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Publication numberUS3882788 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 13, 1975
Filing dateOct 27, 1972
Priority dateOct 29, 1971
Also published asDE2153928A1
Publication numberUS 3882788 A, US 3882788A, US-A-3882788, US3882788 A, US3882788A
InventorsRolf-Dieter Rose, Michael Simon
Original AssigneeRose Rolf Dieter, Michael Simon
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electromagnetically driven high-speed elevated railway car system
US 3882788 A
Abstract
An electromagnetically driven high-speed elevated railway system arrangement wherein the railway car is associated for guiding movement along a guide beam with the system arrangement including linear induction motor assemblies for driving the car and lifting magnet assemblies for spacing the car from the guide beam. The induction motor assemblies and lifting magnet assemblies each include a first part mounted on the guide beam and a second part mounted on the car for cooperation therebetween, the parts being positioned on the respective mounting structures such that the distance between each of the first and second cooperating parts of the motor assemblies and lifting assemblies increases upon failure of the lifting assemblies.
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United States Patent 1191 Simon et al.

1111 3,882,788 1 51 May 13, 1975 [54] ELECTROMAGNETIC/ALLY DRIVEN 707,032 5/l94l Germany H lO4/l48 MS HIGH-SPEED ELEVATED RAILWAY CAR SYSTEM Primary Examiner-M. Henson Wood, Jr. [76} Inventors: Michael Simon, Reginbaldstrasse 4. 41mm"! B Elsenzopf 8 Munichobermenzing; mm Attorney, Agenl, 0r Fmn-Cratg & Antonellt Rose, Kochstrasse ll. 85 Nurnherg. b th fG 0 0 many 57 ABSTRACT [22] Filed: Oct. 27, 1972 I h An electromagnetical y driven igh-speed elevated [2 Appl' 301394 railway system arrangement wherein the railway car is associated for guiding movement along a guide beam [30] Foreign A fi ti priority Data with the system arrangement including linear induc- Oct 29 I97] Germany 519,8 tion motor assemblies for driving the car and lifting l magnet assemblies for spacing the car from the guide 52 us. (:1. 104/148 LM- l04/I48 MS beam The inducio assemb'ies and 51 1m. 01 Bfilb 13/08 magnet assemblies each dude [58] Field of Search |04H48 MS 148 LM 148 55 on the guide beam and a second part mounted on the car for cooperation therebetween, the parts being po- [56] References Cited sitioned on the respective mounting structures such that the distance between each of the first and second UNITED STATES PATENTS cooperating parts of the motor assemblies and lifting M969 Benn" 104/[48 LM assemblies increases upon failure of the lifting assem- 3.638,()93 H1972 Ross 1. l(l4/l48 MS hues FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS I 1,537,842 8/1968 France l04/l48 MS Chums 5 D'awmg FIG 20 H6. 2b

PRIOR ART FIG. lb

PATENTEB MAY 1 31975 PRIOR ART FIG la FIG. 3

ELECTROMAGNETICALLY DRIVEN HIGH-SPEED ELEVATED RAILWAY CAR SYSTEM The present invention relates to an elcctromagnet ically driven high-speed elevated railway car system having a linear induction motor and associated with a guide beam for movement there-along.

In known electromagnetically guided and driven high-speed elevated railway cars, completely separated components are employed on the vehicle and on the guide beam for performing the driving and supporting function. In such railway car systems, the bottom sides of the steel rails of the guide beam attract lifting magnets on the vehicle body upward to produce the hover, and separate linear motors on the vehicle surround the aluminum rails of the guide beam, the aluminum rails being completely separated from the steel rails and being arranged either vertically or horizontally.

The prior-art systems have a number of disadvantages, which result in particular from maintaining the respective clearance between components gliding past one another, thereby forming a narrow gap, while cruising, starting up and switching off, with support of the vehicle being provided by means of mechanical emergency support elements in the event the lifting magnets fail, are not yet functioning or are no longer functioning. The narrow gap, on the one hand, and the necessity of keeping the linear motor free between the vehicle and the guide beam so as not to damage the motor on the other hand, necessitate extremely rapid response ofthe mechanical emergency elements, which either cannot be achieved or can only be achieved a complex structure.

