fork lift trtlck. crane or the likev To enable a workman to depress the shoe in a convenient manner. and thereby retract the hook 42. a crank arm 72 is provided. fast on a rock shaft 74 which extends to and is operable by a handle 75 at the side of the vehicle. the crank arm being connected to the shoe 55 by a tension member 76 such as a link. cable or chain. and the parts being arranged so that rotation of the handle pulls the shoe down against its biasing spring 46. thereby also retracting hook 42.

The rock shaft ntay as shown extend transversely of the \ehicle through frame members as I6. 17 in which it is journaled. and from the former of which it projects to the exterior where it carries the handle 75 at a convcnient location beside the vehicle. The shaft and crank arm 72 are positioned and proportioned so that the free end of the arm lies under the shoe. to which it is connected by the tension member 76. which is illustrated as a cable.

Although such a release means may be provided for each shoe. a release for only one shoe in each aisle will often be all that is desired. if it is practical simply to move the containers to the manually releasable unit when lifting off is required.

The rock shaft may also extend entirely across the vehicle and be similarly connected to aligned shoes in both aisles.

in order to lift the container itli the book retracted. it is of course merely necessary to hift it lightly away front the side. to free it from the tiycd hook means 38.

A protectne shield 70 is pioudetl in the well as to pre\cnt interference bctw ecu any ol the parts. such as the con eyor chain mechanism 30. and the re training mechanism.

This Detailed Description of Preferred Form of the Invention. and the accompanying drawings. have been furnished in compliance with the statutory requirement to set forth the best mode contemplated by the IIHLIF tor of carrying out tltc in entionv The prior portions consisting of the "Abstract of the Disclosure and the "Background of the ln\ention" are furnished without prejudice to comply with administrative requirements of the Patent Office.

What is claimed is:

I. In a con eyoriled \ehiclc ha ing a conveyor sys tem thereon along which cargo members of different widths are movable. cargo restraining means carried by the which: in areas between spaced elements of the con\eyor system and spaced from both sides of such sy stem. said restraining means including a restraining element movable between a raised holding position in which it projects above the top plane of the conveyor system and a depressed position below such plane. means biasing said element to the raised position. and an actuating shoe for the restraining element engage able by a cargo member which extends laterally thereover in bridging relation thereto while resting on the conveyor. to move the restraining means down to the retracted position. and whereby at other times said element is raised and is thereby effective to extend upwardly beside and restrain a cargo member which lies to one side of such bridging position.

2. (argo restraining means as defined in claim I wherein the shoe has downwardly inclined cumming portions engageable by a cargo member moving into the position corresponding to such bridging relation to effect such downward movement of the restraining element. and said shoe also has laterally inclined camming portions for guiding such a cargo member to a desired position to one side of the restraining element.

3. (at-go restraining means as defined in claim I wherein said restraining element is a hook-like member tnovable laterally as well as upwardly when moving to the raised holding position whereby it may overlie part of a cargo member to restrain upward movement thereof,

4. ('argo restraining means as defined in claim 2 wherein said restraining element is a hook-like member movable laterally as well as upwardly when moving to the raised holding position whereby it may overlie part of a cargo member to restrain upward movement thereof.

5. Cargo restraining means as defined in claim i wherein the restraining element is movable laterally as Well as upwardly and is effccti e to restrain unwanted vertical movement of a cargo member lying to one side thereof. and laterally facing abutment portions carried by the shoe for restraining unwanted lateral movement of such a cargo member.

(1. ('argo restraining means as defined in claim 2 wherein the restraining element is movable laterally as well as upwardly and is effective to restrain unwanted vertical movement of a cargo member lying to one side thereof. and laterally facing abutment portions carried h the shoe for restraining unnanted lateral mmement of such a cargo member.

7. In a conreyori/ed vehicle of the type hzning at least three longitudinalh c\tending coplanar conveyor portions ith aisles therehetu'een. cargo restraining means in each aisle. each of said restraining means including a restraining element mo\ ahle between a raised holding position in which it projects above the top plane of the conretor portions and a depressed position helou such plane. and an actuating shoe for each such restraining element engageahle by a cargo incinher which is resting upon two or more of the conveyor portions in bridging relation to the intermediate aisle. to mow said restraining means in such intermediate aisle to the retracted position.

8. (argo restraining means as defined in claim I in' eluding a frame. said restraining element comprising a hook-like member journaletl in the frame on an axis hclon the conveyor top plane. the actuating shoe also being journaled in the frame. means operativel connecting the shoe to the hook-like member. and means biasing the restraining element to the raised position.

