Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3883142 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 13, 1975
Filing dateJul 9, 1973
Priority dateJul 9, 1973
Publication numberUS 3883142 A, US 3883142A, US-A-3883142, US3883142 A, US3883142A
InventorsRobert H Spohn
Original AssigneeRobert H Spohn
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Board game apparatus
US 3883142 A
Abstract
A board game apparatus for simulating a tour comprises a playing surface having a plurality of spaces representing places and clusters of places, for example, places of interest to sightseers, that are connected by differently colored or shaded lines representing avenues of travel, for example, travel by walking, and other lines representing transportation systems, and sets of cards to represent the indicated places and dice of different colors corresponding to the said lines to indicate the mode and extent of movement of game pieces permissible along said avenues of travel, there being also simulations of barricades for interrupting travel between places when placed on the playing surface by a player instructed to do so, for example, by one of said cards drawn by chance, thereby to "restructure" the playing surface.
Images(8)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1 51 May 13, 1975 Robert H. Spohn, 7 Brookside Pl. Primary Examiner-Delbert B. Lowe Livingston, NJ. 07039 ABSTRACT July 91 1973 A board game apparatus for simulating a tour com- Appl 77 5 prises a playing surface having a plurality of spaces representmg places and clusters of places. for example, places of interest to sightseers, that are connected 273/134 AC; 35/35 .1; 273/134 B; by differently colored or shaded lines representing av- 273/134 AD; 273/134 C; 273/134 D enues of travel, for example, travel by walking. and ll'lt. A63f 3/04 other lines representing transportation Systems and Fleld 0f 273/134 Sets of cards to represent the indicated places and i of different colors corresponding to the said lines to References cued indicate the mode and extent of movement of game UNITED STATES PATENTS pieces permissible along said avenues of travel, there 12/1969 Giraurd et 273/134 B being also simulations of barricades for interrupting 3/1971 Moore......................1.. 273/134 AD travel between places when placed on the playing sur- FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS face by aplayer mstructed to do so, for example by 15 223 1907 U d K d 273/134 AC one of said cards drawn by chance, thereby to renlte mg om.......... t f 342,691 2 1931 United Kingdomnm... 273 134 AC Structure he p 5 Sm ace 599,206 3/1948 United Kingdommmn. 273/134 AC 12 Claims, 14 Drawlng Figures United States Patent Spohn 1 1 BOARD GAME APPARATUS [76] Inventor:

[22] Filed:

52 U.S.Cl.........

3 H Y a a 1 3 a SHEET 3 EF 8 LE PANTH EON QPAHN 'I'AY CHURCH DEDICATED TO SAINT GEN EVIEVE, PATQO S NT OF PARIS. 1 CONTAIN5 THE TCMBS CF MANY NCTED FQENCHMEAL INCLUDING VCLTAIRE VICTOR H -Q, EMIL-E ZCILA, AND JEAN JACQUES lzcuss Au.

ADMISSION I L 0 D E0 N (LoH- DAY-CHAN) NATIONAL. THEATRE OF FRANCE. WHERE THE CLASSICAL- PLAYS CIE CORNEILLEJ MOLIERE AND RACINE ARE PERFORMED- ADMISSION JARDINS D E LUX EM BOUR G (zI-IAR- DEE/DU LE EKSI-EM-BOORD NO ADMISSION.

HaTEI. DES INVALIDES IMPOSING EDIFICE CONSTRUCTED BY LOUIS xlv AS A HGME FOR. WQUNDED VETERANS.

CHAPEL NQW' CONTAINS CIZYP'I' HOLDING THE RICH RED POIZPI-IYIZY TOMB 0F EMPEROR NAPCLEON BCNAPAQT'E.

ADMISSION L'E C OLE MILITAIRE (LAY -I uI: MEEI- LEE- TER) THE WEST POINT or FRANCE.

NAPOLEON BCINAPARTE REIZEIVED HIS EARLY TRAINING HEkE- NC ADA/\ISSION.

LA TOUR EIFFEL [LA TC OR EF EL) STEEL TOWER 984, FEET HIGH BUILT 1889 FOR AN ExwsITInN. CAPPED BY RADIO AND TELEVISION MAsTs. ELEVATOR (,AQQIEs YOU TO THE TOP F674 A MAQVELOIJS VIEW/CF PARIS AND ENVIRONS- ELEVATOR ARC DE TRIOMPHE FAMOUS ARCH cw THE cHM/ws EL-VSEFS {sun-m5 A- LE-ZAYDI CUMI\\EMCRATING NAPOI-ECN BC APAQT 'S vIcToIzIE5 BENEATi-I T LIES BURIED FRANCE'E UNKNOWN 5C-LDIER OF WGFZL-D \VAIZ I,

LA MADELEINE (LA MAD -u- LEN) CCNST'RUOTION BEGUM BY NAPOLEON AND COMPLETED IN 1842 THIS ELEGANT CHURCH I5 MODELED AFTER A GREEK TEMPli-Z A LANDMARK' OF PARIS IT PLACE DE LA CONCORDE (PI-As DU LA KONKORD) MENSE BEAUTII=UL SQUARE IN THE HEAR OF ARIS, SITE OF THE G ILLOTINE DURING THE REVOLUTION.

OBELJSGUE DE. LOLIQSCR, G-IFT cI= EGYVI') NCM/ STANDS PROVIDES A FAMILIAR IN ITS CENTER. MEETING- PLACE. FOK

T'CURISTS.

NO ADMISSION. NO ADMISSION. NO ADMISSION,

I MUSEE Dr; LQUVRE L OPERA [MEI-z ZAY DU LOOVR) FCIZ'FCMEKQI M PALACE. CHE QF THE GREATEST AkT N'kkfi-E AKIE 0F THEM/CRUZ. HOME u: II-IE1 MCNA LISA AND THE VEN MT [E m:

ADM EsIr-N 3F (L AW PAY RA) (VERA HOUSE FAMOUS FCR ITS MARBLE GRAND STAIROASE AND HAND$CME FCYER.

