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Publication numberUS3877337 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 15, 1975
Filing dateApr 19, 1973
Priority dateApr 20, 1972
Publication numberUS 3877337 A, US 3877337A, US-A-3877337, US3877337 A, US3877337A
InventorsObayashi Nobuharu, Sakashita Tetsuzi
Original AssigneeKawai Musical Instr Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electronic musical instrument capable of transposition
US 3877337 A
Abstract
An electronic musical instrument capable of transposition has a high frequency oscillator provided on its output side with an octave frequency divider comprising 12 counter circuits to generate 12 tone signals based on a twelve tempered scale. These tone signals are respectively frequency-divided by respective pluralities of counter circuits to obtain a plurality of octave tone signals. An oscillator for transposition comprising a plurality of counter circuits is provided and the output terminals of these counter circuits are selectively connected to an input terminal of the octave frequency divider such that the oscillation frequency generated from the high frequency oscillator is added to the oscillation frequency generated from the transposition oscillation to produce an input frequency for the octave frequency divider.
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[ Apr. 15, 1975 ELECTRONIC MUSICAL INSTRUMENT CAPABLE OF TRANSPOSITION [75] Inventors: Nobuharu Obayashi, Shizuoka-ken;

Tetsuzi Sakashita, Hammatsu, both of Japan [73] Assignee: Kabushiki Kaisha Kawai Gakki Seisakusho, Shizuoka-ken, Japan [22] Filed: Apr. 19, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 352,627

3,674,907 7/1972 Derry 84/1.01 3,743,756 7/1973 Franssen et al.... 84/l.01 3,800,060 3/1974 Hal1man,Jr. 84/1.01 X

Primary Examiner-Richard B. Wilkinson Assistant ExaminerStanley J. Witkowski Attorney, Agent, or FirmWaters, Roditi, Schwartz & Nissen [57] ABSTRACT An electronic musical instrument capable of transposition has a high frequency oscillator provided on its [30] Foreign Application Priority Data output side with an octave frequency divider compris- A r 20 1972 J v 47 39103 mg 12 counter circuits to generate 12 tone signals p apan based on a twelve tempered scale. These tone signals are respectively frequency-divided by respective plu- 8 3: igg'g rggg ralities of counter circuits to obtain a plurality of oc- [58] Fie'ld "8 01 l 1 23 445 tave tone signals. An oscillator for transposition com- 4 prising a plurality of counter circuits is provided and the output terminals of these counter circuits are selectively connected to an input terminal of the octave [56] References cued 1 frequency divider such that the oscillation frequency UNITED STATES PATENTS generated from the high frequency oscillator is added 3,023,659 3/1962 Bode 84/445 to the oscillation frequency generated from the trans. 3,236,931 2/1966 84/1-23 position oscillation to produce an input frequency for 3,379,087 4/1968 Weitzner.... 84/445 X the Octave frequency divider. 3,590,131 6/1971 Reyers 84/1.01 X 3,610,800 10/1971 Deutsch 84/1.01 4 Claims, 7 Drawing Figures I 20 20 -2 K 10 I 0002 CKT. DI I 1- --0 OR CKT. 0 -o 0 2 DIFF.

INOTE 60 4 H E- 60-3 50 v 50-2 20-12 --o OCT. FREQ. DlV. 0,- --0 60-10 CHANGE-OVER u- 0- SWITCH so 1 f" 6041 50-111 50-12 1 50 ZTRANSPOSITON osc.

1 ELECTRONIC MUSICAL INSTRUMENT CAPABL OF TRANSPOSITION FIELD OF INVENTION This invention relates to an electronic musical instrument capable of transposition.

BACKGROUND In an ordinary keyed instrument. natural keys are disposed for natural tones and chromatic keys are disposed for their derivative tones. Accordingly, when flat families or sharp families are played in this kind of instrument, transposed tones require the use of chromatic keys. For example, C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C in the case of C major are played by pressing natural keys. However, D major begins with the D tone. Accordingly, natural keys and chromatic keys must be pressed. Thus, the operation of chromatic keys is required for transposition and this applies also to the case of all electronic musical instruments. Thus, playing with transposition is very difficult for a beginner.

SUMMARY OF INVENTION The present invention relates to an electronic musical instrument which, in view of the foregoing fact, is so designed that sharp families and flat families can be played by using natural keys only in a manner similar to the case of C major, through shifting of frequencies of sound sources associated with and corresponding to the respective keys, without using chromatic keys, and such that any music can be readily played by means of a switch.

