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Publication numberUS3876884 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 8, 1975
Filing dateMay 6, 1974
Priority dateMay 6, 1974
Publication numberUS 3876884 A, US 3876884A, US-A-3876884, US3876884 A, US3876884A
InventorsFrank M Housman, John S Demetrick
Original AssigneeAutomatic Radio Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Vehicle ignition theft control system
US 3876884 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Housman et al.

Apr. 8, 1975 [54] VEHICLE IGNITION THEFT CONTROL SYSTEM [75] Inventors: Frank M. Housman, Lincoln; John S. DeMe trick, Lexington. both of Mass.

[73] Assignee: Automatic Radio Mfg. Co., Inc.,

' Melrose, Mass.

[22] Filed: May 6, I974 21 Appl. No.: 467,253

[52] 11.8. C1. 307/10 AT; 180/114; 340/64; 200/46 [51] Int. Cl. 18601 25/04 [58] Field of Search 307/10 AT; 180/114; 340/63. 64; 317/258; 200/46 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,720.284 3/1973 Myers 180/114 3.777.306 12/1973 Speickhoff 307/10 AT X Primary E.raminerHerman Hohauser Attorney. Agent, or Firm-Richard .1. Birch [57] ABSTRACT A vehicle ignition theft control system for vehicles having a conventional ignition system and a capacitive discharge ignition system for controlling current flow through the primary winding of an ignition coil. Means are provided for operatively connecting either the conventional or CD ignition system to the primary winding of the ingition coil. The electrical connection of the selected ignition system to the primary winding of the coils achieved by means of a two position, substantially planar, removable jumper or ignition key. The planar key has a first plurality of jumper elements on the front surface and a second plurality of jumper elements on the back surface. The jumper elements form a first predetermined'pattern of electrical connections when the jumper is in a first position and a second predetermined pattern of electrical connections when the jumper is in a second position. The second position is obtained by flipping over the planar jumper. In the preferred embodiment, the output of the CD ignition system is directly connected to the primary winding of the ignition coil without utilizing any of the jumper elements. The vehicle battery is connected to the primary winding of the ignition coil in the conventional ignition system mode through a set of contacts on a relay. Energization of the relay is controlled by at least one jumper element on the "key."

17 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures nition system.

1 VEHICLE IGNITION THEFT CONTROL SYSTEM BACKGROUND or I NvENTION In recent years there has been considerable interest in other ignition systems besides the conventional kettering system with its battery, transformer coil and cam-driven mechanical switch (distributor points). Early efforts were directed toward replacing the mechanical current switching distributor points with a solid state switch. Various transistor switching circuits were proposed which employed the mechanical distributor points as trigger source for controlling the conduction state of the switching transistor. A currently available improvement of this type of general circuit is found in the Chrysler Corporations electrical-ignition systems which employ a magnetic reluctor to generate the transistor switching trigger.

Another type of ignition system is the so-called CD or capacitive discharge ignition system. Although CD ignition systems have not been sold in large numbers as O.E.M. equipment, such systems are currently enjoying wide popularity in the after market. CD ignitions are available on the after market from a number of manufacturers either under the manufacturers name or under private brand names. These ignitions can be purchased in assembled or kit form.

Installation of the CD ignition on the vehicle is relatively simple because only four wires are required: batteryj ignition coil positive; ignition coil negative; and trigger (distributor points or other suitable triggering source). Ground is normally provided through the case of the CD unit and the frame of the vehicle. A wiring harness and a pair ofterminal boards, each having two terminals, are employed to connect the CD unit to the ignition coil. The terminal boards a're mounted on the positive and negative binding posts of the ignition coil and the associated vehicle wiring is connected to the outer terminal of the corresponding board in a known manner. Some CD units also include a switch to permit the vehicle operator to select between a conventional ignition mode and a CD ignition mode.

Electrical power-for the after market CD ignition systems is controlled by the conventional automotive ignition switch and key. Unfortunately, the ignition switch is relatively easily bypassed by a jumper wire orwires. This situation affords little protection against a thief.

It is accordingly a general object of the invention to provide vehicle ignition theft control system.

' It is a specific object of the invention to provide a vehicle theft-control system for vehicles having a conventional ignition system and-"a CD ignition system.

