Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3877356 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 15, 1975
Filing dateSep 5, 1972
Priority dateSep 5, 1972
Publication numberUS 3877356 A, US 3877356A, US-A-3877356, US3877356 A, US3877356A
InventorsBruns Herbert F
Original AssigneeBruns Herbert F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Variable air distribution system
US 3877356 A
Abstract
An air outlet grille for walls or ceilings for uniformly distributing air in a room without turbulence or drafts. The grille incorporates a plurality of air projecting modules, which may have different projection properties, to conform to the position of the grille in the room by combining modified individual air streams and fluidic distribution of the propelled air and integrating ambient room air forming a uniform coaductive flow of decelerating air in the room involved. The different modules are interchangeable in a particular grille to provide combined air outlet patterns to conform to the shape of the area involved.
Images(6)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 Bruns [451 Apr. 15, 1975 1 VARIABLE AIR DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM [22] Filed: Sept. 5, 1972 [21] Appl. No.: 286,413

3,482,506 12/1969 Bruns ..98/40C Primary ExaminerWilliam F. ODea Assistant Examiner-Harold Joyce Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Mason, Mason & Albright [5 7 ABSTRACT An air outlet grille for walls or ceilings for uniformly distributing air in a room without turbulence or drafts. The grille incorporates a plurality of air projecting modules, which may have different projection properties, to conform to the position of the grille in the room by combining modified individual air streams and fluidic distribution of the propelled air and integrating ambient room air forming a uniform c0aductive flow of decelerating air in the room involved. The different modules are interchangeable in a particular grille to provide combined air outlet patterns to conform to the shape of the area involved.

4 Claims, 28 Drawing Figures PATENTEUAPR 1 5:975

saw 3 95 FIG. 10

m mEBAFR 1 51975 3.877. 356

SHEET u Q g FIG. 13

PATENTEDAPR 1 :915 3,877, 356

SHEET s 95 g VARIABLE AIR DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM This invention relates in general to air distribution equipment and more particularly to a distribution grille for projecting heated, cooled or ventilating air into rooms. The grille is provided with selectively interchangeable modules for the combined projection of controlled-flow air for the induction of ambient room air, forming a predetermined blanket pattern of air without the presence of turbulence or drafts in the occupied zone.

Reference is had to applicants U.S. Pat. No. 3,482,506.

Prior grilles of the open or vane type projected air from a conducting source into a room resulting in excessive turbulence, non-uniform distribution and the presence of drafts, which problems are overcome by the present invention.

A principal object of the invention is the provision of a grille connected to a duct for receiving a normal flow of air and having a plurality of pre-selected modules therein of the character to be described, which provides the grille with an output including a jet portion of air of relatively high velocity, which is combined with a portion of the motivated duct air of lower velocity, resulting in a blanket of coaductive air formed from the grille and integrating ambient room air of near zero velocity, to produce a blanket of air from the grille which is projected a predetermined distance with a declerating velocity falling to a non-draft range within the I'OOITI.

Another object of the invention is the provision of modules having a wide variety of triangular surfaces angularly mated at predetermined different divergent angles for forming coherent jet streams, which when combined form a uniform flow of air from the source to form a blanket of air which will follow in close proximity to the ceiling of the room and simultaneously attract and integrate ambient air for draft-free distribution over a predetermined occupational portion of the room.

A further object of the invention is the provision of a quick detachable fastening means for retaining a plurality of modules of different output character within the frame of a grille.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a plurality of modular air distribution units which are adapted to low cost manufacture and interchangeable in a given frame.

These and other objects and advantages in one embodiment of the invention are described and shown in the following specification and drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a front elevation, in reduced scale, of the modular grille.

FIG. 2 is a cross sectional view taken through section line 2-2, FIG. 1, illustrating typical air flow from the grille shown in FIG. I.

FIG. 3 is a cross sectional side view, taken through section line 33, FIG. 1, illustrating the air flow from the grille directed in an upward direction.

FIG. 4 is a perspective exploded view of a plurality of different modules for use in a grille frame.

FIG. 5 is an enlarged inverted perspective view of a module shown in FIG. 4.

FIG. 6 is an elevation of a grille having a double row of air distribution modules for the central distribution of air from one wall of a rectangular room.

FIG. 7 is a cross sectional view taken through section line 77, FIG. 6, illustrating the flow of air therefrom.

FIG. 8 is a cross sectional view taken through section line 88, FIG. 6, illustrating the flow of air from the modules.

