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Publication numberUS3880159 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 29, 1975
Filing dateJun 21, 1973
Priority dateJun 21, 1973
Publication numberUS 3880159 A, US 3880159A, US-A-3880159, US3880159 A, US3880159A
InventorsDiamond Jules B
Original AssigneeDiamond Jules B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Multipurpose flat bandage
US 3880159 A
Abstract
Multipurpose flat bandage has a cover layer of generally rectangular shape. The cover layer has pressure-sensitive adhesive on the front thereof and a bandage pad secured thereto. The bandage pad is positioned on the adhesive front of the cover layer and leaves adhesive exposed around most of the periphery. The cover layer and bandage pad have a tab extending outward beyond the body of the cover layer so that the tab can be employed as a bandage lifter when it is employed as a flat bandage and can be employed as an end cover when the bandage is employed as a finger cot.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Diamond 51 Apr. 29, 1975 1 MULTIPURPOSE FLAT BANDAGE 221 Filed: June 21,1973

211 Appl.No.:372,056

[52] [1.8. CI. 128/157 [51] Int. Cl. A611 13/10 [58] Field of Search 128/157. 153. 268, 87 A [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,440,235 4/1948 Solomon 128/157 2,875,758 3/1959 Fuzak et al. 128/157 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 321,693 6/1957 Switzerland 128/157 343.066 1/1960 Switzerland 128/157 Primary E.taminerRichard A. Gaudet Assistant E.raminerl C. McGowan Attorney, Agent, or FirmAllan M. Shapiro [57] ABSTRACT Multipurpose flat bandage has a cover layer of generally rectangular shape. The cover layer has pressuresensitive adhesive on the front thereof and a bandage pad secured thereto. The bandage pad is positioned on the adhesive front of the cover layer and leaves adhesive exposed around most of the periphery. The cover layer and bandage pad have a tab extending outward beyond the body of the cover layer so that the tab can be employed as a bandage lifter when it is employed as a flat bandage and can be employed as an end cover when the bandage is employed as a finger cot.

4 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures MULTIPURPOSE FLAT BANDAGE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION l. Field of the Invention This invention is directed to a multipurpose flat bandage, and particularly a bandage which can be employed both as a flat bandage and as a finger cot.

2. Description of the Prior Art Bandages have been used since time immemorial. Textile fabrics have served as the principal pad or wound-engaging portion ofa bandage since their incep tion. However, even prior to the existence of textile fabrics, mosses and other soft. natural materials were applied to wounds as padding and dressing therefor. Even today. for some purposes and in some areas. such natural materials are employed as bandages.

With the development of pressure-sensitive adhesives, composite bandages have been developed. These composite bandages comprise a cover layer which carries pressuresensitive adhesive thereon and, over a portion of this cover layer, a bandage pad is secured. A backing slip sheet covers the bandage pad and the adhesive layer to maintain the cleanliness of the bandage pad and the stickiness ofthe pressure-sensitive adhesive.

Furthermore. in recent years, many shapes of such bandages have been produced to suit particular needs. Thus. many special-purpose configurations are available, each suiting a particular bandage shape to a particular purpose by previously unobvious means.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In order to aid in the understanding of this invention, it can be stated in essentially summary from that it is directed to a multipurpose flat bandage. The multipurpose flat bandage comprises a cover layer having adhesive on the front thereof, at least adjacent the edges. A bandage pad is positioned on the front thereof, leaving some of the adhesive around the edges exposed. The bandage pad has a tab extending beyond the edge of the cover layer for use in lifting the bandage, when it is employed as a flat bandage, and for use in forming the flat bandage into a finger cot.

It is thus an object of this invention to provide a multipurpose flat bandage which is useful for several different purposes and is specially adapted for use for several purposes, without reduction of function for each individual purpose. It is another object to provide a multipurpose flat bandage which can be used as a flat bandage and having a release tab to aid in the removal of the bandage, when such removal is desired. It is yet another object to provide a flat bandage having a tab thereon which permits the flat bandage to be rolled and employed as a finger cot for the protection of one or more fingers or other digits. It is another object to provide a flat bandage which is formed of a front layer, having a bandage gauze pad thereon. with the bandage gauze pad extending in a tab beyond one edge of the front layer.

