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Publication numberUS3876032 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 8, 1975
Filing dateNov 15, 1973
Priority dateNov 15, 1973
Publication numberUS 3876032 A, US 3876032A, US-A-3876032, US3876032 A, US3876032A
InventorsFerino Ferdinand
Original AssigneeFerino Ferdinand
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Motorized skates
US 3876032 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 1 Ferino 1 1 Apr. 8, 1975 1 MOTORIZED SKATES [76] lnventor: Ferdinand Ferino, 1930 Cottman Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 191 l l [22] Filed: Nov. 15, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 416,076

[52] US. Cl. 180/9.2 R; 180/1 G; 280/11.11 E [51] Int. Cl. B62d 55/04 [58] Field ofSearch... 280/l1.1 R, 11.11 E, 11.1 ET;

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1.672.700 6/1928 Vass 280/1 1.11 E 1,694,671 12/1928 Rodclli 280/1 1.11 E 2,625,229 1/1953 Van Voorhccs 28()/11.11 ET FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLlCATlONS 513,031 12/1937 United Kingdom 28()/11.11 E

246,383 2/1926 ltaly 280/ll.11 E 77.043 9/1894 Germany 280/ll.1 ET 104.127 4/1924 Switzerland 280/11.11 R

Primary E.\'aminerDavid Schonberg Assistant Examiner-Terrance L. Siemens Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Woodcock, Washburn, Kurtz & Mackiewicz [57] ABSTRACT Motorized skates which are driven by a compact motor located on the skate frame, power for which is supplied by battery means. On/off and speed switches are readily accessible and may be attached to the operator by a belt. In one preferred embodiment, axially mounted wheels are used and the structure resembles that of conventional skates. In another preferred embodirnent, an endless treaded track is used in place of the wheels.

7 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures Pi-JEHIEDAPR 8197s 3.876.032

sum 1 0f 2 SCR CONTROL PATENTEDAPR 8l975 sum 2 or 2 BACKGROUND or THE INVENTION The subject invention may be used for recreational and sporting purposes as well as providing a bona tide transportation means. The self-propulsion capability of the skates adds an extra dimension to recreationalskating.

Control means such as the brake, clutch and on/off controls provide safety features which minimize dangers so that the subject skates are comparable to conventional skates from a safety veiwpoint.

' Various types of power skates have-been known in the past such as for example, US. Pat. No. 2,857,008 Pirrello and British Pat. No. 562,281 Hancocks; however, these skates have been without exception cumbersome pieces'of equipment and wholly unsuited for recreational and sporting uses. Various types of motors have been contemplated such as gasoline driven motors, the use of which crcates'a magnitude of problems for the user. For example, gasoline storage requires a sizable tank which is not consistent with the compact design necessary to make a motorized skate practical. Further, safety problems are involved with the use of gasoline, and the operator of such a skate would likely be restricted from various premises and buildings. Fumes and exhaust are also unattractive side effects of gas operated motorized skates.

Also, in the past. skate motors have been unduly large and bulky and in some variations, such as shown in the aforementionedU.S. Pat. No. 2,857,008 have been carried on the operators back. The weight of the motor makes the use of such skates impractical.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is an object of the subject invention to provide a motorized skate designed to minimize the danger of falling.

In accordance with the above object, a preferred embodiment of the invention comprises a self-propelled skating device to be used in pairs for a human rider in which each skating device comprises a skate platform adapted to support a riders foot such that the toe of the 'rider is disposed near the front of the platform and the heel is disposed near the rear of the platform. A plurality of rotatable members are mounted on the platform and in driving communication with the base surface upon which the skating device is operated such that one or more of the rotatable members is rotatably mounted near the front of the platform and one or more of the rotatable members is mounted near the rear of the platform. An electric motor mounted on the platform is actuated by suitable means and is directly coupled to the rotatable members mounted near the front of the platform.

In one embodiment of the invention, the rotatable members comprise wheels. In another embodiment of the invention, endless belts are frictionally disposed around the rotatable members.

The preferred embodiment of the invention may also comprise a brake comprising a member extending to the rear of the platform which engages the base surface when the skating device is tilted.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. l is a front elevational view showing a motorized skate with conventional wheels; Y

DETAILED DESCRIPTION With reference to FIG. 1, a motorized skate as contemplated by the subject invention is shown. The skate has a base platform 10 which is on the order of conventional childrens roller skates only having a portion 12 extending to the rear of retaining structure used to secure an operators foot. The platform 10 may comprise an integral flat member which will preferably be constructed of steel or plastic. Forward clamps 14 are shown which are adjustable to engage the sole of the operators shoe and an adjustable curved heel plate 16 abuts the heel of the operators shoe in the customary manner of conventional skates. A strap 17 which may be leather and is adjustable extends from the heel plate over the arch of the operators foot to secure the foot to the skate.

