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Publication numberUS3881573 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 6, 1975
Filing dateApr 19, 1973
Priority dateApr 19, 1973
Publication numberUS 3881573 A, US 3881573A, US-A-3881573, US3881573 A, US3881573A
InventorsJr Galen A Biery, John L Cotter, Robert C Melder, Dan E Rothenbuhler, Howard E Rothenbuhler
Original AssigneeRothenbuhler Engineering Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Remote teller
US 3881573 A
Abstract
A remote teller for allowing a customer to carry out banking transactions while remaining in his car includes a teller station located within the bank building and a customer station located in a parking area. The teller station and customer station are interconnected by an underground duct in which is located a monorail. A self-powered car travels on the monorail between the two stations and carries a transaction box. An elevator is provided in each station for moving the transaction box between the car and an opening in the station accessible to either the teller or the customer. Logic and control circuitry is provided in the stations for controlling the elevator operations and for controlling the operation of a battery charger for the car's batteries. The car includes a self-contained drive system including a dyanamic braking system. Mechanical arrangements are provided for insuring the security of the transaction box and for coordinating the starting and stopping of the car and the elevator in each station.
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United States Patent [191 Cotter et al.

[ May 6,1975

[ REMOTE TELLER [75] Inventors: John L. Cotter, LaConner; Robert C. Melder, Sedro Woolley; Galen A. Biery, Jr., Bellingham; Dan E. Rothenbuhler, Sedro Woolley; Howard E. Rothenbuhler, Acme, all of Wash.

[73] Assignee: Rothenbuhler Engineering, Inc.,

Sedro Woolley, Wash.

[22] Filed: Apr. 19, 1973 [21] Appl. NO.: 352,617

[52] US. Cl. 186/1 R; 104/127; 104/131; 186/1 C [51] Int. Cl E04h 3/04 [58] Field of Search 186/1 C, 7, 1 A; 243/1, 243/19; 104/118l21, 127-131; 214/11 R [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,896,748 7/1959 McClintock 186/1 C 2,900,046 8/1959 Baily 186/] C 2,912,066 10/1959 Ellithorpe 186/1 C 3,237,933 3/1966 Grosswiller et a1. 186/1 C 3,611,946 10/1971 Heximer 104/127 Primary Examiner-Richard A. Schacher Assistant ExaminerJeffrey V. Nase Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Christensen, OConnor, Garrison & Havelka 5 7 ABSTRACT A remote teller for allowing a customer to carry out banking transactions while remaining in his car includes a teller station located within the bank building and a customer station located in a parking area. The teller station and customer station are interconnected by an underground duct in which is located a monorail. A self-powered car travels on the monorail between the two stations and carries a transaction box. An elevator is provided in each station for moving the transaction box between the car and an opening in the station accessible to either the teller or the customer. Logic and control circuitry is provided in the stations for controlling the elevator operations and for controlling the operation of a battery charger for the cars batteries. The car includes a self-contained drive system including a dyanamic braking system. Mechanical arrangements are provided for insuring the security of the transaction box and for coordinating the starting and stopping of the car and the elevator in each station.

18 Claims, 20 Drawing Figures PATENTEDHAY ems SHEU DlUF 11 PATENTEDMAY 6 I975 I sum 02 BF 11 3 0 mwum MENIEBMAY ESIHYS 3,881,573

saw 03 EF 11 wwv wsv o In? mg mg wk 3 6 M3 7 mg 5 I l N& Mk 8 8 3 5 Io g Rv $8 1. g 3v 0 8 3&3 E n y N OIL I -m v .WQ% 6% QQWMWDQNSQ m MM? Io m G v oI v wk mwv E E I A \lwv MOI? n 3 m% 'D MUN. MQ I W Q q 6 9v NS I 3. m %w x ms .3 m3 I WM H \8 Ev I. *3 MIL QM. 3Q O T Q RN Qmv I 3,881,573 SHEET C-BOF 11 PHENTEDHAY 6% REMOTE TELLER FIELD OF THE lNVENTlON This invention generally relates to remote tellers, and

more particularly, to a semi-automated transit means i for moving a transaction box between two physically separated stations.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Drive-in banking systems have become increasingly popular, particularly in surburban locations where the automobile is the prime mode of transportation. Although such systems are of various complexity, the most common include those having a teller station located within the bank building which is accessible by a teller, a customer station located in the driveway, parking lot, or the like, of a bank to which a customer may drive in his automobile, and a system for transporting items such as deposit slips, cash and checks between the teller station and customer station. Usually, the customer and teller can see each other, although some systems include a closed circuit television for this purpose. Voice communications are provided by an audio system including a microphone and loudspeaker at both stations.

To transport items, the systems of the prior art almost exclusively have relied upon pneumatic tube systems which propel a tubular carrier containing the required items between the stations by compressed air. Although pneumatic tube systems have functioned satisfactorily for banking and other applications for many years, they have certain limitations when applied to drive-inbanking. First, the carriers are clumsy to use, particularly if the customer is not a steady patron and user of the system. Accordingly, the customer may express some confusion, may drop the carrier, or the like. The very fact of having to deal with the carrier may well be a psychological barrier to the use of the system by some customers. Second, the number and size of items that can be carried by any one pneumatic tube is limited by the physical size of the carrier, which in turn is dictated by the requirements of the pneumatic propulsion system, that is, the carrier cannot be too large in diameter to permit the necessary pressures to be obtained for propulsion by inexpensive and compact compressors.

As a result of these limitations, it has been found that, where a banking institution has both a remote system of the type described, and a window system in which an open box is presented to the customer, the customer will prefer the box arrangement, if at all possible.

Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to provide a remote teller for a drive-in banking system in which a transaction box for transport of items between the teller and customer can be moved between a teller station located within a bank building and a customer station located in an area suitable for access by the customer in his automobile.

It is another object of this invention to provide such a remote teller in which the transaction box is presented to the customer at a suitable height and inclination to permit its easy use by the customer.

It is yet another object of this invention to provide such a remote teller in which the transaction box of the customer station is designed to be relatively free from tampering and other unauthorized access.