The features of the present invention which are believed to be novel are set forth with particularity in the appended claims. The present invention. both as to its organization and manner of operation, together with further objects and advantages thereof, may best be understood by reference to the following description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the bandage. showing the backing sheet partly broken away at the tab region and partly separated from the adhesive on the opposite corner region.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view from the same aspect showing a step in applying the bandage to a finger.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view from the same aspect showing completion of the application of the bandage to a finger subsequent to the step shown in FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is an enlarged section taken generally along the line 4-4 of FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the bandage showing an alternative arrangement of the bandage prior to use.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The entire bandage of this invention is illustrated in perspective view in FIGS. 1 and 5 and is generally indicated at 10. Bandage 10 comprises cover layer 12 and a gauze bandage pad 14. Cover layer 12 is preferably of rectangular shape, with its main body defined by end edges 16 and 18 and side edges 20 and 22. Extending outwardly from these edges of the main body of the bandage is tab 23. Tab 23 is formed integrally with cover layer 12. Its positioning, dimensioning, and function are described in more detail below. The corners of tab 23 are preferably rounded. as shown.

Cover layer 12 is preferably of flexible. slightly stretchable, optionally perforated, sheet synthetic polymer composition material. Its top serves as the exterior of the completed bandage and thus it is preferably of such material as to reject contamination. While perforations therein are helpful in maintaining a wound under the bandage in ventilated environment, such perforations permit the entry of water and contamination from the exterior. In general purpose usage, such perforations are preferred, but are not necessary in the present flat bandage structure. The front of cover layer 12 has pressure-sensitive adhesive 24 thereon, at least adjacent the edges thereof. The pressure-sensitive adhesive is of known character and permits the bandage 10 to be adhered to the skin around the area to be bandaged, and/or adhered in part to the exterior 26 of cover layer 12 when the bandage is wrapped around a smaller portion of the anatomy.

Bandage pad 14 is preferably a textile fabric bandage layer of known properties. These known properties include absorbency and resiliency to protect against exterior pressure. Furthermore, the bandage pad should be sterilizable so that, when the bandage pad is placed against the skin, which may have a wounded area, it does not bring contamination to the area. The conventional material for such bandage pads is usually called gauze, and such bandage pads are often formed of woven cotton fabric, sometimes with a synthetic polymer composition top layer to prevent adhesion between the wound and the bandage pad. The significant characteristic of the bandage 10 is the shape of bandage pad 14. As seen in FIG. 1, the main body of gauze bandage pad is substantially rectangular and is of smaller dimension than cover layer [2. It has end edges 28 and 30, as well as side edges 32 and 34. The pressure-sensitive adhesive 24 is left exposed around the edges of gauze bandage pad 14. Additionally and most significantly, tab 36 extends outward beyond side edge 34 of the main body of bandage pad I4 and beyond side edge 22 of cover layer 12. Tab 36 has its end edge in line with and is a continuation of end edge 28. Tab 36 extends to end 38. Its other edge 40 defines the extent of tab 36. In width, tab 36 is preferably slightly wider than a mans middle finger. In length. it is substantially equal to the thickness of that finger plus the length of its terminal bone. With these dimensions, the tab can be engaged over the end of the finger to protect it (see FIG. 2).

Tab 36 is both the tab on the bandage pad and tab 23 on the cover layer. It should be noted that the tab 23 of the cover layer and the tab 36 are coextensive at the edges so that there is no exposed pressure-sensitive adhesive around the edges of tab 36.

Backing sheet 42 is laid over bandage to be coextensive with the edges 16, I8, and 22 of cover layer 12. In the organization of the bandage shown in FIG. 1, the tab 36 extends outwardly from the edge of backing sheet 42. Thus, entry under the backing sheet is permitted at the tab because, in that location, the backing sheet is not adhesively secured to the bandage. Backing sheet 42 has the usual function of protecting the adhesive layer and keeping the gauze bandage pad clean. In the organization of the bandage shown in FIG. 5, the tab 36 is folded in on a fold-line in line with side edge 22 and is positioned beneath backing sheet 42. This has several advantages: it protects the tab 36 against dirt; it also protects tab 36 against damage; it provides a rectangular outline to the bandage 10 so that the bandage 10 can be conveniently packaged by standard packaging machinery and placed into standard packages. Furthermore, with the infolded tab 36, as shown in FIG. 5, removal of backing sheet 42 is facilitated because the backing sheet 42 is not adhesively secured where tab 36 is infolded. Thus, entry beneath backing sheet 42 is permitted at that point.

