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Publication numberUS3880285 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 29, 1975
Filing dateMar 19, 1973
Priority dateMar 29, 1971
Publication numberUS 3880285 A, US 3880285A, US-A-3880285, US3880285 A, US3880285A
InventorsMarch Joseph E
Original AssigneePlatt Luggage Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Implement holder and method of making same
US 3880285 A
Abstract
An implement holder having at least one integral pocket for receiving an implement or tool. The implement holder includes a deformable sheet and a backing. The backing is mounted to the sheet at least about its periphery to support the sheet and provide a back surface for the pocket. The implement holder is constructed by molding a cavity in the sheet of material to provide the pocket, providing an opening in the cavity so that the cavity has an open end, and securing the backing to the wall to complete the pocket.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent March 1 1 Apr. 29, 1975 15 1 IMPLEMENT HOLDER AND METHOD OF 2.350.152 9/1958 Marrufo 206/471 MAKING ME 533???? 3/1325 li?"" "3552 62 3C0 t v [75] Inven or: Joseph E. March. Chicago. Ill. 3.097.787 7/1963 Schur 229/53 3.121.492 2/l964 DcPaul ct al. 206/443 [73] Ass'gnee" Luggage 3.139.182 6/1964 Edell 206/471 [22 Fil d; M 19, 1973 3.404.774 10/1968 Levine 206/464 [711 A N 342 846 3.648.3l8 3/1972 Tsuruzawa 206/38 R Related US. Application D t Primary Examiner-William T. Dixson, Jr. [63] Continuution-in-pz1rt of Scr. No. 128.878. March 29. Attorney Agent or Even Tabm &

I971. abandoned. Luedeka [52] US. Cl. 206/373; 206/461; 224/5 A; [57] ABSTRACT 19 7 [51 Int Cl g g3 An implement holder having at least one integral [is] Fie'Id 464 469 pocket for receiving an implement or tool. The imple- 206/806 4XL T 38 224/5 5 f ment holder includes a deformable sheet and a back- .)9/l63 R. 5 55 R. 4 ing. The backing is mounted to the sheet at least about its periphery to support the sheet and provide a buck surface for the pocket. The implement holder is constructed by molding a cavity in the sheet of material to [56] References cued provide the pocket. providing an opening in the cavity UNITED STATES PATENTS so that the cavity has an open end. and securing the 1.094.009 4/1914 Parkhurst 206/373 backing to the wall to complete the pocket. 2.377.166 5/1945 Muycr 224/5 A 2.816.666 12/1957 Nudcl 206/461 9 Chums Drawing Figures R JENTEEAPMQQYS SHEET 10? 3 PHENTEB 3.880.285

SHEET 2 [1F 3 PIXTENTEU APR 2 9 i975 SHEEI 3 BF 3 IMPLEMENT HOLDER AND METHOD OF MAKING SAME The present application is a continuation in part of application, Ser. No. 128,878, filed Mar. 29, 1971 now abandoned.

The present invention relates to tool holders and, more particularly, the invention relates to a receptacle and carrier for tools, articles and implements, and to a method for making such a receptacle and carrier.

Artisans and craftsmen, such as draftsmen, mechanics, and repairmen, have a need to carry with them a number of tools, articles or implements of their art or trade for use when they are away from their normal work place. Many artisans and craftsmen prefer for this purpose a pallet which has a plurality of implement receiving pockets and which is dimensioned to readily fit within a suitable carrying case. It is known to provide a rigid backing board with a plurality of strips mounted upon the rigid backing to define pockets for receiving the implements. Generally. the strips are pre-cut and then formed into desired shapes by looping or folding them transversely to their longitudinal dimension. The strips are then riveted, sewed, glued or otherwise fastened to the board in a plurality of corrugations so as to provide a series of pockets, each having sufficient depth to receive an implement or tool. To form bottoms for the pockets, when desired, the longitudinal edges of the strips are folded inwardly and secured to the rigid backing.

In constructing such tool holders, a considerable amount of hand labor is required. i.e., an operator must cut the strips to the proper dimensions, shape the strips to form pockets and then sew, rivet. glue or otherwise secure the individual strips to the rigid backing. Because of the extensive amount of hand labor required, the resulting tool holder is frequently misshapen and the pockets tend to separate from the rigid backing. Moreover, to perform these operations entirely by machinery is difficult because of the required shaping of the pieces to form the pockets.

Accordingly, a principal object of the invention is to provide an improved holder for tools, articles, and implements.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved holder for tools, articles, or implements which is inexpensive and which is adapted to rapid manufacture by machine.

Still another object of the invention is to provide an improved and rapid method for forming a holder for tools, articles, ad implements.

