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Publication numberUS3881636 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 6, 1975
Filing dateJun 19, 1973
Priority dateJun 20, 1972
Also published asDE2331813A1
Publication numberUS 3881636 A, US 3881636A, US-A-3881636, US3881636 A, US3881636A
InventorsAubreby Jean-Pierre A D
Original AssigneeAubreby Jean Pierre A D
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for dispensing sparkling beverages by single doses
US 3881636 A
Abstract
Apparatus for dispensing sparkling beverages including a carbonator in which gaseous carbon dioxide is dissolved in water, the carbonated water is passed to an intermediate chamber via the pressure in the carbonator, the pressure of the gas phase in the carbonator communicating with an upper portion of the intermediate chamber, and the upper portion of the intermediate chamber being vented to the atmosphere through a calibrated diaphragm or other flow restrictor to allow limited flow of gas therethrough as the carbonated water enters the intermediate chamber. From the intermediate chamber, the carbonated water is dispensed in dose form to be combined with a suitable favored extract to produce a sparkling drink.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 DAubreby 11] 3,881,636 [451 May 6,1975

[ APPARATUS FOR DISPENSING SPARKLING BEVERAGES BY SINGLE DOSES Inventor: Jean-Pierre A. DAubreby, 173

Avenue do 4 Septembre, Douai, France Filed: June 19, 1973 Appl. No.: 371,348

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data June 20 1972 France 72.22207 Mar. 13, 1973 France 73.08801 References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,637,808 Armond...t...........

Cornelius 2221129.! Black ZZZ/129.1

[57] ABSTRACT Apparatus for dispensing sparkling beverages including a carbonator in which gaseous carbon dioxide is dissolved in water, the carbonated water is passed to an intermediate chamber via the pressure in the carbonator, the pressure of the gas phase in the carbonator communicating with an upper portion of the intermediate chamber, and the upper portion of the intermediate chamber being vented to the atmosphere through a calibrated diaphragm or other flow restrictor to allow limited flow of gas therethrough as the carbonated water enters the intermediate chamber. From the intermediate chamber, the carbonated water is dispensed in dose form to be combined with a suitable favored extract to produce a sparkling drink.

10 Claims, 16 Drawing Figures SHEET 03B? 11 FiG.4

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K////KV/// Fis1 APPARATUS FOR DISPENSING SPARKLING BEVERAGES BY SINGLE DOSES The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for dispensing sparkling beverages, i.e. beverages containing carbon dioxide in the dissolved state up to saturation, in a dispensing machine for delivering determined quantities constituting single doses, each dose possibly being mixed with a suitable extract to make a sparkling drink placed at the disposal of the public, for example in an automatic drink-dispensing machine.

Apparatus of this type are known, which use an intermediate chamber under carbon dioxide gas pressure, and where the carbonated water is brought by gravity from the carbonator; then the carbonated water is placed under atmospheric pressure, by the intermediate chamber being placed in communication with the open air, after which the carbonated water is poured into the individual cup or glass.

However, these apparatuses are very slow to function and the intermediate chamber necessitates a precise and delicate positioning with respect to the carbonator in order to be filled by gravity.

The invention aims at remedying these disadvantages and relates to an apparatus for dispensing sparkling beverages, comprising a carbonator constituted of a chamber placed in communication with a source of water on the one hand a source of pressurised carbon dioxide on the other hand, the carbonator being adapted to cause the carbon dioxide to dissolve in the water by intimate mixing of the two component elements, the carbonator being associated with an intermediate chamber communicating on the one hand with the liquid phase of the carbonator and on the other hand by its top with the gaseous phase of said carbonator, the pipes connecting the auxiliary chamber with the carbonator being provided with electro-valves connected to a programmed control apparatus, wherein said intermediate chamber is in comnication with the atmosphere by a suitably calibrated diaphragm, said diaphragm being adapted to maintain the the gaseous phase of the intermediate chamber a slight depression with respect to the pressure prevailing in the gaseous phase of the carbonator when said latter is placed in communication with said auxiliary chamber, this difference in pressure enabling the pressurised water from the carbonator to be rapidly introduced, whatever the position of the intermediate chamber with respect to the carbonator.

