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Publication numberUS3874760 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 1, 1975
Filing dateJan 28, 1974
Priority dateApr 27, 1972
Publication numberUS 3874760 A, US 3874760A, US-A-3874760, US3874760 A, US3874760A
InventorsGuthmiller Bernell J, Guthmiller La Vern R, Sullivan Herbert J
Original AssigneeGuthmiller Bernell J, Guthmiller La Vern R, Sullivan Herbert J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sheathed electrical coupling
US 3874760 A
Abstract
A cluster of horns project in generally parallel relationship from an insulating case. Each horn has a longitudinal bore stepped to provide progressively smaller sections toward the horn tip. Wires extending through the horns are secured to a connector block within the case. The end of the case remote from the horns is closed in waterproof fashion by a cap having a flange parallel to and spaced from a central boss to form a deep groove into which the margin of the case wall fits. The cap may have apertures through it for receiving electrical conductors sheathed by sleeves having end projections fitting sockets in the cap. Alternatively such sleeves can be coupled with other sleeves to provide smaller sheathed couplings.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Guthmiller et al. [45] A 1, 1975 SHEATHED ELECTRICAL COUPLING 3.395.382 7/1968 Wc'ttg unl 339/209 I76] Inventors: Bernell J. Guthmiller, 12713 SE. 5x1 3}; l67th PL, Renton Wash. 98055. La i Vern R. Guthmiller, 28003 152ml a Ave S E Heme" L Sullivan 9904 11mm b.\amu ierRoy D. Frazier South 7 6 Pl both 0f Kent Assistant E.taIrmierRobert A. Hafer Wash 1380 Almnu'y, Agem, or Firm-Robert W. Beach 7 [2...] Flled. Jan- 28, [21] Appl. No.: 436,990 A cluster of horns project in generally parallel rela- Reiated US. Application Dam tionship from an insulating case. Each horn has a lon- [63] Continuation of Scr. No. 24:: 210 April *7 I97 q bore Stepped 9' Y abundmcd sections toward the horn tip. Wires extending through the horns are secured to a connector block within the {52} Us. H 339/60 R. 339/10] 339/); R case The end of the case remote from the horns is 339/209 5 i closed in waterproof fashion by a cap having a flange [5!] 1m. CL i 11/02 parallel to and spaced from a central boss to form a [58] Field of Search N 33959;) '98 10] deep groove into which the margin of the case wall 339/m3 242 206 108 1] 7 l fits. The cap may have apertures through it for receiv- 51 if ing electrical conductors sheathed by sleeves having i end projections fitting sockets in the cup. Alterna- [56) References Cited tively such sleeves can be coupled with other sleeves UNITED STATES PATENTS to provide smaller sheathed couplings 3,209.06) 9/l965 Ruddcll ct al. 174 91 4 Claims ll Drawing Figures w I' I 3 PATENTEDAPR I 3975 SEIZEI 1 BF 3 SIIIIA'IHIII) IILEUIRK'AI. (UIILING This is a continuation of application Ser. No. 148.210. tiled Apr. 27. W71. now abandoned.

I'he present in ention relates to an electrical coupling which is sheathed in waterproof fashion so that it can be used safely in underground or moist installations.

A principal object of the imention is to prtwide an electricalcoupling construction enclosed in waterproof fashion in a sheath of insulating character which is tough and rugged and cannot be ruptured or injured readily.

A further object is to pro\ide an electrical coupling sheathed so that the electrical coupling lneans will be readily accessible. quickly and without great difficulty. although the sheath is waterproof.

Another object is to provide an electrical coupling which. while being sheathed. is versatile so as to pro vide for connection of various numbers and si/es of wires in different arrangements.

It is also an object to enable a fuse to be incorporated in a sheathed electrical coupling.

An additional object is to pro\ide a selection of sheathing components. various types of which can be selected and assembled in different relationships to sheath a variety ol electrical couplings.

FIG. I is a top perspective ola sheathed electrical coupling. FIG. 2 is an end view of such coupling. FIG. 3 is a longitudinal section through the coupling taken on line 3*3 of Fl(i. 2. FIG. 4 is a top perspecthe ol' the coupling showing components in exploded relationship.

FIG. 5 is a top perspective of a different type of sheathed electrical coupling. FIG. 6 is a longitudinal section through such coupling taken on line 6-fi of FIG. 5. Fl(i. 7 is a top perspective ofsuch coupling with the components shown in exploded relationship.

FIG. 8 is a top perspective ofstill a different sheathed electrical coupling. PK]. 9 is a longitudinal section through such coupling. FIG. It) is a top perspective of the coupling with components in exploded relationship.

FIG. I I is a longitudinal section through an electrical coupling having the same type olsheath as the coupling shown in FIGS. 8, 9 and II). but having different electrical components.