Backing sheet 42 need not have the usual split in the middle of it to aid in its removal. It can be a single backing sheet substantially coextensive with the four edges of cover layer I2. The reason for this is that, with the cover layer 42 in place, the cover layer is not adhesively attached at tab 36. Either in the mode of FIG. 1 or the mode of FIG. 5, there is no adhesive attachment at the tab. Thus, this adjacent edge of the cover sheet at the tab can be engaged so that the entire cover sheet can be lifted away. In this way, there is economy in cover sheet-applying machinery and ease in removal, because the cover sheet is unitary.

In use, when bandage 10 is used as a flat bandage, backing sheet 42 is removed to expose pressuresensitive adhesive 24, and the bandage is placed over the area to be covered in conventional way. Tab 36 extends outward from the bandage and is not adhesively secured. Therefore, when the bandage removal is desired. tab 36 can be engaged to lift the corner of the bandage with a minimum of difficulty. In those cases where bandage I0 is too large for a particular placement, it can be cut to a smaller size. The portion with the tab 36 attached can be readily removed by lifting on that tab.

In further and principal use of the bandage 10, it is employed as a wrapping or cot for digits, preferably fingers. In this use, backing sheet 42 is removed and the bandage is oriented with respect to the finger in the manner shown in FIG. 2. In this case, the finger is aligned with tab 36 and enters across side edge 20 of the bandage. The finger extends across the gauze bandage pad 14 at least as far as side edge 22. Tab 36 is folded up and around the finger so that its end 38 extends inwardly. Now, end edge 16 is wrapped up around the finger to engage and retain tab 36. Next, the balance of the bandage is wrapped around the finger. Finally, both ends of the bandage are pressed to fully engage the adhesive.

If the full bandage is used on a single finger, there are several loose wraps around the finger, as illustrated in FIG. 3, to provide a soft, loose, bulky bandage for maximum finger protection. The adhesive 24 around the edges maintains the bandage in place as a finger cot as illustrated in FIGS. 3 and 4. The length of the bandage from end edge 16 to end edge 18 is preferably sufficient that the bandage can be wrapped around two adjacent digits, holding them together. In this case, the tab 36, which is illustrated as being wider than necessary for a single digit, is shared over the two adjacent digits to protect them both. The bandage 10 can be left in place for as long as desired and can be easily removed and replaced by the user, because a minimum of bandaging experience is necessary for its satisfactory use.

While particular embodiments of the present invention have been shown and described, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that changes and modifications may be made without departing from this invention in its broader aspects and, therefore, the aim in the appended claims is to cover all such changes and modifications as fall within the true spirit and scope of this invention.

What is claimed is:

I. A flat bandage comprising:

a substantially rectangular cover layer having an exterior surface and a front surface and having its main body defined by end edges and side edges;

a rectangular bandage pad positioned against said front surface of said cover layer and having first, second, third and fourth edges, said bandage pad having a width between said first and third edges at least as great as that required to wrap completely around two digits, said cover layer extending beyond said bandage pad along said first, second and third edges and a portion of said fourth edge, pressure-sensitive adhesive on that portion of said front surface which extends beyond said bandage pad so that said bandage can be secured;

said bandage pad having a bandage pad tab portion extending past said fourth edge to form a bandage pad tab, said bandage pad tab having an edge aligned with said third edge of said bandage pad and width about equal to that of two digits, said tab width being less than one-third of said bandage pad width, said cover layer extending coextensively with said bandage pad tab.

2. The bandage of claim 1 wherein:

said bandage pad and said cover layer are folded in along a fold line substantially in line with said fourth edge, and

including a backing sheet positioned over said infolded tab, said bandage pad and the front of said cover layer to provide a rectangular exterior configuration defined by said edges to said bandage.