FIG. 9 is a plan view illustration in reduced scale of the lateral distribution of the air from a grille shown in FIG. 8.

FIG. 10 is a front elevation of a grille having a double row of modules adapted for an L shaped room.

FIG. 11 is a cross'sectional view taken through section line 1lll, FIG. 10, illustrating the unequal distribution of air therefrom.

FIG. 12 is a plan view in reduced scale of an L shaped room showing the distribution of air from the grille shown in FIG. 10.

FIG. 13 is a front elevation of a grille having two rows of modules therein, with portions thereof broken away.

FIG. 14 is a cross sectional view taken through section line 14-14, FIG. 13, illustrating another pattern of air flow.

FIGS. l5, l6, and 17 illustrate the air patterns in coverage of rooms of different shape by the selective positioning of the modules shown in FIG. 4.

FIG. 18 is a perspective rear view of a frame showing a wire fastening means for securing the modules in a frame.

FIGS. 19 and 20 are cross sectional views illustrating the modules held in a sub-frame by the means shown in FIG. 18 and thesub-frame secured by pin means, as shown.

FIG. 21 is a cross sectional view taken through section line 21-21, FIG. 20, showing the elongated upper and lower holes in the frame for holding the sub-frame.

FIG. 22 is a cross sectional view showing the modules mounted at an angle in a sub-frame removably positioned in the main frame and not projecting beyond the wall flange.

FIG. 23 shows a rectangular ceiling frame having modules in each side thereof for distribution of air from a central portion of the ceiling of a room.

FIG. 24 is a cross sectional view taken through section line 24-24, FIG. 23, illustrating the flow of air from opposite projecting modules.

FIG. 25 illustrates a modular equipped frame recessed in a ceiling illustrating the flow of air therefrom.

FIG. 26 is a reduced scale plan view of the air distribution in a rectangular room from the ceiling.

FIG. 27 is a cross sectional view of a linear triangular air reduction member positioned to minimize the normal volume of air from the supply duct.

FIG. 28 is a plan view in reduced scale of a rectangular room having appropriate modules in a ceiling frame for producing a uniform distribution of non-draft air in the room.

FIGS. 1, 2, and 3 show a grille frame assembly 1 which provides an opening for retaining a plurality of interchangeable air conditioning modules or nozzles for directing and initiating a coherent flow of air in a selected pattern of predetermined shape. The frame involves an outer flange member 2 for mounting against the outer surface of the wall or ceiling with a generally rectangular opening defined by rectangular inner frame or duct 3 for engagement within the aperture in the wall or ceiling. There is also a second inner frame or housing 4 which is provided to retain a desired selection of air projecting modules. A cross section of the frame and inner housing construction is illustrated in FIG. 3.

FIG. 3 also illustrates a sub-frame 5 for retaining a number of selected modules in a manner to be hereinafter described.

FIG. 4 is an exploded view of a plurality of different modules 6-18 and 6e, whereas 19e is a spacer or filler. The modules shown in FIG. 4 are representative types for selected use, however interchangeable modules of different characteristics may be made to conform to particular air projection requirements.

FIG. 5 shows a typical module 9 in inverted position which has coplanar inner edges 21-22-23 and opposite outer side edges 24 and substantially parallel sides 25. An integral transverse deflection member 27 has a predetermined inner angular slope with respect to the outer side edges and is in junction with mating sides of the triangular surfaces 28-28, which surfaces have their opposite edges integral with the side walls of the module and the lower sides of the triangular surfaces 28-28 in junction with triangular surfaces 29-29 which are positioned at a steeper predetermined angle than the surfaces 28-28, which define the angular V shaped outlet ofthe module. The air flow formed by the aforesaid angular positioned triangular surfaces consists of an outward flow of duct air and a portion thereof accelerated to a predetermined velocity which is projected from the grille at a lateral angle conforming with the angular position of the deflection member 27 and triangular predetermined angular surfaces 28 and 29. The phenomena of the resulting coaduction of the output will be hereinafter described.

A notch 30 is provided to form a V junction at predetermined angles with respect to said outer side edges in each side of certain large modules for engaging the next adjacent module and preventing misalignment thereof. A cavity 31 in each side of the module is non-functional and provided for economic and practical molding reasons.

The entire frame for receiving the modules may be formed from metal stampings or plastic or metal die moldings, however the use of extruded assemblies is practical for economic reasons.

The surfaces 29-29 are not required when the angle of the members 27-27 become negative or falls into a different quadrant, as in module 6, and with relation to any other module which has a positive angle.

