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Publication numberUS387928 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 14, 1888
Filing dateFeb 28, 1887
Publication numberUS 387928 A, US 387928A, US-A-387928, US387928 A, US387928A
InventorsWilliam Smith
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
William smith
US 387928 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

No Model.) 2 Sheets-Sheet 1.

' W. SMITH.

DOOR MAT.

No. 387,928. Patented Aug. 14, 1888.

N. FETERS, Mammy-war. Walh'nig'lun. n C. 4

(No Model.) 2 Sheets-Sheet 2.

' W. SMITH.

DOOR MAT.

No. 387,928. Patented Aug. 14, 1888.

Witnesses. Jill 8712607".

UNITED STATES PATENT ,EEIbE.

WILLIAM SMITH, OF TORONTO, ONTARIO, CANADA, ASSIGNOR TO JAMES WILSON, TRUSTEE, 0F SAME PLACE.

DOOR-MAT.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 387,928, dated August 14, 1888.

Application filed February 28, 1887. Serial No. 229,178. (No model.)

To aZZ whom it may concern.-

Be it known that I, WILLIAM SMITH, of the city of Toronto, in the county of York, in the Province of Ontario, Canada, gentleman, haveinvented certain new and useful Im pro vementsin Door-Mats,of which the following is a specification.

The primary object of the invention is to design a pliable-wire door-mat, which will effect-ually remove dirt from the feet without injuring the leather of the boots of the party using it; and it consists, essentially, of a series of rings linked together and forminga mat braced at its outer edges by a rod extending through the outer rings of the mat, and preferably connected to grooved plates designed to receive and hold linoleum or other material, to form a bottom for the mat, substantially as hereinafter more particularly explained.

Figure 1 is a plan showing my wire-ring mat held in a frame and secured to grooved plates arranged to hold a bottom of linoleum or other material. Fig. 2 is a cross-section of Fig. 1. Fig. 3 is a perspective view of my frame for holding the wire-ring mat and plates for bolding the linoleum. Fig. 4 is a view of my mat connected to a piece of linoleum having cocoa matting attached to it.

A represents a series of rings linked or intertwined together, either singly or in pairs, as desired. By the term intertwined I mean linked one with another in contradistinction to being connected by means of hooked wires, as is common in bed-bottoms.

B is a frame composed of an iron rod extend ing around the mat of rings A and passed through the outer rings ofthe said mat. This frame B is preferably jointed at a, so that it may be readily detached for the purpose of insertingit through the wire rings A,and through the lugs 12, which are secured to or form part of the plates 0. These plates are grooved and shaped substantially as shown in the drawings, so as to receive a back or bottom, D. made of linoleum or othcrsuitable material. The plates O arejointed at d, immediately on a line with thejoints a, so that the mat may be folded up into a small compass for the purpose of transportation.

A mat thus composed of aseries of rings, A, presents a surface which constitutes a number of scrapers, each scraper being flexible or movable, so that, while being sufficiently stiff to scrape mud off the boots of the user, it is not so stiff as to injure the leather of the boots. The mud scraped off in this way will fall through the rings, so as to leave the top surface clear. By providing a bottom, D, made of linoleum or other suitable material, any dirt thus removed from the boots. instead of falling on the floor, is caught on the surface of the bottom D, and, owing to the open-work of the mat composed of the rings A,it is an easy matter to shake out all dirt which may thus be accumulated by the mat.

I do not confine myself to any particular shape or size of the mat, nor do I wish to limit myself to the nature of the material I may use.

It will of course be understood that I do not confine myself to a frame, B, extending entirely around the mat, nor is it necessary to use the plates 0, as, for instance, I show in Fig. 4 my wire mat connected to the bottom D by means of rods B at each end of the mat A. I also show in this figure cocoa matting E, placed on either side of the mat A.

What I claim as my invention is- 1. A wire mat composed of aseries ofrings, A, linked together, in combination with the plate 0, having lugs b, and the frame B, in serted through the outer rings of the mat and through lugs b, formed in the plates O, substantially as and for the purpose specified.

2. A wire mat composed of a series of rings, A, linked together, in combination with the grooved plates O, having lugs b, and a frame, B, inserted through the outer rings of the mat and through lugs 11, formed in the plates C, substantially as and for the purpose specified.

3. A wire mat composed of a series of rings, A, linked together, in combination with the plates 0, jointed at d and formed with lugs b, and a frame, B, jointed at a. and inserted through the outer rings of the mat and through lugs 11 in the plates 0, substantially as and for the purpose specified.

4. A wire mat composed of a series of rings, A, linked together, combined with a bottom, D, arranged beneath said mat, with a space between the two,and a cocoa matti ng, E, attached to said bottom, substantially as and for the purpose specified.

Toronto, February 15, 1887.

CHARLES C. BALDWIN, J. M. JACKSON.

ICO

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
DE976211C *Dec 24, 1948May 2, 1963Minnesota Mining & MfgElektrisches Isolierband
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA47L11/30