According to a variant embodiment the intermediate chamber may contain the recipient intended to receive the final sparkling beverage and it is provided with an ejection nozzle for deliverying the carbonated water into the recipient, the intermediate chamber also containing an ejection nozzle communicating with a source of an aromatic liquid extract, said chamber being provided with at least one movable wall which, by its retraction, gives access to the inside of the enclosure for the positioning and withdrawal of the recipient, this wall being provided with sealing means enabling the pressure within the chamber to be maintained after closure.

According to another variant embodiment, the apparatus com prises a movable distributor comprising a plurality of intermediate chambers, said latter being of identical dimensions, the movable distributor cooperating with a fixed base comprising a pressurised gas inlet, a carbonated liquid inlet, an exhaust pipe connected to atmosphere, a pipe for the liquid to flow by gravity towards the recipient, the chambers provided on the movable distributor being adapted to come, during the movement of said distributor successively in engagement with each of the inlets or outlets disposed on the fixed base, following the cycle: introduction of pressurised gas, introduction of pressurised liquid, decompression, evacuation.

The invention will be more readily understood on reading the description given hereinbelow with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 shows a schematic functional diagram of an apparatus applying the principle of the invention.

FIG. 2 shows a detailed view of the intermediate chamber for dosing and delivering the carbonated water.

FIG. 3 shows a view in elevation of the carbonation device and FIG. 4 shows a view in section of this same device.

FIG. 5 shows a variant embodiment of the intermediate chamber.

FIG. 6 shows a view of this same chamber according to FIG. 5 but at a later stage of operation of the apparatus.

FIG. 7 shows the same chamber as in FIG. 5 at the final stage of dispensing.

FIG. 8 shows a variant of construction.

FIG. 9 shows a perspective exploded view of a dispenser according to another variant with barrel having multiple intermediate chambers.

FIG. 10 shows a perspective exploded view of a further variant comprising a rotary dispenser with a plurality of intermediate chambers.

FIG. 11 gives a view of the schematic functional diagram of the dispenser of FIG. 10.

FIG. 12 shows a section through a linear dispenser having multiple chambers.

FIG. 13 shows a summary view in detail of the members composing the linear dispenser of the preceding Figure.

FIG. 14 is a perspective exploded view, with parts torn away, of a further variant with rotary dispenser having multiple intermediate chambers, mounted in a concentric base.

FIG. 15 is a plan view of the device shown in FIG. I4.

FIG. 16 is a sectional view of the same device along line XVI-XVI of FIG. 15.

With reference to FIGS. 1, 2, 3, and 4, it is seen that the apparatus is composed of an aerator or carbonator, comprising an enclosure 1 is in communication with a source of carbon dioxide, in the form of a compressed gas container 2; the enclosure is also in communication with a water reservoir 3 via a pump 4.

The carbon dioxide container 2 is in communication with the carbonator via pipe 5 whilst pipe 5' guides the pressurised gas into a reserve or bottle 6 containing the extract intended to be mixed, at the final stage, with the carbonated water.

The functioning of the carbonator, of which the enclosure is shown at I in FIG. I, is understood in greater detail in the light of FIGS. 3 and 4.

It is seen that the water arrives through pipe or central inlet 7, whose end tenninates at ejector 8 opening out into a Venturi 9 in communication by conduit I0 with the gaseous phase of the enclosure of the carbona- IOI.

The whole forms a water suction pump and a certain quantity of carbon dioxide brought through conduit is taken and mixed with the water in the lower pipe 11; arriving at the bottom of the pipe 11, the water is returned from the lower chamber 12 through the annularly disposed openings 13, 13' in the form of substantially vertical, upwardly directed jets, which will break on the intermediate disc or plate 14. The whole allows an intimate bubbling and contact of the drops or particles of water within the gaseous phase of CO, under pressure and allows a satisfactory dissolution of the carbon dioxide within the liquid phase.

The dispensing of the carbonated water will be described with reference more particularly to FIGS. 1 and 2 which correspond to a first embodiment of the invention.

In this first embodiment, the carbonater l is associated with an intermediate chamber shown at 15.

The lower part of this chamber is in communication by conduit 16 with the liquid phase of the carbonator; the upper part of the chamber is itself in communication by pipe l7, 17 with the gaseous phase of the carbonator. On conduit 16 is disposed an electro-valve 18. The conduit 17 is itself connected with atmosphere by conduit 19 and the shunt pipe 20.