It is to be noted that an auxiliary module 6e is provided to project a flow of duct air substantially normal to the grille when positioned adjacent to the end of number 6 module, as shown in FIGS. 13, 14, and 15, particularly at one end of the opening in the grille, which because of its divergent angular inner surface will project air in a flow according to the combined shape of the surface of module 6e and the adjacent surface of module 6.

It is also to be noted that deflector modules 12 and 14-18 serve as end caps for projection modules 7-11, shown in FIG. 4.

FIG. 2 illustrates the use of deflector module 12 as end cap for module 11 at the right or left hand end of the series of modules in the frame, dependent upon the desired direction of the air flow.

It is of further interest to note that the two like modules 6-6, shown in FIG. 3, are used back to back in the series shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, in order to provide a flow of duct air from the grille to properly form the total flow from the grille, such as required and shown in FIG. 15.

It is to be noted from FIG. 4 that a blank module l9e is provided in some cases to completely fill the end space of the opening in the grille for a series of modules. A single row grille, shown in FIG. 1, has modules therein for directing the flow of air from a forward to a right hand direction. 7

FIG. 6 shows a grille frame assembly 32 for receiving a pair of superposed rows of modules for controlling a larger output than the grille shown in FIG. 2 with equal right and left distribution.

The cross sectional view, FIG. 7, shows an outer flange 33 integral with a rectangular frame 34 for positioning adjacent the aperture in the wall or ceiling showing the end member 35 of a sub-frame, to be hereinafter described.

FIGS. 6 and 7 also illustrate a selected group of modules which will uniformly project approximately twice the quantity of air that is projected in grille frame assembly l but diffused in like equal left and right directions, as indicated by arrows.

The cross sectional view shown in FIG. 8 illustrates the flange 33 and frame 34 mounted in an aperture in wall 36 reasonably close to the ceiling 37, and provides a removable modular sub-frame assembly 38 for positioning both rows of modules for upward angular projection in the order of 20 with respect to the wall. The selection of modules for the upper and lower rows are the same which include left and right formations of modules 9e, 9, 8, 7, and 6, shown in FIGS. 6, 7, and 8.

FIG. 8 also illustrates the application of well known multiple blade damper 39 for reducing the flow of duct air into the grille when necessary.

The multiple dotted arrows illustrate the path of travel of the air upward from the grille and along the ceiling, which phenomena is hereinafter explained, and also in the aforementioned US. Pat. No. 3,482,506.

FIG. 9 is a greatly reduced plan view of a room which illustrates the pattern of flow of air from the modules shown in FIG. 6, when the grille is mounted high in the center of one wall for draft-free descent into the occupied portion of the room.

FIGS. 10, 11 and 12 illustrate selected distribution of different modules in frame assembly 32 in which air is distributed in uniform angular directions but with unequal predetermined range to conform with an L shaped room shown in FIG. 10. This particular arrangement of modules clearly illustrates an example of the control of the air to conform with a non-uniform pattern configuration, as well as non-central wall placement of the grille.

FIGS. 13, 14, and 15 illustrate the high wall mounting of a dual row of modules 6e, 6-6, 7, 8, 9, l0 and l0e which are secured in both rows of the frame for producing a substantially uniform air distribution pattern, as illustrated.

FIGS. 16 and 17 illustrate different near ceiling plan view of air patterns in rooms of different shape with the grille positioned in various lateral positions in the walls of the rooms.

FIGS. 18-22 show a simplified means for the quick removal of module retainer sub-frame assembly 38 adapted for convenient interchange of modules therein. The sub-frame is shown in rear perspective in FIG. 18 and provides walls 40, 41, 42 and an upper wall 43, and side walls 44 and 45.

Referring to FIG. 18, a pair of outward tensioned U shaped spring wire retainers 46 are provided with offsets 47-47 in each leg thereof for removal and replacement. Each retainer is adapted to engage a pair of straight longitudinal grooves along the rear edges of the opening for each row of modules. When the modules are inserted in the module sub-frame 38, they are inserted into the rear thereof and adapted to stop against a small linear flange 48 running along the outer edges of each opening. When each module is positioned against the forward flange 48 of the assembly 38 the retainer 46 is snapped into linear grooves 49 running along the rear edge portions of both modular openings, best shown in FIG. 20. Thus each of a selected group of modules are securely held in predetermined selected positions and are easily removed by engaging the offsets 47 in the springs for the removal of same.

