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Publication numberUS3879866 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 29, 1975
Filing dateMar 5, 1973
Priority dateMar 5, 1973
Publication numberUS 3879866 A, US 3879866A, US-A-3879866, US3879866 A, US3879866A
InventorsGunderson Ralph R
Original AssigneeGunderson Ralph R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mechanism for adjusting deflector for discharge chute of snow removal machine
US 3879866 A
Abstract
A snow removal machine including a wheeled chassis with a prime mover and a control station, a snow removal frame pivotally mounted on the front of the chassis for movement up and down, a snow gathering housing on the frame, snow removal blades rotatable in the housing and driven by the prime mover, an upwardly directed snow discharge chute rotatable on the housing about an upright axis, a curved deflector pivotally mounted on the upper end of the chute, and means for pivotally adjusting the deflector from the control station.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 Gunderson Apr. 29, 1975 1 MECHANISM FOR ADJUSTING DEFLECTOR FOR DISCHARGE CHUTE OF SNOW REMOVAL MACHINE [76] Inventor: Ralph R. Gunderson, 8212 S.

Homan, Chicago, 111. 60652 [22}- Filed: Mar. 5, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 337,918

[52] US. CL, 37/43 R; 285/272; 74/25; 193/22 [51] Int. Cl E0lh 5/00 [58] Field of Search 37/43 A, 43 R, 43 C, 43 D, 37/43 E; 302/10, 34, 61'. 193/15-17. 22;

[ 5 References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1.814.695 7/1931 Hinclinc 37/43 B 2.642.680 6/1953 Curtis et al 37/43 E 2.916.330 12/1959 Dummowski 302/34 3239255 3/1966 Murcott 285/319 X 3.244.437 4/1966 Belicka ct a1 285/319 X 1/1967 lbisch 37/43 B 3.347.575 10/1967 Morris 285/319 X 3,357,749 12/1967 Seymour et a1. 214/17 C 3,466,767 9/1969 Rubin 37/43 R 3.483.960 12/1969 Wightman et al. 37/43 D 3.510.171 5/1970 Bacon 37/43 R X Primary Examiner-Edgar S. Burr Assistant E.\'aminerE. H. Eickholt Attorney, Agent, or FirmWegner, Stellman, McCord, Wiles & Wood [57] ABSTRACT A snow removal machine including a wheeled chassis with a prime mover and a control station, a snow removal frame pivotally mounted on the front of the chassis for movement up and down, a snow gathering housing on the frame, snow removal blades rotatable in the housing and driven by the prime mover, an upwardly directed snow discharge chute rotatable on the housing about an upright axis. a curved deflector pivotally mounted on the upper end of the chute. and means for pivotally adjusting the deflector from the control station.

22 Claims. 11 Drawing Figures PATENTEDAPRZSIBYS 79 5 SHEET 1 OF 2 PATENTEDAPmms 3,879,866

MECHANISM FOR ADJUSTING DEFLECTOR FOR DISCHARGE CHUTE OF SNOW REMOVAL MACHINE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to a snow removal machine, and particularly to means for adjusting a pivotally mounted deflector at the upper end of a discharge chute in a snow removal machine.

There are various commercially available poweroperated snow removal machines which include a snow gathering housing at the front of a two-wheel or fourwheel chassis with rotatable snow removal blades for forcing snow into an upwardly directed snow discharge chute which is rotatoable about an upright axis. The upper end of the snow discharge chute includes a pivotally mounted deflector, and angular adjustment of the chute enables snow discharge to one side or the other of the path of movement. In the past, it has been conventional to provide manually accessible means adjacent the operators control station for angularly adjusting the discharge chute. On the other hand, it has not always been usual to provide remote control means for adjusting the deflector from the operators control station. Instead, it has often been a requirement that the deflector must be adjusted locally at the position of its mounting, as a result of which it is necessary to discontinue operation of the machine in order to adjust the deflector.

In some machines, provision has been made for adjustment of the discharge deflector remotely from an operators control station. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 2,971,279 relates to a rotary snow plow in which a deflector is adjustable by a loose cable arranged in a cable guide which is offset from the axis of rotation of the chute.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,229,546 relates to a rotary snow plow with cable means for adjusting a deflector on a discharge chute, including a loose cable on a stationary cable guide pulley and additional guide rollers for holding the cable on the pulley when the chute is angularly directed toward opposite sides of the machine.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,510,171 relates to a snow removing machine in which a deflector is adjustable by a Bowden cable in a sheath.