Upstream of the connection of pipes 17 and 19 there is provided electro-valve 21; on the pipe 19 is provided electro-valve 22. The shunt pipe 20 is itself provided with an internal calibrated diaphragm 23 allowing the passage of gas at a defined and pre-adjusted flow.

The intermediate chamber is itself in communication by the distributor 24 provided with the electrovalve 25 with the individual cup or recipient 26; this latter receives at the same time the aromatic extract contained in bottle 6 by distributor 27 controlled by electro-valve 28.

The functioning of the device is as follows: all the dispensing operations are regulated by a programmer (not shown in the drawings) which remotely controls the operation, i.e. the opening of the electro-valves 18, 21, 22, 25 and 28; it is specified that the electro-valves could be replaced by pneumatically or mechanically controlled valves.

in a first stage, the valve 22 is closed and valve 21, placed in open oposition, introduces into enclosure 15 a carbon dioxide gas pressure corresponding to that prevailing within the carbonator l.

lmmediately afterwards. the electro-valve 21 is closed and at the same time the electro-valve 18 is opened, this bringing the enclosure 15 in communication with the liquid phase of the carbonator; the liquid, i.e. the carbonated water contained in the carbonator, is thus brought into intermediate chamber 15 by the gas pressure, in fact the pressure prevailing within the chamber 15 decreases regularly by leakage of the gas through the diaphragm 23; this drop in pressure in the chamber 15 allows the introduction and filling of this chamber by the liquid phase coming from the carbona tor.

When the chamber 15 is completely filled by the carbonated water, still maintained under a pressure substantially close to the pressure prevailing within the carbonator, or under a slightly lower pressure (in view of the clearance of diaphragm 23), a programmer controls the opening of the electro-valve 22 which thus brings pipe 17 in communication with pipe 19 (electrovalve 21 being closed); the chamber 15 is thus placed in communication, at its upper part, with atmospheric pressure, this causing an expansion of the gaseous phase; the carbonated water is thus taken to atmospheric pressure; however, this operation is effected whilst the liquid is in a stable state and without movement, this limiting the degasification within the liquid medium.

Immediately afterwards, the electro-valve 25 is opened, this causing the carbonated water contained in the chamber 15 to fall and be dispensed in the cup 26; at the same time, the electro-valve 27 is also placed in opened position for a certain period of time, this allowing a pre-dosed quantity of extract to be introduced into the cup; the extract may optionally be introduced slightly before or slightly after the carbonated water has arrived, according to the operational conditions set for ensuring a good mixture of the two elements.

FIGS. 5, 6 and 7 show a variant embodiment of the invention, wherein the operational conditions are slightly different.

In this embodiment, the intermediate chamber is constituted by a base 30 associated with two side walls forming truncated half-shells 31, 31' and surmounted by a cover 32; in this embodiment, the shells 31, 31' will constitute the side walls capable of retracting and are for example mounted to be articulated on the base 30. The chamber thus formed is made to receive a cup 33, for example made of synthetic material of known type applied against the base and sides of the chamber 30, 31, 31 Gaskets 34, 34', 35, 35' ensure the seal of the assembly thus obtained. The inner chamber 36 is in communication by the ejection nozzle 37 with the liquid phase of the carbonator; this nozzle is connected as shown in FIG. 1 with pipe 16.

An ejection nozzle 38 allows the extract that is to complete the carbonated water to be introduced inside chamber 36.

Finally, a pipe 39 opening at the top of chamber 36 allows communication of the upper part of this chamber with the gaseous phase of the carbonator by pipe 40 and with the atmosphere by pipe 41, the connection on one or the other of these pipes being effected by a three-way valve 42.

A body 43 capable of a vertical movement penetrates inside the enclosure 36.

The functioning of the apparatus according to this variant embodiment will be understood in the light of FlGS. 5, 6 and 7.