I'tisanother object of the invention to provide a vehicle theft control system which permits the authorized user to select between a conventional ignition system and a capacitive discharge ignition system.

It is-still another object ofthe invention to provide for ignition system'selection by the user without producing radio frequency interference on the vehicle radio.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a removable electrical jumper or key which can be removed vby the vehicle owner to disable both the conventional and CD ignition systems.

- It is a feature of the invention that the electrical jumper or keys can be individually coded to provide a number of unique and non-interchangable keys.

It is another feature of the invention that it can be employed with various types of existing after market ignition systems including CD, transistor and magneto.

Theseobjects and features and other objects and features of the invention will best be understood from a detailed description of a preferred embodiment thereof, selected for purposes of illustration and shown in the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. I is an illustration in partial schematic block and diagrammatic form of a vehicle ignition circuit in a CD mode;

FIG. 2 is an illustration showing the circuit of FIG. 1 in a conventional ignition mode;

FIG. 3A is an enlarged, detailed plan view of the CD Ignition side of one jumper or ignition key;

FIG. 3B is an enlarged, detailed view of the Standard Ignition side of the jumper or key shown in FIG. 3A;

FIG. 4 is a side elevation of the jumper or key shown in FIG. 3A;

FIGS. 5A and 5B illustrate anotherjumper configuration in the key of FIGS. 3A and 3B; and, 7

FIGS. 6A and 6B illustrate still another jumper configuration for the key of FIGS. 3A and 3B.

Turning now to the drawings, there is shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 the circuitry, in partial diagramatic, schematic and block form, of the vehicle theft control system of the present invention. FIG. 1 illustrates the circuitry for the capacitive discharge or CD Ignition mode while FIG. 2 illustrates the circuitry for the Standard Ignition mode.

Looking at FIG. 1, a standard automotive ignition coil 10 is energized through an ignition key circuit 12 comprising the vehicle battery, ignition key switch and ballast resistor or resistors (not shown). The ignition key circuit 12 is connected to terminal 14a of terminal board 14 which is secured to the positive side of the ignition coil 10. Terminal 14b is electrically connected to the positive binding post of the ignition coil. A timing trigger pulse source 16 such as a standard set of automotive ignition points, is connected to another terminal board 18 mounted on the negative side of ignition coil 10. The points 16 are connected to terminal 18a and the negative binding post of the ignition coil is connected to terminal 18b.

- An ignition coil wiring harness 20 connects the coil through connector 22 to a capacitive discharge circuit 24 which is housed within a suitable case 26. The case 26 is normally grounded by physically and electrically connecting the case to the vehicle frame. Positioned within the case 26 is a control relay 28 having normally open contacts 28A and 28B. In the capacitive discharge or CD mode illustrated in FIG. 1, the relay 28 is de-energized with the normally opened contacts,

opened as shown in FIG. 1. The function of relay 28 in the Standard Ignition mode, as shown in FIG. 2, will be discussed below. w

The ignition wiring harness 20 is connected through a connector 30 to a key cable harness 32 which terminates in a key socket 34 having two sets of contacts 340' shown on FIG. 1, or to connect the standard vehicle ignition system to the ignition coil as shown in FIG. 2.

The selective interconnection of the two different types of ignition circuits is achieved by means of a plurality of jumper elements 40 positioned on both sides of the circuit board substrate 38. The jumpers 40 are arranged in a predetermined configuration to jump a corresponding pluralityof predetermined contacts in the key socket 34. The specific arrangement of these contacts will be discussed below in connection with the operation of the circuitry shown in FIGS. 1 and 2.

Each jumper or key 36 preferably has a plurality of indicia 42 comprising a key code 42a and ignition code 42b. The key code 42a identifies the jumper elements 40 on the CD side of the key. Looking at FIGS. 1 and 3A, the jumper code illustrated in these figures is 14578. Other key codes are shown in FIGS. 5A and 6A. If desired, a decorative pattern 44 can be formed on both sides of the key 36 by standard printed circuit board techniques. Preferably, the indicia 42 and decorative pattern 44 areas are covered by a light transmitting protective layer 46, as shown in FIG. 4, to protect the indicia and pattern against physical abrasion.