U.S. Pat. No. 2,741,512 relates to a forage harvester with an adjustable deflector controlled by a cable mechanism held by a ratchet device.

In view of various disadvantages associated with deflector adjustment controls of the type described, it would be desirable to provide an improved deflector adjustment mechanism.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is a general object of the present invention to provide a new and improved mechanism for adjusting a deflector at the upper end of a discharge chute in a snow removal machine wherein provision is made for applying appropriate force to adjust the deflector in all angular positions of the discharge chute, wherein the adjustment mechanisn is not subject to clogging or binding in cold weather and wherein the deflector may be returned to the uppermost position from any pivotally adjusted position.

A more specific object is to provide a new and improved deflector adjusting mechanism of the type described including a mounting bracket on an upright angularly adjustable chute, a pulley block mounted on the bracket for pivotal movement about an axis aligned with the axis of rotation of the chute, a pulley rotatably mounted on the block, and a cable secured to the deflector and passing around the pulley to a control station, so that appropriate force may be applied to the deflector regardless of the angular position of the chute.

Provision is made for anchoring the accessible end of the adjustment cable adjacent the control station, so that the deflector is held in adjusted positions without continuous attention of the operator. In such an arrangement, the mounting of the cable guide pulley for pivotal movement about an axis aligned with the axis of rotation of the chute assures that the cable path remains at a constant length for all angular positions of the chute, as a result of which the deflector is maintained in accurately adjusted position while the chute is angularly adjusted.

In the construction illustrated herein, the snow gathering housing is pivotally mounted about an axis low on the front of the chassis, so that the housing may be adjusted between an upper retracted position and a lower operative position, and so that the housing is pivotal relative to the chassis to follow undulations in the surface being plowed The cable for adjusting the deflector is led through a path which includes a cable guide adjacent the pivotal axis of the snow gathering housing, approximately on a radius between such pivotal axis and the cable guide pulley, as a result of which the path of the cable remains substantially constant, and the deflector remains substantially in the same angular position when the snow gathering housing moves pivotally relative to the chassis.

In one embodiment illustrated herein, the mounting bracket on the angularly adjustable chute comprises an inverted U-shaped member having lower ends secured to opposite sides of the chute, and an upper portion disposed above the chute behind the deflector for supporting a cable guide mounted on the upper portion of the bracket in line with the axis of rotation of the chute.

The cable guide on the upper portion of the U- shaped bracket comprises a pivotally mounted pulley in one construction and comprises an aperture lined with bearing material in another construction.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a tractor including a snow removal attachment and a deflector adjustment mechanism embodying the principles of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary enlarged view of a portion of the deflector adjusting mechanism illustrated in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a rear view of the chute, deflector and adjusting mechanism illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2;

FIG. 4 is a side elevational view of the adjusting mechanism illustrated in the preceding FIGS;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of another form of handle or regulator, different from that in FIGS. I-4 for anchoring the cable;

FIG. 6 is a plan view of still another handle or regulator for anchoring the cable;

FIG. 7 is a sectional view of the mechanism illustrated in FIG. 6, taken at about the line 77 of FIG.

FIG. 8 is a side elevational view of another embodiment of the deflector actuating mechanism utilizing a mounting bracket different form that in FIGS. 1-4;

FIG. 9 is a rear elevational view of the mechanism illustrated in FIG. 8;

FIG. 10 is a rear perspective elevation of anotherembodiment in which: the cable guide on the, mounting bracket differs from that illustrated in FIGS. 8 and 9; and

FIG. 11 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken at about the line 11-11 of FIG. 10.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF ILLUSTRATED EMBODIMENTS Referring now to the drawings in more detail, and first the embodiment of FIGS. 1-4, the invention is illustrated in connection with a garden tractor 10 having a power operated snow removal attachment 12. The tractor 10 includes a chassis 14 supported on wheels including a pair of rear propelling wheels as at 15 and a pair of front steering wheels as at 16. In the tractor illustrated, there is a prime mover in the form of a gasoline engine 18 on the front of the chassis 14 connected to drive an appropriate transmission connected for rotating the propelling wheels 15. The engine is adapted to be controlled from a control panel 19 located adjacent to a steering wheel 20 for controlling the front wheels 16. The control panel 19 and the steering wheel 20 are adjacent to a seat 22 on which an operator may be seated in a position accessible to the steering wheel and the control panel for appropriately controlling the engine 18 and the transmission mechanism driven thereby.