The skate has pairs of forward and rear wheels 18 and 19 respectively. The wheels are joined by their axles 20 and 22 which are secured to the skate platform 10 by means of brackets 21, 23. The forward bracket 21 secures the front axle 20 below platform 10 while the rear bracket 23 secures the rear axle above platform 10 (see FIG. 2). The structure of the brackets, 21, 23 is not important but may be hollowed members which receive the axles and are secured in any conventional manner to the platform 10. As seen in FIG. 1, the rear wheels 19 are shown to be substantially larger than the forward wheels 18 thus providing better drive capability. They also are provided with rubber tires 25 as shown.

A small electric motor 28 is shown mounted on the rear portion 12 of the platform. A motor such as sold by Louis Marx Co. of Erie, Pa. and designated No. 4784 Speedy Motor may be used to provide sufficient power for skates. The motor 28 drives the rear axle 22 and wheels 19 by means of any standard type of speed changing linkage as for example, the chain 30 which extends between sprockets 32 and 34 shown in phantom within the encasement 36. Various other types of the many speed changing mechanisms may be substituted for the chain and sprocket mechanism such as spur gear trains. Wires 40 are shown extending from the motor 28 and lead to the battery 42 worn by the operator (see FIG. 3). The battery may as well be mounted on a belt 44 which also can include a control panel 46 with switches for on/off and speed control.

As shown in the schematic circuit diagram in FIG. 3A, the motor 28 is connected in series with the DC power supply or battery 42 and-the speed control 46 which may comprise SCR motor control circuitry. A fuse 47'is also included in the series circuit.

FIGS. 1 and 2 show the rear platform extension 12 upon which the motor 28 is placed. An alternate embodiment includes projecting the rear platform extension 12 upwardly at about a 45 angle, thus positioning the motor 28 closer to the ankle of the rider and in a plane above that of axle 22. This positioning is advantageous in that it eliminates the problem of extension 12 dragging on curbs. steps or uneven terrain.

The preferred embodiment of the motorized skate is shown in FIGS. 4 and 5. In place of the conventional wheels, the embodiment as best seen in FIG. 5 has an endless rubber track 50 with traction treads or rubber stubs 51 shown extending partially therearound although in actuality, these will extend completely around the track 58. The track 50 extends between the front and rear pairs of belt wheels 52 and 54 respectively. The track 50 is held in grooves 51 of the wheels 52 and 54 which are of such-a size that the track 50 extends outwardly from the wheels 52 and 54 to keep the wheels themselves from touching the ground. In place of the platform shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, front and I rear crosswise frame members 56 and 57 respectively are used to support the operators shoe as best seen in FIG. 5. It will be noted that this type of structure places the operators feet much closer to the ground.

The belt wheels 52 and 54 have extending therebetween side panels 66 which forms part of the framework along with front and rear upright portions 68 and 70 respectively. These upright portions 68 and 70 extend upwardly from crosswise frame members 56 and 57 and may be integral therewith. Front upright members 68 may be rigidly secured to side panels 66 or may be secured together by the axle structure which would extend through apertures therein. The front right member 68 may be an integral part of casing 71 which is used to enclose the speed changing mechanism. The rear wheel location is adjustable by means of slots 72 in side panels 66 and the lug and nuts which are used to secure the rear wheel to the framework. In this manner, tension may be controlled and the endless track 50 adjusted according to conditions. An axle 58 extends between the front belt wheels 52 and is driven by motor 60 and the chain 62 and sprockets 63 and 64. As stated previously, a series of gears or other mechanisms may be substituted for the chain arrangement.

The battery 74 is shown adjacent motor 60 and in this embodiment a clutch 75 which engages the axle 58 is also shown. A housing member, not shown, may cover all of these parts to esthetieally improve the skate. Control means may be provided as shown in FIG. 3 or may be located at the top of the battery 74 (see FIG. 4).

A brake 76 is shown which can be brought into play by the operator shifting his weight to the rear by rocking on his heels so that the brake engages the ground or floor.

.Thus. the subject invention provides self-propelling motorized skate means either by means of the embodiment of FIG. 1 or the embodiment of FIG. 4 whereby the operator may place a skate on each foot and be selfpropelled. The electric motor may be driven by a six or twelve volt battery and the speed obtainable will be determined by such criteria as size of motor and the type of speed changing mechanism which is used.

The structure of the embodiments of FIGS. 1 and 4 may be modified in many ways and still be within the scope and spirit of the present invention. For example,

' wheels 19 with tires 25 as shown in FIG. I may be used to replace the endless track 50 means of FIG. 4; or the lower framework of FIG. 4 may be used with wheels similar to those of FIG. 1, thus placing the operators feet nearer the ground or other base surface.

For skates for children, small motors may be used to prevent the-child from obtaining speeds greater than he otherwise would be able to obtain on conventional skates. Nevertheless, the skates will provide a measure of enjoyment in that a motorized means of travel is provided.

While particular embodiments of the invention have been shown and described, it will, of course, be understood that various modifications may be made without departing from the principle of the invention. The appended claims are, therefore, intended to cover any such modifications, within the spirit and scope of the invention.

