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Publication numberUS3880141 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 29, 1975
Filing dateFeb 21, 1974
Priority dateFeb 21, 1974
Publication numberUS 3880141 A, US 3880141A, US-A-3880141, US3880141 A, US3880141A
InventorsAbshear Harold R
Original AssigneeAbshear Harold R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Heating systems for fireplaces
US 3880141 A
Abstract
A heating system easily installed in fireplaces using surplus fireplace heat to heat air for delivery into a room or rooms of a building. A relatively flat heat exchanger is positioned at the rear of the fireplace opening or chamber, the heat exchanger being inclined upwardly and forwardly. An air inlet duct is connected to the lower end of the heat exchanger and a hot air outlet duct is connected to the upper end of the heat exchanger. There is a cabinet in the lower part of which is housed an electric fan or pump for blowing air from the room through the inlet duct, through the heated air duct into the upper part of the cabinet which is partitioned. From the upper part of the cabinet, the heated air is blown through openings in the walls of the cabinet and this air is directed by louvers so as to spred through the area to be heated. At its upper end, the heat exchanger is held in position by an adjustable rod and sleeve mechanism and within the heat exchanger is a primary baffle or partition which separates lower and upper chambers of the heat exchanger and there are a plurality of secondary baffles which cause the air within the heat exchanger to be swirled and agitated so that it will be quickly and effectively heated while passing through the heat exchanger.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Abshear 1 Apr. 29, 1975 1 1 HEATING SYSTEMS FOR FIREPLACES [76] Inventor: Harold R. Abshear, PO. Box 4734,

Whittier, Calif. 90607 [22] Filed: Feb. 21, 1974 [21] Appl. No.: 444,685

Primary Examiner-William F. ODea Assistant Examiner-Peter D. Ferguson Attorney, Agent, or Firm-.l. Carroll Baisch [57] ABSTRACT A heating system easily installed in fireplaces using surplus fireplace heat to heat air for delivery into a room or rooms of a building. A relatively flat heat exchanger is positioned at the rear of the fireplace opening or chamber, the heat exchanger being inclined upwardly and forwardly. An air inlet duct is connected to the lower end of the heat exchanger and a hot air outlet duct is connected to the upper end of the heat exchanger. There is a cabinet in the lower part of which is housed an electric fan or pump for blowing air from the room through the inlet duct, through the heated air duct into the upper part of the cabinet which is partitioned. From the upper part of the cabinet, the heated air is blown through openings in the walls of the cabinet and this air is directed by louvers so as to spred through the area to be heated. At its upper end, the heat exchanger is held in position by an adjustable rod and sleeve mechanism and within the heat exchanger is a primary baffle or partition which separates lower and upper chambers of the heat exchanger and there are a plurality of secondary baffles which cause the air within the heat exchanger to be swirled and agitated so that it will be quickly and effectively heated while passing through the heat exchanger.

6 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures nim' i l llll l ll illllllll WENTEDAPRZ IHY 3.880.141

sum 1. BF 2 HEATING SYSTEMS FOR FIREPLACES BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION l. Field of the Invention This invention relates to a heating system for utilizing the heat generated in a fireplace for heating positively circulated air.

2. Description of the Preferred Art Various systems have been proposed for improving the effectiveness of fireplaces in heating rooms of a house or the like. These systems, as far as I am aware, are not very effective. Also, some of these systems require units built into the fireplace and many of these arrangements are very expensive.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention comprises a system that is easily installed in the usual fireplace and which utilizes heat of the fire in the fireplace that would otherwise be lost up the chimney. A relatively flat heat exchanger is positioned at the rear of the fireplace opening or heat chamber and is inclined upwardly and forwardly. At the upper end of the heat exchanger is an adjustable device having one end connected to the heat exchanger and having the other end adapted to engage the front wall of the fireplace so as to hold the heat exchanger in its proper inclined position. Within the heat exchanger is a primary baffie extending part way across the width of the heat exchanger and dividing it into a lower and an upper chamber with a passage between the chambers at the free end of the primary baffie. Additional baffles are distributed in both chambers to agitate the air and to cause it to swirl about so as to quickly pick up heat as the air passes through the heat exchanger. A cabinet having a lower chamber and an upper chamber separated by a partition is positioned adjacent the fireplace. There is a connection between the lower chamber of the heat exchanger for the delivery of air into the heat exchanger, there being an electric fan or pump in the lower chamber for forcing the air into the heat exchanger. Air that has passed through the heat exchanger is carried by a conduit to the upper chamber of the cabinet and is blown from this upper chamber into the area to be heated, the heated air being directed in various directions by louvers or vains.

OBJECTS AND ADVANTAGES OF THE INVENTION It is an object of the present invention to provide a heating system for utilizing heat of a fireplace to heat air of a forced air system.

