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Publication numberUS3881321 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 6, 1975
Filing dateFeb 19, 1974
Priority dateFeb 24, 1970
Publication numberUS 3881321 A, US 3881321A, US-A-3881321, US3881321 A, US3881321A
InventorsWilliam T Riley
Original AssigneeDrackett Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Self-cooling disposable liquid container
US 3881321 A
Abstract
The article disclosed herein is a self-cooling disposable liquid container. One embodiment includes a beverage container and pressurized refrigerant fluid stored in a refrigerant chamber. The fluid upon being released passes directly through the beverage. In another embodiment a mixing device is also provided to mix the contents of the container upon the release of the refrigerant fluid. Preferably the refrigerant fluid carbonates as well as cools the contents of the container.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Appl No.: 443,679 7 Related US. Application Data United States Patent 1191 11 11 3,881,321 Riley T451 May 6, 1975 54 sELncooumc DISPOSABLE LIQUID 3.29:2,194 1 /1967 Hutchinson 62/294 CONTAINER FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS [751 William Riley 0M0 141,040 10/1930 Switzerland 62/293 [73] Assignee; The Bracken Company, Cincinnati, 513,015 10/1920 62/294 Ohio Filed: Feb. 1974 Primary ExammerW1lI1am J. Wye

Attorney, Agent, or FirmDavid J Mugford; George A. Mentis; John A. Caruso 5 7 ABSTRACT The article disclosed herein is a self-cooling disposable liquid container. One embodiment includes a beverage container and pressurized refrigerant fluid stored in a refrigerant chamber. The fluid upon being released passes directly through the beverage. In another embodiment a mixing device is also provided to mix the contents of the container upon the release of the refrigerant fluid. Preferably the refrigerant fluid carbonates as well as cools the contents of the container.

17 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures PATENTEUHAY mars INVENTOR. WM 76%; ar-11g MM g m r roe/vars SELF-COOLING DISPOSABLE LIQUID CONTAINER This application is a substitute application by the same inventor for U.S. Patent application Number 13,290, filed on Feb. 24, 1970 and now abandoned.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION AND THE PRIOR ART Many prior art patents disclose a beverage container having integral cooling means in association therewith. The advantages of such a container are immediately apparent. In order to enjoy a cooled beverage all that would be required would be to activate the cooling mechanism and wait a few moments. Such devices would eliminate the need for expensive and bulky coolers.

One approach to providing such a device has been to provide the beverage container with refrigerating means that include compressed gas capable of being released to provide a refrigerating effect. Typical of such devices are those described in U.S. Pat. Nos. 2,460,765, 2,556,893, 2,757,517, 2,773,358, 2,805,556, 3,229,478, 3,309,890, 3,320,767, 3,326,013, 3,338,067, and 3,373,581. Many prior art devices have been too costly to manufacture. Others have been too bulky. Others have not produced the desired cooling effects.

Further, U.S. Pat. Nos. 1,897,723 and 3,298,194, French Pat. No. 513,015, and Swiss Pat. No. 141,040, discloses prior attempts to provide a beverage container with a selfcontained refrigerating means.

U.S. Pat. No. 2,556,893 discloses several self-cooling containers. The structure of FIG. 4 of this patent includes a breakable refrigerant gas chamber that when broken released refrigerant gas which surrounds the wall of the chamber containing the beverage which in turn cools the beverage.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,320,767 shows a self-chilling disposable container utilizing a refrigerant gas as the cooling medium. The refrigerant gas is stored with the beverage thus eliminating the need for a separate refrigerant gas chamber.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In contrast to the prior art devices, my self-cooling container is: (1) easy to operate; (2) inexpensive to construct; and (3) cools very quickly and efficiently. In its more specific embodiments it carbonates and/or mixes the contents as well as cooling them.