COST OI: SEAT 50F PATENTED HAY l 3 5 SHEET h E? 8 I SACRE COEUR I (sAK RAY KER) NINETEENTH CENTURY WHITE. BASILICA S'TUA ED HILL. 0F AAONTMARTRE,W|TH mAsNIclceN-I- VIEW oI= ALL PARIS- NEARBY Is THE. PLACE DU TERTRE'. TREE- LINED SQUARE THE SUMMER HAUNT OF ARTISTS n CONTRIBUTION 5F MOULJN ROU 6 ES Moo- EN ROGZH) WcRLD-FAMCUS NIGHTCLUB WHERE DANCEPS F\RST' PERFORMED THE CAN CAN.

FORMER HAUNT' OF THE PAINTER TOULOUSE- LAUYREC.

BILL 50F SAINT CHAPELLE (S SHA- DELI) GOTHIC CHURCH BUILT BY LOUIS IX. TOWERING UPPER CLHAFEJ. FAMOUS FOR ITS INCOMPARABLE. STAXNED GLASS WINDOWS, CONNECTED WITH THE KING'S APARTMENTS, SMALL- LOWER CHAPEL. WAS FOR SERVANTS- ADMISSION 2F PLACE DE LA BASTILLE (PLAS DU LA sAs-TEE'-Y) SITE OF THE FAMous PRISON) SYMBOL OF THE OPPRE'SSION 0; THE PEOPLE BY THEIR RULE-RS. IT'S DESTRUCTION IN 1759 BY THE MOB ToucI-IED OFF THE FRENCH REVOLUTION.

ND ADMISSION LA CONCIERGERIE DIsMAI. PRISON \N WHICH MARIE- ANToINET-TE WAS HELD BEFORE- BEJNG LED TD THE GUILLOTINE. TO BE BEHEADED ADMISSION 2F NOTRE DAME (NDI-ITR DAM MARVELOUS BOO-YEAR OLD CATHEDRALJ SYMBOLIZING THE SACRED SPLENDOR OF THE. MIDDLE. AGES; NOTED FOR. 115 FLYING BUTTRE-SSES AND GARGOYl-ES AND ITs vIvID BLUE. AND ROSS- ,STAlNED qLAss wINDows.

coNTnIauTIoN 5F VERSAI LLES (vAIR- SAI-Y) MAGNIFICENT vALAcE,GARDENs AND ,000 ACRE. PARK BUILT FOR KINq Lows x'hl, ALSO THE HOME. OF LOUIS xv, L ws xvI AND HIS QUEEN MARIE ANTOINETTE.

SETTINQ FOR THE TREATY OF VERSAILLES ENDING WORLD -wAR L.

ADMIssIoN 10F LONG CHAMPS LAwNG sI-IAwMP) RACING CQLLECT WINNINGS ON ARRIVAL! MORE. PRELISIELY COLOMBEY LE5 D ux Eauslzs (COLCMBEY cI= TI-IE Two CHURCHES)- cDuNTRY TOWN B THE, MARNE RIVER W'HEQE CHARLES DE GUI-\ULLEJHERC C'F FRANCE IS BURIED. ABC-UT 30C KMS BY TRAIN FRSM GARE DE L EST ROUND TRIP TICKET i 0F FIVE GAUCHE PATENTEI] HAY I 3I975 SHEET 5 OF 8 Fig 5 55 (I EACH) GO DIRECTLY TO THE- BUREAU DE POSTE (BEERI-OH nu PAM/5|) cos-\- 5 F FOE STAMPS T'IMBRES POSTE GO DIRECTLY TO THE- BANQUE (a AWN K) TO CHANGE TRAVELER/5 CHECKS \m-o FRANCS.($LOO 5;)

DISCOuN'I F TAUX DU CHANqE. (TOP: 00 SHAWNZH) GO DIRECTLY 1-0 THE" PHARMACIE I (FAR-MA-SEE.)

BUY ASPIRIN TAB LET'S- COST 5 F A vous AVEZ MA A LA TETEI vooz A-VAY MALA LA TET) You HAVE A HEADACHEI GO DIRECTLY TO THE BLANCHISSERIE QBL I SHE SREE) 1k PAY 10 F FOR YOUR LAUNDRY.

NGE (LEMZH) GO DIRECTLY TOTHE" GALERIES LAFAYE/TTE (cu-u: REE/ LAH-FAY- ET) SHOP FOR CLOThES AND SOUVENIRS- BILL 200 F GO DIRECTLY To THE- cAFl-f DE LA PAIX I C(AFAY DU LA as) i am mamas (50F)AND PAY m TOTAL.

* POURBQIRE (Paola BWAR) GO DIRECTLY TO THE- I SALON DE BEAUTE (SAL-21:1 DE aoH-TAY) HAVE A HAIRCUT *FOR 10F *couPE DE. cHEvEux Q oop nu SHE-Vu) GO DIRECTLY TO THE MAGAZIN DES PHOTOS QmA-sA-zl f DAY FAWI-TOH) PHOTO SHOP PURCHASE COLOR FILM'*F0R 10 F *FILM EN couLEuR I (FEELM m-m KOO- LEI-1R PATENTEI] MAY 1 3I975 SHEET B 0? 8 GO DIRECTLY *0 THE- PENSION FOR A NI HT-s LODGING LOSE NEXT TURN.

BILL

:zvas AGRIEABLE! (Rev A- GRAY A- BUL) PLEASANT DREAMS LUNCHTIMEE'GO DIRECTLY To A- B I ST R O (BEES TROH) I L ADDHION LADEE5 -YuI-IN) F OMAG z (amass) 3 F FRUIT 5F V\N INE) E a BILL: 15F

LOSE NEXT TURN.

.r aou APPEJH'kBON AP-PAY-TEE)! 600D APPETI TE G0 DIRECTLY To THE- (Doo'-BL-vAY SAY) EMERGENCY! NO ADMISSION CHAWQE.

GO DHQECTLY To THE- HOTEL SCPIBE FOR A NlGHT OF LQDGING LOSE NEXT TURN.