Cargo restraining means as defined in claim 8 including a suhframe assemhl secured to the vehicle and defining said frame. the hiasing means also being carried by said frame. the means connecting the shoe to the hook-like memher comprising an arm attached to the shoe and directly engaging the interior of the hooklike memher.

I0. ('argo restraining means as defined in claim 8 in which the actuating shoe is also hiased upnardly to a raised position. the shoe having eannnahlc surfaces inclined LlU\\I'l\\'dlLll from a central portion thereof. the shoe when in the raised position ha\ ing its central por tion above such plane and the cantmahle surfaces being inclined don'nn'ardl therefrom in opposite directions longitudinally of the conveyor portions.

11. Cargo restraining means as defined in claim 9 in which the actuating shoe is also hiased upnardl} to a raised position. the shoe having eammahle surfaces inclined do\\ n\\'ardl from a central portion thereof. the shoe when in the raised position hating its central portion ahore such plane and the eammahle surfaces heing inclined do\\'n\\'ardl therefrom in opposite directions longitudinall of the conveyor portions.

12. Cargo restraining means as defined in claim I including means for moving the shoe and restraining element do\\'n\\'ardl to depressed position comprising an actuator therefore carried hy the vehicle at a position remote front the cargo restraining means.

l3. (at-go restraining means as defined h claim 9 including means for moving the shoe and restraining element downnardl) to depressed position comprising an actuator therefore carried h the \ehicle at a position remote from the cargo rc training means.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1838538 *Aug 25, 1930Dec 29, 1931Universal Winding CoMoistening device
US2351314 *May 20, 1943Jun 13, 1944Stephania ArioLocking device for roll-off van bodies
US2956835 *Sep 6, 1957Oct 18, 1960Clark Equipment CoLocking device for freight carrier
US3125035 *Apr 9, 1956Mar 17, 1964 Freight handling means
US3399921 *Dec 27, 1966Sep 3, 1968Clark Equipment CoLatching mechanism
US3612316 *Dec 22, 1969Oct 12, 1971Mc Donnell Douglas CorpCargo loading and restraint system
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4388030 *Dec 24, 1980Jun 14, 1983The Boeing CompanyEndwise pushdown guide and lateral restraint fitting for cargo
US4696609 *Apr 21, 1986Sep 29, 1987Ancra CorporationPallet restraint mechanism for cargo loading system
US6015177 *Dec 23, 1997Jan 18, 2000Tijerina; RaulVehicular storage unit transit system
US7073994 *May 3, 2004Jul 11, 2006Telair International GmbhCargo deck for an aircraft
US7134829Mar 9, 2004Nov 14, 2006Absolute Electronic Solutions, Inc.Cargo trailer
US7950675May 12, 2006May 31, 2011Absolute Electronic Solutions, Inc.Cargo carrier
US8317215Jun 23, 2009Nov 27, 2012Absolute Electronic Solutions, Inc.Fifth wheel trailer with adjustable deck
DE2711253A1 *Mar 15, 1977Sep 22, 1977Pepsico IncVorrichtung zum festlegen und umsetzen von ladegut
WO1982002174A1 *Dec 18, 1981Jul 8, 1982Boeing CoPushdown guide and lateral restraint for cargo
Classifications
U.S. Classification414/507, 198/721, 410/92, 414/514, 244/137.1
International ClassificationB60P1/52, B60P1/00, B60P7/06
Cooperative ClassificationB60P1/52
European ClassificationB60P1/52
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Aug 30, 1993ASAssignment
Owner name: IBJ SCHRODER BANK & TRUST COMPANY, NEW YORK
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:FRUEHAUF TRAILER CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:006668/0984
Effective date: 19930820
Aug 30, 1993AS06Security interest
Owner name: FRUEHAUF TRAILER CORPORATION
Owner name: IBJ SCHRODER BANK & TRUST COMPANY ONE STATE STREET
Effective date: 19930820
Apr 27, 1989AS03Merger
Owner name: FRUEHAUF CORPORATION
Owner name: FRUEHAUF CORPORATION, A MI CORP.
Owner name: LMC
Owner name: LMC ACQUISITION CORPORATION, A MI CORP.
Effective date: 19870330
Apr 27, 1989ASAssignment
Owner name: FRUEHAUF CORPORATION
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNORS:LMC ACQUISITION CORPORATION, A MI CORP.;FRUEHAUF CORPORATION, A MI CORP.;LMC ACQUISITION CORPORAITON;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:005132/0001
Effective date: 19870330