In one embodiment my self-cooled disposable container consists of two parts, a container for the beverage, preferably made from plastic, or plastic or wax coated paper, and a plastic gas chamber for containing the mixture of the refrigerant fluids. The two parts are easily and inexpensively manufactured and it is easy to assemble the two in operable relationship. The beverage container can be made from materials which probably would not be able to withstand the pressures now encountered in packaging carbonated beverages. This is made possible by my invention because the beverages need not be carbonated. They are carbonated, in situ so to speak, when a refrigerant fluid mixture, including carbon dioxide, is released and passed through the beverage. Another advantage of this embodiment is that two refrigerant fluids, e.g. carbon dioxide and ism-butane. can be used. The heat capacity of the refrigerant mixture is increased and the vapor pressure is decreased, as compared to the use of carbon dioxide alone. Other possible refrigerant fluids include nitrous oxide, nitrogen, and propane.

As to another embodiment of my invention, 1 include a mixing device which is actuated by the release of the refrigerant fluid mixture. Providing a means for mixing the contents is desirable in certain instances, as where a malted milk is the beverage in the container. Not only will my device cool the malted milk but it will also mix it. ,Such a mixing device would also be useful in instances where puddings are contained in my device.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a cross-sectional view of a container constructed in accordance with one embodiment of my invention;

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view taken along lines 22 of FIG. 1 showing the refrigerant fluid chamber and my puncturing mechanism;

FIG. 3 is similar to FIG. 2 but shows the fluid chamber pierced by my puncturing mechanism;

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view showing a second embodiment of my invention;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged cross-sectional view showing my mixing device and its relationship to the fluid chamber; and

FIG. 6 is a perspective view showing my mixing device.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now to the drawings, and, more specifically, to FIGS. 1-3, I shall now describe one embodiment of my invention. Referring now to FIG. I, there is shown a unitary beverage container and refrigerant chamber designated generally by the number 1. The beverage container 2 is of conventional design. It has a side wall 3 which can be cylindrical, a bottom wall 4, and a top wall 5. Preferably the beverage container 2 is made from a flexible material such as plastic, or wax or plastic coated paper. Heretofore in the manufacture of carbonated beverage containers the use of plastic or coated paper has been impractical because the containers have been pressurized, thus requiring a very strong, rigid material. However, as previously pointed out, the contents of my beverage container 2 are carbonated in situ so that the contents need not be contained under pressure.

The bottom wall 4 and top wall 5 are secured to the cylindrical side wall 3 by any suitable means. While it has not been shown, the top wall 5 may contain means in combination therewith for opening the container so that the beverage may be consumed.

Within the container is disposed a refrigerant chamber 6. This chamber 6 contains the pressurized fluid refrigerant. Preferably the refrigerant chamber 6 is made from plastic and is cylindrical. The refrigerant chamber includes a neck portion 7 which is the portion of the chamber 6 adapted to be punctured. Surrounding the refrigerant chamber and secured thereto is a refrigerant chamber retaining ring 8. This ring 8 may be made from plastic also and may be form fitted to the refrigerant chamber 6, much the same as a golf ball to a golf tee. Connecting the ring 8 to the chamber 6 are a plurality of ribs 9. The ring includes a free end 10. Secured to the free end 10 is a refrigerant chamber puncturing device 11. The radius 12 of the ring 8 is approximately equal to the radius of the beverage container 2.

The side wall 3 of the beverage container 2 includes an annular groove 13 for receiving the retaining ring 8 and positioning the refrigerant chamber 6.

The refrigerant chamber 6 contains a pressurized fluid refrigerant. Preferably this refrigerant fluid is a mixture of carbon dioxide and iso-butane. However, others could be used. When released, the carbon dioxide not only serves to cool the beverage in the container 2 but also carbonates it. By using a mixture of refrigerants, it is possible to significantly increase the heat capacity of the refrigerant while keeping its vapor pressure under 200 psig. In contrast, the vapor pressure of carbon dioxide is about 1,000 psig at 80F.

Those skilled in the art can easily calculate the amount of iso-butane and carbon dioxide needed to cool the beverage and it is not believed necessary to go into this aspect of my invention.