It is a further object of this invention to provide such a remote teller which is rugged and reliable in construction and operation, and which consumes little space at both the teller and customer stations, despite its capability to move large amounts of material therebetween.

lt is yet a further object of this invention to provide such a remote teller in which the position of the transaction box can be controlled by either the customer or by the teller.

It is still another object of this invention to provide a system which is broadly applicable to moving materials between two separated points.

It is yet another object of this invention to provide such a system, which may be applicable to drive-in banking applications, in which the requirements for electric power are minimized, due to self-propulsion of the means providing transport of the transaction box between the physically separated points or stations.

It is another object of this invention to provide such a system in which the means providing transport has, in addition to a drive mechanism, a means for velocity control so as to permit transport through curves and the like and to permit braking to a stop without the necessity of external controls.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION These objects and other advantages are achieved, briefly, by a provision of a monorail transportation system interconnecting the two stations of the system, which may be a teller station and a customer station. The monorail transportation system includes a a battery operated, self-propelled car which has means for carrying the transaction box and which in turn includes suitable drive and braking means for moving along a monorail between the stations. A plurality of magnets are spaced along the monorail at curves and other braking points where speed control of the car is necessary, and at each end of the monorail where it is desired that the car come to rest.

When installed as a drive-in banking system, the monorail is disposed within an enclosed duct which may be buried. At both stations, suitable means are provided for latching and unlatching the car into and from a fixed position. An elevator including a carrier is included in each station for removing the transaction box from the stationary car and raising it to a position and inclination suitable for access by a teller or a customer. Means are provided responsive to the elevator operation for opening and closing an access door at both stations, for opening and closing security doors on the transaction box, and for latching the elevator carrier into a raised position for access, or into a lower position for delivery of the transaction box to the car.

Suitable electrical, mechanical and electrical sensors and interlocks synchronize the operation of both elevator carriers with the position of the car and condition the propulsion means within the car to run in one or the other directions. Battery charging contacts are provided at each station for engaging corresponding contacts on the car to recharge the cars batteries when the car is at the station. A single logic and control circuitry within one of the stations responds to the electrical sensors and interlocks to raise or lower each elevator carrier between lower and upper positions. An in termediate retract position is also established for the customer station elevator carrier so that a transaction box may be delivered to the customer in a minimum of time upon request.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The invention can perhaps best be understood by consideration of the following portion of the specification, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a pictorial view showing a teller station, a customer station, and the monorail transportation system;

FIG. 2 is a pictorial view showing details of the car and the transaction box;

FIG. 3 is a pictorial view showing details of the transaction box when opened;

FIG. 4 is a plan section view showing details of the elevator and car latching mechanism, and the electrical sensors at one of the stations;

FIGS. 5, 6 and 7 are side elevation section views showing the operation of the elevator and car latching arrangement at one of the stations, with the car approaching the station and the elevator carrier down, with the car latched into position and the elevator carrier being raised, and with the elevator carrier being lowered and the car subsequently leaving the station, respectively;

FIG. 8 is a plan section view showing the elevator carrier at the teller station;

FIG. 9 is a plan section view showing details of the elevator carrier track and support mechanism at the teller station;

FIG. 10 is a side elevation section view showing the teller station, with the car latched into position, the elevator carrier in its raised or upper position, the transaction box open, and the teller access door open;

FIG. 11 is a side elevation view showing the customer station, with the car latched into position and the elevator carrier in three successive positions corresponding to the lower position, an intermediate position, and the retract position;

FIG. 12 is a plan section view showing details of the elevator carrier and door opening, and drive mechanism for the customer station, with the elevator carrier in its upper position;

FIG. 13 is a partial side elevation section view showing the elevator carrier at the customer station in its raised position, with the customer access door open;

FIG. 14a and 14b are portions of a logic diagram illustrating a typical control and logic arrangement to provide the electrical interlock and control operations;

FIG. 15 is a diagram illustrating the relative arrangements of FIGS. 14a and 1412;

FIG. 16 is a combined schematic and block diagram illustrating the drive and velocity control circuitry for the car propulsion means;

FIG. 17 is a schematic diagram illustrating the connections of the cars batteries to the battery charging contacts thereon;

FIG. 18 is a schematic diagram illustrating a typical arrangement of the speed control magnets adjacent the monorail;

FIG. 19 is a schematic diagram illustrating the connections to the elevator motor drive circuitry.

DESCRIPTION OF A PREFERRED EMBODIMENT GENERAL DESCRIPTION While the invention is to be described in terms of an application as a remote teller fora drive-in banking system, it necessarily finds broader applicability in any situation where a semi-automated transit means for moving a transaction box between two physically separated stations is required.

Now referring to FIG. 1, the system includes a customer station CS, and a teller station TS that are physically separated. The customer station CS includes a housing 21 having an inclined front surface 21A which faces the customer when the system is installed. An access door 22 is situated in an opening of surface 21A and allows access to a transaction box 44 to be hereinafter described, when the transaction box 44 is at a proper position within the customer station CS.

The teller station TS likewise includes a housing 32 having an upper surface 32A which is accessible to a teller in the bank building, when installed. The embodiment illustrated shows the housing 32 at its upper surface 32A being disposed adjacent a tellers desk 31. An access door 33 is disposed in an opening of surface 32A for allowing the teller to gain access to the aforementioned transaction box 44 when the transaction box 44 is at a proper position.

Transaction box 44 is carried between the stations TS and CS by a monorail transportation system 40 including a monorail 42 supported within an enclosing duct structure 41. A battery operated, self-propelled car 43 rides on the monorail 42 and includes suitable means for receiving and carrying the closed transaction box 44. In FIG. I, the car 43 and box 44 are shown in a position intermediate the stations TS and CS. When the car 43 comes to the end of the monorail 42 at either station TS or CS, suitable means are provided for braking the car and for latching the car into a fixed position. At the customer station CS, an elevator carrier 45 is provided for lifting the transaction box 44 from the car 43 when the car has been latched and for raising the transaction box 44 to an upper position and inclination suitable for presentation to the customer. When box 44 is brought to the upper position adjacent access door 22, suitable means are provided for opening door 22 and for opening the transaction box 44. These means also prevent unauthorized access by a party at the customer station CS into the interior of housing 21, when the transaction box 44 is not at the upper position. For example, it is desirable that the elevator carrier 45 and transaction box 44 be maintained at a retract position intermediate the lower position of the elevator carrier 45, that is, adjacent monorail 42, and the upper position thereof, that is, when door 22 is open. This retract position is desirable so that the transaction box 44 can be delivered to a customer in a minimum of time on request.