It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide an electromagnetically driven high-speed elevated railway car system arrangement which overcomes the disadvantages of prior art arrangements and which eliminates the possibility of damage to the linear motors if the lifting magnets do not function, even without extremely rapidly responding emergency elements.

In accordance with the present invention, a railway car system arrangement is provided wherein the lifting magnets, linear motors and corresponding aluminum and steel reaction rails be arranged beneath a portion of the guide beam.

With the arrangement of the present invention. in the event of failure of the lifting magnets the gap between vehicle and guide beam increases in such a manner that the linear motors are not subject to damage by the vehicle dropping onto the guide beam, even if the mechanical emergency support elements do not take over support of the vehicle with an extremely short response period. Thus, in other words. the present invention permits a certain shifting movement of the vehicle between non-acting ofthe lifting magnets and response of the mechanical emergency support element. without the linear motors being damaged by such shifting.

These and other objects, features and advantages of the present invention will become more apparent from the following description when taken in connection with the accompanying drawing wherein:

FIGS. Ia and 1b are partial schematic cross sectional illustrations of electromagnetic railway car and guide beam arrangements in accordance with the prior art;

FIGS. 2a and 2b are partial schematic cross sectional illustrations of electromagnetic railway car and guide beam arrangements in accordance with the present invention wherein the railway car is mounted for movement above the guide beam; and

FIG. 3 is a side view partially in cross section of a railway car and guide beam arrangement in accordance with the present invention wherein the car is mounted for movement below the guide beam.

Referring now to the drawing wherein like reference numerals designate like parts throughout the several view. and more particularly to FIGS. la and 1b which show two examples of prior art vehicle and track sys tents of the type which can be provided with separate optimization of the main electromagnetic components, i.e., the driving and supporting systems. As shown in FIG. la, the vehicle is designated by reference numeral 3 and is guided for movement above and along a guide beam 5. The vehicle is driven by linear motors I. 2 formed by driving magnets 2 carried by the vehicle and cooperating with an aluminum reaction rail I mounted on the guide beam. The vehicle also carries lifting mag nets 4 cooperating with a steel reaction rail 6a mounted on a support rail 6 of the guide beam and wherein the necessary lifting force is provided by this arrangement. It can be seen that failure of the lifting magnets 4 result in an emergency situation in which significant problems can occur if emergency supporting components (not shown) do not immediately become effective, As illustrated in FIG. la, the linear motor 1, 2 is horizontally disposed and has almost no vertical path of fall. That is, upon failure of the lifting magnets 4. there is essentially no time in which a mechanical emergency supporting system can be actuated in order to support the vehicle 3 on the guide beam 5 without damaging or destroying the lifting and driving system. The reason for this is that the support rail 6 of the guide beam 5 has an inwardly directed portion and the lifting magnet 4 of the vehicle are drawn upward in cooperation with the steel reaction rail 6a arranged on the bottom part of this inwardly directed portion, while the aluminum reaction rail 1 of the linear motor I, 2 is disposed in the gap of the driving magnets 2 of the linear motor at the top part of the support rail 6. If the lifting magnets 4 fail and if the mechanical emergency supports do not act immediately, the linear motor I, 2 will necessarily be damaged or destroyed before such emergency supports can function.

In the arrangement of FIG. lb, the linear motor 1, 2 is vertically disposed adjacent to the vertical support rail 6. As in the FIG. la arrangement, the steel reaction rail 60 is mounted on an inwardly directed portion of the support rail 6 and the lifting magnets 4 are positioned on the vehicle 3 vertically below the reaction rail. As shown, the reaction rail 1 of aluminum for the linear motor extends vertically upward from the guide beam 5 and is disposed in the vertical gap ofthe driving magnets 2 of the linear motor. Thus, if the lifting magnets 4 fail and the emergency supports do not act immediately thereafter, the driving magnets 2 carried by the vehicle will drop onto the reaction rail I thereby damaging or destroying the linear motor. As shown in FIGS. la and lb, lateral driving magnets 7 are arranged vertically adjacent the faces of the inwardly directed portion of the support rail 6 or a corresponding steel reaction rail located thereat. In these arrangements, the bottom ends of the sides of the vehicle are curved in ward to create space for the linear motors on both sides of the vehicle, which also results in unfavorable condi tions with respect to the emergency support system. On

the other hand. it is desired to have small gaps between the guide beam and the vehicle in order to keep the required supporting engery and driving energy within reasonable limits since the energy requirements increase at a greater rate with an increase in size of the gap.