The sheathed electrical coupling shown in FIGS. I to 4. inclusive. includes the sheathing ease I in the form of a cup having an open end. A cluster of horns 2 project longitudinally from the bottom of the cup in generally parallel arrangement. Each of these horns is tapered externally away from the cup bottom. A stepped bore extends longitudinally through each horn. and normally such bore is blind. opening into the litterior of the cup I. The end of the bore at the tip of the horn is closed by a button 3.

The exterior ol'each horn is marked at intervals along its length by markers 4n. 4/1. 4(- and 41/ which may he in the form of small annular ribs or grooves as are the markers 41!. 4/1 and 4r. or may he shoulders such as the marker 4d. Each of these markers is in substantially radial regist y with the transition location 5a. 5h. 51' and 51/. respectively. of the longitudinal bore in the horn. In the horn shown in FIG. 3 each such bore is composed of sections 6a. 6h. 6(- and 6d. The transition between such sections is formed by shoulders 50. Sh and Sr. The cross sections of the sections is progressively smaller (ill toward the tip ot'the horn. and the outer end ol the section (it! is terminated by the end wall 5d formed by the interior of btttton 3.

An electrical conductor connector block 7 is re- 5 ceived within the cup I of the case formed by the cup I and horns 2. In the type ol'conneetor block illustrated in FI(iS. 3 and 4. two components of angle shape are arranged with corresponding flanges 8 disposed iit parallel relationship and secured together by bolts 9. The

to other flange of each component has in it one or more apertures I0 having axes extending perpendicular to such l'lange. Wires can he secured in such apertures by set screws II. Such apertures should be sufficiently large so that wires of a considerable range of si/es can I be recei ed in the apertures.

By locating a spacer S of proper thickne s between the flanges 8 the apertures II) of the two components can be spaced apart appropriately so that wires \Y of a given si/e pressed against the sides of apertures HI by Ill set screws 1] will he axially aligned with horns 2.

thereby d\ oiding deflection ol'sueh wires between their respective horns 2 and connector apertures III. .-\lso each horn is se\ered at a transition location 4a. 4/. 4(-

or 4d such that the end section (w. (il ()t or ()(I' of the :5 stepped horn bore will lit the insulation of the wire W snugly and the waterproof fashion. as shown at the left of FIG. 3.

By tttili/ation of the connector block shown in FIGS. 3 and 4. a junction can be made within the sheath hetween two pairs of wires extending through horns 2.

While such wires in FIG. I are shown as being all of the same sire. such uniformity ot'sive is not necessary. Also it is not necessary for the connector block to be connected to the sheath in any manner. The wires \N can simply he slid through the horns 2 until their exposed ends project beyond the margin of the cup portion of the sheath. and the connector block can be secured to the bare wire ends by the set screws l I in such position. The horns can then he slid along the wires toward the connector block until such block engages the bottom of the sheath cup.

With the connector block thus housed fully within the sheath cup 1. the open end of such cup can be closed in watertight fashion by a cap l2. Such cap has an axially extending marginal flange l3 spaced outward from a central plug portion 14. The circumference of such plug portion and the inner circumference otthe flange I3 are spaced apart a distance to form a deep groove of a radial width substantially equal to the thickness of the margin of the open end of cup I.

Because of the proportions of the thickness of the cup margin and the radial width of the cap groove, the engagement of the cup margin in the cap groove will be watertight. The cup margin and the cap groove can be secured in engagement by providing an annular interl'itting rib and groove on such cup margin and cap deep groove. In FIG. 3 an annular rib I5 is shown projecting inwardly from the margin of the cup I and received in a complemental annular groove [6. shown best in FIG. 4. in the periphery of the plug 14.

The cup I and horns 2 of the sheath case are made of tough. somewhat llexihle. elastotner material prefer ably having a duronietcr value of about 70. The sheath cap 12 is made of similar material but preferably somewhat softer. such as having a duronieter value of approximately 50, so as to facilitate assembly of the cap onto the cup. In order to make the sheath as compact as possible while allowing adequate body for the plug I4 a central cavity I7 can be provided in the inner side of the cap to afford sufficient space to house the connector block 7 within the cup. The cap recess is shown as being of spherical section shape so as to minimize radial deflection of the plug l4.

In the sheathed electrical coupling shown in FIGS. 5. h and 7. the ease including the cup I and the horns 2 is the same as described in connection with FIGS. I to 4. Al o. the marginal portion of the cap I2 and its structure which fits with the margin of the cup I is the same as that described in connection with FIGS. I to 4. This coupling differs. howe\er in the type of connector block used and in the central portion of the cap. Here the coupling is used for taking off taps from wires W extending through horns 2 instead ofsimply providing a junction between wires extending through such horns.