When the elevator carrier 45 is brought back to its lower position and the transaction box 44 returned to the car 43, the car 43 is unlatched and its drive circuitry is conditioned and initially mechanically pr0- pelled towards the teller station TS. The self-contained drive circuitry of the car 43 then continues to propel the car 43. As the car 43 approaches and rounds curves in the monorail 42. its velocity control circuitry brakes the car 43. As the car 43 approaches station TS, it is again braked and latched into position adjacent an elevator carrier 46 which removes box 44 from car 43 and raises it to an access position suitable for presentation to the teller. During this operation, suitable means are actuated to open door 33 and to additionally open the transaction box 44.

To control the position of the transaction box 44, only four switches are required. In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 1, three of these switches are at the teller station TS and therefore under the control of the teller. The first of these comprises a switch SW1, not illustrated in FIG. 1, which is actuated when the teller door 33 is closed. In response to the closure of switch SW1, the elevator carrier 46 is moved downwardly, the car 43 is unlatched and propelled to the customer station CS with the box 44, the car 43 is braked and latched at customer station CS. and the elevator carrier 45 is driven to its upper position with the box 44 so that the door 22 is open and the box 44 is open.

Likewise, a pushbuttom switch SW is provided at the customer station CS for performing the reverse operation upon depression by a customer, so that the transaction box 44 is returned to the teller station TS.

The teller also has a pushbutton switch SW12 available. Depression of recall switch SW12 returns the box 44 to the upper position in the teller station TS.

An extend/retract switch SW11 is also provided to the teller at station TS and allows the teller to move the elevator carrier 45 between the retract position and its upper or access position in response to successive depressions thereof.

To assist in the banking process, the system may be provided with a voice communications system including a microphone 23 and a loudspeaker 24 exposed in the inclined surface 21A at the customer station CS, and suitable amplifiers, cables, and a loud speaker, not illustrated, at the teller station TS.

A typical banking transaction will result in an operation of the system as follows. After a banking transaction, the teller at station TS will have sent the transaction box 44 and elevator carrier 45 to the retract position by depressing switch SW11. When a customer arrives at station CS, the teller recognizes this fact, either by voice or visual contact, and depresses switch SW11 to cause the elevator carrier 45 to move its upper position to thereby open both door 22 and transaction box 44. The customer then deposits the necessary items for the banking transaction into the transaction box after filling out any deposit slips, etc. which may have already been contained within the box 44. Then the customer sends the transaction box 44 to the teller by depressing switch SW10. Or, the teller can recall" the transaction box 44 by depressing switch SW12. If by chance the customer did not require a banking transaction, the teller could cause the transaction box 44 and elevator carrier 45 to be moved to its retract position again by another depression of switch SW11.

When the car 43 reaches the teller station TS, the elevator carrier 46 removes the box 44 and raises it to the upper position. opening access door 33 and box 44 in the process. The teller then completes the banking transaction by removing the items in the transaction box and carrying out the necessary entries, and then returns deposit books and the like to the transaction box 44. The transaction box 44 is then returned to the customer when the teller closes the door 33. After the customer has removed the necessary items, the teller may then send the transaction box 44 back to its retract position by depressing switch SW1]. Alternately, if nothing needs to be returned to the customer, the teller may return the transaction box 44 directly to the retract position by closing door 33 and then depressing switch SW11.

To fully understand how the system provides these and other features, reference should be made to the details described hereinafter.

TRANSACTION BOX Now referring to FIG. 2, the transaction box 44 is illustrated in the upper portion of this figure and comprises an elongated, open-topped box portion 120 which is closed by the doors 122, 123, each of which is spring-loaded by its hinge, such as hinge 122A. The doors 122 and 123 are locked by a locking bracket 124 which is hinged on a side of box portion 120 at 124A and which likewise is spring-loaded to bear against doors 122 and 123. Door 122 additionally has a lip portion 122B extending along its length.

Accordingly, the contents of the transaction box 44 are protected during transit between the stations TS and CS and when the box 44 is located in the stations TS and CS.

Locking bracket 124 has attached thereto a tab 125 which, when depressed, pivots locking bracket 124 about hinge 124A so as to unlock doors 122 and 123, as best illustrated in FIG. 3. Doors 123 and 122 have attached thereto opening arms 126, 128 which have disposed on one end thereof rollers 127, 129, respectively. When the rollers 127, 129 engage suitablypositioned actuators, the doors 123, 122 are caused to rotate about their pivots and open, as also illustrated in FIG. 3. Suitable actuating means are provided in the stations TS and CS for engaging tab 125, and rollers 127 and 129, when the elevator carrier in each station is raised to its upper position, so that the transaction box is opened. At other times, transaction box 44 remains closed as illustrated in FIG. 2.

Situated on the side of box-like portion 120 are a plurality of projecting guides 121 suitable for engagement with corresponding recesses in the elevator carriers 45 and 46, hereinafter described.

The car 43 includes a generally U-shaped support member 100. A plurality of spring clips 101, 102 and 103 project above the top surface of support member for engaging the sides of transaction box 44 to hold it in position while on car 43. Car 43 is supported on the upper top and sides of the monorail 42 by two truck assemblies 104 which are rotatably journaled in the upper surface of support member 100 at 105. Each of the truck assemblies 104 includes two vertical rollers 106 for engaging the top of the monorail 42, and four horizontal rollers 107 for engaging opposite, upper sides of the monorail 42.

The car 43 also includes lower guide assemblies, namely, a pair of spring arms 108 which are affixed at one end to opposite sides of support member 100 and which have rotatably journaled at the other end thereof a roller 109 for engaging the lower sides of the monorail 42. Preferably, rollers 109 have resilient engaging surfaces.