In a first stage, and as has been described previously, the chamber 36 is placed in communication by pipe 39 and pipe 40 with the gaseous phase of the carbonator, this bringing the enclosure of the chamber 36 under a carbon dioxide gas pressure close to that prevailing within the carbonator; after the pipe 39 has been closed by electro-valve 42, the carbonated water is introduced by simple gravity within the chamber 36 through ejection nozzle 37; the shunt 44 provided with the diaphragm 45 allows the evacuation of a certain quantity of gas and facilitates the filling of the chamber 36 by the carbonated water at 30; the filling of the chamber is pre-dosed by the electrovalve whose opening time is controlled, with a slight excess, so as to ensure in all conditions the correct filling of the chamber, the overflow escaping through shunt 44. Diaphragm 45 thus functions as a gas flow restricting or throttle means regulating the venting of gas from the upper portion of chamber 36.

During this operation, the body 43 is in low position; as soon as the enclosure 36 has been filled with carbonated water, the body is returned upwardly and thus leaves a quantity of volume available within the enclosure 36 by reducing the level of the carbonated water contained at 5 and which is brought to level 46 (FIG. 6).

At the same time, the electro-valve 42 places the pipe 39 in communication with pipe 40, this bringing the gaseous phase of the enclosure 36 in communication with the atmosphere.

After the body 43 has been withdrawn, a pre-dosed quantity of extract is introduced into the cup 33 through the ejector 38 in communication by means of a dosing electro-valve with a container of extract as shown at 6 in Flg. I.

To allow the cup to be at the consumers disposal and to be gripped by him, the base 30 can be provided to be retractable, it lowering whilst the halfshells 31 and 31' retract laterally so as to leave the cup 33 clear, which may thus be taken and which contains a closed quantity for the individual consumption of a sparkling beverage at an optimum degree of saturation and thus of sparkle, the filling level of the cup reaching line 47 higher than the level 46 due to the addition of the extract.

lt will be noted that the device thus produced allows the evacuation, at each dispensing, ofa certain quantity of gas taken at the top of the carbonator, this gas being introduced into the intermediate chamber thus pressurised and evacuated to the outside at the moment of decompression of this chamber; the device thus made enables the residual air which stagnates, by density, at the top of the carbonator, to be constantly evacuated at each dispensing; this air which is only weakly dissolved in the water finishes by accumulating at the top of conventional carbonators which must be regularly purged to eliminate said air. In the device made according to the invention, the air is, on the contrary, eliminated regularly at each dispensing, since the gas which is taken at the top of the carbonator contains with carbon dioxide the fraction of air to be eliminated and which stagnates at the summit by simple density.

In the variant embodiment shown in FIG. 8, the dosing device limiting the quantity of water introduced into the auxiliary chamber 36 is here obtained by suitable positioning of the base of the gas inlet 39 in this way, when the carbonated water rising in the chamber where it is introduced through nozzle 37 reaches the base of the tube 39, it then obturates the base of the tube and the gas remaining in the top of the chamber can no longer escape, it then opposing the later rise of the liquid, the pressure in the top of the chamber balancing the pressure prevailing inside the carbonator.

According to the example of FIG. 9, the device comprises a distributor constituted by a central cylindrical barrel pierced with longitudinal housings or recesses 102, I03, 104, 105, 106 and 107; the barrel is mounted to rotate about a central axis (not shown all the recesses communicate with the atmosphere by means of a capillary channel I08, 108' opening out in the upper part of each recess and communicating with the outside medium.

The barrel or rotor is enclosed between an upper stator or cover 109 and a lower stator or base 110. On the edge of each recess is mounted a gasket 1]], H1 ensuring the seal of each recess fixed between the plate or upper cover 109 and the lower base 110. Each recess constitutes an intermediate chamber.

The upper cover 109 is traversed by conduits opening out at the level of the interface between the cover and the corresponding section of the barrel; the conduit 2 thus communicates with the gaseous phase of the carbonator; the conduit 115 also opens out at the interface between the cover and the corresponding section of the barrel is simply in communication with the atmosphere; it is extended by a groove "5' enabling it to serve several chambers at the same time.

The base 110 is itself traversed by the conduit 3 coming from the liquid phase of the carbonator and ending at the groove 114 through which the liquid may expand at the same time in two chambers of the barrel overhanging said groove; the evacuation conduit 116 terminates at 117 at the ejection nozzle for the liquid in the recipient; as for the case of the liquid inlet con duit 113, the conduit 116 for the evacuation of the liquid opens out at the interface between the base l 10 and the corresponding section of the barrel 101 by a groove 118 enabling it to communicate with two internal chambers at the same time.