BILL 15OF BouNE NUIT! (sou Nwaa) Goon NIGHT.

g DIRECTLY To LA TOUR IJ'ARGENT QA TOQR DAR -ZHU H N) LosE NEXT TURN BUT ENJOY YouR DINNER cu: EsCARGOTs (ES-CAR- csoI-I), $NA\LS AT THIS PLUSH GOURMET RESTAURANT,

SERVICE COMPRIS'. (sAIR-vEEs KOMD-REE) TIP \NCLUDED- 8 4 (IEACH) BUY A COPYoI= THE- CZHOOR-NAL) COST PAY THE NEWSSTAND (KIosK) DEALER AND LOSE YOUR NEXT TURN.

QUE-LLB NOUVELLE (KIEI. NOO -VEL.L)

WHAT'S NEW PURCHASE Two TICKETS m- L. OPERA (L01 PAYT RAH) THE OPERA COST 100 F THE PROGRAM Is PEILE'AS ET' MELISANDE. I

PE LAY-AH E MEL-EE-SOND) BY CLAUDE DEBUSSY.

LY A SUPPLY or:

CARTES POSTALE (KART Pos TAQ TO SEND O FRIENDS BACK HOME' cosr: 10F

CHER MAURICE: NDUS SOMMES K PARIS! 11 FALT BEAU TEMPS.

A BIENTQT,

JACQUES,

\ 'O U WERE OVERCHARGED ATTHE- HOTE L SCRIBE I ou TEL s KREEB) TAKE BACK FROM THE RACEYRACK BANK (ow. WHATEVER \S THERE IF IT DOES NOT HAVE. Ioo FRANCS.)

PLACE A LONG DISTANCE COMMUNICATION OVER THE METRO STATIC-N DHCINE -k TOLL \N T'OKENS SIIEEI 7 [IF 8 iEJA 54 (I EACH) PURCHASE A TOUROFTHE" E GOUTS DE PARIS PRENEZ GAME. (PREM GARD) BEWARE! THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA INHABITS THESE $EWERS- BILLET GRATLI IT CBEE-YE'G RA qwe) FREE TICKET @Ass) 000 FOR one nouwu- TRIP BETWEEN METRO: PLATFORM AND ORLY VERSAILLES, LONGCHAMPS OR COLCIMBEY,

KEEP OR AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER. RETURN T 0 DETQUR FILE WHEN USED:

@ BUY ATICKET FOR:

A RIDE ON THE. SEINE. IN A- BATEALI MOUCHE CBACTOH moosu) BON vovAcE/ YOU HAVE BOUGHT A" CARNET* (KA-NE) or= SECOND CLASS TICKETS FOR TI-IE. METRO.

COST 8 F BOOK 0: TEN TICKETS AT REDUCED PRICE.

YOU HAVE BOUGHT A- cARNET* (KAP: NE)

or: FIRST CLASSZTICKEI'S FOR THE METRO.

COST F 500K OF T'EN TICKETS A1 REDUCED PRICE.

{55b YOU HAVE JUST TAKEN A TOUR DE LA CITE (man no LA ssanv) FARE. 50F

THE BANKER WILL GIVE YOU C RDS FOR A Y THR ATI'RACTIONS YOU H VE N31 YET VISITED EXCEPTING VERiAILLES AND COLOMBE-Y.

QUATORZE J'IJILLET JULY I4 (BASTILLE DAY) PURCHASE OF FLAGISF ALL PLAYER? GO DIRECTLY To THE. PLACE DE LA BASTILLE FOR CERE-MONIES COMMEMORATING THE ANNIVERSARY OF FRENCH INDEPENDENLE.

VIVE LA FRANCE.

RUPTURE DE 6A2! (RsEd-TEER nu sAHz) GAS BQEAK.

AssIsT THE- GENDARMES BY PLACING A BARRICAOE ACROSS HE. STREET AT A OINT WHERE THE GAS MAIN *cRossEs IT'- *GRANDE CONDUIT DE 6A2 (sew KOHN -DwaEou GAHz.)

FILIPTUBE o'EAu! CR'EEPITEER Dos-I) WATER B REAKI.

ASSISTTHE GENDARMES BY PLACINIG A BARRICADE AcRoSS THE STREET AT A POINT WHERE THE WATER MAIN *cnosses I1.

(GRAHN KQi-ILI owaz DOH) BOARD GAME APPARATUS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to board game apparatus of the type wherein the board has a playing surface having marked paths and spaces indicating the course of movement for game pieces with which are associated sets of cards containing cards related to certain movements of the game pieces which are controlled by dice.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION A primary object of the invention is to provide a board game apparatus for entertaining and educating the players by simulating a tour or trip along a network of courses, particularly on the streets and rapid transit lines, to certain special points of interest, such as public buildings, historical and geographical features, of a large city, and wherein the course of travel is determined in large part by chance through the relation of at least two parts, for example, two dice differing in color and the indicia they bear, or one or two diversified dice and cards, certain of which are chosen randomly according to certain indicia on the dice and give directions relating to the movement of tokens representing players, and some of which also bear language for instructing, rewarding, directing or penalizing the players.

The invention also contemplates such a board game apparatus wherein there are spaces representing certain places and lines representing avenues of pedestrian travel and other lines representing transportation systems, said lines connecting said spaces and constituting optional but continuous routes of play which include stations and stopping points which are distinctively shaded to indicate; the form of transport to be used from one stop to another in accordance with the rules of the game, means to determine the avenues along which and to what extent a game piece may move, one or more sets of cards containing cards for instructing, rewarding or penalizing the players, certain of which cards have titles corresponding to certain titles on said places on the playing surface, and dice carrying indicia to control movement of the game pieces and to initiate the draw of a card by a player by chance from at least one set of cards.

Another feature of the invention is the provision of playing pieces representing barricades to interrupt travel between clusters of places when placed on the playing surface by a player directed to do so, for example, by dice and one of the cards, and thereby restructure" the playing surface by dividing one region of the board from the other regions.