Propulsion for the car is provided by a pair of drive assemblies located at the opposite end of car 43 from the guide assemblies. Namely, these drive assemblies include a pair of spring brackets 110 which have one end affixed to the upper portion of support member 100 and which depend downwardly therefrom, having an L-shaped bracket at the lower end for supporting first and second drive motors 111A, 1118, respectively. The output of drive motors 111A and 111B is provided at shafts 112A. 1128 which extend down beyond the bottom of spring brackets 110. Shafts 112A, 1128 engage in turn rollers 114A, 114B which are rotatably journaled in brackets 113A, 113B attached to the sides of support member 100. Preferably, rollers 114A, 1148 are composed of a resilient material and are positioned on brackets 113A, 1138 so that their peripheral drive surfaces come into firm contact with the lower sides of the monorail 42. Shafts 112A, 112B are maintained in contact with these peripheral drive surfaces by the spring action of brackets 110.

Preferably, motors 111A. 111B are reversible DC motors so that the car 43 can be driven in either direction.

Means are provided to sense whether the car is at the customer station CS or the teller station TS. Specifically, assuming that the car is placed on the monorail 42 so that the end including bracket 103 and the motors 111A, -111B faces the teller station TS, a switch SW14 is mounted on a bracket 115 at the rear or customer end" of car 43 and has an actuating arm and roller 116 projecting through an aperture in bracket 115. Similarly, a switch SW15 is mounted on a bracket 117 at the front or teller end of car 43 and has an actuating arm and roller 118. Both switches SW14 and SW15 are actuated by engagement with suitable cam surfaces in the latching mechanisms to be described which are located at the stations CS and TS. Switches SW14 and SW15 provide one input to drive and velocity control circuitry which is mounted within car 43, but not illustrated, which in turn provides suitable drive signals to the motors 111A and 111B.

While the car 43 is latched into position at either of the stations TS or CS, a pair of battery charging contacts BCl, BC2 mounted on one of the arms 108 make contact with corresponding stationary battery charging contacts BCl', BC2 (FIG. 4). Accordingly, a battery charger whose output is available at both of the stations TS and CS is connected to the selfcontained batteries (not illustrated) of the car 43.

Dynamic velocity control signals for the electrical drive and velocity control circuitry are obtained from two coils K1, K2 located, respectively. on the underside of brackets 113A. 1138. As will be described in more detail hereinafter. coils K1 and K2 interact with a plurality of permanent magnets spaced along the monorail 42 at desired velocity control points. Coil K1 provides velocity control signals when the car 43 is proceeding from the teller station TS to the customer station CS, and coil K2 provides velocity control signals when the car 43 is proceeding in the opposite direction.

CAR AND ELEVATOR INTERLOCKS Since the car 43 is self-propelled. it is essential for proper operation of the system that the operation of car 43 and of elevator carriers 45 and 46 be coordinated. lest either elevator carrier 45 or 46 be out of position when the car 43 arrives at either of the stations CS or TS and so forth.

With specific reference now to F168. 4 and 5, the interlock mechanism and electrical sensors at the teller station TS are illustrated although it is to be clearly understood that a similar mechanism and sensors are provided at the customer station CS. In FIG. 4, the mechanism is shown in plan view. without the elevation view, with the car 43 approaching the station TS.

The elevator carrier 46 includes a plurality of notches for receiving corresponding projecting guides 121 on the transaction box 44. The elevator carrier 46 includes a support portion 154 for the arms thereof having notches 150 therein. Support portion 154 is attached to a drive mechanism 152, more completely illustrated in FIGS. 8-10 and explained herein after. Attached to support portion 154 is a first projecting catch 208 and a second projecting catch 209 having a spring-like lower arm portion 209A. Projections 208 and 209 interact with a mechanism to be described in controlling the lower position of the elevator carrier 46. An electrical input signal is provided by a limit switch SW3 whose actuator arm 222 is depressed by the lower side of the elevator carrier 46 when elevator carrier 46 is in its lower position.

Car 43 is likewise provided with a plate 200, which may be affixed to end support 103, for interacting with the mechanism to be described in controlling the car position at the station TS. As previously described. car 43 also includes a switch SW15 including an actuator arm 117 which provides an electrical input to the car control circuitry.

The mechanism includes an arm 202 which is rotatable on a pivot 203 passed through and secured to the monorail 42. A roller 201 is provided on the upper end of arm 202 and projects above and over monorail 42, resting on the top surface thereof in its normal position. The lower end of arm 202 has a right-angle portion 202A which has an aperture therethrough which in turn supports a bushing 204. A rod 205 is reciprocable in two brackets 206 and 207 connected to the side of monorail 42 in a direction substantially parallel to the upper surface thereof. A pin 205A in rod 205 bears against bushing 204 and serves to provide a linkage between rod 205 and arm 202.

The assembly including arm 202 and rod 205 is maintained in the position illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 5 by a spring 209 disposed about rod 205 and bearing on pin 205A and a portion of bracket 206. As will be seen. spring 209 serves to provide an initial propulsive force to the car 43 when it is to begin its travel to the customer station CS.

In the normal position of bolt 205, when car 43 is away from the station TS, the end of bolt 205 blocks upward movement of the elevator carrier 46 by engagement with projecting catch 208. The other end of bolt 205 is adapted to actuate a switch SW4 attached to the monorail 42 by engagement with an actuating arm 215 thereof. However, in the normal position illustrated, switch SW4 is deactuated.

A mechanism is also provided for latching the car 43 at the station. This mechanism includes a cam member 210, which rotates about a pivot 211 supported by a bracket 212 which is detachable from duct 41 for installation and service. Member 210 has three surfaces 210A. 2108. and 210C and is normally maintained in a position illustrated in FIG 5 by a spring 214 compressed between member 210 and a support bracket 213 affixed to bracket 212.

Surfaces 210A and 210C are designed to engage cam-actuating surface 220 and latching surface 221 of a projection 223 attached to bracket 117 at the front of car 43, while cam surface 2108 is designed to engage spring-like lower arm portion 209A. Surface 210C is also designed to engage actuator arm 118 of switch SW15.

With reference to FIGS. 6 and 7, the operation of the elevator carrier and car interlock mechanisms will now be described.