It is another object of the invention to provide a system of this character wherein heat of the fireplace which would otherwise be lost up the chimney is utilized to heat the air forced through the system.

It is still another object of the invention to provide a system of this character that is portable and easily installed in a fireplace.

It is a further object of the invention to provide apparatus of this character that will substantially cut heat loss of a fireplace.

A still further object of the invention is to provide apparatus of this character that is relatively simple in construction and operation.

Another object of the invention is to provide apparatus of this character that will quickly heat a room or rooms of a building or the area to be heated.

LII

Still another object of the invention is to provide apparatus of this character that is relatively inexpensive to manufacture and to install.

A further object of the invention is to provide apparatus of this character that is highly efficient.

The characteristics and advantages of the invention are further sufficiently referred to in connection with the following detailed description of the accompanying drawings, which represent one embodiment. After considering this example, skilled persons will understand that many variations may be made without departing from the principles disclosed and I contemplate the employment of any structures, arrangements or modes of operation that are properly within the scope of the appended claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS Referring to the drawings, which are for illustrative purposes only:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of apparatus embodying the present invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged side elevational view of the apparatus with portions broken away to show certain interior parts; and

FIG. 3 is an enlarged side elevational view of the apparatus installed in a fireplace, the fireplace being shown in section and certain parts of the apparatus being broken away.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring more particularly to the drawings, there is shown apparatus of a system embodying the present invention.

The apparatus comprises a heat exchanger indicated generally at 10, and a cabinet or housing indicated generally at 12.

The heat exchanger comprises front and rear walls 14 and 16 in spaced parallel relationship and peripheral top and bottom walls and side walls 22 and 24.

There is a horizontal partition 26 dividing the heat exchanger into a bottom chamber 28 and an upper chamber 30. Partition 26 does not extend entirely across the heat exchanger but terminates in spaced relationship to the side wall 22 thereby leaving an air passage 32 at its free end between the lower chamber and the upper chamber. The partition is secured in the heat exchanger by any suitable means such as welding, brazing 34, or the like. Other suitable means could also be used to secure the partition in place.

Also, within the heat exchanger are a plurality of variously arranged and spaced baffles 36. There are baffles 36 in both the lower chamber 28 and the upper chamber 30. Baffles 36 are also secured within the heat exchanger by welding or brazing 38 although any other suitable means may be used.

The cabinet 12 comprises a housing having atop wall 40 and a bottom wall 42 with a front wall 44 and a rear wall 46. There are also side walls 48 and 50. A horizontal partition 52 divides the cabinet or housing into a lower chamber 54 and an upper chamber 56, the partition 52 being secured in the housing by any suitable means such as welding. brazing or the like although other suitable means such as screws may be used.

The front, rear and side walls of the housing extend below the bottom wall 42 to space the said bottom wall above the surface on which the cabinet or housing is disposed. An opening 58 is provided in the front wall and a grill or filter 60 is placed within the housing to cover said opening while still allowing air to be drawn into the lower chamber 54. Within chamber 54 is disposed a fan 62 driven by any suitable means such as, for example, an electric motor 64 which is secured to the bottom wall 42 by means of screws 66. Lower chamber 54 of the housing is connected by means of a conduit or duct 68 with the lower chamber 28 of the heat exchanger.

Upper chamber 30 of the heat exchanger is connected by means of a duct 70 with the upper chamber 56 of the housing. Openings or vents 72 are provided and openings 72 are provided in the top wall, front and back walls and one of the side walls and there is a louver 74 for each opening.

When installed, the heat exchanger is at the back of the fireplace opening and is inclined upwardly and forwardly. There is a brace or device indicated generally at 76 for retaining the heat exchanger at the proper inclined position, the device comprising a rod 78 having one end secured to the front wall of the heat exchanger by means of welding, brazing or the like. Rod 78 is slidable in a sleeve 82 and the rod and sleeve are held in adjusted position by means of a screw 84. The front end of the sleeve 82 is in abuttment with the upper front wall 86 of the fireplace so that the heat exchanger will be maintained in the proper inclined position. By inclining the heat exchanger forwardly, there is a greater amount of heat from the fuel, indicated generally at 88 transferred to the interior of the exchange for heating air passing therethrough.

In operation, air is drawn from the room or area to be heated through the filter and into the chamber 50 by the fan 62 and forced through duct 68 into the lower part or chamber 28 of the heat exchanger. Air in the chamber 28 is caused to swirl by the baffles 36 so as to more readily pick up heat from the fuel 88. This air flows into chamber 30 by way of the passage 32 between the free end of the partition 26 and the adjacent side wall of the heat exchanger. As the air passes into and through chamber 30, it is further agitated and swirled by the baffles 36 therein and the heated air then flows through the duct 70 into the upper chamber 56 of the cabinet 12 and thence out through the openings 72. Air discharged through openings 72 is directed by the louvers 74. Louvers 74 of the upper wall of the cabinet direct air forwardly and slightly upwardly while the louvers in the front, back and side walls direct the heated air in a generally upwardly direction and somewhat outwardly of the cabinet.