It is another feature that simulations of conveyances are provided upon which a player's game piece may be mounted for travel on the transportation system, according to the game rules.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS For a more complete understanding of the invention, reference should be had to the following description in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. I is a plan view of the preferred design of the board for the selected city a simulated map of Paris. The various areas, spaces and paths thereon are clearly shown:

FIG. 1A is an enlarged plan view of the lower right section of the board that is encompassed by the dot and dash lines on FIG. 1 showing the titles of the stopping points or attractions or services and also showing the reference numerals by which they are indicated in FIG. 1

FIG. 2 is a view in elevation of the tokens or travelers used by the several players to register movement;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a special set of dice whose coloring is used to determine permissible paths of movement in accordance with the coloring or shading of the stops and whose count is used to determine vthe extent of movement allowed along any path, and

also to initiate a chance draw from a special set of Detour Cards;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view 'of four identical barricades that are used singly to block the street at a ruptured utility line crossing, as required by certain cards drawn in the course of the game;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the Metro subway car which, in this embodiment of the game, serves to transport travelers from one region of the board to another, by rapid transit;

FIGS. 6 and 7 represent a set of twenty Attraction Cards, one for each sightseeing attraction depicted on the board and identifiable thereon as squares with titles enclosed. Each card has indicated on it the title of the attraction spelled in the predominating language of the city; the phonetic spelling of the title as an aid to its pronunciation by the players; certain historical and explanatory data relating to the attraction; the admission charge or viewing cost, if any; and a point value;

FIGS. 8, 9, 10 and 10A represent a set of 32 Detour Cards, 18 of which bear directions to transfer a traveler from one location on the board to another, the remaining 14 of which call for certain diversions or digressions from the basic tour of attractions, or for various actions on the part of the traveler that are either favorable or unfavorable to the player controlling the traveler;

FIG. 11 represents one of a set of 30 identical Service Cards which are awarded to players visiting the services, which are shown on the board as circles with titles enclosed. Each Service Card preferably bears a list of all of the services and a point value, and

FIG. 12 is a view of the play or scrip money used in this embodiment of the game in denominations of l, 5, I0, 20, 50 and francs.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT To begin with, an overview of the invention will be given. The general purpose of the game is to familiarize the players with the experience of sightseeing in a strange city with a limited sum of money at ones disposal. Much of the excitement derives from there being only one source from which to replenish ones finances the racetrack and from the competition to tap that source and to block others from tapping it. The general purpose is achieved by requiring a player to visit a collection of attractions and services from among those that appear on this embodiment of the board the simulated map of Paris, France. He is obliged to pay admission to view many of the attractions and to pay charges for many of the services which he is required to purchase in the course of his tour. At the outset of the game each player is provided with a fixed amount of play money or scrip in the currency and its denominations of the country and city visited. The object of the game is to complete the tour by accumulating a specified number of points for visiting the attractions and services and to return then to the airport at the corner of the board where play began, while not having run out of money. The first to accomplish this is the winner.

In this and other embodiments of the game, the players move from one place to another over either walking, riding or combined walkinig/riding paths, along which lie the places visited. The throw of the dice controls the type of path or paths that may be taken and the extent of movement permitted. One of the paths is a rapid transit line in this emobodiment, the Paris subway, or Metro. A player frequently finds it desirable to call on the rapid transit carrier in order to accelerate his movement from one region of the board to another. Movement along the street and the sidewalk is slower because of the higher density of stops which constitute the counting points along these paths. Attraction Cards of various values, containing data of educational interest, are awarded for visiting attractions. Similarly, Service Cards of equal value are awarded for visiting services. Draw of Detour Cards is initiated by the throw of the dice, each die having one face which reads Detour. A Detour Card will either direct a player to transfer his traveler to a service spot, such as a restaurant, or to carry out some other characteristic action of a tourist, such as the purchase of a newspaper or the mailing of a letter. In either case, a detour will sometimes lead to a result unfavorable to the player, such as a large expenditure of money or a delay simulated by a loss of turn, or to a favorable result, such as the refund of a hotel bill overcharge.

As nearly as possible, authenticity is preserved in the titling and orientation of places on the board, in the prevailing fees and charges levied, in the information provided on events, places and customs and in the use of native currency and language. Since tourism is international, other embodiments of the game may include those realized by simple translation of the rules of play and informational material on the cards into the language of any group of players, such as into German for Germans playing the Paris game.

A specific and detailed description of the selected embodiment of the game is set forth in the ensuing discussion; however, my invention is not limited to this embodiment and discussion, as is hereinafter set forth in the claims.

The board as a whole is shown at l in FIG. 1. The generic name of this board apparatus is Sightseeing. However, inasmuch as each embodiment of the game will be given the name of the city visited, and since in the embodimentunder discussion the visited city is Paris, that city name is indicated in the center space of the board at 2. Also, at 3 in the center space is indicated the place where the set of Detour Cards is piled, preferably face down, during play. Any player drawing a Detour Card takes the top card from the pile, follows the directions given thereon, then returns the card face down to the bottom of the pile.

The simulated map of the city which is the basis for the board s design is laid out in such a way that the four sides of the board, which is preferably square, correspond in direction to four points of the compass. In this embodiment these directions are: north at 4 representing that area of Paris north of the Seine River known commonly as the Rive Droite, or right bank; east at 5 representing the island of the Seine River known as Isle de la Cite and the area directly to the east of it; south at 6 representing the area south of the Seine, known commonly as the Rive Gauche, or left bank; and west at 7 representing the areas commonly known as the Champ de Mars, the Place Charles de Gaull (Etoile) and surroundings, and the areas directly to the west of these. These four areas or quarters of the board corresponding to the northern, eastern, southern, and western regions of the city constitute for the purpose of play four sightseeing sectors, these being further defined by being separated, each from the one adjacent, by special paths or rampways at 8 to 11 inclusive which lead from the center area of the board to points of interest outside the city at the four corners of the board at 66, 67, 68 and 69, respectively.

The four sightseeing sectors of the board are traversed by three types of path of avenue of travel. The central or innermost path at 12 effects a full circuit of the board, is preferably neither shaded nor colored, and represents in this embodiment of the game the Paris subway, or Metro. Along it lie eight stations at 13 to 20 inclusive, the four at 13 to 16 inclusive serving the four sightseeing sectors, and the four others at 17 to 20 inclusive serving the four rampways and giving access via them to the points of interest at the four corners of the board. Movement along this path is clockwise and is accomplished by riding a simulated Metro subway car, one design for which is shown in FIG. 5 at 89, which carries the players travelers with it as it moves according to the rules of the game to be described.