The snow removal attachment 12 includes a snow gathering housing 26 extending transversely at the front of the tractor and defining the width of the swath to be cut by the snow removal equipment. The housing 26 includes a rear wall (not visible), a top wall 27 and end walls as at 28 and 29. The front of the housing 26, and the bottom, are largely open to facilitate entry of snow into front of the housing. The housing 26, as well as the mechanism carried thereby, is supported by a pair of rigidly attached arms extending rearwardly from the housing at opposite sides of the chassis 14, one of which is visible at 31 in FIG. 1. Each bracket 31 is pivotally mounted at 32 on a support bracket 33 secured to the side of the chassis as at 34. The housing 26 is movable between a lowered operative position illustrated in FIG. 1, and an elevated retracted position by means of a link 36 having one end connected to an arm on the bracket 31 and having a remote End connected to a lever 37 pivotally mounted on the chassis at 38 adjacent to the operators station. The lever 37 includes handle 39 at the upper end which is manually accessible to an operator on the seat 22. Preferably, the handle and the lever include a reciprocally mounted plunger adapted to positively hold the lever in an angularly adjusted position with the housing 26 elevated off the ground.

In order to collect and remove snow in a predetermined path as the tractor progresses, the housing 26 in cludes appropriate rotary blade mechanism rotatably mounted as at 42 in opposite end walls 28,29. Preferably, the blade mechanism in the housing 26 includes oppositely directed blade portions 43 and 44 at opposite ends of the housing for moving snow inwardly toward the mid-portion of the housing where it is directed upwardly through a chute 46. If desired, there may be second stage blower or fan in the housing 26 aligned with the chute 46 for forcing the gathered snow upwardly at a high rate of speed so that in effect the snow is thrown or blown with great force outwardly through the chute 46 in a direction determined by the angular adjustment of the chute 46 and a deflector 48 mounted at the upper end of the chute 46.

In order to provide for supply of power to the rotating blade mechanism in the snow removal housing 26, the tractor 10 includes a power takeoff shaft stub (not visible) projecting forwardly from a lower portion of the chassis at the front end thereof, and the snow removal attachment 12 includes an appropriate flexible drive shaft having one end contained in a housing 50 attached to the front of the tractor. In the housing 50, the power takeoff shaft is connected to the flexible drive shaft, and the latter has an opposite end extending toward the snow gathering housing end wall 29, where the flexible drive shaft is appropriately connected to rotate the blade structure 43,44. The flexible drive shaft permits vertical movement of the housing 26 relative to the tractor either under control of the pivoted lever 37 or as the result of irregularities in the surface where the snow is being removed, while at the same time the power is continuously transmitted for rotating the blade structure 43,44.

In order to provide for direction of the discharged snow toward one side or the other of the path of movement of the tractor, the upright snow discharge chute 46 is mounted for rotation on the housing 26 about an upright axis which is designated 52 in FIG. 4. The lower end of the chute 46 includes an annular outwardly extending flange 53 which is disposed transverse to the axis 52 and which has a plurality of apertures 54 adapted to be engaged by a toothed wheel 56 secured on a shaft 57 rotatably mounted in a bracket 58 fixed on the housing 26 (FIG. 2). In order to angularly adjust the chute 46 remotely from the operators station, the rotatable shaft 57 has a universal connection 60 with an elongated shaft member 62 supported in an eyelet 63 mounted on the chassis 14. The long shaft 62 terminates in a handle 65 which is accessible from the operators staion. As illustrated in the drawings, and particularly FIG. 4, while the chute 46 is angularly adjustable about an upright axis 52, the chute actually is curved relative to the axis 52 for purposes of directing snow to one side of the axis 52 depending upon the angular adjustment of the chute. Thus, through the medium of the angulated drive shaft 57,62 and the toothed gear wheel 56, the operator may turn the chute within a range of approximately from one extreme position where the snow is directed laterally toward the left side of the machine to another extreme position where the snow is directed laterally toward the right side of the machine.

less upwardly or downwardly relative to the chute, so

that the snow is discharged at a higher or a lower angle.