The functioning of the device is understood; when the barrel rotates, the recesses or chambers will be successively in communication with each of the mouths of the inlet or outlet conduits.

Repeating the cycle from the beginning, it is seen that a chamber presents itself beneath the conduit I 12 communicating with the gaseous phase of the carbonator, i.e. this chamber is filled with pressurised gas; with the barrel following its continuous rotary movement. this chamber is positioned at the beginning of the groove 114 where the conduit 113 which communicates with the liquid phase of the carbonator opens out; by capillary channels [08, 108', each chamber communicates in its upper part with the atmosphere, the pressure of gas inside said chamber which was substantially equal to that prevailing in the gaseous phase of the carbonator, is thus dropping slightly, but constantly; consequently, the chamber in communication with the conduit l 13 is in slight depression with respect to the gaseous phase of the carbonator; this difference in pressure enables the liquid to be driven from the carbonator into the corresponding chamber which it quickly fills, more especially as this filling may be continued during the whole period corresponding to the progress of the chamber along the groove 114; the chamber being filled to a maximum is then brought beneath the opening of conduit 115 which places the upper part of the chamber in communication with the open air, creating a rapid decompression within said chamber.

Each chamber following its path after decompression is then brought to the groove [18 made in the base H0 and extended by pipe 116 and ejection nozzle "7, the liquid then escapes by gravity and it flows into the glass (not shown) provided under the nozzle 17, whilst the chamber remains in communication by its upper part with the atmosphere by means of the groove I15 which is extended in an arc until the evacuation conduit 116.

Thus an almost instantaneous and continuous delivery of liquid is obtained, locks being, however, arranged between the carbonator and the recipient to be served. which enable the successive phases of filling and decompression to be respected.

Another variant embodiment is shown in F105. l and II; the barrel 120 is hewever here provided with longitudinal chambers 12], I21 along a diametral half of the rotary cylinder; at the same time, the inlet pipe I22 for pressurised gas, pipe I23 for delivering pressurised liquid. pipe I24 for exhaust of gas and finally pipe I25 for evacuation of the liquid, are also disposed along a diametral half of the base or stator; this enables the barrel to be fixed in waiting or inactive position, the chambers I2I, 121' being positioned in the zone of the stator not provided with conduits; the openings of these chambers are provided with gaskets, in the same way as the openings of the conduits, the solid part of the rotary distributor I20 obturates the conduits, particularly the pressurised gas inlet conduit I22 and pressurised liquid conduit 123, so that the machine may remain in waiting position for an extended period, the conduits being suitably obturated.

As soon as the rotor or barrel 120 starts to rotate, further to a starting order, the first of the chambers immediately comes beneath the pressurised gas conduit I22, then on the carbonated liquid conduit, etc. until it overhangs the conduit I25 from where the liquid will leave after decompression by tube I24; the rotor will make a complete revolution, this enabling each chamber to follow the complete cycle of operations; six doses corresponding to six volumes of the chambers will thus be poured into the recipient and these six volumes will correspond to the overall dose to be served; at the end of the cycle, the rotor will be in waiting position again, the solid part of the rotor obturating the inlet and outlet conduits disposed on the stator.

In this variant embodiment there is also provided a capillary channel enabling a depression to be created in each chamber so that it is filled by the pressurised liquid and this channel opens out ot the outside, as shown in FIG. 11.

FIGS. I2 and I3 further show a variant embodiment in which the distributor 130 forms a register mounted to slide in a bore I31; the chambers I32, I33, 134, etc. are, during the linear slide movement of the distributor I30, successively placed opposite the openings or mouths of the pressurised gas inlet conduit I35, pressurised liquid delivery conduit I36, conduit 137 for decompression by communication with the open, air and finally conduit I38 for evacuation of the liquid by gravity, at the end of the sliding movement, when all the chambers have followed the cycle, the distributor 130 must return to allow the starting of another cycle.

The capillary leak is effected by a longitudinal groove I40 extended up to the end of the movable register I30 and consequently opening out to the outside, whilst this longitudinal groove 140 communicates with each of the chambers I32, I33, I34, etc. by a branching constituted of a small transverse rib I41, 14!.

