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Publication numberUS387957 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 14, 1888
Filing dateOct 1, 1887
Publication numberUS 387957 A, US 387957A, US-A-387957, US387957 A, US387957A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
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US 387957 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

(No Model.)

P. R. MOBEON & O. DURAND.

APPARATUS FOR FACILITATING THE READING OF GEOGRAPHICAL GLOBES.

Patented Aug. 14, 1888.

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I WW 3 a ME 4 UNITED STATES PATENT EEIoE.

PIERRE REeIs MORE-ON AND CLAUDE DURAN-D, 0F LYONS, FRANCE.

APPARATUS FOR FACILITATING THE READING OF GEOGRAPHICAL GLOBES.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 387,957, dated August 14, 1888.

Application filed October :24, 1887. Serial No. 253,272.

(No model.) Patented in France April 7, 1887. No. 182,672, and in Belgium April 7, 1887. No. 77,008.

To all whom it hwy concern:

Be it known that we, PIERRE REoIs M0- nEoN and CLAUDE DURAND, both citizens of the Republic of France and residents of Lyons, (Rhone) France, have invented certain Improvements in Apparatuses forFaoilitatingthe Reading of Geographical Globes, (for which we have obtained patents in France,No. 182,672, dated April 7, 1887, and in Belgium, No. 77,008, dated April 7, 1887,) of which the following is a specification.

The object of our invention is to enable one to read with facility the map on a geographical or school globe.

Our device operates on the following prin ciplcs: Two series of numbers or conventional signs are employed, and each geographical point on the map on the globe, or each of certain selected points thereon, has belonging to it two of these numbers or signs,one from each series.

Our device or apparatus serves to point out or indicate any one of these locations on the globe by setting the indicators of the ap parat-us to the respective numbers or signs (belonging to that location) on graduated arcs bearing said numbers or signs.

In the drawing, which is a perspective view of a map-globe provided with our apparatus, G is a semicircular graduated are or limb, which is pivoted at points in the prolonged axis of the globe A at its poles, and is capable of being swung around the globe on said pivots. This are G bears one series of the numbers or signs above mentioned, and has on it an index-slide, M. The are G carries an index E, which plays over a graduated circle or limb, H, bearing the other series of numbers or signs above mentioned. This circle H is arranged with its plane at right angles with the axis of the globe, and is fixed with respect to and is concentric with the axis of the globe.

The operation of the device is simple. It is first desirable to prepare a table or key for the various geographical points or places on the globe-map, and this may be done as follows: Take the city of Lyons, for example, swing the arc G on its pivots and slide the index M thereon until the point on the latter rests on Lyons on the globe. Then note down along with the name,Lyons, on a suitable ruled sheet, the number or are G at which slide M stands, and the number on circle H at which pointer E stands. This may be done with respect to as many geographical localities as itis desired to put in thetable orkey. Suppose, for example, that in the table we find after the name Lyons the numbers 56-90. To find Lyons on the globe-map, move the slide M to the number 56 on are G, and then swing the are about the globe until the pointer E stands at the number 90 on circle H. The pointer on slide M will then stand at Lyons on the globe.

Of course the table or key may be primarily prepared and sold with the globe and apparatus.

The diameter of the globe need bear no special relation to the sizes of the are G and circle H, except that the globe must be small enough to turn within are G.

Having thus described our invention,we do not broadly claim to have discovered the general principles upon which our apparatus opcrates; but what we do claim is- The combination, with a geographical or school globe, of the graduated arc G, pivoted at points in the prolonged axis of the globe, and provided with an index-slide, M, and a pointer, E, and the graduated circle H, fixed with respect to and concentric with the axis of the globe, said pointer E being adapted to move over said ring H, substantially as set forth.

In testimony whereof we have hereunto signed our names in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

MOREON, PIERRE EEoIs. CLAUDE DURAND.

Witnesses:

XAVIER JANICOT, JEAN GERMAIN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2422101 *Oct 22, 1943Jun 10, 1947Johannsen Homer VTerrestrial globe
US2429754 *Aug 3, 1943Oct 28, 1947Hayes Hagner FrederickNavigational globe
US2619726 *May 12, 1945Dec 2, 1952Anton StuxbergSpherically curved plotting body and compass for use therewith
US2846227 *Jan 23, 1957Aug 5, 1958Joseph P MorganFortune telling ball
US3281961 *Sep 4, 1964Nov 1, 1966Rand Mcnally & CoGlobe structure
US4790756 *Sep 29, 1987Dec 13, 1988The Quaker Oats CompanyWorld globe geographic area viewer
US4972477 *Apr 26, 1988Nov 20, 1990Campbell Robert JEncoder/decoder
US5083795 *Oct 18, 1990Jan 28, 1992Julane SeversonGlobe chance device for bingo-type game
US5580253 *Feb 6, 1995Dec 3, 1996Abdalla; ShakshoukiGeographical globe with an information base
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationG09B27/08