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Publication numberUS3882690 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 13, 1975
Filing dateSep 28, 1973
Priority dateSep 28, 1973
Publication numberUS 3882690 A, US 3882690A, US-A-3882690, US3882690 A, US3882690A
InventorsDuell Richard J, Honnold Jr Fred V
Original AssigneeCarrier Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Heat exchange assembly
US 3882690 A
Abstract
A heat exchange assembly including a heat transfer coil having a relatively cold heat exchange medium supplied thereto. The coil includes tube sheets provided at each end thereof, each of the tube sheets having at least one tab extending outwardly from the surface. A relatively warm medium is passed in heat transfer relation with the cold heat exchange medium, the warm medium being cooled thereby. A condensate collection pan is disposed below and extends substantially coextensive with the lower surface of the heat transfer coil to permit condensate formed on the surface of the coil to drain into the collection pan. Slots are formed at either end of the collection pan for receiving the tabs extending from the tube sheet to secure the collection pan to the heat transfer coil.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 1 Duell et al.

[4 1 May 13, 1975 HEAT EXCHANGE ASSEMBLY [75] Inventors: Richard J. Duell, Syracuse; Fred V.

Honnold, ,lr., North Syracuse, both of N.Y.

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2/1923 Raymond .,52/473 4/1935 Gloekler....

2,175,396 10/1939 Hoffman... 1. 62/290 2,210,725 8/1940 Mac Master 62/290 2,728,204 12/1955 Harbers l 62/288 3,200,464 8/1965 Cousins 24/230 SC 3,251,110 5/1966 Hedu 24/230 SC 3,724,233 4/1973 Pugh et al. .1 62/285 Boorman, Jr. 62/298 Misner 62/291 Primary Examiner-Albert W. Davis, Jr.

Assistant ExaminerSheld0n Richter Attorney, Agent, or FirmJ. Raymond Curtin; Barry E. Deutsch [57] ABSTRACT A heat exchange assembly including a heat transfer coil having a relatively cold heat exchange medium supplied thereto. The coil includes tube sheets provided at each end thereof, each of the tube sheets having at least one tab extending outwardly from the surface. A relatively warm medium is passed in heat transfer relation with the cold heat exchange medium, the warm medium being cooled thereby. A condensate collection pan is disposed below and extends substantially coextensive with the lower surface of the heat transfer coil to permit condensate formed on the surface of the coil to drain into the collection pan. Slots are formed at either end of the collection pan for receiving the tabs extending from the tube sheet to secure the collection pan to the heat transfer coil.

6 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures HEAT EXCHANGE ASSEMBLY BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The instant invention relates to heat exchange assemblies and in particular, to those assemblies including condensate collection pans provided to receive condensate formed on the surface of the heat exchange coil.

Heat exchange assemblies are employed in many applications wherein a relatively cold heat exchange medium is supplied to the coil of the assembly. Typical of such an application is the utilization of the heat exchange assembly as an evaporator of a refrigeration unit employed in an air conditioning system. A relatively warm medium is passed thereover to be cooled by passing in heat transfer relation with the relatively cold medium passing through the coil. As a result of the cooling of the warm medium, very often condensate is produced on the surface of the heat transfer coil.

Condensate draining from the surface of the coil must be collected to avoid pools of water from developing beneath the lower surface of the heat transfer coil. Typically, a condensate collection pan is disposed below and extends coextensive with the lower surface of the heat transfer coil.

It is the general practive to connect the condensate pan to the heat transfer coil via fasteners, such as screws or similar devices. Although fasteners such as screws satisfactorily attach the condensate collection pan to the heat transfer coil, the use of such fasteners increases the cost of producing the heat exchange assembly. By eliminating the use of conventional fasteners, substantial cost reductions may be obtained in manufacturing the heat exchange assembly.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is therefore an object of the invention to provide a heat exchange assembly including a condensate collection pan that may be readily attached to a heat transfer coil without the utilization of conventional fasteners.

It is a further object of this invention to provide means integrally formed with the condensate collection pan for attaching the pan to the heat transfer coil of a heat exchange assembly.

These and other objects of the present invention are obtained by providing a heat exchange assembly including a heat transfer coil. A relatively cold heat exchange fluid is passed through the heat transfer coil. The coil includes at least one tab means extending from each surface defining the ends of the heat transfer coil. A relatively warm medium is passed in heat transfer relation with the relatively cold heat exchange medium passing through the heat transfer coil, the warm medium being cooled, thereby resulting in the formation of condensate on the surface of the heat transfer coil. Means to collect the condensate is disposed below and extends substantially coextensive with the lower surface of the heat transfer coil to permit the condensate to drain into the collection means. The collection means includes means defining a slot at each end thereof, each of the slot defining means receives a tab extending from the heat transfer coil to secure the collection means to the coil.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is a perspective view, partially in phantom, of

a heat exchange assembly including the present inventron;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged, perspective, fragmentary view of a portion of the heat exchange assembly illustrated in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an exploded perspective view of the portion of the heat exchange assembly shown in FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged, perspective, fragmentary view of a further portion of the heat exchange assembly shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is an exploded, fragmentary perspective view of the portion of the heat exchange assembly shown in FIG. 4; and

FIG. 6 is a vertical sectional view, taken along line 6-6 of FIG. 2.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now to the drawing, there is disclosed a heat exchange assembly including the invention herein disclosed. In referring to the various figures of the drawing, like numerals shall refer to like parts.