Having described the components of the theft control ignition system, we will now discuss the operation of the system first in the CD mode, as shown in FIG. 1, and then in the Standard Ignition mode as shown in FIG. 2. Looking at FIG. 1, the positive terminal of the vehicle battery (not shown) is connected through the ignition key circuit 12 to terminal 14a. The positive battery voltage is applied through lead 48 to the key socket 34b contact No. 5, through the key jumpers 40-5 and 40-8 to contact No. 2 on the key socket. From key socket contact No. 2, the positive voltage is applied through lead 50 to the A+ input of the capacitive discharge circuit 24. The trigger pulse for the capacitive discharge circuit 24 is obtained from the trigger source of 16 through lead 52 which terminates at key socket 34a-K. Jumpers No. 8 and No. 7 on the CD side of key 36 connect the trigger source through key socket contact 34a-J and lead 54 to the trigger input of the capacitive discharge circuit 24. The output from the capacitive discharge circuit is applied to the ignition coil binding post and terminal board terminal 14b through lead 56. The negative binding post of the ignition coil is connected to ground through terminal board terminal 18b, lead 58, key socket contacts 34a-F, jumper contacts No. 5 and No. 6 on the CD side of the key 36, key socket contact 34a-B, lead 60, and the case 26 of the capacitive discharge unit. Alternatively, or in addition to the case grounding, a separate ground lead 62 can be employed.

Turning now to FIG. 2 which illustrates the interconnection of the standard vehicle ignition system to the ignition coil 10, it can be seened at the key 36 has been flipped over to the Standard Ignition position so that the standard side of the key engages key socket contacts 34A while the CD side of the key engages key socket contacts 34b. The same numbers are used in FIG. 2 to identify the components in FIG. 1.

The positive battery voltage is applied through ignition key circuit 14 to the terminal board 14a and from there through lead 48 to contact 34b-5. Jumpers No. 1 and No. 5 on key 36 transfer the positive voltage from key socket contact 34b-5 to key socket contact 34b-9 which in turn applies'the positive battery voltage to lead 64. Lead 64isconnected to the coil of relay 28 and provides an energization path for the relay. With the relay energized, the relay contacts 28a and 28b are closed thereby also applying the positive battery voltage through lead 56 and connector 22 to the positive binding postterminal 14b of the ignition coil. The ground circuit for the ignition coil 10 in the Standard Ignition mode is provided through the negative terminal binding post 18b, lead 58, key socket contact 34a- F, jumper contacts No. 5 and No. 8 on the standard side 36b of the key, key socket contact 34a-K and lead 52 which terminates at the standard ignition distributor points 16. Given the wiring just described, the ignition circuit will operate in the Standard Ignition mode.

FIGS. 3A and B, 5A and B and 6A and B illustrate three possible jumper coding patterns. FIGS. 3A and 3B show the coding pattern for jumper contacts 14578 (as seen on the CD ignition side and including dummy jumpers No. 2 and No. 3), while FIGS. 5A and 5B illustrate the coding pattern for 24567 and FIGS. 6A and 6B illustrate the coding pattern for 13458. It will be appreciated that other coding patterns can be employed to form the appropriate jumper connections in conjunction with the use of other contacts on the key socket 34a-34b.

Normally, the key socket 34a-34b is mounted on the drivers side of the vehicle firewall. The key socket can be mounted in the glove compartment of the vehicle to provide an added degree of security. The user has the option of leaving the key 36 permanently in the key socket or removing the key to obtain a further degree of security against unauthorized use of the vehicle.

With the key socket 34a 34b mounted on the passenger side of vehicle firewall, it is very desirable to keep the output from the capacitive discharge circuit 44 off of any wires which penetrate the vehicle firewall into the passenger compartment. The reason for this is to prevent interference with the vehicle radio. It has been found that the presence of the CD circuit output pulse on a wire in the passenger compartment can cause considerable RFI. Accordingly, relay 28 is employed to provide a circuit function which permits the output of the capacitive discharge circuit 24 to be wired directly to the ignition coil 10 in the CD mode. The relay is normally de-energized in the CD mode. For standard vehicle ignition, the relay is energized as described above to apply the positive battery voltage to the ignition coil 10.