3. A bandage comprising:

a cover layer having first, second, third, and fourth edges defining a rectangular body of said bandage;

a bandage pad having first, second, third, and fourth edges positioned on said cover layer so that said edges of said bandage pad are spaced inward from the respective edges of said cover layer to expose a portion of the front of said cover layer adjacent said cover layer edges, at least a portion of the exposed front of said cover layer having pressuresensitive adhesive thereon for adhesive attachment of said bandage to a substantially flat surface. the improvement comprising:

a tab on said bandage pad extending beyond the body of said bandage pad at said fourth edge thereof, said tab extending beyond said fourth edge of said cover layer so that, when said bandage is applied to a substantially flat surface. said tab can be manually engaged to lift said tab and the adjacent portions of said cover layer to aid in bandage removal;

pressure-sensitive adhesive adhered to the entire front surface of said cover layer which is not covered by said bandage pad;

said tab on said bandage pad is folded in over the body of said cover layer along a fold-line in line with said fourth edge of said cover layer; and

a backing sheet substantially co-extensive with said first, second, third, and fourth edges of said cover layer. said backing sheet being positioned over the front of said cover layer, the infolded tab of said bandage pad and the body of said bandage pad,

said backing sheet being adhesively secured to said cover layer by the adhesive adjacent the edges thereof except at the infolded bandage pad tab so that said backing sheet may be removed by engaging it at said infolded bandage pad tab.

4. A flat bandage comprising:

a substantially rectangular cover layer having an exterior surface and a front surface and having its main body defined by end edges and side edges;

a rectangular bandage pad positioned against said front surface of said cover layer and having first. second, third and fourth edges, said bandage pad having a width between said first and third edges at least as great as that required to wrap completely around two digits. said cover layer extending beyond said bandage pad along said first, second and third edges and a portion of said fourth edge, pressure-sensitive adhesive on that portion of said front surface which extends beyond said bandage pad so that said bandage can be secured;

said bandage pad having a bandage pad tab portion extending past said fourth edge to form a bandage pad tab, said bandage pad tab having an edge aligned with said third edge of said bandage pad and a width about equal to that of two digits, said cover layer extending coextensively with said bandage pad tab;

said bandage pad and said cover layer are folded in along a fold line substantially in line with said fourth edge; and

a backing sheet positioned over said infolded tab, said bandage pad and the front of said cover layer to provide a rectangular exterior configuration defined by said edges to said bandage.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2440235 *Jun 7, 1944Apr 20, 1948Morris SolomonFinger bandage
US2875758 *May 29, 1957Mar 3, 1959Boles Bernard JFingertip bandage
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5356397 *May 28, 1991Oct 18, 1994Storandt Duane LApplicator mitt
US5454207 *Aug 30, 1993Oct 3, 1995Storandt; Duane L.Applicator mitt
US5502946 *Apr 11, 1994Apr 2, 1996Storandt; Duane L.Applicator mitt
US5820578 *Feb 5, 1996Oct 13, 1998Johansen; ChristenBandage
US5833061 *Jun 7, 1995Nov 10, 1998Storandt; Duane L.Applicator mitt
US5998694 *Jun 30, 1995Dec 7, 1999Jensen; Ole R.Skin contactor barrier layer
US6248932Jan 17, 1998Jun 19, 2001Beiersdorf AgSelf-adhesive ready-made bandage for restricting stretching or bending of the metacarpophalangeal joint and of the wrist
US6584729 *Jun 18, 2002Jul 1, 2003Southpac Trust International, Inc.Method of wrapping a potted plant with a sleeve having tabs
US6592889 *Jul 17, 2000Jul 15, 2003Southwest Technologies Inc.Gel dressing
US7195605Jun 3, 2002Mar 27, 2007White Christopher HSimple dynamic orthosis
US7249385 *Sep 20, 2004Jul 31, 2007Richard SchukraftFinger/toe tip protective apparatus
US7309809 *Jan 31, 2006Dec 18, 2007Xennovate Medical LlcAdhesive attachment and removal device
US7645252May 16, 2006Jan 12, 2010Barbara Brooke Jennings-SpringBody or plant part dressing
US7905852Aug 29, 2008Mar 15, 2011Barbara Jennings-SpringSkin-contacting-adhesive free dressing
US20110132384 *Dec 8, 2009Jun 9, 2011Kiss Nail Products, Inc.Artificial nail or tip arrangement and method of making same
WO1998032405A1 *Jan 17, 1998Jul 30, 1998Beiersdorf AgSelf-adhesive ready-made bandage for restricting stretching or bending of the metacarpophalangeal joint and of the wrist
Classifications
U.S. Classification602/58
International ClassificationA61F13/10
Cooperative ClassificationA61F13/105
European ClassificationA61F13/10H2