In the interest of cost, a pin 50 may be an integral projection from the sub-frame assembly 38, particularly when the latter is molded from plastic material, with slots 60 or 61 in the main frame 59, to be hereinafter described.

A formed V shaped flat latch spring 55 is secured in a groove 54 in the upper central portion of the assembly 38 with one side thereof bearing upon the inner side of member 43. The opposite end includes a pin 56 projecting upward therefrom and an angular portion 53 projecting downward for finger engagement to release pin 56 from frame 34 for removal of the assembly 38. A coil spring 57 is retained within the V of spring 55 for added security of the latch.

FIG. shows the module retainer secured in frame assembly 58 having flanges 59 thereon for positioning against the surface of the wall or ceiling. A pair of spaced slots 60 and 61 are positioned in the upper side of the frame assembly 58 for the alternate engagement of pin 56.

FIG. 20 illustrates the modular assembly when secured in a position which permits the modules to project from the surface of the wall by the engagement of the pin 50 in a forward slot 60 with the upper pin 56 also engaged in the foward slot. When it is desired to have the modules recessed from the surface of the wall, the pins 50 and 56 are inserted sequentially in the rearward slots 61, as shown.

Referring to FIG. 19, when it is desired to remove the modular assembly, a finger is engaged with the angular portion 53 of spring 55, which when pulled forward will extract pin 56 from engagement with the frame assembly 58 and permit the modular assembly to tilt forward for removal. This procedure is the same for both positions of the assembly, as shown in FIGS. 20 and 22.

FIG. 21 shows the slots in the top and bottom sides of the frame assembly 58 for alternate engagement by pin 56.

FIG. 23 is a perspective view of a rectangular ceiling air diffuser assembly 63 which provides for the insertion of four sets of modules for producing air distribution, illustrated in FIG. 26. The cross sectionalview, FIG. 24, illustrates the installation of the diffuser assembly 63 secured in a central rectangular opening in a ceiling 64 mated with a rectangular duct 65 for supplying a predetermined volume of air, whereby in operation four groups of selected modules form a continuous circular blanket in coaductive relation along the ceiling wherein the flow will deaccelerate in an approximate proportionate ratio to its induction of ambient room air therewith.

FIG. 25 illustrates a modified diffuser frame assembly 67 which is positioned in a recess in the ceiling 64 to provide optional flush mounting for appearance reasons. The volume of air flow from ducts 65 and 65a may be controlled by an adjustable damper, such as shown in FIG. 8.

FIGS. 27 and 28 illustrate the use of a linear spoiler rail or baffle 68, having a predetermined triangular cross section, shown in dotted lines, which is positioned at the entrance of each row of modules to limit the air flow and modify the direction of the flow therefrom in proportion to the size of the baffle 68, as illustrated by arrows in FIG. 27.

FIG. 28 illustrates the distribution of air in a room area with the baffles 68 transverse the width of the room for compensating the air flow in all directions in the room.

It is to be noted that the word coaductive is a coined word which is believed to simplify reference to a complex phenomena of combining three phases of air movement to minimize drafts in a room.

' In. operation, it is apparent from the foregoing that a wide range of interchangeable air distribution modules having different characteristics are selectably, interchangeably adaptable in a wall mounted grille or a ceiling diffuser connected to an air conducting duct for distributing draft-free air throughout the occupational portion of each of a variety of shaped rooms.

The operation of each module depends upon the principles disclosed in US. Pat. No. 3,482,506, and physically modified to obtain air nozzles having a wide range of different air patterns dependent upon the combined effect of the selection of modules secured in a particular grille.

It has been well established that each module has a passageway therein formed by the junction of triangular surfaces positioned at an obtuse angle with each other and at an angle to the direction of the flow of air from the source, which creates a higher velocity jet stream that mixes with the air of normal velocity from the source. The projection into the room induces and integrates a quantity of ambient room air to form a flow of air of decelerating velocity in the form of a coaductive blanket spread over the area of the room. Since it is desired to place the air distribution grille relatively high in the wall of a room, the blanket of coaductive air tends to slowly move along in close relation to the ceiling until the range of decelerated projection is completed. The tendency of fast moving air to move in close relation to walls or ceilings is well established. However the coaductive type of air flow from the modules will maintain the air in close proximity to the ceiling and walls at a reduced velocity and suitable for distribution and temperature blending of room air with the ceiling air which will slowly descend into the deep occupational zone in a room at a substantially uniform temperature and draft-free low velocity.

It is also apparent that modules may be quickly interchanged by the use of the finger to move the flat spring 55 forward in the main or a sub-frame of the grille.