I claim:

1. A self-propelled skating device to be used in pairs for a human rider in which each said skating device comprises:

a skate platform adapted to support a riders foot such that the toe of said rider is disposed near the front of the platform and the heel is disposed near the rear of said platform; plurality of rotatable members mounted on said platform and in driving communication with the base surface upon which said skating device is operated. one or more of said rotatable members rotatably mounted near the front of said platform, and one or more of said rotatable members rotatably mounted near the rear of said platform;

electric motor means mounted on said platform;

means directly coupling said electric motor to said rotatable members mounted near the front of said platform.

2. The self-propelled skating device of claim 1 wherein said rotatable members mounted to said platform comprise axially mounted wheels.

3. The self-propelled skating device of claim 1 further comprising one or more endless belts frictionally disposed around said rotatable members.

4. The self-propelled skating device of claim 1 wherein said actuating means comprises switch and battery means mounted on said skate framework.

5. The self-propelled skating device of claim 1 including a brake comprising a member extending to the rear of said platform so as to engage the base surface when said device is tilted.

6. The self-propelled skating device of claim 1 wherein said means communicating between said electric motor and said rotatable members comprises sprockets mounted on said electric motor means and said rotatable members mounted to the front of said platform and further comprises an endless chain communicating between said sprockets.

7. A self-propelled skating device for human riders comprising:

a front and rear set of belt wheels;

framework joining said front and rear wheels including cross support members extending from the left to the right front and rear wheel respectively and positioned so that said cross members are depressed below the center point of each of said left and right wheels respectively;

an axle means extending from the left to right wheel of one of said set of wheels;

electric motor means mounted on said framework;

speed changing means communicating between said electric motor and said axle means;

endless treaded tracks extending between the left front and rear wheel and between the right front and rear wheel respectively to engage a base surface as said skating device is propelled by said motor; and

means to actuate said electric motor to propel said skating device.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1672700 *Mar 29, 1926Jun 5, 1928Joseph VargoRoller skate
US1694671 *Jan 10, 1927Dec 11, 1928Rodelli MicheleMotor-roller-skate brake
US2625229 *May 19, 1950Jan 13, 1953Voorhees Stanley VanPower-driven ski
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4094372 *Feb 28, 1977Jun 13, 1978Notter Michael AMotorized skateboard with uni-directional rear mounting
US4508187 *Jul 12, 1982Apr 2, 1985Wenzel William BPowered roller skates
US5020621 *Dec 19, 1989Jun 4, 1991Martin Christopher VElectric motor powered skateboard with integral brakes
US5048632 *Oct 18, 1989Sep 17, 1991Battel Gerard RSelf-propelled device
US5730241 *Aug 15, 1996Mar 24, 1998Chorng Rong ShyrCaterpillar track shoe
US5826674 *Oct 22, 1993Oct 27, 1998Taylor; GrantWheeled vehicle
US6341658Jul 6, 2000Jan 29, 2002Greg RosenwaldModular vehicle system having variable configurations and its associated method of assembly
US7610972 *Aug 4, 2005Nov 3, 2009Heeling Sports LimitedMotorized transportation apparatus and method
US8668039 *May 13, 2008Mar 11, 2014Raja TuliMotorized walking shoes
US8672074 *May 25, 2012Mar 18, 2014Marcus Mark Henry GaneousApparocycs
US9027690 *Jan 31, 2011May 12, 2015Paul ChavandWheeled shoes or undersoles enabling fast walking
US9526977Mar 28, 2013Dec 27, 2016Daniel B. EdneyPowered skate with automatic motor control
US20060027409 *Aug 4, 2005Feb 9, 2006Heeling Sports LimitedMotorized transportation apparatus and method
US20060145444 *Jan 3, 2005Jul 6, 2006Norman GarlandSkateboard hockey
US20080217084 *May 13, 2008Sep 11, 2008Raja TuliMotorized Walking Shoes
US20100051372 *Nov 2, 2009Mar 4, 2010Adams Roger RMotorized transportation apparatus and method
US20120325567 *May 25, 2012Dec 27, 2012Marcus Mark Henry GaneousApparocycs
US20130025955 *Jan 31, 2011Jan 31, 2013Paul ChavandWheeled shoes or undersoles enabling fast walking
EP0367645A1 *Oct 11, 1989May 9, 1990Gérard René BattelSelf-propelled engine, especially motorized roller skates
WO1996020762A1 *Dec 29, 1995Jul 11, 1996Keyes Adrian C NPowered skate system
WO2000035542A1 *Dec 15, 1999Jun 22, 2000Brandley Adam KMotorized skate
Classifications
U.S. Classification180/181, 180/9.1
International ClassificationA63C17/00, A63C17/12, A63C17/10
Cooperative ClassificationA63C17/12, A63C17/10
European ClassificationA63C17/10, A63C17/12