As the car 43 approaches the station TS, it is dynamically braked by its propulsion circuitry in a manner to be described hereinafter. Then, plate 200 engages roller 201 to rotate arm 202 in a counterclockwise direction, as viewed in FIG. 6. Spring 209 is accordingly compressed and further brakes car 43. In addition, rotation of arm 202 causes bolt 205 to move to the right, due to the interaction of bushing 204 and pin 205A. Accordingly, one end of bolt 205 is withdrawn from engagement with projecting catch 208 and the other end thereof engages actuating arm 215 to actuate switch SW4. The freeing of projecting catch 208 allows the elevator carrier 46 to move upwardly as hereinafter described.

While this braking and elevator unlatching operation is occurring, the car 43 is also being latched into position and conditioned for its return trip in the following manner. Cam'actuating surface 220 on the car first en gages surface 210C, causing member 210 to rotate to the dotted position illustrated in FIG. 6. As the car 43 continues its travel and comes to a stop, the projection 223 passes over the conjunction of surfaces 210C and 210A, at which time member 210 returns to its original position due to the action of the spring 214. When member 210 has returned to its original position, car 43 is latched into place due to engagement of latching surface 221 and surface 210A. Furthermore, switch SW is actuated by engagement between actuating arm 117 and surface 210C. Actuation of SW15 provides an input signal to the car propulsion circuitry to complete the dynamic braking process and further conditions that circuitry for the return trip.

When the elevator carrier 46 begins its upward travel, spring-like arm 209A passes by member 210 due to its spring action.

The car unlatching and elevator latching operation will now be described. With specific reference to FIG. 7, when elevator carrier 46 travels downwardly, springlike arm 209A comes in contact with surface 210B. Accordingly, member 210 is rotated from the dotted position in FIG. 7 to the solid line position. The rotation of member 210 deactuates switch SW15. As cam surface 210A passes below the lower edge latching surface 221, the car 43 is unlatched away from the station and is propelled away from the station TS, or to the right by the expansion of spring 209. Concurrently with this operation, elevator carrier 46 continues to move downwardly, and spring-like arm 209A slips around member 210. Elevator carrier 46 continues to move downwardly until the lower edge thereof engages the actuating arm 222 of switch SW3, whose actuation is used to stop the elevator carrier movement. As car 43 moves away from the station TS, arm 202 returns to its original position, due to the action of spring 209, switch SW4 is deactuated and the elevator carrier 46 is then latched by the engagement of bolt 205 and projecting catch 208.

TELLER STATION With reference to FIGS. 8-10, the structure and operation of the teller station will now be described. Once the car 43 is latched into position at the teller station TS as previously described. the elevator carrier 46 must provide for transporting the transaction box 44 between the car 43 and an access or uppermost position in which box 44 is opened and its interior made accessible to a teller.

The elevator carrier 46 is raised and lowered by an elevator mechanism, generally at 152, which includes the support portion 154 of the elevator carrier 46. Support portion 154 has attached thereto two arms 155, 156, each supporting a plurality of rollers 157 which bear against the slide on two tracks 158 located on the side of a vertically-extending channel 159. The elevator carrier 46 and its carriage including support member 154 and arms 155, 156 is caused to reciprocate on the elements 158 and 159 by a drive chain 176 attached at a first end 1768 to support portion 154 and at a second end 176A to a counterweight, not illustrated, which is reciprocal within channel member 159. Drive chain 176 passes over a sprocket member 174 which is attached to and rotatable with a shaft 160 which is journalled in bearing members 161 mounted on a plate 179A on the upper end of channel member 159. Shaft 160 passes through one of the bearing supports 161 and has attached to one end thereof a second sprocket member 162 around which is passed a second driving chain 164. A drive motor for the teller station TS is mounted on the opposite side of the housing 32 and has an output shaft 168 on which is mounted a sprocket member 166, around which passes the second drive chain 164. Motor 170 preferably is a reversible motor, and is controlled as hereinafter described.

As elevator carrier 46 is raised to the uppermost or access position, the doors of the transaction box 44 must be opened. Accordingly, teller station TS includes first and second projecting rods 178, only one of which is illustrated, which depend from plate 179A. Projecting rods 178 are positioned to engage rollers 127, 129 upon upward movement of the elevator carrier 46. The teller station TS also includes a third projecting rod supported from plate 179A. Projecting rod 180 is positioned to engage the unlocking tab 125 of the transaction box 44, again upon upward movement of the elevator carrier 46. The engagement of projecting rods 180 and 178 with the unlocking tab 125 and rollers 127, 129 causes the locking bracket 124 and doors 122 and 123 to open to the position illustrated in FIG. 3 upon upward movement of the elevator carrier 46, as also illustrated in FIG. 10.

In addition, the access door 33 must be opened when the transaction box 44 is at the access position. Normally, door 33 is closed and locked by the engagement of an angle portion 33B thereof with a catch 186 which is spring-loaded by an integral portion 184 thereof forming part of the housing 32. An actuating arm 182 is attached to support portion 154 of elevator carrier 46. When the elevator carrier 46 reaches its uppermost position, actuating arm 182 engages portion 184 and accordingly causes catch 186 to move out of engagement with angle portion 338. Door 33 is pivoted in the upper surface 32A of housing 32 at 33C, and supports at its other end a balance weight 33A. Accordingly, as catch 186 and angle portion 338 move out of engagement, door 33 is caused to rotate to its open position illustrated in FIG. 10.

The position of the door 33 is sensed by a switch SW1 mounted on the side of motor 170 and having an actuating arm 192 which is engaged by balance weight 33A when the door 33 is closed. A switch SW2 mounted on the side and interior of housing 32 has an actuating arm 190 which engages elevator carrier 46 when elevator carrier 46 is in its uppermost position. The function of switch SW1 has been previously described. Switch Sw2 furnishes an input to the station drive circuitry indicating when the elevator carrier 46 is in its uppermost position.

The operation of the mechanism illustrated in FIGS. 8-10 is precisely the opposite when elevator carrier 46 is proceeding in a downward direction.

CUSTOMER STATION With reference to FIGS. 11l3, the structure and operation of the customer station CS will now be described.