Having described a preferred embodiment of our invention, it will now be apparent to those skilled in the arts that numerous modifications can be made therein without departing from the scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims. For example, the key socket key arrangement can be employed with other circuits including the O.E.M. transistor switching ignition circuits found on current model vehicles.

What we claim and desire to secure by letters patent of the United States is:

1. A vehicle theft control system for vehicles which utilize a high tension ignition coil having primary and secondary windings and which have a vehicle ignition circuit means for controlling current flow through the primary winding of the ignition coil, said theft control system comprising:

1. An alternative ignition circuit means for controlling current flow through the primary winding of said ignition coil; and,

2. means for operatively connecting one of said ignition circuit means to said ignition coil for controlling current flow through the primary winding of the ignition coil, said connecting means including a plurality of circuit contact means and a removable, substantially'planar jumper means for selectively interconnecting said circuit contact means in a first predetermined pattern of electrical connections when said substantially planar jumper means is in a first position and in a second predetermined pattern of electrical connections when said substantially planar jumper means is in a second position.

2. A vehicle theft control system for vehicles which utilize a high tension ignition coil having primary and secondary windings and which have a vehicle ignition circuit means for controlling current flow through the primary winding of the ignition coil, said theft control system comprising:

1. An alternative ignition circuit means for controlling current flow through the primary winding of said ignition coil; and,

2. means for operatively connecting one of said ignition circuit means to said ignition coil for controlling current flow through the primary winding of the ignition coil, said connecting means including a plurality of circuit contact means and a removable, substantially planar jumper means having front and back surfaces with a first plurality of jumper elements on the front surface and a second plurality of jumper elements on the back surface, said first and second plurality of jumper elements selectively interconnecting said circuit contact means in a first predetermined pattern of electrical connections when said substantially planar jumper means is in a first position and in a second predetermined pattern of electrical connections when said substantially planar jumper means is in a secondposition.

3. The apparatus of claim 2 wherein said first predetermined pattern of electrical connections operatively connects said alternative ignition circuit means to said ignition coil for controlling current flow through the primary winding of the ignition coil and said second predetermined pattern of electrical connections operatively connects said vehicle ignition circuit means to said ignition coil.

4. The apparatus of claim 3 wherein said first and second predetermined patterns of electrical connections are different.

5. The apparatus of claim 2 wherein said substantially planar jumper means comprises a double sided printed circuit board and said jumper elements comprise printed circuits formed thereon.

6. The apparatus of claim 5 wherein said double sided, printed circuit board includes electrically unused, printed circuit formed indicia.

7. The apparatus of claim 6 wherein said indicia identifies at least a portion of one of the predetermined patterns of electrical connections formed by said jumper elements.

8. The apparatus of claim 7 wherein said indicia also identifies said first and second positions with respect to the operative connection of said first and second ignition circuit means.

9. The apparatus of claim 8 wherein said indicia are covered by a light transmitting protective, planar element.

10. The apparatus of claim 2 wherein said substantially planar jumper means includes a circuit contact edge and wherein said first and second plurality of jumper element are in superposed relation on the front and back surfaces, respectively, of said substantially planar jumper means and terminate with respect to said circuit contact edge.

11. The apparatus of claim 2 wherein said connecting means includes at least one unused circuit contact means and said substantially planar jumper means includes at least one jumper element which electrically contacts said unused contact means when the jumper means is in the first position.

12. The apparatus of claim 2 wherein said second position of the substantially planar jumper means is obtained by flipping over said jumper means so that said first and second plurality of jumper elements form said second predetermined pattern of electrical connectors.

13. The apparatus of claim 3 wherein said alternative ignition circuit means includes capacitive discharge circuit means having an output and wherein said apparatus further comprises means for electrically connecting the output of said capacitive discharge circuit means directly to the primary winding of said ignition coil without utilizing any of said jumper elements and relay means for electrically connecting a battery to said primary winding when said substantially planar jumper means is in the second position.

14. The apparatus of claim 13 wherein said relay means includes a set of normally open contacts which when closed electrically connect the battery to said primary winding and wherein the energization circuit of said relay means includes at least one of said jumper elements.