The deflector 48 is essentially an inverted channelshaped member which has approximately a halfcircular transverse cross-sectional configuration, and a longitudinal axis which is somewhat curved in a degree of curvature corresponding approximately to the curvature of the chute 46. At opposite edges, near the lower end, the deflector 48 is pivotally mounted on the chute 46 by means of pivot pins 70. Associated with each of the pivotal joints 70, there is a torsion spring 72 in the form of a wire-shaped member having a central portion wrapped around the pivot pin 70, and opposite ends hooked respectively on the chute 46 and the deflector 48 in a manner such that the springs 72 function to bias the deflector upwardly relative to the chute 46 toward a relatively open position where the snow would be permitted to discharge in an upward direction. In order to provide for adjustment of the deflector remotely, so that the operator may adjust the deflector from the operators station, to direct discharge at a lower angle, a remote control mechanism is connected to the deflector 48 and adjustable from the operators station.

The remote control mechanism for adjusting the deflector 48 includes a cable attachment bracket or arm 74 having an upper end portion secured to the deflector 48 at 75. From the mounting 75, the bracket 74 extends downwardly behind the chute 46 to a lower terminus 76 to which a cable 77 is attached. From the attachment 76, the cable 77 extends upwardly and about a pulley rotatably mounted at 78 in a pulley block 79. The pulley block 79 is adapted to swivel in a support bracket 80 which in turn is adapted to swing around a mounting pin 82 at the upper end of a pulley support bracket 84 which has a lower end portion secured at 85 to the chute 46. As will be understood in reference to FIG. 4, the pivot pin 82 for the pulley support bracket 80 is disposed in alingment with the upright axis 52 about which the chute 46 is angularly adjustable.

After passing about the pulley 78, the cable 77 is led downwardly about a pulley 86 mounted on a bracket 87 secured to a lower portion of the chassis 14 near the pivotal mounting 32 for the snow gathering housing 26. After passing around the pulley 86, the cable 77 is led upwardly and about a pulley 88 on a bracket 89 mounted on the upper portion of the' tractor at the front end. From the pulley 88, the cable 77 is led rearwardly to a position near the control panel 19 and the steering wheel 20.The rear end of the cable 77 is suitably secured to a rectangular nut 90 slidable in a guide housing 91 on top of the tractor. The nut 90 is adapted to be secured in adjusted positions longitudinally in the housing 91 by means of a lock screw 92 threadably mounted in the nut 90. The screw 92 projects through a longitudinal slot in the housing 91 so that when the screw is loosened, the nut is slidable to adjust the cable.

In operation, the springs 72 normally bias the deflector 48 in an upward direction, and the force of the springs 72 may be opposed by the cable 77. If the thumb screw 92 is loosened, and the cable 77 is pulled rearwardly toward the operators station, the opposite end of the cable, at the attachment 76, is pulled upwardly to pivot the deflector 48 in a clockwise direction about the pivot pins 70, so that the upper discharge end of the deflector 48 is moved in a direction to lower the snow discharge and direct such discharge more horizontally. If the thumb screw 92 is loosened, and the resistance force on the cable is reduced, the springs 72 move the deflector 48 upwardly to elevate the snow discharge and direct the discharge more vertically. When the deflector 48 is adjusted to a desired angle, the thumb screw 92 may be tightened in a manner to lock the nut against movement in the guide 91, so that the cable effectively holds the deflector in properly adjusted position without requiring the constant attention of the attendant to hold the cable manually.

The location of the pivot pin 82 for the pulley bracket 80 coincident with the axis 52 about which the chute 46 is adjustable, assures that the path of the cable 77 remains constant for all angular positions of the chute 46. Thus, when the chute 46 is adjusted about the axis 52, such adjustment does not alter the angular adjustment of the deflector 48 about pivot pins 70. Further, the location of the pivot pin 82 on the axis 52 as sures that the position of the pulley support bracket 80 remains constant regardless of the angular position of the chute 46. Thus, regardless of the angular disposition of chute 46, the pulley support bracket 80 assumes a position in which the cable 77 is appropriately located to apply force to adjust the deflector against the bias of the springs 72.

The path of the cable 77 about the pulley 86 which is mounted adjacent to the pivot axis 32 for the snow collection housing 26 assures that the front end portion of the cable 77 swings about an axis approximately corresponding to the axis about which the housing 26 swings. As a result of such arrangement, the length of the cable path remains substantially constant when the housing 26 rises and falls with variations in the surface from which snow is being removed. Thus, the angle of the deflector 48 remains substantially the same even though the housing 26 may move up and down with variations in the road surface.