It is to be noted that rows of modules may be applied in grilles which are fewer in number of greater in number than those shown in the drawings and that multiples of superposed rows of modules may be effective tc meet certain requirements of rooms of various size and shape.

It is to be understood that certain modifications in construction are intended to come within the teachings and scope of the above specification.

Having described my invention, I claim:

1. An air projection grille for wall and/or ceiling mounting and connection with an air duct, said grille comprising a frame having four sides defining an elongated opening, a series of displaceable modules being positionable within said opening to project air in predetermined patterns for integration with ambient air in rooms of varying sizes and shapes, said modules being positionable adjacent one another in the front of the grille and each module having parallel sides with a transverse deflection surface leading to an outlet between said sides, said series of modules having deflection surfaces mounted at different angles with respect to one another and side-by-side V-shaped outlets formed between said surfaces to project air at preselected and different angles through said outlets.

2. An air projection grille for wall and/or ceiling mounting and connection with an air duct, said grille comprising a frame that defines a generally rectangular opening, and a series of displaceable modules that are positionable within said opening to project air in predetermined patterns for integration with ambient air in rooms of varying sizes and shapes, said modules being positionable adjacent one another in the front of the grille and each module having parallel sides with a transverse deflection surface leading to outlet means between said sides, said series of modules having their deflection surfaces mounted at different angles with respect to one another and side-by-side V-shaped outlets of said outlet means formed between said surfaces to project air at preselected and different angles through said outlets, each V-shaped outlet being located between adjacent modules, the sides of said modules having outer edges interfitted with a flange of said frame, said flange extending inwardly from the outer edge of the opening and forming a stop rest for receiving said edges.

3. The grille of claim 2, wherein a groove in said frame is located adjacent an inner edge of said opening and spring means is retained in said groove to bear against said modules and releaseably retain same in said opening.

4. The grille of claim 3, wherein the spring means is a V-shaped wire that is retained in said groove and said wire projects from the groove to contact the inner edges of said modules and hold the latter in said openmg.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3065685 *Dec 3, 1959Nov 27, 1962Carnes CorpModular air diffuser
US3111075 *Oct 16, 1961Nov 19, 1963Carrier CorpAir distributing apparatus
US3482506 *Jul 12, 1968Dec 9, 1969Bruns Herbert FAir distribution apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4080882 *Feb 7, 1977Mar 28, 1978Bruns Technology, Inc.Air diffuser for ceiling air outlet
US4147095 *Apr 20, 1977Apr 3, 1979Jacobs John DDirectional concentrated air discharge outlet
US5741179 *May 17, 1996Apr 21, 1998Manchester Plastics, Inc.Modular air outlet assembly and method of making same
US6669555 *Aug 22, 2001Dec 30, 2003Carrier CorporationNozzle cover
US9453654 *Apr 21, 2008Sep 27, 2016Airgreen Ltd.Method of dispersing air, jets from air conditioning systems and mixing them with the ambient air of an enclosure for better comfort and apparatus to create the jets
US20090275277 *Nov 5, 2009Al-Alusi Thamir RAlternate directional momentum ventilation nozzle for passenger cabins
US20100132383 *Apr 21, 2008Jun 3, 2010Airgreen Ltd.Method of dispersing air, jets from air conditioning systems and mixing them with the ambient air of an enclosure for better comfort and apparatus to create the jets
EP0964796A2 *Feb 17, 1998Dec 22, 1999Bowles Fluidics CorporationVehicle air outlet with combined flow straightener and shutoff door
Classifications
U.S. Classification454/299
International ClassificationF24F13/06
Cooperative ClassificationF24F13/06
European ClassificationF24F13/06
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jan 25, 1984AS17Release by secured party
Owner name: BRUNS, HERBERT F.
Owner name: BRUNS, TECHNOLOGY, INC.,
Effective date: 19831006
Jan 25, 1984ASAssignment
Owner name: BRUNS, TECHNOLOGY, INC.,
Free format text: RELEASED BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:BRUNS, HERBERT F.;REEL/FRAME:004215/0344
Effective date: 19831006
Sep 3, 1982ASAssignment
Owner name: BRUNS HERBERT F
Free format text: CONDITIONAL ASSIGNMENT;ASSIGNOR:BRUNS TECHNOLOGY,INC.;REEL/FRAME:004039/0448
Effective date: 19820915
Sep 3, 1982AS08Conditional assignment
Free format text: BRUNS HERBERT F * BRUNS TECHNOLOGY,INC. : 19820915