In accordance with the present invention, the disadvantages of the prior art system arrangements are overcome by the arrangements illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3 of the drawing. As shown in FIG. 2a. the vehicle 3 is arranged for movement above the guide beam 5 and the lateral guiding magnets 7 are arranged on the vehicle opposite a canted bottom portion of the support rail 6 while the lifting magnets 4 and the driving magnets 2 of the linear motor are arranged in line one behind the other opposite the bottom of the inwardly directed portion of the support rail 6. The steel reaction rail 60 for the lifting magnets 4 and the aluminum reaction rail 1 for the linear motors are located one above the other on the support rail of the guide beam. The arrangement of the lifting magnets and the driving magnets on the vehicle 3 as well as the arrangement of the steel reaction rail and aluminum reaction rail on a part of the guide beam in the HO. 2 arrangements are similar to that illustrated in FIG. 3. FIG. 3 illustrates an arrangement wherein the vehicle is positioned for movement below the guide beam rather than moving the guide beam as illustrated in FIG. 2. As shown in FIG. 3, a lifting magnet 4 may be arranged between two driving magnets on the vehicle.

lt can thus be seen that in the arrangement of HO. 2, the failure of the lifting magnets 4 will result in that the distance between the vehicle 3 and the bottom of the guide beam will increase and the distance between the driving magnets 2 of the linear motor and the lifting magnets 4, on the one hand and the reaction rails 1 and 60. on the other hand will increase in such a manner that the driving magnets and the lifting magnets will become free of the guide beam and a correspondingly enlarged period of time will be provided for the emergency supporting system to become operational. As is known in the art. the emergency support system may be formed by support rollers 10 schematically illustrated in FIG. 2a or support skids ll schematically illustrated in FIG. 21).

As illustrated in FlG. 3. the steel reaction rail 60 is mounted on a bottom portion of the guide beam 5, the vehicle being arranged for movement below the guide beam. The aluminum reaction rail 1 for the linear motor is mounted on the steel reaction rail such that the steel reaction rail acts through the aluminum reaction rail for cooperation with the lifting magnets 4. Due to the mounting arrangement of the rails l and 6a. which is similar to that of FIGS. and 2b. the lifting magnets 4 and the driving magnets 2 can be arranged in line one behind the other on the vehicle 3 with the magnets being positioned below the reaction rails. As illustrated. a lifting magnet 4 may be arranged between two driving magnets on the vehicle. it can thus be seen that the structural arrangement of the reaction rails on the guide beam and the cooperating magnets on the vehicle is such that when the lifting magnets 4 fail to function properly. the distance between the vehicle 3 and the bottom of the guide beam will increase and the distance between the magnets and the cooperating reaction rails will increase such that the emergency supports can operate and support the vehicle on the guide beam without fear of damage or destruction to the Iin ear motors or the lifting system.

While we have shown and described several arrangements in accordance with the present invention. it is understood that the same is not limited thereto but is susceptible to numerous changes and modifications as are known to those skilled in the art. and we therefore do not wish to be limited to the details shown and described herein. but intend to cover all such changes and modifications as are encompassed by the scope of the appended claims.

What we claim is:

1. An electromagnetically driven high-speed elevated railway system arrangement having a vehicle arranged for guiding movement along guide beam means, comprising linear induction motor means including first and second cooperating parts and a separate lifting means including first and second cooperating parts for spacing the vehicle from the guide beam means. the first part of each of the motor means and lifting means being mounted on the guide beam means, and the second part of each of the motor means and the lifting means being mounted on the vehicle and being positioned with respect to the respective cooperating first part such that the distance between each of the first and second cooperating parts of the motor means and lifting means increases upon failure of the lifting means. each of the second parts of the motor means and the lifting means being a magnet means, and the magnet means of the motor means and the lifting means being positioned in line one behind the other in the longitudinal direction of the vehicle.