The instrument is characterized by the following: in an electronic musical instrument capable of transposition a high frequency oscillator is provided on its out-.

put side with an octave frequency divider comprising twelve counter circuits to generate twelve tone signals based on a twelve tempered scale. These tone signals are respectively frequency divided by respective pluralities of counter circuits to obtain a plurality of octave tone signals. The instrument is characterized in that an oscillator for transposition comprising a plurality of counter circuits is provided, and the output terminals of these counter circuits are selectively connected to the input terminal of the octave frequency divider such that the oscillation frequency generated from the high frequency oscillator is added to the oscillation frequency generated from the transposition oscillator so as to produce an input frequency for the octave frequency divider.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWING Examples of this invention will next be explained with reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a diagram showing the relationship between keys and tones;

FIGS. 2 and 3 are each a block diagram showing the frequency dividing system of an octave frequency divider;

FIG. 4 is a block diagram of one example of this invention;

FIG. 5 is a diagram showing a wave form at each portion thereof; and

FIGS. 6 and 7 are each a block diagram showing another example of this invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION 0 tion of chromatic keys is required for the transposition and this applies to the case of all electronic musical instruments. Thus, playing with transposition can be very difficult for the beginner.

As for systems employing an octave frequency divider, there are two such systems. FIG. 2 shows one system with octave frequency divider 20 which comprises twelve counter circuits (20-l).....(20-12) connected in series with one another. The frequency dividing ratio of each thereof is 196/185. If it is assumed that a frequency of 8372.02 Hz is generated by the first counter circuit (20-1), the oscillation frequency fm of a high frequency oscillator 10 connected to the input terminal of the octave frequency divider 20 becomes 196/185 times said frequency, that is, 8869.84 Hz. Thus, the oscillation frequencies obtained at output terminals (20- la).....(20-12a) of the counter circuits (20-1).....(20-12) become those shown in FIG. 2. The tone signals of the respective frequencies are as shown in parentheses. Though not illustrated, these oscillation frequencies are each further frequency-divided by each of a respective plurality of counter circuits, for example, into 7 stages if it is intended to cover 7 octaves of a whole piano.

FIG. 3 shows the other system of octave frequency divider 20. It comprises twelve counter circuits (20-l).....(l2-12) connected in parallel with one another to a common high frequency oscillator 10'. The frequency dividing ratios thereof are 1/239. 1/253 ..l/45l, respectively, as shown in FIG. 3. If it is assumed that 8372.02 Hz is generated by the first counter circuit (20'-1), the oscillation frequency fm of the high frequency oscillator 10 is 239 times said frequency, that is, 2.00024 MHZ. Thus, the oscillation frequencies obtained at output terminals (20'- lu).....(20- 12a) of the counter circuits (20-1).....(2012) become nearly equal to those in the case shown in FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 shows one example of this invention. An output terminal of a high frequency oscillator 10' is connected to an octave frequency divider 20' through an OR circuit 30 and is connected, in parallel therewith, through a NOT circuit 40 (i.e., a circuit which changes a 0 to a 1 and vice versa) to an oscillator 50, for transposition, comprising a plurality of counter circuits (50-2).....(50-l2). It is so arranged that output terminals of transposition oscillator are selectively connected to the OR circuit 30 through a change-over switch 60. The change-over switch comprises a stationary contact (60-1) positioned at a zero position and not connected to the transposition oscillation 50, a plurality of stationary contacts (60-2).....(60-l2) connected to the respective counter circuits (50-2).....(50-12), and movable contact connected to the OR circuit 30.

The oscillation frequency of the high frequency oscillator 10' is 2.00024 MHz and the wave form thereof is as shown in FIG. 5 (a). This wave form is then differentiated by differentiation circuit D2 (FIG. 4) into the wave form shown in FIG. (b) and is applied to the octave frequency divider 20 through the OR circuit 30. Also, the output wave form shown in FIG. 5 (a) of the high frequency oscillator is inverted by the NOT circuit 40 as shown in FIG. 5 (c) and is differentiated by differentiation circuit D2 (FIG. 4) as shown in FIG. 5 (d) and is applied to the transposition oscillator 50.

The oscillation frequencies generated at the respective counter circuits (50-2).....(50-I2) of the transposition oscillator 50 are shown in Table 1 below.

As clear from Table l, the dividing ratios of counter circuits (50-2)...(50- l2) are as follows:

only.