These and other objects of the invention will become more apparent from the following detailed description and accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of an implement holder showing various of the details thereof;

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view taken along the lines 2-2 in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged and exploded view ofa section of FIG. I;

FIGS. 4 through 6 are sequential, diagramatic views ofa method of forming an implement holder of the type shown in FIG. 1;

FIGS. 7 through 8 are sequential, diagrammatic views of an alternative method of forming the implement holder;

FIG. 9 is a plan view of a further embodiment of an implement holder in accordance with the invention, and

FIG. 10 is an enlarged view of a section of FIG. 9 showing further details.

Very generally, and with reference to FIG. 1 of the drawing, there is shown an implement holder 10 having a plurality of pockets for receiving and carrying a plurality of tools or other implements. The implement holder 10 can be employed as a pallet for maintaining the tools in a position for immediate use adjacent the work place of the user. The implement holder I0 can be any desired shape but is preferably substantially rectangular in shape and preferably has dimensions that are suitable to fit within a carrying case. The implement holder 10 includes a wall 12 having at least one integral, permanently formed, outstanding cavity 14 and a backing 16 mounted in fact to face relation to the wall 12 and affixed to the wall by suitable means. As can be seen in FIG. 3, the backing 16 is joined in fact to face relation with the wall 12 so as to complete formation of pockets or loops 18 which are formed by the cavities l4 and the backing 16.

More particularly, there is illustrated in FIGS. 1 through 3 of the tbawings, the wall 12 in which cavities 14 are integrally formed. The wall [2 is preferably fabricated from a thermoplastic or thermosetting plastic material which can be molded by heat or pressure to form the cavities 14. Typical materials which are useful for this purpose include vinyl resins, such as polyvinyl butyral and polyvinylchloride, styrene resins, such as polystyrene, amide resins, such as nylon, cellulose acetate, polyethylene and polypropylene. It should be understood, however, that any material which can be readily formed in a die by suitable means can be used to fabricate the wall 12. In this connection, the material may be formed between a pair of dies by pressure alone or pressure in combination with heat. Some materials, such as thermoplastic materials, may be formed against a single die by vacuum thermoforming or pressure thermoforming. The material selected should be relatively inexpensive and tear resistant. The material is prefera bly in sheet form and may be substantially rigid or may be flexible. Particularly preferred are thermosetting plastic materials which may be formed by injection molding.

It is a particular feature of the implement holder 10 that the cavities 14 are integrally and permanently formed in the wall 12 and are not separately looped or folded strips or cups which are formed and then secured to the wall. This permits the cavities l4 and the wall 12 to be formed from a single sheet of material by a relatively simple mechanical operation. This permits saving of a considerable amount of hand labor heretofore necessary to fabricate separate materials and to secure them to the wall to provide pockets for an implement holder.

Preferably, a plurality of cavities I4 are formed in the wall I2 to accommodate a number of implements, or articles, each cavity having the general shape of the implement, or article. contemplated to be placed in that cavity. In the implement holder 10 shown in FIG. I, a plurality of pockets 14 of various sizes are formed in the wall 12. The pockets I4 for receiving the implements are open at the top. The pockets can be either open or closed on the bottom. It is a particular feature of the holder that both open end pockets and closed end pockets can be concurrently formed by the method hereinafter described without any additional hand labor being required.

The backing 16 is mounted in face to face relation with the wall I2 in which the cavities I4 are formed to define a rear surface for each pocketv The backing 16 provides additional support to the wall 12 and results in an implement holder I which is substantially rigid. This enables the implement holder to be used as a pallet which conveniently contains a plurality of imple ments or articles in a position where they are readily available for use. The backing I6 is preferably fabricated from a substantially non-flexible material, such as heavy cardboard, wood, or a plastic material, such as polystyrene. polypropylene or a rigid vinyl resin sheet. It is apparent, however, that other rigid materials could also be employed for this purpose, such as a light gauge metal sheet.

The wall 12 and the backing I6 are secured together in face to face relationship to provide pockets 18 for receiving tools, articles or implements. The wall and the backing can be fastened by any suitable method, such as sewing, glueing, heat sealing and riveting. In the illustrated embodiment of FIG. 1, a border 19 is positioned about the outer peripheries of both the wall 12 and the backing l6 and overlaps a portion of the front face of the wall and the rear face of the backing. The wall, the backing and the border are securely fastened by suitable fastening means, such as a row of stitches 20 extending through each of them. The row of stitches 20 is sufficient to secure the wall and the backing together and provide the pockets I8. It is sometimes desirable, however, to provide additional fastening, such as by the rows of stitches 21 about each group of pockets 18 to securely connect the wall 12 and backing 16 in the vicinity of the pockets. This retards tearing of the material about the pockets when implements are inserted. Although it is generally unnecessary to provide rows of stitches between each of the pockets themselves, such stitches may be provided. especially where heavy tools are contained in the pockets or where the pockets are relatively large. Other fastening means, such as glueing, may be used to provide complete bonding of the wall 12 to the backing 16 when desired. A decorative cover sheet (not shown) may be provided on the rear face ofthe backing 16, if desired, to conceal any stitching that is used.