To assemble this embodiment of my self-cooling beverage container all that is necessary to do is to place the refrigerant chamber 6 with the retaining ring 8 attached thereto into the beverage container 2. The chamber 6 and the ring 8 are then positioned adjacent the bottom wall 4 of the container 2. The annular groove 13 receives the ring 8 and prevents the chamber 6 from sliding above the bottom of the container 2.

To operate my self-cooled container one first punctures a hole in the top wall of the container 2. Next one squeezes the side walls 3 of the container 2 at the annular groove 13. It can be seen from FIG. 3 that when this is done the puncturing device 11 is forced into the refrigerant chamber 6. When this occurs the refrigerant is released from the chamber 6 and flows through the beverage and then into the atmosphere. As

it passes through the beverage it cools and carbonates it if needed. The time involved to cool and carbonate the beverage is relatively short, i.e., a few seconds.

Referring now to FIGS. 4-6, there is shown another embodiment of my invention. This embodiment is especially adapted for use with a beverage or liquid that should be mixed prior to drinking, such as a malted milk, or a pudding. Referring now to FIG. 4, there is shown a beverage container 2 which has a cylindrical side wall 3, a bottom wall 4, and a top wall 5. Again, this container 2 is preferably made from plastic or paper coated with plastic or wax. Projecting upwardly from the bottom wall 4 is a refrigerant chamber punc turing pin 15, having its uppermost end 16 pointed. The puncturing pin includes a refrigerant fluid conduit 17. About its middle the puncturing device 15 contains an angular groove 18, the purpose of which will be explained later. This embodiment includes a mixing de vice generally designated by the numeral I9. More specifically, the mixing device 19 shown is a propeller-type mixing device. The device 19 includes a hub portion 20 and two blades 21, each having a pitch thereto. The hub portion includes a hole 29 extending through the hub. Each blade 21 includes a refrigerant fluid conduit 22. The conduits 22 extend from the hole 29 in the hub 20 toward the end 23 of the blades 2|. The conduits 22 extend substantially parallel to the longitudinal axis of the mixing device until they are directed outwardly substantially perpendicular thereto. From that point they extend until they exit the blade at points 24. It will be noted from FIG. 6 that the exit points 24 extend in opposite directions, as further explained below.

Referring now to FIGS. 5 and 6 it can be seen that the mixing device 19 can be slipped down over the puncturing pin 15, the pin 15 passing through the hole 29. If desired, the puncturing pin 15 can be constructed so that the portion 25 is slightly larger in diameter than the hole 29. This insures that when the mixing device 19 is slipped over the puncturing pin 15 it is retained in that position. It will be noted from FIG. 5 that when the mixing device 19 is positioned the angular groove 18 connects the conduits 22 with the conduits 17.

A refrigerant chamber 6 is suspended from the top wall 5 by a tube 30. The tube 30 may be made from plastic. The top wall 5 contains a hole 26 through which the tube 30 passes. The tube 30 includes a flange 27 which may be secured to the top wall 5. The tube 30 includes a vent 28 as does the flange 27. (Means, not shown, are provided for covering the vent 28 in the flange 27 until it is desired to cool the beverage.) It will be noted that the refrigerant chamber 6 is suspended above the puncturing pointed end 16 of the pin 15 and is spaced a short distance therefrom. The refrigerant chamber includes a neck portion 7 similar to the neck portion shown in FIG. I.

To operate the embodiment shown in FIG. 4, one first removes or exposes the vent 28 in the flange 27. Next the flange 27 and top wall 5 are forced downwardly toward the bottom wall 4. This causes the neck portion 7 of the chamber 6 to come into contact with the puncturing means 16. Upon continued downward movement the puncturing pin punctures the chamber 6. When this occurs, the pressurized refrigerant fluid escapes from the chamber 6 and enters the conduit 17. The fluid then passes into the angular groove l8 and into the conduits 22 in the mixing device 19. The fluid exits the mixing device 19 through the exits 24. The force of the exiting refrigerant fluid through the exits 24 causes the mixing device 19 to rotate. The rotation of the mixing device serves to mix the contents of the container 2. As the mixing device rotates it distributes the refrigerant fluid about the periphery of the container 2. The fluid flows upwardly through the contents of the container and into the atmosphere through the vents 28. The refrigerant fluid cools the beverage as it passes through the beverage in just a matter of a few moments.