FIGS. 14, I and I6 show a further embodiment in which the rotor I48, internally containing chambers 142, I43, 144, I45, 146 and 147, is inserted into a stator formed of a concentric annular sleeve I49.

The chambers I42, I43, 144, I45, I46 and 147 are disposed inside the cylindrical rotor 148 and they each comprise an upper conduit I50 and lower conduit I51 opening at the periphery of the rotor I48.

On the annular stator I49 are disposed the inlet and outlet conduits as indicated previously.

In the example of FIGS. l4, l5 and 16, the chambers disposed on the rotor on the one hand and the openings of the conduits disposed on the stator on the other hand are each positioned along a diametral half; as described previously, the solid part of the rotor not comprising any openings of conduits I49 and may thus, in rest position, be placed in register with the openings of the inlet or outlet conduits and ensure obturation thereof; the rotation of the rotor unit I48 will successively bring the mouths of conduits I49 and 150 in communication with the mouths of the inlet and outlet conduits disposed on the stator; thus, the conduit I51 has been provided to correspond to the inlet of the pressurised gas; downstream and in lower position, there is found conduit I52 opening into the inner groove 153; downstream again, there is found, in upper position, the groove 154 extended by conduit I55 and enabling the decompression and evacuation of the pressurised gas from the chamber, after this latter has been filled with liquid through conduit 152.

In lower position and at the end of the cycle, is found the groove 156 adapted to serve two chambers at the same time and extended by the conduit 157 for evacuation of the carbonated liquid to the recipient.

Each chamber communicates, moreover, with the atmosphere by its upper part by means of a capillary channel 158.

It is understood that the distributor may have any suitable form enabling its angular or linear displacement for the purpose of successive communication of the different chambers with the inlet and outlet conduits disposed on the stator; the rotary distributor of FIGS. 1, 2 and 6 could thus be formed by a spherical dome.

The invention also relates to a variant embodiment in which the chambers would be fixed and each one being in communication with a pressurised gas inlet conduit, a carbonated water inlet conduit, an upper conduit for decompression by exhasut of the gas and a lower conduit for water evacuation after decompression, each chamber being associated with a movable obturator suitable for placing each chamber successively in communication with the pressurised gas inlet pipe, the carbonated liquid inlet pipe, the decompression pipe, the carbonated water evacuation pipe, each chamber being in addition connected to atmosphere by a calibrated capillary channel causing a slight and regular drop in pressure in the enclosure after pressurisation.

In the examples of FIGS. I to 8, the communication (with diaphragm) of the intennediate chamber with the atmosphere may comprise a valve downstream of the diaphragm; the action of the valve being remotely controlled to allow the chamber to be placed in communication with the atmosphere via the diaphragm, only dwing the period when the chamber is being filled with carbonated water.

What I claim is:

I. Apparatus for dispensing sparkling beverages comprising a carbonator having an enclosure capable of being placed in communication with a source of water and a source of pressurized carbon dioxide, means in said carbonator for causing the carbon dioxide to dissolve in the water by intimate mixing of the two component elements, at least one normally empty dosage size chamber means communicating by first conduit means with the liquid phase of said carbonator, second conduit means connecting the top of said chamber means with the gaseous phase of said carbonator, said first and second conduit means having programmed valves, calibrated gas flow restricting means communicating with both the chamber means and the atmosphere, said restricting means being adapted to maintain in the gaseous phase of said chamber means a slight depression with respect to the pressure prevailing in the gaseous phase of the carbonator so that this difference in pressure enables pressurized water from the carbonator to be rapidly introduced whatever the position of the chamber means with respect to the carbonator.

2. The apparatus according to claim 1, wherein said chamber means has means for receiving the final sparkling beverage, a first ejection nozzle means for delivering the carbonated water into said receiving means, a second ejection nozzle communicating with a source of an aromatic liquid extract, and at least one movable wall whereby retraction of said wall provides access for the positioning and withdrawal of said receiving means, said wall having sealing means so as to enable the pressure within said container means to be maintained after closure.

3. The apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said enclosure cmprises movable distributor means having inlet and outlet means on its base and wherein said chamber means comprise a plurality of intermediate chambers, said chambers being of substantially similar dimensions, said distributor means cooperating with a fixed base comprising a presurized gas inlet means, a carbonated liquid inlet means, an exhaust means connected to the atmosphere, means for receiving the final sparkling beverage, a third conduit means for the flow of liquid by gravity towards said receiving means, said chambers on said distributor means being adapted to come during the movement of said distributor means successively in engagement with each of said inlet means or outlet means on said base.