If, next, the movable contact 60a is connected to the stationary contact (60-2), the oscillation frequency 5 0.1 1717 MHz of the counter circuit (50-2) is added to the oscillation frequency 2.00024 MHz of the high frequency oscillator 10. This condition is such that the wave form (FIG. 5 (c) inverted by the NOT circuit 40 is used as the input for the transposition oscillator 50, and the output thereof is differentiated (FIG. 5 ((1)) and is properly interposed through the OR circuit 30 in the oscillation frequency of the high frequency oscillator 10 (FIG. 5 (e)).

Thus, the input frequency for the octave frequency divider becomes 2.11741 MHz and, accordingly, the output frequencies of the octave frequency divider become those shown in Table 2, column (II). The tone signals are as shown on the right hand side thereof. This 20 is a C# and shows that it is transposed to the higher side by one interval. Accordingly, playing of C# major can be easily effected by operating only natural keys in almost the same manner as in the case ofC major, Without using chromatic keys.

and playing can be carried out by using natural keys If, next, the movable contact 60a is connected to the stationary contact (60-3), the oscillation frequency 0.24055 MHz of the counter circuit (50-3) is added to the oscillation frequency 2.00024 MHz of the high frequency oscillator 10 and it becomes 2.24079 MHz. The respective oscillation frequencies of the octave frequency divider 20 becomes those shown in Table 2, column (III), and the tone signal thereof is D and this shows that it is further transposed to the higher side by one interval. Accordingly, playing of D major can be effected by the operation of only natural keys. Thus, any desired transposition can be effected by that the oscillation frequencies of counter circuits When the movable contact 6021 is set to the stationary (-2)--.-.( 5 of the transposition l at 50 are contact (-l),the oscillation frequency 2.00024 MHz 40 selectively added to the oscillation frequency of the itself of the high frequency oscillator 10 becomes an high oscillator 10', and thereby the playing of any deinput for the octave frequency divider 20', and output sired music with sharps or flats becomes possible by frequencies as shown in Table 2, column (I) are obusing nly tu al keys.

TABLE 2 Counter circuit (I) C major (11) C major (III) D major number of octave frequency Output fre- Tone Output frc- Tone Output fre- Tone divider quency Hz signal quency H7. signal quency Hz signal 1 20' 1 8372.02 C 8869.84 C# 9397.21 D 2 20' 1 7902.13 B 8372.02 C 8869.84 C# 3 20 3 7458.62 A# 7902.13 B 8372.02 C 4 20' 4 7040.00 A 7458.62 A# 7902.13 B 5 20' 5 6644.88 G# 7040.00 A 7458.62 A# 6 20' 6 6271.93 G 6644.88 G# 7040.00 A 7 20' 7 5919.91 F# 6271.93 G 6644.88 G# 8 20' 8 5587.65 F 5919.91 F# 6271.93 G 9 20 9 5274.04 E 5587.65 F 5919.91 F# 10 20' 10 4978.03 D# 5274.04 E 5587.65 F 11 20' 11 4698.64 D 4978.03 D# 5274.04 E 12 20' 12 4434.94 C# 4698.64 D 4978.03 D# Input frequency 2.00024 MHZ 2.1 1741 MHz 2.24079 MHz Contact number of 60 0 changeover switch tained at its respective output terminals. The tone signals corresponding to the respective frequencies are as shown on the right hand side thereof. This is C major,

The above is the case where transposition is to the higher side. As shown in FIG. 6, the high frequency oscillator 10' is provided on its output side with a frequency divider 70 comprising a plurality of counter circuits, so that the oscillation frequencies thereof are lowered by steps at each counter circuit. If the output terminals thereof are selectively connected to the OR circuit 30 and the NOT circuit 40 through a changeover switch 80, a transposition to the lower side can be easily effected by selective connection of the changeover switch 80 and selective connection of the changeover switch 60. Additionally, movement of an octave becomes possible by that the frequency dividing ratio of each counter circuit of the frequency divider 70 is designed to be 1/2. lf, under this condition, the oscillation frequency of the high frequency oscillator is made higher by several octaves, movement of an octave either to the higher side or the lower side becomes possible by selective connection of the change-over switch 80. Accordingly, a player can play any octave at a predetermined position, without especially moving his position.