With particular reference to FIG. 1, heat exchange assembly 10 includes side walls 11 and 13, connected together by a rear wall 12, the walls forming the casing of the unit. Although not shown, it should be understood, that the casing generally includes a front wall or door spaced apart from illustrated rear wall 12. The front wall is preferably removable to permit servicing of the assembly.

A heat exchange coil 15 is disposed within chamber 14 of the casing, the chamber being defined by the front, rear and side walls. The heat exchange coil includes a plurality of plate finned members 16 which extend outwardly from tubes not shown. Each of the tubes terminate in a return bend 17. Return bends 17 are suitably connected to the various tubes so a continuous flow circuit is formed for the heat exchange medium flowing in the tubes. A suitable heat exchange medium, for example a refrigerant such as dichlorodifluoromethane, sold under the trademark Freon-12 passes through the tubes of the heat exchange coil. Tube sheets 18 and 18' are preferably provided at either end of the coil. Tube sheet 18' has tabs 19 and 20 integrally formed therewith and extending therefrom. Tabs 19 and 20 are received in slots formed in embossments 21 of rear wall 12 for securing heat exchange coil 15 within chamber 14.

Side walls 11 and 13 and rear wall 12 define at their bottom an opening 29 serving as an inlet. The walls further define at their top an opening 30 serving as an outlet from the heat exchange assembly. The medium to be cooled, for example air, is routed through opening 29 via a fan or other similar device (not shown) and passes in heat transfer relation with the relatively cold medium flowing through the tubes of the heat exchange coil 15. The relatively cold medium absorbs heat from the relatively warm medium to cool the warm medium to a desired temperature level. After it is cooled, the medium leaves the heat exchange assembly via outlet 30 and is delivered to the area or space requiring the relatively cold medium. It should be understood that the flow of the medium through the heat exchange assembly may be reversed so that outlet 30 functions as an inlet and inlet 29 functions as an outlet. The heat exchange assembly heretofore discussed may be typically employed as an evaporator of arefrigeration unit employed in a residential air conditioning system,

When the heat exchange assembly is employed as an evaporator, the medium to be cooled, is directed over the surface of the tubes having the relatively cold medium flowing therethrough. When the medium is air, its capacity to hold moisture is reduced as its temperature is lowered; accordingly, when the air is cooled, condensate very often is formed on the surface of fins 16.

To prevent the formation of undesirable puddles of water, a condensate pan 22 is provided to collect the condensate draining from the surface of fins 16. Condensate collection pan 22 is disposed below and extends substantially coextensive with the lower surface of heat exchange coil 15.

Referring now to FIG. 2, there is shown an enlarged view of a portion of condensate collection pan 22. Pan 22 includes a suitable opening 31, which may be threaded in the manner shown, for connection to a pipe for draining the condensate collected in the pan. Pan 22 further includes a first portion 21 having a recessed section 32. A movable, upwardly extending finger 24 is disposed in an opening 33 defined in recessed section 32. As is clearly shown in FIG. 6, finger 24 includes cam or inclined surface 34 for a reason to be explained hereinafter.

Referring now to FIG. 4, there is disclosed an enlarged view of the left hand portion of the heat exchange coil shown in FlG. l. The condensate collection pan includes a second portion 26 having a recessed section 27 defining a slot or opening 28.

Referring particularly to FIGS. 3 and 5, there are shown exploded perspective views of the: portions of the condensate pan illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 4 respectively. In particular, tube sheet 18 includesan outwardly extending tab member 23 integrally formed therewith. As shown in FIG. 5, tube sheet l8includes a tab member 27 integrally formed therewith and extending outwardly therefrom.

When it is desired to secure condensatecollection pan 22 to heat exchange coil 15, tab 27 is inserted through slot 28 to secure the left hand portion of the condensate pan to the portion of the heat exchange coil disposedthereabove. Thereafter, tab member 23 of tube sheet 18 is inserted into opening 33 defined by recessed section 32. Tab member 23 rides over cam 34 of finger 24 so that the top surface of the tab member engages the bottom surface of the cam, as is shown in FIGS. 2 and 6. Tab member 23 is thus firmly locked in opening 33 of section 32. The condensate collection pan is firmly secured to the heat exchange coil without requiring the utilization of conventional fasteners such as screws. As is obvious, the elimination of such conventional fasteners will decrease the cost of manufac turing a heat exchange assembly of the type heretofore discussed. When it is desired to remove pan 22 from the coil, finger 24 is slightly depressed to permit tab means 23 to ride over cam 34.