In the lower portion of FIG. 11, the car 43 is shown as being latched into position at the customer station CS, with the battery charging contacts BCl, BC2, in engagement with the battery charging contacts BCl", BC2 provided thereat.

The customer station CS is provided with switches SW and SW6, not illustrated, whose functions are sim ilar to those of switches SW4 and SW3, that is, switch SW5 is actuated when the car 43 is latched into position at the customer station CS, and switch SW6 is actuated when the elevator carrier 45 is at its lowermost position.

The elevator carrier 45 and the transaction box 44 are shown for three separate positions. The lower two or dotted positions correspond to the lower position when transaction box 44 is resting on the car 43, and to a position where the transaction box 44 and elevator carrier 45 are intermediate the lower position and a retract position to be describedv The solid line position illustrated in FIG. 11 shows the box 44 and the elevator carrier 45 at the retract position. In FIGS. 12 and 13, the box 44 and elevator carrier 45 are shown in the uppermost or access position.

The elevator carrier 45 is supported on and made reciprocable on a track 301 by a carrier 300 having a plurality of rollers engaging the sides of track 301. Carrier 300 is caused to move on the track 301 by a chain 306 which has one end attached to carrier 300. Chain 306 passes around a sprocket 312 attached to a shaft 313 which is rotatable in an arm 314 attached to track 301, and then around a plurality of sprocket members 311, 308, 305, and is attached at 307 to a portion of housing 21.

Sprocket member 311 is rotatable in a frame 315 which supports a drive motor 310 having an output shaft 309 to which is attached sprocket member 308. Motor 310 is preferably a reversible member. Sprocket member 305 is rotatable on a shaft rigidly attached to a portion of a counterweight 304 which is reciprocable within a vertically-extending channel member 303.

A switch SW7 is mounted on track 301 and has an actuating arm 330 which projects through an aperture of track 301. A projection 45A is provided on the side of elevator carrier 45 and engages actuating arm 330 when the elevator carrier 45 reaches the retract position. Actuation of the switch SW7 indicates when the elevator carrier 45 is at the retract position.

The access door 22 is normally closed by an overcenter mechanism. Specifically, access door 22 is provided with rollers 333 at each side of the top end thereof which ride in tracks 333A mounted on the interior sides of housing 21. and with rollers 334 on either side of the bottom end thereof which ride in corresponding tracks 334A, also mounted on the interior sides of housing 21. The upper portion of door 22 is also pro vided with two pivot points 324 to which are attached one end of first and second, parallel linking arms 323. The other end of linking arms 323 are pivotally attached to one end of third and fourth linking arms 322 (FIGS. 12, 13), whose other end is rigidly attached to a pair of support brackets 321. Both of the brackets 32] are rigidly attached to a shaft 320 which is rotatable in and supported by two bearing support members 318, 319. An angle bracket member 317 attached to the housing 21 extends across the width of housing 21 and supports the support members 318, 319.

Normally, door 22 is in the position illustrated in FIGS. 11 and cannot be opened due to the overcenter action of the pairs of arms 323, 322.

For opening the access door 22, the mechanism includes an actuating arm 327 and roller 328 rigidly secured to one of the support members 321. Roller 328 is positioned to be engaged by a cam-actuator 326 attached to the carrier 300. When the elevator carrier 45 is in the retract position illustrated in FIG. 11, the camactuator 326 hasjust come into engagement with roller 328. As the elevator carrier 45 moves from the rest position to the access position, best illustrated in FIGS. 12 and 13, the continued engagement of the cam-actuator 326 and the roller 328 causes the actuating arm 327 and support bracket 321 to rotate shaft 320 in a counter-clockwise direction, thus causing the entire overcenter mechanism to assume the position illustrated in FIGS. 12 and 13. During this operation, door 22 is drawn upwardly and back into the housing 21, with the rollers 333, 334 sliding in the corresponding tracks 333A, 334A.

Simultaneously, the locking bracket 124 and the doors 122, 123, are opened by the engagement of the unlocking tab 125, and rollers 127, 129, with three projecting arms, not illustrated, which are similar to those provided in the teller station TS. AS a result, the door 122 opens to the position illustrated in FIGS. 12 and 13 such that the lip portion 122B abuts the housing 21 to provide a smooth surface for access into the interior of the box 44. Similarly, the door 123 opens to the position illustrated in FIGS. 12 and 13, where door 123 is covered by a botton portion 335 of access door 22.

The position of access door 22 is sensed by a switch SW9 having an actuating arm 332 which is engaged by projecting rod 321A attached to one of the brackets 321 when the door 22 is closed, as illustrated in FIG. 11. A switch SW8 which is attached to the track 301 has an actuating arm 331 projecting through an aperture therein. Actuating arm 331 is engaged by the projection 45A when the elevator carrier 45 reaches the upppermost or access position, as best illustrated in FIG. 13.

The operation as described proceeds in reverse when the elevator carrier 45 moves from the access position to the retract position. and from the retract position to the lowermost position. i

ELECTRICAL STATION DRIVE AND CONTROL CIRCUITRY With reference now to FIGS. 14A and 148. whose relationship is illustrated in FIG. 15, a logic circuit is illustrated for controlling the elevator mechanisms at the stations TS and CS and for controlling the operation of a battery charger having the output terminals BC] BCI BC2', BC2 previously described. The switches SW1, SW2, SW12 whose physical location and operation has been previously described are shown at the left hand side of FIGS. 14A and 148. Each switch comprises a SPDT (single pole double throw) switch whose movable contact is connected by a line 400 to a source of reference potential. Each switch is provided with two stationary contacts engageable with the movable contact. In the case of switches SW1 and SW9, which are associated with the teller and customer doors 33, 22, respectively, the stationary contacts are designated CL, OP. In the case of the remaining switches, the stationary contacts are designated NP and P. Switches SW1 and SW9 are shown in their closed and open positions, respectively, and the remainder of the switches are shown in their normal deactuated positions.