In another preferred embodiment of the present in vention, a self-cooling disposable beverage container comprises in combination a cylindrlcal beverage container having a plurality of walls including side walls, a top wall, and a bottom wall; a refrigerant chamber; a refrigerant chamber retaining ring, the ring partially surrounding the chamber and secured thereto, the ring having a free end; refrigerant chamber puncturing means, the means carried by the ring adjacent the free end; the refrigerant chamber and the ring being positioned in the beverage container adjacent the bottom wall thereof; the free end of the ring being in contact with a side wall of the beverage container; and pressur ized refrigerant fluid in the refrigerant chamber.

In another preferred embodiment of the present invention a self-cooling disposable beverage container comprises in combination a beverage container having side walls, a top wall. and a bottom wall, refrigerant chamber puncturing means secured to the bottom wall of the chamber; beverage mixing means. the beverage mixing means having an aperture therethrough adapted to receive the refrigerant chamber puncturing means;

a refrigerant chamber, the chamber spaced from the refrigerant chamber puncturing means and adapted to be forced into contact therewith; pressurized refrigerant fluid in the chamber; the fluid refrigerant causing the mixing means to move when the fluid refrigerant is released from the chamber when the chamber is punctured by the refrigerant chamber puncturing means.

Inasmuch as the present invention is subject to many variations, modifications, and changes in detail, it is intended that all matter above described or shown in the drawings be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

What is claimed is:

l. A self-cooling disposable beverage container comprising in combination:

a disposable beverage container for containing a beverage;

a refrigerant chamber disposed within said container;

pressurized refrigerant fluid, said fluid being contained in said refrigerant chamber and being a mixture of carbon dioxide and a material selected from the group consisting of iso-butane, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, propane and mixtures thereof; and

means for puncturing said refrigerant chamber to permit said pressurized refrigerant fluid to escape through the beverage.

2. The article of claim 1 wherein said beverage container is made from plastic or coated paper.

3. The article of claim 1 wherein there is disposed within said beverage container beverage mixing means, said mixing means actuated by said pressurized refrigerant fluid when said fluid is released from said refrigerant chamber.

4. A self-cooling disposable beverage container comprising in combination:

a cylindrical beverage container having a plurality of walls including side walls, a top wall, a bottom wall;

a refrigerant chamber;

a refrigerant chamber retaining ring, said ring partially surrounding said chamber and secured thereto, said ring having a free end;

refrigerant chamber puncturing means, said means carried by said ring adjacent said free end;

said refrigerant chamber and said ring being positioned in said beverage container adjacent the bottom wall thereof;

said free end of said ring being in contact with a side wall of said beverage container; and

pressurized refrigerant fluid in said refrigerant chamber.

5. The article of claim 4 wherein said beverage container is made from plastic or coated paper.

6. The article of claim 4 wherein said pressurized refrigerant fluid is a mixture of carbon dioxide and a member selected from the group consisting of isobutane, nitrous oxide, nitrogen. and propane. said mixture being adapted to carbonate as well as cool a beverage contained in said container.

7. The article of claim 5 wherein said pressurized refrigerant fluid is a mixture of carbon dioxide and isobutane.

8. A self-cooling disposable beverage container comprising in combination:

a beverage container having side walls, a top wall and a bottom wall;

refrigerant chamber puncturing means secured to the bottom wall of said chamber;

beverage mixing means, said beverage mixing means having an aperture therethrough adapted to receive said refrigerant chamber puncturing means;

a refrigerant chamber, said chamber spaced from said refrigerant chamber puncturing means and adapted to be forced into contact therewith; pressurized refrigerant fluid in said chamber;

said fluid refrigerant causing said mixing means to move when said fluid refrigerant is released from said chamber when said chamber is punctured by said refrigerant chamber puncturing means.

9. The article of claim 8 wherein said mixing means is a propeller having a plurality of blades.

10. The article of claim 9 wherein each blade has refrigerant fluid conduit means therein for conducting refrigerant fluid.