In the illustration of FIG. 5, an alternative handle or regulator is utilized with cable 77, including a flexible ball chain 93 associated with a latch bracket 94 secured on an engine cover 95, as by adhesive or other suitable means, The bracket 94 includes an upright flange 96 having a vertical slot 97. The chain 93 is of conventional construction and includes balls connected by articulated links. The links are positionable in slot 97 to hold the chain and cable in adjusted position against the bias of springs as at 72 acting on the deflector 48. The chain 93 is guided in an inverted U-shaped member 98 having lower ends welded or otherwise secured to flange 96 at opposite sides of slot 97, so that when the chain is released it is maintained in the vicinity of the latch member. At one end, the chain has a link 99 secured to cable 77, and positioned in a bell-shaped stop 100. At the opposite, free end, the chain has a second stop 100 retained thereon. In operation, the stops 100 are too large to pass through guide 98, and thus limit longitudinal movement of the chain in opposite directions. The chain provides a means for positively retaining the deflector in adjusted positions, while permitting rapid adjustment to other positions. Stops 100 permit a full range of deflector adjustment while restricting unnecessary freedom of chain movement.

Referring now to FIGS. 6 and 7, an alternative construction is illustrated for adjustably anchoring the end of the cable adjacent to the operators station to positively hold the cable in adjusted position. More particularly, engine cover supports a plate 101 having an upright shaft 102 which is secured in place by a lock nut 103 on a threaded lower end of the shaft. A reel or spool 105 is rotatably mounted on the shaft 102, and a deflector adjustment cable 107 has one end secured as at 108 to the reel. The cable 107 passes partially around the reel 105, so that rotation of the reel in a counterclockwise direction as viewed in FIG. 6 has the effect of pulling the cable 107 in a direction to lower a pivotally mounted deflector such as that illustrated at 48 in FIGS. 1-4. To facilitate adjustment, the reel 105 includes a hand grip knob 110 which is manually accessible adjacent the operators station.

In order to provide for retention of the reel in angularly adjusted positions, the reel 105 is axially movable on the shaft 102. A coiled compression spring 112 surrounds the shaft 102 and bears against a spring seat 113 on the upper end of the shaft in a manner to bias the reel 105 downwardly toward the plate 101. The reel 105 and the knob 110 are adapted to be held in angularly adjusted positions by means of a pin 115 integral with the reel and the knob and adapted to engage a plurality of anuglarly spaced apertures 116 in plate 101.

In operation, the spring 112 normally functions to maintain the reel 105 and the knob 110 closely adjacent to the plate 101, as illustrated in FIG. 7, with the detent pin 115 seated in one of the detent apertures 116 in the plate 101. In this manner, the cable 107 is positively held in opposition to the bias of the springs such as those illustrated at 72 in FIGS. 14, which tend to bias the deflector 48 in an upward direction. Thus, the deflector is held in properly adjusted position. When it is desirable to vary the adjustment of the deflector, the knob 110 may be raised sufficiently to withdraw the pin 115 from an aperture 116 and permit angular adjustment of the knob, whereupon the pin 115 may be again inserted into the appropriate aperture 116.

Referring now to the embodiment of FIGS. 8 and 9, there is a showing of an alternative pulley mounting bracket associated with the angularly adjustable snow discharge chute. To simplify the description, parts in FIGS. 8 and 9 corresponding to similar parts in FIGS. 14 are designated by similar reference numbers bearing a prime suffix. More particularly, angularly adjustable chute 46' carries a pivotally adjustable deflector 48' mounted by means of pivot pins 70 and biased upwardly toward fully open position by means of springs 72. The deflector 48'is adjustably by means of a cable 77 having one end secured at 76' to the lower end of a cable attachment bracket 74' secured at 75' to the deflector 48'. The cable 77 passes upwardly from the attachment 76' and about a pulley mounted on a block 79 carried by bracket 80. The brackef'S' is mounted on a pivot pin 120 carried on a projection 121 extending outwardly from the upper end of an inverted U- shaped pulley mounting bracket 122 having lower ends secures as at 123 on opposite sides of the angularly adjustable chute 46'. Preferably, the inverted U-shaped pulley mounting bracket 122 is constructed of yieldable material which permits bending of the bracket so that the lower ends may be moved toward or away from each other in a manner to accommodate the bracket for universal use in connection with various discharge chutes 46 having different diameters. The pivot pin 120 is aligned with axis 52' about which the chute 46' is angularly adjustable.