The implement holder 10, as shown in FIGS. 1-3 of the drawings, may be constructed by the method and apparatus shown in sequential views in FIGS. 46. For purposes of clarity, the apparatus shown in FIGS. 4-6 provides an implement holder having only a single pocket. However, a plurality of cavities is generally formed in the wall. Generally, a wall 12 is cut from a sheet of material. A cavity 14 is then molded therein. At least one end of the formed cavity is then opened. A backing I6 is then attached to the sheet to provide the pocket.

More particularly, the wall 12 is positioned between a male die member 22 and a corresponding female die member 23 (FIG. 4). Both the male and female die members are shaped to form a cavity of the desired dimensions in the wall and at least one of the die members is heated by suitable means, such as the resistance coil 24. The die members are brought into engagement, which forces the wall into the female die member 22 and thereby forms a cavity 14 in the wall. The cavity I4 is permanently molded in the wall by heat and pressure. The cavity may be provided with any desired configura tion to accomodate any shape of tool, article or implement. As shown in FIG. 5 the cavity, as formed, includes a pair of substantially parallel sides extending transversely to the plane of the wall 12, an outer surface located in a plane parallel to the wall and closed top and bottom ends.

In FIG. 5, a sharp instrument, such as a knife 25, is illustrated as cutting an opening 26 in the cavity such that at least one end of the formed cavity is open. One or both of the top and bottom ends of the cavity are cut out and removed so that access to the interior of the cavity is achieved when the backing I6 fixed in place. The wall 12, having an open-ended cavity, is then secured to the backing 16 to complete the implement holder. As shown in FIG. 6, the wall 12 and the backing 16 are secured together by a heat sealer 28 which includes a resistance heating coil 30. The heat produced by the coil 30 causes a physical joining of the peripheral edges of the wall I2 and the backing 16. It should be understood, however, that the wall 12 and the backing 16 can be secured by any suitable means, such as glueing, stitching, riveting or other fastening methods.

In FIGS. 7-8, there is shown sequentially an alternative method of fabricating the implement holder 10. In the alternative method a slit 32 is first made in the sheet of material from which the wall 12 is cut. The slit 32 is formed by a sharp instrument, such as the knife 33 (FIG. 7). The slit 32 is of suitable length such that when the cavity 14 is molded in the wall 12, the slit is expanded to provide an open end 34 in the cavity. It is apparent that if a pair of slits 32 are cut in the wall 12 at suitable positions, both slits will be expanded upon forming the cavity so that the cavity has two open ends.

After the slit 32 is made in the sheet, the sheet is placed between the male and female die members described above. A guide 34 is used to position the wall I2 so that the slit 32 is adjacent one of the end surfaces of the male and female die members. As the die members are engaged, a cavity is permanently molded in the wall. Concurrently, the slit 32 is expanded by the die members to provide an open end 36 for the cavity which extends transversely to the plane of the flexible sheet.

The backing 16 is then secured to the wall 12 at least about the periphery of the sheet, such as by heat sealing the peripheral edges using the heat sealer 28 (FIG. 6) or by stitching or other suitable means.

A particularly preferred embodiment of the present invention is shown in FIGS. 9 and 10. As shown in FIG. 9, a facing blank 4] is prepared by injection molding. The facing blank is prepared from a thermosetting resin capable of being formed by injection molding. Particularly preferred materials for preparing the facing blank 41 are polyvinylidene chloride, polyethylene, polypropylene, polyurethane, acrylonitrile, butadiene and styrene. The facing blank 41 is prepared in a one-step operation wherein a thermosetting resin is injection molded to provide a sheet 43 with cavities 45 formed therein. The cavities 45 may be formed with single or double openings as desired.