11. The article of claim 19 wherein said conduit means exit said blades on opposite sides whereby when refrigerant fluid is injected through said conduit means it causes said propeller to rotate.

12. The article of claim 11 wherein said refrigerant chamber is secured to the top wall of said beverage chamber.

13. The article of claim 8 wherein said refrigerant fluid is a mixture of carbon dioxide and iso-butane.

14. The article of claim 10 wherein said refrigerant chamber puncturing means includes a refrigerant fluid conduit means cooperable with said conduit means in said blades when said puncturing means punctures said refrigerant chamber and adapted to conduct fluid refrigerant from said chamber through said puncturing means and into the conduits in said blades.

15. A self-cooling disposable beverage container comprising in combination:

a disposable beverage container for containing a beverage;

a refrigerant chamber disposed within said container;

pressurized refrigerant fluid contained in said refrigerant chamber;

refrigerant chamber puncturing means; and

means for activating said refrigerant chamber puncturing means, disposed within said container and attached to both said refrigerant chamber and said puncturing means, whereby pressure applied to said means permits the puncturing of said chamber and the escape of said pressurized refrigerant fluid through the beverage.

16. The article of claim 15 wherein said pressurized refrigerant fluid is a mixture of carbon dioxide and a material selected from the group consisting of isobutane, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, propane and mixtures thereof.

17. The article of claim 16 wherein said beverage container is made from plastic or coated paper.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1897723 *Apr 29, 1927Feb 14, 1933Free Walter HRefrigerating device
US3298194 *Jun 24, 1965Jan 17, 1967Hutchinson James HSelf-contained beverage cooler
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4361013 *Mar 13, 1981Nov 30, 1982Skeele Robert CPortable refrigerator
US4640102 *Mar 3, 1986Feb 3, 1987Marcos TenenbaumSelf-cooling container for beverages
US4784678 *Apr 6, 1987Nov 15, 1988The Coca-Cola CompanySelf-cooling container
US4802343 *Jul 1, 1987Feb 7, 1989The Coca-Cola CompanySelf-cooling container
US4911740 *Aug 2, 1988Mar 27, 1990Schieder Hans BCooling using pressurized container
US5197302 *Jan 8, 1991Mar 30, 1993International Thermal Packaging, Inc.Vacuum insulated sorbent-driven refrigeration device
US5214933 *Jan 29, 1992Jun 1, 1993Envirochill International Ltd.Self-cooling fluid container
US5447039 *Mar 29, 1994Sep 5, 1995Allison; Robert S.Beverage can cooling system
US5555741 *May 18, 1995Sep 17, 1996Envirochill International Ltd.Self-cooling fluid container with integral refrigerant chamber
US5704222 *Sep 27, 1995Jan 6, 1998Cold Pack Technologies Usa, Inc.Refrigerating apparatus and method
US6167718 *Apr 20, 1997Jan 2, 2001Edward M. HalimiSelf-carbonating self-cooling beverage container
US6173579Jul 4, 1997Jan 16, 2001Paul DavidsonSealed liquid container
US7219449Jun 17, 2004May 22, 2007Promdx Technology, Inc.Adaptively controlled footwear
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WO1994005958A1 *Sep 3, 1993Mar 17, 1994Glenio BonderCooling container
WO1995029105A1 *Apr 19, 1995Nov 2, 1995Edward M HalimiSelf-carbonating self-cooling beverage container
WO1997006392A1 *Aug 8, 1995Feb 20, 1997Robert S AllisonBeverage can cooling system
WO1997047932A1 *Jan 8, 1997Dec 18, 1997Boc Group PlcApparatus for cooling and/or gassifying a liquid
WO1998001364A1 *Jul 4, 1997Jan 15, 1998Paul DavidsonSealed liquid container
Classifications
U.S. Classification62/294, 426/109, 62/371, 62/293, 62/69, 62/386, 62/70
International ClassificationF25D3/10, F25D31/00
Cooperative ClassificationF25D31/007, F25D2331/805, F25D3/107
European ClassificationF25D3/10C