The invention and its attendant advantages will be understood from the foregoing description and it will be apparent that various changes may be made in the form, construction and arrangement of the parts without departing from the spirit or scope thereof or sacrificing its material advantages, the arrangement hereinbefore described being merely by way of example and I do not wish to be restricted to the specific form shown or uses mentioned except as defined in the accompanying claims.

I claim:

1. Heating systems for fireplaces, comprising:

a heat exchanger adapted to be disposed at the rear of the fireplace opening; a horizontal partition separating the interior of the heat exchanger into a lower chamber and an upper chamber, there being a flow passage between the lower and upper chambers;

means for introducing air to be heated into one of said chambers and an outlet for heated air for the other chamber;

a plurality of secondary baffles in each of said chambers for causing air passing through the chambers to be agitated;

said heat exchanger being inclined upwardly and forwardly;

and an adjustable brace for the upper end of the heat exchanger, said brace being adapted to engage the front upper wall of a fireplace for positioning the heat exchanger in its inclined position.

2. The invention defined by claim 1, including a housing having upper and lower chambers therein, one of said chambers having an inlet opening and the other said chamber having a plurality of outlet openings; a fan for drawing air into the chamber with the inlet opening; conduit means operable connecting the fan with one of the chambers of the heat exchanger; a conduit connecting the other chamber of the heat exchanger with the chamber of the housing having the plurality of outlet openings.

3. The invention defined by claim 2, including louvers for the various openings of said other chamber for directing air in various directions into an area to be heated.

4. A fireplace heating system, comprising:

a relatively flat heat exchanger including front and rear walls;

a horizontal partition in the heat exchanger dividing said heat exchanger into lower and upper chambers, said partition being of less length than the width of the heat exchanger to provide an air passage between the free end of said partition and the adjacent side wall of said heat exchanger;

a plurality of baffles within each of the chambers of the heat exchanger to cause air passing through the heat exchanger to be agitated and to swirl;

said heat exchanger being inclined upwardly and forwardly;

a housing having a lower and an upper chamber, the lower chamber having an inlet opening and the upper chamber having a plurality of outlet openmgs;

a conduit connecting the lower chamber of the housing with the lower chamber of the heat exchanger;

a conduit connecting the upper chamber of the heat exchanger with the upper chamber of the housing;

and means for forcing air from the lower chamber of the housing into the lower chamber of the heat exchanger.

5. The invention defined by claim 4, including an adjustable brace attached to the upper end of the heat exchanger retaining said heat exchanger in an inclined position when installed in a fireplace.

6. The invention defined by claim 5, including louvers for the various outlet openings of the housing for directing air in various directions.

Patent Citations
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US1314968 *Mar 4, 1918Sep 2, 1919 Planoqrapii co
US1653466 *Apr 3, 1926Dec 20, 1927Nickels Stanford BFireplace heater
US2158041 *Jul 9, 1936May 9, 1939Covert James DFireplace
US2359197 *May 11, 1943Sep 26, 1944Brooks Wilbur RFireplace heater
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4008704 *Jun 10, 1975Feb 22, 1977Petrie Henry WUniversally adjustable forced air fireplace heater
US4018208 *Jun 9, 1975Apr 19, 1977Tom Lauderdale Machine Shop, Inc.Hot air andiron
US4019492 *Feb 4, 1975Apr 26, 1977Rush Joseph AMethod and apparatus for automatic furnace
US4049194 *Mar 9, 1976Sep 20, 1977Vernon Lawton TiceForced air furnace heat generation and distribution system
US4142507 *Jul 5, 1977Mar 6, 1979Stanko John JFireplace systems
US4163442 *Oct 17, 1977Aug 7, 1979Welty Robert OFireplace heat system
US4187829 *Apr 27, 1978Feb 12, 1980Pauley Eugene EFireplace heat exchanger assembly
US4271814 *Jun 9, 1978Jun 9, 1981Lister Paul MHeat extracting apparatus for fireplaces
US4287877 *Dec 7, 1979Sep 8, 1981Gaines Cecil ASolar and central fireplace heating system
US4446848 *May 9, 1983May 8, 1984Gladstone Furnace Company, Inc.Fireplace insert construction
US5934270 *Jan 30, 1997Aug 10, 1999Kim; SinilFireplace heat exchange device
US20100186731 *Aug 18, 2009Jul 29, 2010Michael Patrick MurrayAmerican chimney furnace
Classifications
U.S. Classification126/521, 126/523
International ClassificationF24B1/00, F24B1/188
Cooperative ClassificationF24B1/1885
European ClassificationF24B1/188F