Adjacent to the Metro path, connected to it at the Metro stations, but further removed from the center of the board, is a path at 21 which represents the street. Along it and joined in sequence are circles as at 22 and squares as at 23 (equivalent designating symbols may be substituted in other embodiments of the game) which are used for counting during movement over this path, such movement being governed by throw of the dice shown in FIG. 3 at and 81 as hereinafter described. Those circles or stops that do not represent places of service, as well as the segments of the street path connecting all of the circles and stops along it, are half in white and half in color in order to indicate that either riding (as by bus) or walking is permitted along this path. Sections of the street at 24 to 27 inclusive which connect adjacent sightseeing sectors pass over but do not connect with the corner rampways as indicated, and each is intercepted by a utility line at 28 to 31 inclusive for either gas or water, there being two lines of each type.

Adjacent to the street path, connected to it at various points, but still further removed from the center of the board is a path at 32 which represents the sidewalk. Along it and likewise joined in sequence are additional circles as at 33 and squares as at 34 which serve as stops for counting movement along the sidewalk, said movement being governed by the throw of the dice in a manner to be described below. Along this path walking only is allowed, as indicated by the solid coloring or shading of all stops excepting those which represent attractions or services. There are sixteen stops in each sightseeing sector along the sidewalk, or a total of 64 in all four sectors.

In other embodiments of the game the three paths may be interchanged with reference to their proximity to the center of the board and may have fewer or more stops than in this embodiment; the connections between any two paths may overpass or underpass the third; similar variations of the elements of path, stop and their arrangement may occur.

It is to be noted that the count of stations or stops in this embodiment is: for the rapid transit Metro path 8; for the street path 32', for the sidewalk path 64. Thus, for any given count the distance moved along the respective paths will be greatest for the path with the fewest stops, less for the path with the next fewest stops, and least for the path with the largest number of stops, conforming to expectation.

Along the sidewalk and street paths the stops indicated by squares at 35 to 51 inclusive are titled with the names of sightseeing attractions. For each square, one identically titled Attraction Card is supplied (see FIGS. 6 and 7, at 82) for each player who may play the game, up to four. The attractions include a selection of the places most frequently visited by tourists visiting Paris. The stops indicated by circles at 52 to 65 inclusive are titled with the names of places which render or purvey a service. For each of these there is a Detour Card related by title (see FIGS. 8 and 9, at 83). The services include a selection of those which are customarily used or patronized by tourists in Paris. In other embodiments of the game, a choice of attractions and services would be made which was appropriate to the city being simulated. Also, the use of squares and circles identified by printed titles is not meant to imply that other geometric symbols for place designation and titling cannot or will not be used in this and other emodiments of the game.

At the four corners of the board are the airport Orly at 66 where play begins and three special attractions: Versailles at 67, indicated by a fleur-de-lis symbol; Longchamps at 68, the racetrack serving Paris, indicated by a horseshoe symbol; and Colombey at 69, the former home and now the burial place of Charles de Gaulle, indicated by the Cross of Lorraine symbol. Attraction Cards are supplied for the three special attractions, two of which, Versailles and Colombey must be among those visited by a player in order to win the game. The airport and the three special attractions are each accessible from a station on the Metro path four riding stops distant via a rampway: Orly from Place DI- talie at 17 via rampway 8; Versailles from Pont de Sevres at 18 via rampway 9; Longchamps from Pont de Neuilly at 19 via rampway l0; and Colombey from Gare de lEst at 20 via rampway 11.

Two to four players may play the game. One of these is chosen as the Banker, who has the following duties to perform. At the start of the game he distributes to each player a certain fixed amount of game or scrip money; he receives and places into a Racetrack Bank, which may be contained in the box lid of the game, or in any other suitable receptacle, all monies paid by players for admissions, fees, or other charges or penalties levied; he pays out what is currently contained in the Racetrack Bank to any player arriving at Longchamps during the course of the game; and, lastly, he takes charge of the Attraction and Service Cards and delivers the appropriate one of these to any player whose traveler, at the players turn, stops by exact count of either die on an attraction or service square or circle. Being himself a player, the Banker renders the same services mentioned to himself as well as to other players.

Four tokens or travelers indicated in FIG. 2 at to 73 inclusive are provided,.one for each individual who may play. They are in the form of miniature people dressed preferably in the accoutrements of a tourist such as slacks, duffel bags, dark glasses, shoulder cameras, and the like, and are readily identifiable by their distinctive unlike colors.

The game money or scrip provided and indicated in FIG. 12 at 74 to 79 inclusive, is in the denominations of the country in which the city simulated is located. in

.the Paris game, the selected embodiment, these denominations are 1, 5, 10, 20, 50 and francs. Before the commencement of play the Banker gives each player an exact sum, say 500 francs, and no additional money may be given or lent to any player by the Banker or by another player during the game. A player whose supply of money is exhausted is automatically eliminated from the game.

Two dice indicated in FIG. 3 are provided, one white as at 80, one colored as at 81, keyed to the coloring or shading of the avenues of travel and whose six faces, respectively, read 1-2-3-4-5-Detour. A count of one to five thrown on the white die indicates through how many stops the player may advance his traveler along a path on which riding is permitted, i. e., the street or the Metro. When moving with the subway car on the Metro, or on the four corner rampways, the white die only is thrown. When on the Metro a count of one to five obtained indicates through how many stations or platforms the Metro car may move. A count of one to five thrown on the colored die by a player throwing both dice indicates through how many stops he may advance his traveler along a path on which walking is permitted, i. e., the street and the sidewalk. When both dice are thrown and two numerical counts are obtained (i.e., no Detours) they are taken squentially in either order. If Detour is thrown on one of the dice, the numerical count on the other is taken first, after which a card is drawn from the Detour pile and the directions upon it are followed. lf Detour is thrown on both dice, i.e., double Detour, all other players in turn draw Detour Cards and follow the directions thereon, after which the player who threw double Detour takes his next turn. An exception occurs when Detour is thrown by a player whose traveler is enroute from Orly Airport to Place Dltalie, or whose traveler is enroute to the airport after having accumulated the necessary number of visiting points to complete the tour. In either of these cases a Detour obtained on the face of one die only is disregarded. Double Detour thrown enroute from Orly to Place Dltalie is thrown over.

