Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3883301 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 13, 1975
Filing dateJun 21, 1973
Priority dateJun 21, 1973
Publication numberUS 3883301 A, US 3883301A, US-A-3883301, US3883301 A, US3883301A
InventorsJoseph H Christian, Donald G Emrick, Robert M Hines
Original AssigneeU S Floor Systems Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of cleaning textile fabrics
US 3883301 A
Abstract
Textile fabrics such as carpet, upholstery and the like are cleaned by a method which includes spraying a solution of hot water and detergent from a predetermined distance, at a predetermined pressure and at a predetermined flow rate against the fabric to be cleaned while simultaneously withdrawing the solution and soil from an adjacent portion of the fabric. Specific relationships for the various parameters defining this invention are stated hereinafter.
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

[ May 13, 1975 3,663,984 5/1972 Anthony et 3,711,891 1/1973 Conway.............n.i,, 3,747,155 7/1973 Koellisch l l METHOD OF CLEANING TEXTILE FABRICS Inventors:

[75] Donald G. Emrick, Fort Lauderdale;

Joseph H. Christian; Robert M.

Primary ExaminerBilly J. Wilhite both of Ralelgh of Assistant Examiner-{l K. Moore U.S. Floor Systems, Inc., Raleigh,

Attorney, Agent, or FirmParrott, Bell, Seltzer, Park & Gibson [73} Assignee:

221 Filed: June 21, 1973 Appl. NOJ 372,201

ABSTRACT Textile fabrics such as carpet, upholstery and the like predetermined flow rate against the fabric to be 2M 2 3 9 /7 Ill. 1 L48 2 2 m E 5 0 0 H 5 7 H 0 8 U2 H3 H5 mmh c uur Ha r e S I hf ca .M e nal UIF film 555 [ll cleaned while simultaneously withdrawing the solution and soil from an adjacent portion of the fabric. Spe- Reierences Cited cific relationships for the various parameters defining UNITED STATES PATENTS this invention are stated hereinafter.

3 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures 3,614,797 Jones 15/321 X METHOD OF CLEANING TEXTILE FABRICS In place cleaning of a textile fabric such as carpet. upholstery and the like which has the capability of withdrawing soil from the fabric has long been recognized as a desirable method of cleaning. Heretofore. attempts at commercial realization of such processes have resulted in the development of apparatus which spray or otherwise discharge vapor or liquid solutions against fabrics to be cleaned and subsequently subject the fabric to be cleaned to a vacuum. While such apparatus and processes have achieved some success as being more desirable than prior practices. certain deficiences in such processes as heretofore proposed have been noted.

In particular, subjection of textile fabrics such as carpet. upholstery and the like to moisture in the form of vapor or liquid solutions is known to have adverse effects on such fabrics under certain circumstances. For example, processes which permit vapor or liquid solutions to remain in contact with the textile fabric for excessive periods of time may bleach the fabrics or otherwise disturb the coloration characteristics of the fabric. Permitting vapor or liquid solution to remain on the textile fabric for an excessive period of time will have the result of carrying soil into the underlying ground warp or pad of a carpet. Further, if the vapor or liquid solution applied to the fabric is permitted to dry, removal of the soil by means of extraction of the solution is rendered impossible.

The converse difficulties encountered in the event that an insufficiently long period of time is permitted lie in failure to adequately clean the textile fabric. Such failure results from allowing insufficient time for the vapor or solution to loosen soil and prepare the soil for vacuum removal.

Having in mind the difficulties encountered heretofore, it is an object of this invention to accomplish the cleaning of textile fabric such as carpet. upholstery and the like. in accordance with a method which balances the desired accomplishment of soil removal against the time required for cleaning in such a manner as to maximize soil removal while minimizing the time required. In accomplishing this object of the present invention, a solution of hot water and detergent is sprayed in a predetermined zone and against fabric to be cleaned under particularly designated conditions. At the same time. air is drawn through the fabric under predeter mined conditions and in predetermined spaced relation to the location of spraying. With the fabric and the zones of spraying and withdrawal being displaced one relative to the other, areas of the fabric are subjected in closely following sequence to spraying and withdrawal of solution and soil. Due to the particular relationships established between these steps of the process, soil removal is maximized while time required for cleaning is minimized.