2. A system arrangement as defined in claim 1. wherein each of the second parts are mounted below the respective cooperating first parts such that the vertical distance between each of the first and second cooperating parts increases upon failure of the lifting means.

3. A system arrangement as defined in claim 1, wherein each of the first parts of the motor means and lifting means is a reaction rail means.

4. A system arrangement as defined in claim 3, wherein the reaction rail means of the motor means is an aluminum reaction rail and the reaction rail means of the lifting means is a steel reaction rail.

5. A system arrangement as defined in claim 4, wherein the steel and aluminum reaction rails extend in the longitudinal direction of the guide beam means.

6. A system arrangement as defined in claim 5, wherein the magnet means of the lifting means and the magnet means of the motor means are arranged in line one behind the other.

7. A system arrangement as defined in claim 4, wherein the steel reaction rail is mounted on a bottom surface of a substantially horizontally disposed portion of the guide beam means and the aluminum reaction rail is mounted on the steel reaction rail such that the steel reaction rail acts through the aluminum rail for cooperation with the magnet means of the lifting means.

8. A system arrangement as defined in claim 7. wherein the horizontally disposed portion of the guide beam means is an inwardly directed portion of a support rail of the guide beam means. the vehicle being arranged for movement above the guide beam means.

9. A system arrangement as defined in claim 7, wherein the vehicle is arranged for movement below the guide beam means and the magnet means of the motor means and the lifting means are arranged along an upper portion of the vehicle.

10. A system arrangement as defined in claim I. wherein a plurality of separate lifting means and separate motor means are provided,

11. A system arrangement as defined in claim I. wherein each of the first parts and each of the second parts are separate and individual members 12. A system arrangement as defined in claim ll, wherein each of the first parts of the motor means and the lifting means is a separate reaction rail and each of the magnet means of the motor means and the lifting means is a magnet cooperating with the respective reaction rail.

13. A system arrangement as defined in claim 12, wherein the reaction rail of the motor means is an aim minum reaction rail and the reaction rail of the lifting means is a steel reaction rail.

14. A system arrangement as defined in claim I}, wherein the steel reaction rail is mounted on a bottom surface oi a substantially horizontally disposed portion of the guide heam means and the aluminum reaction rail is mounted on the steel reaction rail such that the steel reaction rail acts through the aluminum rail for cooperation with the magnet of the lifting means,

[5. A system arrangement as defined in claim l4, wherein the steel and aluminum reaction rails extend in the longitudinal direction of the guide heam means 16. A system arrangement as defined in claim l5. wherein the magnet of the lifting means and the magnet of the motor means are arranged in line one behind the other and extend in the longitudinal direction of the ve hicle.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3616762 *Sep 16, 1969Nov 2, 1971Linerail Manutention Par MoteuOverhead conveyor system
US3638093 *Apr 19, 1971Jan 25, 1972Rohr CorpMagnetic suspension and propulsion system
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5481984 *Aug 9, 1994Jan 9, 1996Railway Technical Research InstituteLeg apparatus for the magnetically levitated vehicle
US5778796 *Aug 28, 1997Jul 14, 1998Kim; In KiTransportation system
US5992575 *Mar 24, 1997Nov 30, 1999Kim; In KiPersonal rapid transit braking systems
US6029104 *Nov 7, 1996Feb 22, 2000Kim; In KiPosition recognition apparatus for a personal rapid transit control system
Classifications
U.S. Classification104/286, 104/281, 104/290, 104/294
International ClassificationB60L13/04, B61B13/08, B60L13/10, H02K41/025
Cooperative ClassificationB60L2200/26, H02K41/025, B61B13/08, B60L13/10
European ClassificationB61B13/08, B60L13/10, H02K41/025