A plurality of RS flip-flops 401, 402, 412 are provided for switches SW1, SW2 SW12. The function of each RS flip-flop is to convert its switch actuations into corresponding logic voltages. When the movable contact area of a switch is connected to the upper stationary contact, a logic 1 output is provided on an upper terminal of the corresponding RS flip-flop. When the movable contact of the switch is connected to the lower stationary contact, the logic 1 output is provided on a lower terminal of the corresponding RS flip-flop. The upper terminal of each flip-flop is designated by the flip-flop number, and the lower terminal is designated as the logical complement thereof. To take an example, when switch SW1 has its movable contact engaged with stationary contact OP, flip-flop 401 provides a logic l output on terminal 401, and when switch SW1 has its movable contact engaged with stationary contact CL, flip-flop 401 provides a logic 1 output on terminal 4 1.

The outputs from the flip-flops 401, 402 412 are supplied to a circuit distributor 415 which comprises a means for routing the outputs to appropriate portions of the logic circuitry, to be described.

The flip-flop outputs thus appear as indicated in FIGS. 14A and 14B and are applied to a plurality of gates, monostable multivibrators, and flip-flops which perform the desired logic operations. The outputs of the logic circuitry appear at terminals 469, 471, 479, 475. 481,311. and 482.

When the signal on line 475 is a logic I, a battery charger 480 is turned on to provide a charging voltage on output terminals BCl', 8C2 (BC1"), (BC2"). Battery charger 480 includes a timer and appropriate circuitry, not illustrated, for providing a variable charging process to the batteries in the car and turns itself off when this process is completed. Although there are two sets of terminals BCI', BC2. and BCI", BC2", only one battery charger 480 is provided and located at either of the stations TS or CS with suitable interconnections being made between the stations.

The remainder of the output terminals are connected to the elevator motor drive circuitry more completely detailed in FIG. 19.

Terminals 469 and 479 are connected to a motor control circuit 490 which provides an output on line 491 to both the motors 170 and 310. In a working model, motors 170 and 310. and the motor control circuit 490, were manufactured by the Superior Electric Company. Bristol. Conn., and were identified by their trademark SLO-SYN." Basically. this type of motor comprises a reversible stepping motor whose energization is controlled by connecting a voltage across two terminals thereof, as exemplified by the plus and minus terminals in FIG. 19, and whose actual movement and direction of rotation is controlled by a control signal supplied thereto, such as the signal on line 491.

The logic circuitry in FIGS. 14A and 14B provides a logic 1 output on terminal 469 when either elevator carrier is to run, and a logic 0 output signal on line 469 when either elevator carrier is to be stopped. A logic 1 output signal is provided on line 479 when the elevator carrier 46 at station TS is to be run up and the elevator carrier 45 at station CS is to be run down, and a logic 0 output signal is provided on line 479 when the elevator carrier 46 is to be run down and the elevator carrier 45 is to be run up.

Motor control circuit 490 includes an oscillator and a reversible counter which are controlled by the signals on lines 469 and 479. Specifically, the logic 1 output signal on line 469 starts the oscillator in motor control circuit 490, and the specific logic signal on 479 determines in which direction the counter will count. A resultant output signal on line 491 comprises either a positive or negative pulse whose duration determines the duration of motor actuation and whose polarity determines the direction thereof.

The logic circuitry in FIGS. 14A. 148, provides a logic 1 output signal on terminal 482 when the elevator motors are to be energized, and a logic 0 output of terminal 482 when they are not. The signal on terminal 482 is supplied in FIG 19 to a motor power switch 492 which may comprises a single pole, single throw relay for connecting the power supply voltage V, to its output terminal.

The logic circuitry in FIGS. 14A, 148, provides a logic 1 output signal on line 471 when the elevator motors are to run, and a logic 0 output signal thereon when the elevator motors are to be maintained in a hold" condition. The signals on line 471 are coupled to a run/hold driver circuit 495 in FIG. 19 which includes a switching device whose operative effect is symbolized by the normally-closed contacts 494. Contacts 494 shunt a resistance 493 connecting the motor power switch 492 directly to a motor driver 496. The purpose of run/hold driver 495 and its associated elements is to insert the resistance 493 by opening the contacts 494 into the circuit between the power supply V, and the motors 170, 310 when the elevator carriers are stationary but energized so as to minimize motor current drain.

The logic circuitry in FIGS. 14, 148, provides a logic 0 output signal on a line 4 81 when the teller station motor is to be energized. and a logic 0 output signal on a line 481 when the customer station motor 310 is to be energized. These signals are supplied in FIG. 19 to the motor driver 496 which also has a source of reference potential as an input. Motor driver 496 may comprise any switching device, or group of switching devices, preferably solid state, for connecting the power supply V, and the reference potential connection to the plus and minus terminals of the motors 170 or 310, in response to the logic signals present on input control lines 481, E5. The polarity of the supply connections to motors 170, 310 are reversed so that with a given directional control signal on line 491, the motors rotate in opposite directions so that only one directional control signal is needed when the transaction box 44 is transported between stations.

Reference should now be made back to FIGS. 14A and 14B to consider how the controlling logic signals are developed by the circuitry illustrated therein.

There are five basic operations of the system that can be performed under control of the teller and customer. These operations are as follows:

First, the teller may send the transaction box 44 from the uppermost position thereof at the teller station TS to the uppermost or access position at the customer station CS by closing the teller door 33. Second, the customer may send the transaction box 44 from the access position at the customer station CS to the uppermost position at the teller station TS by depressing the switch SW10. Third, the teller may send the transaction box 44 to the retract position within the customer station CS from the uppermost position at teller station TS by closing the teller door 33 and by depressing the retractlextend switch SW11 before the limit switch SW7 is actuated by the elevator carrier 45 in the customer station CS. Fourth, the teller may recall the transation box 44 to the access position in station TS if the car 43 is latched into position at either station TS or CS and if one of the elevator carriers 45 or 46 is at its lowermost position, by depressing switch SW12. Fifth, once the transaction box 44 is at the retract position, it may be moved between the retract position, and the customer access position by successive depressions of the switch SW1 1.

1n the first case noted above, it will be evident from the preceding description of the mechanical portions of the system that initially switch SW1 is open, switches SW2, SW4, and SW6 are actuated, switches SW3, SW5, SW7, SW8, SW10, SW11, SW12 are deactuated, and switch SW9 is closed.