4. The apparatus according to claim 3, wherein each of said chambers of said distributor means is obturated by the base inside of which said movable distributor moves, the edges of said chambers being flush with the level of said base.

5. The apparatus according to claim 3, wherein each of said chambers communicates by its upper part with the atmosphere by a capillary channel in the body of said distributor means so as to permit a limited exhaust of the pressurized gas to the atmosphere.

6. The apparatus according to claim 3 wherein said base is traversed by second conduit means connected upstream to said first conduit means and connected to said carbonator, said second conduit means opening out inside said distributor means and being spaced out so that the internal chambers of said distributor means are brought during the displacement of the distributor successively in communication with the opening of gas and liquid inlet conduits coming from the carbonator, said base further having in its lower position suitably disposed evacuation conduit means whereby the distributor means durng its movement successively brings each of the chambers having been placed previously in communication with the inlet conduits, in communication with the lower evacuation conduits.

7. The apparatus according to claim 3, wherein said distributor means comprises a prismatic unit of circular section perforated with longitudinal chambers and forming a barrel, said longitudinal chambers being distributed over one half of said prismatic unit along a diametral plane, the opposite half being solid, said barrel being mounted to rotate between an upper cover and a lower base hermetically covering the terminal sections of the barrel, said cover being transversed by a pressurized gas inlet conduit, a pressurized liquid inlet conduit, a conduit for exhaust by communication with open air, said base being traversed by a liquid evacuation conduit, all of said conduits opening to the inside at the level of the interface between said cover and said upper section of the barrel on the one hand and the base and the lower section of the barrel on the other hand, and said conduits being spaced so as not to communicate with a common enclosure or recess and their opening at the level of the recesses being distributed over a diametral half of said cylinder.

8. The apparatus according to claim 3, wherein said distributor means comprises a cylindrical means having perforations with recesses opening on to the outside wall of said cylindrical means by an upper mouth and a lower mouth, said cylindrical means being inserted into a stator having a sleeve concentric to said cylindri' cal means, said stator having inlet and evacuation conduits for the pressurized gas and for the carbonated water, said conduits opening into the inner wall of said stator at the level of the mouth of the lower chambers of a rotor and being adapted to be placed in communication according to the rotation of the rotor, with said mouths of said chambers.

9. The apparatus according to claim 8 wherein said pressurized gas outlet conduit, said pressurized liquid inlet conduit and said conduit for evacuation of the liquid disposed on said stator and opening out at the interface between the stator and the rotor communicate with an arcuate groove disposed on the stator and enable the conduits to serve several chambers at the same time.

10. In an apparatus for ensuring the automatic dispensing of carbonated liquids, a carbonator of the type in which liquid is delivered from said carbonator under pressure to individual receiving means subjected to atmospheric pressure by passage in at least one intermediate enclosure in which the liquid is brought under pressure, subjected to decompression, then evacuated towards said receiving means, said carbonator having a plurality of chambers, said chambers being of substantially similar dimensions, each of said chambers being associated with. a pressurized gas inlet conduit, a carbonated liquid inlet conduit, a conduit means for exhaust to the atmosphere and conduit means for the flow of liquid by gravity towards said receiving means, a movable obturation member associated with said chambers and adapted to place each of said chambers successively in engagement with each of the inlets and outlets during the cycle of introduction of pressurized gas, introduction of pressurized liquid, decompression and evacuation, each of said chambers having at its top a capillary channel of calibrated dimensions so as to ensure a slow and constant evacuation of compressed gas to the atmosphere.

* i i I

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Classifications
U.S. Classification222/129.4, 141/51, 141/102
International ClassificationB67D1/04, B67D3/00, B67D1/00, G01F11/22
Cooperative ClassificationG01F11/22, B67D1/0071, B67D3/0045, B67D1/0057, B67D3/00, B67D1/007, B67D1/04, B67D1/0073
European ClassificationB67D1/00H4H2, B67D1/00H4H6, B67D1/00H4H4, G01F11/22, B67D1/00H4, B67D1/04, B67D3/00L2, B67D3/00