Some of the objects of the invention having been stated, other objects will appear as the description proceeds, when taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an apparatus for the practice of the method of this invention;

FIG. 2 is an elevation view from a side of a portion of the apparatus of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an elevation view from one end of a portion of the apparatus of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged elevation view of a spraying and vacuum head for the apparatus of FIG. I;

FIG. 5 is an elevation view from the side of the head of FIG. 4. illustrating certain relationships important in the practice of the method of this invention;

FIG. 6 is a view from below of the head of FIGS. 4 and 5;

FIG. 7 is an enlarged elevation view. in section, through a spray nozzle incorporated in the head of FIGS. 4-6, taken along the line 7-7 in FIG. 5; and

FIG. 8 is an enlarged view similar to FIG. 6 showing an individual spray nozzle incorporated into the head of FIGS. 4-6.

While the present invention will be disclosed hereinafter by particular reference to the accompanying drawings, it is to be understood at the outset that the following description and the accompanying drawings are presented solely for purposes of illustrating the we ferred embodiment of this invention. It is contemplated that the method of this invention may be practiced by apparatus other than that illustrated and described, and for that reason, the disclosure of this application is to be taken broadly rather than restrictively.

In practicing the method of this invention, a solution is prepared of hot water and a suitable detergent. This solution is preferably prepared by pouring hot water into a tank or reservoir 10 contained within and forming a part of a mobile apparatus generally indicated at 11 (FIGS. 1-3). Subsequent to preparation of the solution of hot water and detergent. such solution is pumped from the tank or reservoir 10 by means of a pump contained within the apparatus (and indicated in phantom lines in FIGS. 2 and 3). The pumped solution of hot water and detergent is delivered through a suitable conduit 12 to a spray manifold 14 which forms a portion of a cleaning head generally indicated at 15 (and shown in greater detail in FIGS. 4-6).

In accordance with important features of this invention, the pump within the apparatus II has the capability of delivering pumped solution at a pressure in the range from about 22 to about 30 pounds per square inch and at a flow rate in the range of from about threefourths to about 1% gallons per minute. As will be pointed out more fully hereinafter, these parameters or conditions are among those which are critical to achieving the particularly favorable results of this invention.

As is best illustrated in the enlarged detail views of the head 15 (FIGS. 4-8). the spray manifold 14 extends widthwise of the head for a predetermined distance and has a plurality ofspray nozzles 16 mounted thereon. In an operating embodiment of this invention. the spray nozzles are No. 8004 as manufactured by Spraying Systems, Inc. of Wheaton. Illinois. The plurality of such nozzles 16 mounted on the manifold 14 are arranged to spray in an overlapping pattern of a predetermined width and are mounted so as to be spaced from the surface of the textile fabric to be cleaned (indicated by the line F in FIG. 5) at a distance in the range of from about 1% to about 2% inches (the distance A in FIG. 5). This spatial relationship, together with the parame ters or conditions of pressure and flow rate, assures impingement of sprayed solution of hot water and detergent against fabric to be cleaned in a predetermined zone or area. It has been discovered that impingement under the conditions herein described as critical maximizes the cleaning effect which results when operation is in accordance with the other characterizing features of this invention and is believed to result. at least in part from a penetration ofthe solution into the textile fabric to be cleaned which is coordinated with the withdrawal of solution and soil as pointed out more fully hereinaf ter.

Simultaneously with the pumping of the solution, a vacuum fan within the apparatus 11 (indicated by phantom lines in FIGS. 2 and 3] draws air through a vacuum conduit 18 and through a vacuum opening 19 provided in the cleaning head 15 (-FlGS. S and 6). Thus, air is drawn through the fabric to be cleaned in a predetermined zone defined by the vacuum opening 19. This zone is spaced from the spraying zone at a distance in a range of from about l% to about 2% inches (the distance in FIG. which is also a critical dimension in accordance with this invention. Preferably, the dimensions of the opening [9 into which air is drawn are such that the opening has a transverse width in the range of from about three-eighths inch to about onefourth inch and an elongate dimension in the range of from about 9 inches to about It) inches. The elongate dimension of the zone through which air is thus drawn preferably is substantially the same as the elongate dimension of the zone into which solution is sprayed.

In accordance with this invention the vacuum fan operatively connected with the conduit 18 and the opening 19 is such as to have a lift. with the opening 19 sealed in the range of from about lit) to about 120 inches of water.

in practicing the method of this invention, the fabric to be cleaned and the zones into which solution is sprayed and from which air is drawn are moved one relative to the other for subjecting areas of the fabric to spraying and withdrawal in closely following sequence. In using the apparatus illustrated in the drawings. such relative movement is accomplished by drawing the cleaning head across carpet toward an operator. through the use of a rigid portion 20 of the vacuum conduit This practice is similar to the operation of conventional commercial vacuum cleaners. As the cleaning head 15 is pulled toward an operator (as toward the left in FIG 1 or the right in FIG, 5), solution delivered through the conduit 12 passes through the spray nozzles l6 and is sprayed against the fabric. In closely following sequence, the solution and soil are withdrawn from the fabric into the vacuum conduit 18. Due to the critical relationships and parameters or conditions described hercinabove. cleaning of the fabric is maximized while adverse effects on the fabric are minimized.