As further shown in FIG. 9, the facing blank 41 is formed with integral, multiple lugs 47. The lugs 47 are designed to mate with matching holes in backing material l6. The mating of the lugs 47 with the holes 49 permits the backing I6 to be snapped into position in face to face relationship with the facing blank 41. This permits rapid assembly of the implement holder. The lugs 47 may extend through the holes 49. In this case. the lugs may be cut off flush with the backing to provide a smooth surface. in a preferred embodiment of the present invention, the portion of the lugs extending beyond the backing are heated to deform the lug and provide a seal, such as is formed by a metal rivet. Of course, the facing blank 41 may be formed without the lugs 47 and the backing 16 may be attached by other suitable means such as glueing, stitching or riveting. Facing blank 4] may also be formed with a flange 5] around the perimeter of the facing blank. The flange 51 aids in alignment of the backing l6 and also provides a neatly finished perimeter.

The present invention provides an improved implement holder for containing and carrying a number of tools or implements. An improved and rapid method of forming an implement holder which requires a minimum of hand labor has been provided.

While one form of the invention has been shown and described, it should be apparent that various modifications can be made therein without departing from the scope of the invention.

Various of the features of the invention are set forth in the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A holder for tools, articles or implements comprising a wall having a plurality of permanently formed cavities therein for receiving an implement, said cavities having at least one open end through which a tool, article or implement may be inserted, and a backing, said wall having a plurality of lugs affixed to the surface of said wall, said backing having a plurality of holes formed therein, said holes being in mating relationship with said lugs. said backing being located in face-toface relationship with said wall with said lugs extending into said mating holes whereby said backing is secured to said wall so as to provide, in combination with said wall, a plurality of pockets for receiving tools, articles or implements.

2. An implement holder according to claim 1 wherein said wall is formed from thermoplastic or thermosetting plastic materials.

3. An implement holder according to claim 1 wherein said wall is formed from a plastic material selected from the group consisting of vinyl resins, styrene resins. amide resins, cellulose acetate, polyethylene and polypropylene.

4. An implement holder according to claim 1 wherein said backing is made from a material selected from the group consisting of cardboard, wood, metal sheet, or plastic.

5. An implement holder according to claim 1 wherein said cavity is molded such that it has generally the shape of the tool, article or implement which is to be received therein.

6. A method for making an implement holder for tools, articles or implements comprising forming a sheet of material having a plurality of cavities by injection molding, said cavities being formed by said injection molding in a manner such that at least one end of each cavity is open in a plane perpendicular to said sheet and said cavity is open in a plane parallel to said sheet, said sheet having integrally molded therein a plurity of lugs extending from said sheet on the side opposite said cavities, and securing a backing to said sheet in face-to-face relation with said sheet to provide a plurality of open ended pockets into which tools, articles or implements may be inserted and retrieved. said backing having a plurality of holes which mate with said lugs to secure said backing to said sheet.

7. A method according to claim 6 wherein said backing is secured to said sheet by heat sealing said backing to said sheet at least about the peripheral edge thereof.

8. A method according to claim 6 further comprising providing a second opening in at least one cavity of said sheet such that at least one pocket formed by securing said backing to said sheet is open at opposing ends thereof.

9. A method in accordance with claim 6 wherein said injection molded sheet has integral multiple lugs formed in the back side thereof and said backing has holes formed therein, said lugs and said holes being in aligned relationship whereby said backing may be joined to said sheet.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1094009 *Apr 17, 1913Apr 21, 1914Arthur C ParkhurstTool-carrier.
US2377166 *Feb 9, 1943May 29, 1945Otto MayerDie for the manufacture of pen cases
US2816666 *Oct 10, 1956Dec 17, 1957Compton Company LtdDisplay devices
US2850152 *May 4, 1956Sep 2, 1958Angelo MarrufoCombined fountain pen, spectacles and comb case
US2998899 *Jun 9, 1958Sep 5, 1961Cons Molded Products CorpMultiple compartment carrier for beverage containers
US3047139 *Jul 5, 1960Jul 31, 1962Great Neck Saw ManufacturersArticle holder
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4664865 *Nov 26, 1985May 12, 1987United Technologies Automotive, Inc.Panel in-part locators
US4836374 *Sep 2, 1988Jun 6, 1989The Stanley WorksFitted tool case
US5409560 *Mar 3, 1994Apr 25, 1995Hammer; Erik D.Method of making liners for tool boxes
US6149006 *Aug 19, 1997Nov 21, 2000General Mills, Inc.Refrigerated food product container
US7210580 *Oct 28, 2003May 1, 2007Future Technology (Uk) LtdDispensing containers
US7644822 *Mar 22, 2007Jan 12, 2010Future Technology (Uk) LtdDispensing containers
US7823742Feb 5, 2007Nov 2, 2010Future Technology (R&D) LimitedSeal
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/373, 229/406, 206/461, 264/163
International ClassificationB65D75/28, B65D75/36
Cooperative ClassificationB65D75/367, B65D75/36
European ClassificationB65D75/36, B65D75/36H