Referring now to the embodiment of FIGS. and 11, where parts corresponding to previously described parts have been designated with similar reference numbers bearing a prime suffix, an angularly adjustable chute 46' carries a pivotally mounted deflector 48' supported by pivot pins 70 and biased upwardly toward an open position by springs 72. A deflector adjustment cable 77' is secured at 76 to a cable attachment bracket 74 in turn secured to the deflector at 75'. A cable support bracket 122 of inverted Ushaped configuration has lower end portions secured at 123' to opposite sides of chute 46'. In lieu of a pulley for supporting the cable 77', the upper central portion of the bracket 122' is provided with a centrally located aperture carrying a grommet or eyelet 130 of suitable bearing material such as plastic material in the form of nylon or teflon. In order to facilitate angular adjustment of the chute 46', the grommet 130 is mounted on the bracket 122' in a position of alignment with the axis 52 about which the chute 46 is angularly adjustable. The use of eyelet 130 simplifies the construction by eliminating the need for a pivotally mounted pulley.

It should be understood that while the invention has been illustrated in connection with four-wheel tractors having propelling wheels at the rear and steering wheels at the front, the invention may be used with other constructions such as those involving front-wheel drive, articulated chassis and two wheels only, for example. The term chassis is used broadly to refer to any stationarily mounted portion of the vehicle of machine such as chassis, frame, body, skirts, fenders, covers, handles and the like. The term control station is used to refer to the vicinity of a control panel or other area where vehicle or machine controls are located, whether in a four-wheel or two-wheel machine.

I claim:

1. A snow removal machine, comprising,

a. a wheeled chassis having a control station,

b. a snow removal frame on the front of the chassis including a snow gathering housing,

c. snow removal blades rotatable in the housing,

(I. an upwardly directed snow discharge chute rotatable on the housing about an upright axis,

e. a curved deflector pivotally mounted on the upper end of the chute and yieldably biased in one direction, and

f. means for pivotally adjusting the deflector from the control station, including f-l. an upright rod having one end secured to the chute to afford a mounting bracket,

f-2. a pulley block mounted on the bracket for pivotal movement about the axis of rotation of the chute,

f-3. a pulley mounted on the block,

f-4. cable guide means on the chassis,

f-5. a cable secured to the deflector and passing from the deflector about the pulley and through the cable guide means on the chassis, and

f-6. having an end accessible for adjustment adjacent the control station for moving the deflector to adjusted positions.

2. A snow removal machine as defined in claim 1, including a flexible chain attached to the accessible end of the cable, and a latch bracket on the chassis for holding the chain in longitudinally adjusted positions.

3. A snow removal machine comprising,

a. a wheeled vehicle having a prime mover and an operators station thereon,

b. a snow removal framework attached to the front of the vehicle including a snow gathering housing and snow removal blades rotatable in the housing,

c. an upwardly directed snow discharge chute including a lower chute portion rotatable on the housing about an upright axis, an upper chute portion of inverted channel shape, and pivot pins mounting opposite edges of the upper chute portion on the lower chute portion,

d. remote control means for pivotally adjusting the upper chute portion from the operators station, including d-l torsion springs mounted at each pivot joint biasing the upper chute portion upwardly,

d-2. a cable attachment bracket on the rear of the upper chute portion,

d-3. a pulley mounting bracket attached to the lower chute portion,

d-4. a pulley mounted on the pulley mounting bracket above the cable attachment bracket for pivotal movement about an upright axis coincident with the axis of rotation of the lower chute portion,

d-5. cable guide means on a front portion of the vehicle,

d-6. a handle adjustably mounted on the vehicle adjacent the operators station,

d-7. a cable secured to the cable attachment bracket and passing around the pulley, through the cable guide means, and secured to the handle, and

d-8. means for securing the handle in adjusted positions against the bias of the torsion springs including a longitudinal guide on the chassis, a nut slidable in the guide and secured to the cable, and a thumb screw threaded in the nut for locking the nut in adjusted positions.

4. A snow removal machine as defined in claim 3, including a flexible ball chain secured to the cable and comprising a plurality of balls connected by articulated links, an upright flange on the chassis having a slot for receiving said links to hold the chain, a guide adjacent the flange constraining the chain, and stops on opposite ends of the chain engageable with the chain guide to limit chain movement in opposite directions.