In the coupling of FIGS. 5 to 7 two connector blocks 7' are located in the cavity ofcup I in side-hy-side relationship and are separated by a partition I8 of insulating material. whiclrmay be soft rubber. [Zach of the connector blocks has in it apertures It) for receiving the ends of wires estending through horns 2. Between these apertures is a further aperture I) receiving the tip 20 of a fuse clip 2|. As shown at the left of FIG. 6. the connector block 7' can be secured to the cap I2 by a set screw I9 clamping the tip 20 of the fuse clip in the aperture I9 of such connector block after the reduced tip portion of the fuse clip has been inserted through an aperture in the cap. The enlarged portion of the fuse clip is snugly received in a complemental bore in the cap I2.

A fuse clip 22 can cooperate with the fuse clip 2! to hold opposite ends of a fuse 23 in such clips. A tap wire 24 can he held in the end of fuse clip 22 opposite the fuse by a set screw 25. The fuse clip 22. the end portion of wire 24 secured in the fuse clip. and the principal portion of the fuse 23 can all he enclosed in a sheath formed by a sleeve 26 of soft rubber. The end of such sleeve encircling the fuse 23 is reduced to fit a complc' mental aperture in the outer side of cap I2, axially aligned and communicating with the bore receiving clip 2|.

The sheathed electrical coupling shown in FIGS. 5, (a and 7 can he used by assembling the connector block 7' with the cap I2 by inserting the fuse clips 2| through the cap apertures with their tips clamped in the apertures I9 ofthe connector block. Wires W can then he inserted through horns 2 as described in connection with the coupling shown in FIGS. I to 4 and their ends inserted and clamped in apertures 10' ofthe connector blocks by set screws II. The case 1.2 can then he slid along the wires W toward the cap until the margin of the cup I is inserted into the deep groove of the cap in locking engagement as shown in FIG. 6.

The tap connection ofthe coupling is then made by securing the tip of wire 24 in the fuse clip 22 by set screw 25 and sliding sleeve 26 along the wire over clip 22 as shown in FIG. 6. One end of fuse 23 can then be inserted in the clip 22 and the opposite end ofsuch fuse and the reduced end of sleeve 26 can simultaneously be inserted into the cap IZ' until the other end of fuse 23 has entered the other fuse clip 2] in the relationship Itl shown in FIG. 6. 1\ fused connection will then he colitpleted between a supply wire or wires W and a tap wire or wires 24.

A sheathed electrical coupling including a fuse can be pro\ ided between single wires without the complication of the casing I.2. Such a coupling is shown in FIGS. 8. 9 and III as including a fuse clip 22 in which the tip of a wire 24 is secured by a set screw 25 and such clip and wire end are received within a sheath sleeve 26 as described in connection with the electrical coupling shown in FIGS. 5. 6 and 7. One end of a fuse 23 is fitted into the fuse clip 22 previously described. The opposite end of the fuse can he titted into a similar fuse clip 22 secured on the end of a wire 24' by a set screw 25. This fuse clip and wire end portion are re ceived within an insulating sleeve 27.

The end of the bore through sleeve 27 opposite that through which wire 24' extends is considerably larger than the wire-receiving bore end. In fact. such larger end is formed by a flange extending axially of the sleeve which is of a size to fit over the reduced end portion of sleeve 26 as shown best in FIG. 9. to provide a sheath completely enclosing the fuse and fuse clips.

In the sheathed electrical coupling shown in FIG. II the sleeves 2(1 and 27 tre used to enclose plug and socket elements of a connector for connecting wire 24 and wire 24 without interposition of a fuse. The socket element 28 of the connector is secured to the tip of wire 24 by set screw 25. Correspondingly, the plug element 29 of the connector is secured to the tip of wire 24' by set screw 25. Preferably the reduced portion of sleeve 26 is long enough to cover the socket element 28 of the connector, and the axial flange of sleeve 27 is long enough to encircle the plug tip of the connector element 29. When the plug and socket elements are interengagcd the reduced portion ofslecve 26 will be inserted within the axial flange portion of sleeve 27 in the manner illustrated in FIG. I].

We claim:

I. A sheathed electrical coupling comprising a sheathing case. a cluster of hollow horns projecting from said sheathing case in generally parallel arrangement. a wire extending through the bore of at least one of said horns into said case. wire-connecting means received in said case and connected to said wire. cap means for closing said ease having an aperture therethrough. electrical-conducting means extending through such aperture, a second wire connectible to said electrical-conducting means, and a sheath sleeve encircling the end portion of said second wire and engageahle with said cap means. said cap means and said sheath sleeve having interlitting projection and socket means for retaining said sheath sleeve and said cap means in assembled relationship.

2. The sheathed electrical coupling defined in claim I. the sheath sleeve including a projection and the cap means having a socket into which the sheath sleeve projection can be inserted.

3. The coupling defined in claim I. in which the wire means and the electrical-eonducting means are readily disengageable.

4. The coupling defined in claim I. and fuse-holding means covered by the sheath sleeve.

t: =t= k

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification439/588, 174/91, 439/732
International ClassificationH01R13/52
Cooperative ClassificationH01R13/5221
European ClassificationH01R13/52P1