With reference now to FIGS. 14A and 148, the signals on lines 401, 402 and 404 are accordingly a logic 1. As a result, a NAND gate 438 provides a logic output to one input and a NAND gate 453. The logic 1 output of NAND gate 453 is inverted by a gate 472 and applied as a logic 0 to the set (s) input of a flip-flop 478. Flip-flop 478 is a typical RS-flip-flop which in response provides a logic 0 output on its Q output, designated as line 479 in FIG. 14B. As previously explained, a logic 0 output on line 479 conditions the motor control circuit 490 for downward movement of elevator carrier 46 and upward movement of elevator carrier 45.

Upon the arrival of the car 43 at either of the stations TS or CS, the motor power switch 492 will have been placed in an ON condition as follows. The signals on line 404 or K15 are a logic 0. Accordingly, the output of a NAND gate 458 is a logic 1, as a result of which the output of a Nor gate 459 is a logic 0. If an initial condition ICA is a logic 1, as hereinafter described, the output of a NAND gate 460 is also a logic 0. As a result, a logic 1 appears on the output 482 ofa NOR gate 477, which turns on the motor power switch 492 as previously described.

Let it be assumed that a flip-flop 476 is in its reset state, wherein a logic 0 signal is provided on its Q output designated at 481 so that motor driver 496 is conditioned to apply the voltage supply to a teller station motor 170. Let it be further assumed that a flip-flop 466 is in its reset state wherein a logic 0 is provided on its Q output designated at 469, and that a NOR gate 470 provides a logic 0 output on line 471. As a result, motor control circuit 490 is off and run/hold driver 471 is in its hold condition whereby contacts 494 are open.

When the teller closes the access door 33, switch SW1 is closed. The sequence of switch operations is as follows as the transaction box 44 is transported from the uppermost position at the teller station TS to the uppermost or access position at the customer station CS: Switch SW2 is deactuated, switch SW3 is actuated, switch SW4 is deactuated, switch SW5 is actuated, switch SW6 is deactuated, switch SW7 is actuated, switch SW7 is deactuated, switch SW8 is actuated, and then switch SW9 is opened. The operation of the logic in FIGS. 14A and 148 to control the elevator carriers at the teller station TS and the customer station CS so as to result in transport of the transaction box 44 is as follows.

Upon closure of teller access door 33, the signal on line 401 becomes a logic 1. A monostable multivibrator 420 provides a logic 1 output signal for a predetermined period of time, on the order of one second, to the input of a NAND gate 430 and a NOR gate 442. Since the car 43 is latched into position, the signal one line 404 is a logic 1. As a result, a NAND gate 430 provides a logic 0 output which is inverted by NAND gate 450 into a logic 1 output. If the customer access door 22 is closed, the signal on line 41W is likewise a logic l, and NAND gate 461 accordingly provides a logic 0 output which is inverted by a NAND gate 462 and applied as a logic 1 output to NAND gate 463. At this point, a further check is made to insure that the teller access door 33 is closed, for NAND gate 463 provides a logic 0 output only if the signal on line m is a logic 1. This logic 0 output is inverted by NAND gates 464 and 465, assuming that an initial condition 168 is a logic 0, and applied as a logic 0 to the set(s) input of flip-flop 466, causing flip-flop 466 to assume its set state wherein a logic 1 is provided on line 469 to turn on motor control circuit 490. The logic 1 signal on 469 passes through NOR gate 470 and is supplied on line 471 to run/hold driver 495 to place it into its run condition, whereby contacts 494 are closed to shunt resistor 493.

As a result, the elevator carrier 46 moves downwardly. When elevator carrier 46 has reached the lowermost position and when the car 43 has been unlatched, the motor 170 at the teller station TS is stopped as follows. The signal on line 403 is a logic 1 which causes a logic 0 signal to be produced by a monostable multivibrator 424 for a short period of time, for example, V2 second. The resultant output of a NAND gate 467 is a logic 1, which is inverted by gate 468 and applied as a logic 0 to the reset (R) input of flip-flop 466, causing the output signal on line 469 to become a logic 0 and to turn off the motor control circuit 490.

As previously described, the signal on line 469 turns on and off an oscillator within motor control 490. When that oscillator is turned off, its output does not terminate immediately, but rather decays over a certain period. During a portion of this decay period, full power is maintained across the motor 170 due to the run/hold driver being maintained in its run" condition. Specifically, when the car 43 leaves the station TS, the signal on line 404 becomes a logic 0, thereby causing a multivibrator 445 to produce a logic l output signal for a certain time period. approximately 2% seconds. The output of multivibrator 445 is applied

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4010824 *Dec 24, 1975Mar 8, 1977Bavis Edward FConveyor system for drive-in banks and the like
US4411336 *Nov 9, 1981Oct 25, 1983Diebold IncorporatedRailway transport banking system
US4987834 *Jun 20, 1989Jan 29, 1991Roberts Sinto CorporationAccumulating conveyor with self-propelled pallets
US5167300 *Nov 7, 1990Dec 1, 1992Hitachi, Ltd.Financial institution system and apparatus for conveying valuable paper sheets
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US8827041 *Aug 5, 2009Sep 9, 2014Michael E. BrownCarrier car door assembly
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EP0143663A2 *Nov 29, 1984Jun 5, 1985Fujitsu LimitedCash processing system
EP0146290A2Nov 29, 1984Jun 26, 1985Fujitsu LimitedInitialize control system in a cash processing system
EP0164717A2 *Jun 10, 1985Dec 18, 1985Oki Electric Industry Company, LimitedAutomatic bank note depositing and dispensing system
EP0211747A1 *Jul 23, 1986Feb 25, 1987Compagnie De Signaux Et D'equipements ElectroniquesAssembly for conveying coins between a coin-operated apparatus and a coin-processing unit
WO1986006856A1 *May 14, 1986Nov 20, 1986Anthony KenyonA dispensing apparatus and deposit apparatus for drive up machines
Classifications
U.S. Classification186/37, 104/127
International ClassificationG07F19/00, E05G1/06, E05G7/00
Cooperative ClassificationE05G7/008, G07F19/20, G07F19/201, G07F19/205, E05G1/06
European ClassificationG07F19/20, G07F19/201, G07F19/205, E05G7/00D4D