The Attraction Cards, twenty in number, are represented in FIGS. 6 and 7 at 82. There is one for each sightseeing attraction on the board, i.e., four for the attractions on the left bank sector, three for the west sector, six for the right bank sector, four for the east sector, and three for the corner attractions. The title of an Attraction Card corresponds to the title of the corresponding attraction on the board which it represents, both being given in the language predominantly used in the city simulated. As an educational device, the pronunciation of the titles on the cards is given directly below them in phonetics. ln addition, also as an educational device, a short paragraph or two in the players language follows, setting forth a few salient facts, historical, explanatory, or otherwise informative, relating to the attraction. Also, on each card is indicated on its reverse side (see, for example, FIG. 7 at 82a) the name of the sightseeing sector in which the attraction is located. Finally, there is a value in points given on each Attraction Card, said value depending upon the attraction. One Attraction Card set is provided for each individual who may play, up to four. The appropriate Attraction Card is awarded a player by the Banker in any turn in which his traveler lands upon an attraction square by exact count of either die. The player retains the card during the remainder of the game and thus has the opportunity to scan or refer to it from time to time, thereby improving his retention of the information given on it and his proficiency in pronouncing the title. Attraction Cards are given only for the first visit to an attraction.

Whenever a player succeeds in visiting all of the attractions within any sector, those attractions become closed (no cards issued for visiting them) to any player who has not similarly succeeded in visiting all of the attractions in at least one of the four sectors. To close the sectors attractions the player must announce the closing by placing the attraction cards together in a pile face down, thus revealing on the reverse of the top card the name of the closed sector. The attractions are reopened to another player as soon as that player acquires all of the attractions in one of the other sectors.

There are 32 Detour Cards as shown in FIGS. 8, 9, 10 and 10A at 83 and 84. Drawn according to the throw of the dice as described above, they introduce diversions into the tour which are designed to acquaint players with a number of aspects of the culture of the city. The first group of 18 at 83, five of which have duplicates, direct the player to transfer his traveler to one of the 14 service stops on the board, which include stores, restaurants, the post office, the W. C. (public rest room), and other services likely to be patronized or sought by a tourist. Most are located approximately in the areas where they would be likely to be found in Paris. At the time the transfer of a traveler is made, any charge indicated on the Detour Card must be paid to the Banker, who deposits the amount in the Racetrack Bank. The second group of 14 Detour Cards at 84 do not require that the traveler be transferred to a service stop but, instead, involve him in such other actions as a telephone call, the purchase ofa newspaper, etc., said actions generally also carrying a charge that, as in the case of transfer-to-a-service Detour Cards, must be paid to the Banker for deposit in the Racetrack Bank. Two special Detour Cards shown at 84A and 84B direct the player to assist the police to place a barricade across the street at a point where a gas or water main crossing it has ruptured, thus causing partial interruption of travel between the two adjacent sectors, the only remaining travel connection being via the rapid transit or Metro. There are four of these crossing points clearly marked on the board at 28, 29, 30 and 31, and the four miniature identical barricades provided, shown in FIG. 4 at 88, allow for the possibility that the Detour Card pile may be gone through twice in the course of the game, thus turning up the two special Detour Cards twice. As explained earlier, the placement of a barricade has the effect of interrupting travel, except by Metro car, between the sightseeing sectors of the board which adjoin the utility break. It therefore serves to increase the use of the Metro and progressively adds excitement to the game.

As in the case of Attraction Cards, many names and expressions in the Detour Cards are given in the language of the visited city and are accompanied by their phonetic spellings in order to encourage the players to learn their proper pronunciation. The fees, charges, and admissions are equal or close to the actual amounts prevailing in Paris, thus giving the player a sense for what the expenses of a tourist purchasing services in Paris might be.

Whenever a traveler moves by exact count of either die onto a service stop, as opposed to when he is detoured there, it is assumed that he has merely happened by and is not visiting with the intent to make a purchase or use the service. He is therefore awarded a Service Card shown in FIG. 11 at 87 by the Banker for viewing the service but is not required to pay a charge. A supply of 30 of these cards, all identical, is provided, each having a value of one point. One is awarded every time a travelers move terminates on a service stop otherwise than by being detoured there.

It is necessary to call attention to several aspects of the game regarding movement of travelers which havent been mentioned previously. It should be noted that a traveler may be moved in either direction along the street or sidewalk, provided, of course, that the path followed is permissible according to the walking or riding count thrown on the dice. In this respect movement in this game is more free than in a game in which a constant direction is pursued along a continuous non-branching path. An experienced player at each turn selects the direction of movement of his traveler so that its advance terminates exactly with the count of either or both dice on an attraction or service, preferably two. The direction of movement may not be reversed while taking the count obtained in a single throw of the dice. Passing another traveler is permitted and two or more travelers may occupy the same stop or station at the same time.

in some cases, after walking, not enough riding stops will lie ahead to permit the riding count to be taken. In such cases the riding count is forfeited.

Along rampways, only the white die is thrown to obtain a riding count since it is presumed that the distance from the city to the corner locations outside it is too great for walking. Counts exceeding the distance, four counts in this embodiment, cannot be taken, but counts advancing the traveler partway may be used. The terminal points of a rampway must be reached by exact count.

A player may always choose to begin his turn by having his traveler ride the Metro. He may, for example, after having visited all the attractions in one sector, wish to reach those in another. Or he may wish to gain access to the special attractions at the corner of the board, notably the racetrack. To ride the Metro, before throwing the dice he calls out the word Metro to announce his intention. He then positions his traveler on the Metro platform serving the sector or rampway that his traveler occupies. If the traveler is already on a platform, he does not move it. At the same time, any other player may (but need not) re-position his traveler onto the platform serving the sector or rampway that it occupies. The player who called Metro" then throws the white die and advances the Metro car from its currecnt position by the number of stations corresponding to the count obtained. The travelers on every platform passed by the Metro car, including those on the platform at which it started, are carried to the station at which the car arrives. Those not passed (including possibly the traveler of the player who called the Metro) are free to leave their platforms by count of the dice for further sightseeing in their sectors. lf transported, the player now has two choices: 1) He can pass his turn to the player on his left (thus remaining on the Metro to go with the car on its next move) or 2) he may complete his turn by throwing a second time. In the latter case, if the car stopped on a sector platform, he throws both dice to begin sightseeing in the new sector. [f it stopped on a corner platform, he throws only the white die in order to advance along the rampway toward the corner attraction. Lastly, if his traveler was not picked up by the Metro originally, the player loses his turn to the player on his left.