FIG. 7 shows the case where the NOT circuit in FIGS. 4 and 6 is omitted. In this case, the oscillation frequency of the high frequency oscillator 10' is doubled to be 4.00048 MHz and this frequency is made to be 1/2 through a binary circuit 90. At the same time, positive and negative wave forms as shown in'FlGS. 5 (a) and (c) are taken from the binary circuit 90. Thus, this only slightly different from the case of FIGS. 4 and 6 The above explanation has been given with reference to the second frequency dividing system of an octave frequency divider, but this is similar also in the case of the first system except only that the oscillation frequencies of the high frequency oscillator 10 and the transposition oscillator become smaller.

Thus, according to this invention, the oscillation frequency of the high frequency oscillator is properly added to any of the oscillation frequencies of the transposition oscillator comprising the plurality of counter circuits so as to produce an input for the octave frequency divider so that, by means of selecting the adding frequency. and desired transposition can be effected. Accordingly, the playing of any desired music with sharps or flats can be effected by a player as long as he can play in C major.

What is claimed is:

1. An electronic musical instrument capable of transposition comprising a high frequency oscillator having an output side, an octave frequency divider including twelve counter circuits to generate twelve tone signals, a transposition oscillator including a plurality of counter circuits coupled between the output side of said oscillator and said divider, means to control the addition of the frequency of the output of said high frequency oscillator to the frequency of the output of the transposition oscillator to generate an input frequency for the octave frequency divider, said means including 21 NOT circuit coupled between said oscillators and an OR circuit coupled between said high frequency oscillator and divider, and a selector switch between the transposition oscillator and said OR circuit.

2. An instrument as claimed in claim 1 comprising differentiation circuits coupled between said OR circuit and said high frequency oscillator and switch.

3. An instrument as claimed in claim 1 comprising frequency divider means coupled to said high frequency oscillator and a change-over switch coupling said frequency divider means to said NOT circuit and OR circuit.

4. An electronic musical instrument capable of transposition comprising a high frequency oscillator having an output side, an octave frequency divider including twelve counter circuits to generate twelve tone signals, a transposition oscillator includiing a plurality of counter circuits coupled between the output side of said oscillator and said divider, means to control the addition of the frequency of the output of said high frequency oscillator to the frequency of the output of the transposition oscillator to generate an input frequency for the octave frequency divider, said means including a binary circuit between the high frequency oscillator and the transposition oscillator and divider and an OR circuit coupling said high frequency oscillator and said transposition oscillator to said divider.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3023659 *Jul 11, 1960Mar 6, 1962Wurlitzer CoTransposition apparatus for electrical musical instrument
US3236931 *Jan 15, 1960Feb 22, 1966Academy Of AeronauticsElectronic musical instrument
US3379087 *Jun 16, 1965Apr 23, 1968Dorothea M. WeitznerElectrically operated music display and cuing apparatus
US3590131 *Feb 11, 1969Jun 29, 1971Robert R ReyersElectronic musical scale generator employing a single master oscillator
US3610800 *Oct 30, 1969Oct 5, 1971North American RockwellDigital electronic keyboard instrument with automatic transposition
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3929052 *Sep 30, 1974Dec 30, 1975Philips CorpElectronic musical instrument with one tone generator controlling a second tone generator
US3933072 *Oct 24, 1974Jan 20, 1976U.S. Philips CorporationGenerator for producing tones of a musical scale in an electronic musical instrument
US4009633 *Oct 14, 1975Mar 1, 1977Coles Donald KElectronic musical instrument
US4023457 *Aug 21, 1975May 17, 1977Rodgers Organ CompanyOrgan stop switching system
US4056032 *Apr 23, 1976Nov 1, 1977Coles Donald KMusical apparatus
US4058042 *Jun 20, 1975Nov 15, 1977D. H. Baldwin CompanyKey transposing electronic organ
US4276801 *Nov 19, 1979Jul 7, 1981Yerusavage Joseph APedal actuated musical chord system
US4332182 *Jan 6, 1981Jun 1, 1982Reinhard FranzApparatus for transposing passages in electronic musical instruments
US4401005 *Feb 3, 1982Aug 30, 1983Reinhard FranzElectronic keyboard-operated musical instrument
US4664010 *Nov 9, 1984May 12, 1987Casio Computer Co., Ltd.Method and device for transforming musical notes
US6084171 *Jan 28, 1999Jul 4, 2000Kay; Stephen R.Method for dynamically assembling a conversion table
Classifications
U.S. Classification84/675, 84/657, 84/685, 984/381, 84/445, 84/648, 984/338
International ClassificationG10H5/00, G10H1/20, G10H5/06
Cooperative ClassificationG10H1/20, G10H5/06
European ClassificationG10H1/20, G10H5/06