While a preferred embodiment of the present invention has been described and illustrated, the invention should not be limited thereto; but may be otherwise embodied within the scope of the following claims.

We claim: l. A heat exchange assembly comprising; V i

a. heat transfer means having a relatively cold heat exchange fluid passing therethrough, said heat transfer means including at least one tab means ex-" tending from each surface defining the ends ofsaid heat transfer means; i b. means to pass a relatively warmme'dium in heat transfer relation with the relatively cold heat exchange medium passing through said heat transfer means, said warm medium being coole d thereby' said' resulting in the formation of condensateon heat transfer means; and

one of said tab means extending fromsaid "heat transfer means to secure said collection means to said heat transfer means.

2. An assembly in accordance with claim liwherein at least one of said slot defining means includesa movable finger for engaging said tab means receivedin said slot.

3. An assembly in accordance with claim 2 wherein said movable finger includes a cam, the bottom surface of said cam engaging the top surface of said tab means,

4. A heat exchange assembly comprising:

a. heat transfer means including a plurality of tubes having a relatively cold heat exchange fluid passing therethrough, a plurality of fins extendingoutwardly from the surface of said tubes to increase i the heat transfer surface, and a tube sheet provided at each end of said heat transfer means, each of said tube sheets having at least one tab means'extendingoutwardly from the surface thereof;

b. means to pass a relatively warm mediumin heat transfer relation with the relatively cold heat ex-. change medium passing through said heat transfer means. said warm medium being cooled thereby resulting in the formation of condensate on the sur I face of said fins; and I c. means to collect said condensate, said collection means beingdisposed below and extending-substantially coextensive with the bottom surface'of said heat transfer means to permit said condensate to drain into said collection means, said collection means including means defining a slot at each end thereof, said slot defining means receiving said tab means extending from said tube sheet to'secure said collection means to said heat transfer means.

5. An assembly in accordance with claim 1 wherein at least one of said slot defining means includes a mo.vable finger for engaging said tab means received in said slot. 7 .v

6. An asembly in. accordance with claim2 wherein said movable finger includes a cam, the bottom surface of said cam engagingthe top surface of said tab means.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1445354 *Feb 16, 1920Feb 13, 1923Right Mfg CompanyRadiator ventilator
US1997212 *Nov 24, 1933Apr 9, 1935Bernard Gloekler CompanyRefrigerating cabinet
US2175396 *Jun 9, 1938Oct 10, 1939C V Hill & Company IncRefrigerated case
US2210725 *Mar 23, 1939Aug 6, 1940C V Hill & Company IncDrip pan and related construction
US2728204 *Aug 8, 1952Dec 27, 1955Marion A HarbersCoil pan construction
US3200464 *Aug 29, 1963Aug 17, 1965Cousins SydneSeparable fastener
US3251110 *Sep 27, 1963May 17, 1966Watertown Mfg CompanyClasp
US3724233 *Feb 17, 1972Apr 3, 1973Gen Motors CorpMolded plastic base pan for room air conditioner
US3832863 *Sep 10, 1973Sep 3, 1974Gen ElectricIce tunnel mounting
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4129013 *Sep 1, 1977Dec 12, 1978Westinghouse Electric Corp.Air-conditioning unit with multi-position coil
US4132088 *Dec 27, 1976Jan 2, 1979Grosskopf Peter VolkerRefrigerating machine in flat unit construction
US4261418 *Dec 12, 1979Apr 14, 1981Westinghouse Electric Corp.Outdoor coil unit for heat pump
US4410033 *Jul 2, 1981Oct 18, 1983Carrier CorporationCombination coupling retainer and support for a heat exchange unit
US4474232 *Jul 2, 1981Oct 2, 1984Carrier CorporationHeat exchange unit for both vertical and horizontal applications
US5207074 *Apr 3, 1992May 4, 1993Rheem Manufacturing CompanyIndoor air conditioning unit
US6871695 *May 24, 2001Mar 29, 2005Denso CorporationAir conditioner having unit connection structure
US20100011795 *Oct 25, 2007Jan 21, 2010Spot Cooler Systems AsArrangement in connection with cooling element including condensate gutters
WO2008079121A1 *Dec 26, 2006Jul 3, 2008Carrier CorpHeat exchanger with blow-off condensate collecting screen
Classifications
U.S. Classification62/288, 62/298, 165/138, 165/76, 165/111, 62/285
International ClassificationF24F13/22, F24F13/00, F25D21/14
Cooperative ClassificationF24F13/22, F25D21/14
European ClassificationF25D21/14, F24F13/22