15. A vehicle theft control system for vehicles which utilize a high tension ignition coil having primary and secondary windings and which have a vehicle ignition circuit means for controlling current flow through the primary winding of the ignition coil, said theft control system comprising:

1. a capacitive discharge ignition circuit means for controlling current flow through the primary winding of said ignition coil;

2. means for operatively connecting one of said ignition circuit means to said ignition coil for controlling current flow through the primary winding of the ignition coil, said connecting means including a plurality of circuit contact means and a removable jumper means for selectively interconnecting said circuit contact means in a first predetermined pattern of electrical connections when said jumper means is in a first position and in a second predetermined pattern of electrical connections when said jumper means is in a second position; and,

3. relay means for electrically connecting a battery to said primary winding when the jumper means is in said first position.

16. The apparatus of claim 15 further characterized by means for directly connecting the output of said capacitive discharge ignition circuit means directly to the primary winding of said ignition coil without utilizing said jumper means.

17. The apparatus of claim 15 wherein said relay means includes a set of normally open contacts which when closed electrically connect the battery to said primary winding and wherein the energization circuit of said relay means includes said jumper means.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3720284 *Oct 26, 1970Mar 13, 1973P MyersTheft-prevention ignition system
US3777306 *Oct 16, 1972Dec 4, 1973Simpson AVehicle electronic security device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3973641 *Apr 25, 1975Aug 10, 1976Barker Leslie CAnti-theft device for motor vehicles
US4240516 *Jan 19, 1979Dec 23, 1980Keycon CorporationVehicle securing and lockout prevention system
US4327353 *May 9, 1980Apr 27, 1982George W. BeardSecurity system
US4645939 *Aug 8, 1985Feb 24, 1987Robinson Ronald JAutomotive device for inhibiting engine ignition
US4672225 *Jan 9, 1986Jun 9, 1987Hanisko John C PAutomotive anti-theft device
US5336934 *Dec 17, 1992Aug 9, 1994Ford Motor CompanyElectrical connection and interlock circuit system for vehicle electric drive
US5442243 *Feb 16, 1993Aug 15, 1995Electro Lock, Inc.Electrical key and lock system
US5775148 *Jun 16, 1997Jul 7, 1998Medeco Security Locks, Inc.Universal apparatus for use with electronic and/or mechanical access control devices
US6454585 *Aug 1, 2001Sep 24, 2002Compaq Information Technologies Group, L.P.Low profile NIC jumper solution using ZIF connector
US6626687Mar 25, 2002Sep 30, 2003Hewlett Packard Development Company, L.P.Low profile NIC jumper solution using ZIF connector
US6626690Aug 1, 2002Sep 30, 2003Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.Low profile NIC jumper solution using ZIF connector
US6766577Mar 25, 2002Jul 27, 2004Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.Method for changeably connecting electronic devices
US8237542 *Jul 24, 2007Aug 7, 2012Kabushiki Kaisha Tokai Denki SeisakushoKey system
US8982567Nov 15, 2012Mar 17, 2015Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.Device including circuit board with different form factor terminal sets and assemblies including the same
US9578760May 26, 2015Feb 21, 2017Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.Circuit boards, connectors, cases, circuit board assemblies, case assemblies, devices and methods of manufacturing the same
US20080024270 *Jul 24, 2007Jan 31, 2008Toshiharu KatagiriKey system
US20100062617 *Jan 7, 2009Mar 11, 2010Hyojae BangCircuit boards, connectors, cases, circuit board assemblies, case assemblies, devices and methods of manufacturing the same
CN100532891CDec 27, 2004Aug 26, 2009天津市天派工业自动化技术有限公司Electronic control unit of automatic gearbox of vehicles
DE3620297C1 *Jun 16, 1986Sep 24, 1987Helmut HirtzDiebstahlsicherung fuer Kraftfahrzeuge mit elektronischen Motorsteuergeraeten
EP0588755A1 *Apr 2, 1993Mar 23, 1994Patcol LimitedAn engine immobilizing device for a vehicle
EP2982549A1 *Aug 5, 2014Feb 10, 2016C & S Fahrzeugtechnik GmbHOBD II diagnosis read and write protection
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Classifications
U.S. Classification307/10.5, 180/287, 200/46
International ClassificationB60R25/04
Cooperative ClassificationB60R25/04
European ClassificationB60R25/04