5. A snow removal machine as defined in claim 4, wherein said pulley mounting bracket comprises an inverted U-shaped bracket having opposite ends secured to the lower chute portion.

6. A snow removal machine as defined in claim 4, wherein said pulley mounting bracket comprises an upright rod having one end secured to the lower chute portion.

7. A snow removal machine comprising,

a. a wheeled vehicle having a prime mover and an operators station thereon,

b. a snow removal framework attached to the front of the vehicle including a snow gathering housing and snow removal blades rotatable in the housing,

0. an upwardly directed snow discharge chute including a lower chute portion rotatable on the housing about an upright axis, an upper chute portion of inverted channel shape, and pivot pins mounting opposite edges of the upper chute portion on the lower chute portion,

d. remote control means for pivotally adjusting the upper chute portion from the operators station, including d-l. torsion springs mounted at each pivot joint biasing the upper chute portion upwardly,

d-2. a cable attachment bracket on the rear of the upper chute portion,

d-3. a pulley mounting bracket attached to the lower chute portion,

d-4. a pulley mounted on the pulley mounting bracket above the cable attachment bracket for pivotal movement about an upright axis coincident with the axis of rotation of the lower chute portion,

d-5. cable guide means on a front portion of the vehicle,

d-6. a handle adjustably mounted on the vehicle adjacent the operators station,

d-7. a cable secured to the cable attachment bracket and passing around the pulley, through the cable guide means, and secured to the handle, and

d-8. means for securing the handle in adjusted positions against the bias of the torsion springs.

8. A snow removal machine as defined in claim 7, including a pulley block mounted on the pulley mounting bracket for pivotal movement about said upright axis and rotatably supporting said pulley.

9. A snow removal machine, comprising,

a. a wheel chassis having a prime mover and a control station,

b. a snow removal frame pivotally mounted about an axis low on the front of the chassis including a snow gathering housing movable up and down,

c. snow removal blades rotatable in the housing,

(1. an upwardly directed snow discharge chute rotatable on the housing about an upright axis,

e. a deflector pivotally mounted on the upper end of the chute and yieldably biased in one direction,

f. control means for pivotally adjusting the deflector from the control station, including f-l. a mounting bracket on the chute,

f-2. a first cable guide mounted on the bracket in line with the axis of rotation of the chute,

f-3. a second cable guide mounted low on the front of the chassis adjacent the pivotal axis of the snow removal frame,

f-4. a third cable guide mounted high on the chas- SIS,

f-5. a cable secured to the deflector and passing upwardly from the deflector through the first cable guide, the second cable guide and the third cable guide and having an end accessible for adjustment adjacent the control station for moving the deflector to adjusted positions.

10. A snow removal machine as defined in claim 9, wherein the first cable guide comprises a pulley block mounted on the bracket for pivotal movement about said upright axis and a pulley rotatable on the block.

11. A snow removal machine as defined in claim 9 wherein the mounting bracket comprises an upright rod having one end secured to the chute.

12. A snow removal machine as defined in claim 9, wherein the mounting bracket comprises an inverted U-shaped bracket having opposite ends secured to the chute.

13. A snow removal machine as defined in claim 12, wherein the first cable guide comprises an aperture in the upper portion of the mounting bracket concentric with said upright axis and lined with bearing material.

14. A snow removal machine, comprising, a. a wheeled chassis having a prime mover and a control station, b. a snow removal frame on the front of the chassis including a snow gathering housing, c. snow removal blades rotatable in the housing and driven by the prime mover, d. an upwardly directed snow discharge chute rotatable on the housing about an upright axis, e. a deflector pivotally mounted on the upper end of the chute, f. means yieldably biasing the deflector upwardly,

remotecontrol means for pivotally adjusting the deflector from the control station, including 1" gl. a mounting bracket of inverted U-shape having lower ends'secured to opposite sides of the chute and an upper portion disposed above the chute behind the deflector.

g-2. a first cable guide mounied tin the upper"? bracket portion in line with the axis of rotation of the chute, g-3. a second cable guide mounted low on the front of the chassis adjacent the pivotal axis of the snow removal frame, f g-4. a third cable guide mounted high on the chassis,

g-5. a cable secured to the deflector and passing upwardly from the deflector through the first' cable guide, the second cable guide and the third' wherein the first ca'lble guide comprises a pulley block mounted on the bracket for pivotal movement about said'upright axis and a pulley rotatable on the block.