It has been mentioned already that all money paid out by players is deposited in the Ractrack Bank situated, in this embodiment of the game, at Longchamps, and that a player whose traveler arrives there immediately wins whatever stake it holds at that time. A judicious player will usually time his arrival at Longchamps to coincide with a time when the stakes are rich. However, if a player who is almost out of money is bound for Longchamps to replenish his fortunes, he may often be eliminated from the game by a second player who plans his arrival there sooner and takes whatever stake it holds, thus frustrating player number one; The racetrack may be visited as often as a player wishes, but an Attraction Card is received for the first visit only.

Play begins after the Banker has distributed to each player his play money budget, after the Detour Cards have been shuffled and placed face down in the center of the board, and as soon as the first to play has been chosen by a trial throw of the dice, the one throwing highest starting. All travelers are placed at the airport, and the rapid transit car, the Metro in this embodiment, is placed at the city station platform connecting by rampway with the airport, i.e., Place Dltalie in this embodiment. Play proceeds to the left. An exact count on either die or a combined count on both dice equivalent to the number of stops on the rampway must be obtained in order to reach the connecting rapid transit station initially.

With adherence to the rules for movement and detouring, play proceeds until one player has obtained a specified number of points in Attraction and Service Cards, twenty points in this game of Paris being recommended. He then calls out Vive La France, or its equivalent for other embodiments, and guides his traveler to the airport, no longer being subject to taking detours. The first player completing the point requirements and arriving at the airport by exact count and with money still left, however little, wins. Also, if 'all players but one are eliminated, the survivor wins regardless of how many points he has accumulated.

It will be appreciated from the foregoing description that the board game apparatus described simulates very closely the conditions that a traveler visiting a strange city is likely to encounter. It therefore has a very high educational value for those desiring to familiarize themselves with such a city. The length of the game may be an hour and a half to three hours, depending on how many are playing. Early elimination of players who are unsuccessful in recouping their finances at the racetrack will frequently reduce the length of the game.

Although this description has dealt with one illustrative embodiment of the invention in specific terms, it is to be understood that such terms are used in a generic sense and are not meant to limit the scope of the invention set forth in the following claims:

I claim:

1. ln a board game apparatus, a board having a playing surface having on it marked spaces representing places and clusters of places which are to be visited by players during the playing of the game and bear titles and constitute stopping points, said playing surface also having lines that connect said spaces, said lines representing avenues of travel for connecting said spaces, certain lines representing avenues restricted to pedestrian travel, other lines encompassing both pedestrian travel and local transportation and still other lines representing avenues of rapid transit systems, a set of game pieces diversified in color or design representing players for registering movement along said lines, said lines constituting optional but continuous routes of play along which the speed of movement of said game pieces is governed by the density of stopping points marked in said lines, said avenues being differently colored or shaded and keyed to dice which are unlike in color corresponding to the colors or shading of said avenues for determining the permissible avenues along which a game piece may move and which also have indicia indicating the extent of movement of the game pieces, said lines connecting said clusters of spaces in such a manner as to permit travel between them to be interrupted by any player at points along the secondmentioned avenue designated on the playing surface according to randomly indicated directions, there being a plurality of cards bearing indicia indicating such directions and said dice having indicia to direct the drawing of said cards.

2. The game apparatus as defined in claim 1 with the addition of means manually manipulatable on said playing surface for interrupting travel on said lines.

3. The apparatus as defined in claim 1 with the addition of a set of playing pieces simulating barricades to be manually placed on the playing surface according to said directions to interrupt travel.

4. The apparatus as defined in claim 1 with the addition of a playing piece simulating a conveyance or rapid transit carrier for transport 'along a designated avenue of travel.

5. A board game apparatus as defined in claim 1 wherein said randomly indicated directions are provided by one or more spiral sets of card containing cards for the purposes of instructing rewarding or directing or penalizing players, said cards being received for visiting designated places or being drawn by chance, the set of cards received for visiting designated places and certain of those cards drawn by chance each bearing an indication by title corresponding to a title on a specific stopping place on the board, each card also bearing matter describing the stopping place; the remainder of the cards drawn by chance bearing directions which cause players drawing them to gain awards or suffer penalties or to take actions that are favorable or unfavorable for their winning the game; and a special set of dice, one colored and one uncolored corresponding to the colored and uncolored avenues, re spectively, carrying indicia to control movement of said game pieces during the game, and other indicia to inititate the draw by a player of a card by chance from one or more of said sets of cards.

6. A game board apparatus as defined in claim wherein said lines or avenues are respectively fully colored, semi-colored and uncolored to differentiate one from the other, the permissible advance of a game piece along the fully colored avenues being governed solely by the count on only the colored die, and there being indications at certain points along said avenues for cross-over from one avenue to another.

7. In a board game apparatus, a board serving as a playing surface, having on it marked spaces representing in their proper geographical orientation places and clusters of places of public congregation, cultural interest and commerce, which are visited by players during the course of the game, and bear titles and constitute stopping points along avenues of travel and transportation connecting them, said avenues constituting optional but continuous routes of play along which the speed of movement is governed by the density of marked stopping points and stations, the same being colored or semicolored or uncolored respectively, to differentiate one avenue from another with respect to the mode of travel permitted along it; which clusters of places are so connected by said avenues of travel as to permit travel between them to be wholly or partially interrupted, at points designated on the board, by any player directed randomly to do so according to the rules of the game; the whole constituting a simulated map of a city or similar political subdivision; the apparatus also including a simulated conveyance or rapid transit carrier for transport along designated avenues of travel connecting places and cluster of places; also one or more sets of cards containing cards for the purpose of instructing, rewarding, directing, or penalizing players, said cards being received either for visiting designated places, or being drawn by chance; a special set of attraction cards, each card bearing an indication by title that corresponds to a title on a specific place on the board; also a set of pieces representing barricades for the purpose of interrupting travel between clusters of places when placed on the playing surface by a player directed to do do; also a set of game pieces or travelersfor the purpose of registering movement, each of distinctive design, and a special set of dice one colored and one uncolored carrying indicia to control movement of the game pieces during the game, and other indicia to intitiate a draw by a player by chance from one or more of said sets of cards.

8. A board game apparatus including, in combination, a board whose playing surface is the simulated map of a city or similar political subdivision and has marked spaces representing places and clusters of places of interest to sightseers such as public buildings, historical monuments, notable edifices, places of commerce, amusement and service as well as representations of avenues of travel and transport connecting said places, including stopping points along them; a simulated conveyance or rapid transit carrier, such as a subway car; a set of tokens, each of distinctive design or color,- constituting the game playing pieces for the players; special dice differentiated from each other to determine the avenues along which a player may move and the permissible extent of such movement; a set of barricades manually manipulatable on the playing surface, to interrupt travel at designated points where a break in utility lines at the point where they cross avenues of travel requires the placement of such barricades thereby to divide one region of the playing surface from the other regions by blocking access paths; a set of attraction cards, on each of which is given the name of a sightseeing place in the city depicted on the board, the phonetic spelling of its name in order to assist the player in pronouncing the name, descriptive, historical and explanatory data referring to the place, and a point value awarded to the player visiting it; a set of detour cards, all or several of which contain words and phrases in the language predominantly spoken in the city simulated with phonetic spellings, some of which cards bear data relating to places marked on the board which render a service to tourists and direct that a players token be moved thereto, others of which represent diversions from the players sightseeing tours or require actions, favorable or unfavorable, to be taken by the players; and a set of identical service cards bearing a point value which are awarded to players visiting places of service.

9. A board game apparatus as defined in claim 5 wherein each attraction card corresponding to a title of a place has on its reverse side the name of the sightseeing sector in which said place is located.

10. A board game apparatus including, in combination, a board bearing the simulated map of a city of similar political subdivision, having marked spaces representing places and clusters of places of interest to sightseers, with lines representing avenues of travel and transport connecting them; said avenues being distinctively colored or shaded, a set of tokens, each of distinctive design, constituting the playing pieces; a special set of dice of unlike color matching the distinctive coloring or shading of the several avenues on the board in order to designate particular avenues along which a player may move his token, and bearing indicia to indicate the extent of such movement permitted; a set of barricades to interrupt travel among the avenues when placed by a player according to directions; there being means indicating by chance such directions.

11. A board game apparatus including, in combination, a square board, being the simulated map of a city or similar political subdivision, having marked spaces representing places of interest along representations of interconnected paths or avenues of travel joining them, there being one such avenue designated by color or shading, respectively, for walking (the sidewalk), for walking or riding (the street), and another avenue for rapid transit by means of a simulated public conveyance; said places including four corner areas one of which represents a racetrack at which are collected all admission charges, fees, penalties and other charges levied on players, and from which payments are to be made to players arriving there, another of which represents an airport at which play begins and ends, the other two representing special attractions outside the city; said apparatus also including cards describing sightseeing attractions to be visited and noting a point value accorded for such visitation and also containing instructions for payment of charges, fees and penalties; a single playing piece for each player to be moved in accordance with the rules of the game; means for determining by chance the permissible paths and extent of travel of players pieces along said paths or avenues.

12. In a board game apparatus, a board having a playing surface having on it marked spaces bearing titles representing in their proper geographic orientation places and clusters of places of public congregation, cultural interest and commerce which are to be visited by players during the playing of the game and constitute stopping points or stations, said playing surface also having lines representing avenues of pedestrian travel and lines representing transportation systems that connect said spaces, a set of game pieces diversifled in color or design representing the players for registering movement along said lines, said lines constituting optional but continuous routes of play along which the speed of movement of said game pieces is governed by the density of stopping points and stations marked in said lines which are differentiated one from the other by shading or coloring according to the form of transport permissible along them, as stated in the Rules of Play, one or more sets of cards containing cards for the purpose of instructing, rewarding, directing or penalizing players, said cards being received either for visiting designated places, or being drawn by chance; a special set of cards, each card bearing an indication by title corresponding to a title on a specific place on the board and also bearing indicia of point value which are used during the playing of the game for determining a players progress, and a special set of dice of unlike color corresponding, respectively, to the shading or coloring of said routes of play, and carrying indicia to control movement of the game pieces during the game and other indicia to inititate the draw by a player of a card by chance from at least one of said sets of cards.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3481605 *Mar 15, 1967Dec 2, 1969Marvin Glass & AssociatesRacing game with chance positionable removable hurdles
US3572718 *Dec 4, 1967Mar 30, 1971Robert L MooreBoard game apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4084816 *Jun 21, 1976Apr 18, 1978Shafer Deborah LWord game
US4411432 *Aug 10, 1981Oct 25, 1983Stevens Richard LTravel game
US4534567 *Feb 3, 1983Aug 13, 1985Marvin Glass & AssociatesBoard game with chance device playing piece
US4961582 *Sep 15, 1989Oct 9, 1990Lysel Stephen P VanGeographical travel game
US5007651 *Dec 12, 1988Apr 16, 1991Mason Jr Stanley IKit for board games
US5183258 *Nov 19, 1991Feb 2, 1993Lerke Charles JMap reading game apparatus
US5257939 *Oct 13, 1992Nov 2, 1993Robinson Don TCultural knowledge board game
US5813671 *Jul 25, 1997Sep 29, 1998Barratt; Patricia G.Game apparatus and method of play
US6808172Nov 1, 2002Oct 26, 2004Mattel, Inc.Board game
US6932342Nov 1, 2002Aug 23, 2005Mattel, Inc.Board game
US7121549Feb 13, 2004Oct 17, 2006Levine Howard NWorld geography and culture based game and method
US20090197227 *Nov 12, 2008Aug 6, 2009Mccall DannyRelationship performance system and method
WO2001014024A1 *Aug 17, 2000Mar 1, 2001Myrna CulbreathPhonics board game
WO2002064226A1 *Feb 7, 2002Aug 22, 2002Toubkin Walter MiltonGame
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/251
International ClassificationA63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00006, A63F3/00088
European ClassificationA63F3/00A12