16. A snow removal machine as defined in claim 14, wherein the first cable guide comprises an aperture in the upper portion of the mounting bracket concentric ,tion; a guide pivotally mounted substantially on the axis with said upright axis and lined with bearing material.

17. A snow removal'machine, comprising,

a. a wheeled chassis having a prime mover anda control station,

b. a snow removal frame on the chassis including a snow gathering housing,

c. snow removal blades rotatable in' the housing,

,d. an upwardly directed snow dischargejchute rotatable on the housing about an upright axis, e. a deflector pivotally mounted on the upper end jot the chute and yieldably biased in one direction, and f. means for pivotally adjusting the deflector from the control station, including f=l, a mounting bracket on the chute,

f=2. a cable guide mounted on the bracket in line with tl'l '"3XiS of rotation of the chute,

f=3. a cable secured to the deflector and passing through the cable guide, and

f=4. an adjustable regulator on the chassis adjacent the control station connected to the cable for securing the cable in adjusted positions, said regulator including a flexible chain secured to the cable, a flange with a chain guide secured to the chassis adjacent the control station, said flange including a slot for receiving the chain links to hold the chain in adjusted positions, said guide constraining the chain to the vicinity of the slot, and stops on opposite ends of the chain engageable with the chain guide to limit chain movement.

18. In a snow removal machine, an adjustable snow directional device for directing snow particles forwardly and laterally of the machine comprising: an upright chute for receiving snow particles from the machine and directing said particles upwardly to an upper end of said chute, said chute being rotatable about an upright axis of rotation; a deflector pivoted to the chute for swinging movement between an upper position and a lower position, the deflector being positioned transversely of the open upper end of the chute to intercept and to redirect snow particles outwardly of the open upper end of the chute, the swinging movement of the deflector between said upper and lower positions varying the angular direction from the horizontal of the path of snow particles from the chute; spring means normally urging the deflector toward said upper posiof rotation of said chute and rotatable about said axis; and means for selectively adjusting the deflector toward said lower position, said means including lever means on the deflector having a free end extending transversely of the axis of rotation of the chute, and a single elongated, flexible, control cable extending rearwardly of the machine to a control station, said control cable being secured to said free end and bearing on said guide, whereby movement of said control cable against the action of said spring means will pivot said deflector downwardly to a pre-selected position of adjustment, ,and rotation of the chute about its axis of rotation will swing said free end on a uniform radius about said axis of rotation so that the deflector is maintained .in said pre-selected position of adjustment during said rotation.

19. An adjustable snow directional device as specified in claim 18 in which the transversely extending free end of the lever means projects rearwardly of the axisof rotation when the deflector is positioned to direct snow particles forwardly of the device.

20. An adjustable snow directional device as specitied in claim ,18 in which said chute is rotatable through an angle of at least 180.

.21. A snow removal machine for attachment to a vehicle comprising: a snow removal frame having a pivotable mounting for attachment to the vehicle, the frame including a snow gathering housing movable up and down to conform to irregularities of the surface from which snow is being removed; an upright chute on the housing for receiving snow particles from the housing and directing said particles upwardly to an upper end of said chute, said chute being rotatable about an upright axis of rotation; a deflector having a pivot connection adjacent the upper end of said chute for swinging movementbetween a first position and a second posicent the pivotable mounting of the frame so that the first cable guide will swing on substantially the same radius about said second cable guide and said pivotable mounting, whereby up and down movement of the housing will not substantially affect a pre-selected position of adjustment of the deflector; and means for selectively adjusting the deflector toward the other of said positions, said means including an attaching portion on the deflector spaced from said deflector pivot connection, and flexible cable means extending rearwardly of the machine to a control station, said cable means being secured to said attaching portion and bearing on said cable guides, whereby movement of said cable means against the action of said spring means will pivot said deflector toward the other of said positions to a pre-selected position of adjustment, and during rotation of the chute, the first cable guide will be maintained substantially on the axis of rotation of said chute so that the deflector is maintained in said pre-selected position of adjustment during said rotation of the chute and during up and down movement of the housing.

22. A snow removal machine as specified in claim 2] in which a third cable guide is provided between the second cable guide and the control station, and the cable means bears successively on said first, second and third cable guides to define the path of the cable means to the control station.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification37/260, 285/272, 74/25, 193/22
International ClassificationE01H5/04, E01H5/09
Cooperative ClassificationE01H5/098, E01H5/045
European ClassificationE01H5/09E, E01H5/04B