In the drawings and specification, there has been set forth a preferred embodiment of the invention. and al though specific terms are employed. they are used in a generic and descriptive sense only and not for purposes of limitation.

That which is claimed is:

l. A method of cleaning textile fabric such as carpet, upholstery and the like wherein cleaning of the fabric is maximized while adverse effects on the fabric are minimized due to operation within optimal parameters, the method comprising the steps of:

spraying a solution of hot water and detergent in a predetermined zone and against fabric to be cleaned from a distance of about 2 inches and at a pressure of about 26 pounds per square inch and at a flow rate of about one gallon per minute. while drawing air through the fabric in a predetermined zone spaced from the spraying zone at a distance of about 2 inches and withdrawing the solution and soil from the fabric into a vacuum conduit having a sealed orifice lift of about US inches of water.

2. A method of cleaning textile fabric such as carpet. upholstery and the like wherein cleaning of the fabric is maximized while adverse effects on the fabric are minimized due to operation within optimal parameters. the method comprising the steps of:

preparing a solution of hot water and detergent. then spraying the solution in a predetermined zone and against fabric to be cleaned from a distance in the range of from about l% to about 2% inches and at a pressure in the range of from about 22 to about 30 pounds per square inch and at a flow rate in the range offrom about three-quarter to about one and one-quarter gallons per minute, while drawing air through the fabric in a predetermined zone spaced from the spraying zone at a distance in the range of from about 1% to about 2% inches and withdrawing the solution and soil from the fabric into a vacuum conduit having a sealed orifice lift in the range of from about one hundred ten to about one hundred twenty inches of water, then displacing the fabric and the zones one relative to the other for subjecting areas of the fabric to spraying and withdrawal in closely following sequence.

3. The method according to claim 1 further comprising the step of moving the zones across the fabric to be cleaned and spraying the fabric in advance of the with drawing zone for subjecting areas of the fabric to spraying and withdrawal in closely following sequence.

* l l l=

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3614797 *Dec 12, 1969Oct 26, 1971Jones Judson OMethod for cleaning and partially drying carpets
US3663984 *Apr 3, 1970May 23, 1972Carpetech CorpPortable vacuum carpet and upholstery cleaning apparatus
US3711891 *Aug 3, 1971Jan 23, 1973J ConwayJet-vibrator-vacuum system and method
US3747155 *Jul 9, 1971Jul 24, 1973G KoellischNozzle construction for portable carpet cleaning machine
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4014067 *Jun 20, 1975Mar 29, 1977Charles Ross BatesCarpet cleaning implement
US4156952 *Oct 4, 1977Jun 5, 1979Chemko Industries, Inc.Carpet soil extractor having a powered brush
US4238869 *Nov 24, 1978Dec 16, 1980Fernand LachanceLiquid aspirator
US4275478 *Oct 1, 1979Jun 30, 1981Kohlenberger Raymond WExtractor head for cleaning soft surfaces such as carpet or upholstry
US4558823 *Mar 2, 1984Dec 17, 1985Regina CorporationSpotting control and trigger assembly
US4559665 *Mar 2, 1984Dec 24, 1985Regina CorporationIndicator nozzle for cleaning devices
US4570856 *Mar 2, 1984Feb 18, 1986Regina CorporationLiquid and detergent mixing chamber and valves
US4575007 *Mar 2, 1984Mar 11, 1986Regina CorporationMixing control for water and cleaning fluid
US4712740 *Mar 17, 1986Dec 15, 1987The Regina Co., Inc.Venturi spray nozzle for a cleaning device
US5503594 *Jan 25, 1995Apr 2, 1996Kentmaster Mfg. Co., Inc.Carccass cleaning system
US5607349 *Apr 3, 1995Mar 4, 1997Kentmaster Mfg. Co., Inc.Carcass cleaning system
US5613272 *Dec 19, 1995Mar 25, 1997Bissell Inc.Accessory crevice tool for use with water extraction cleaning machine
US5632670 *Oct 26, 1995May 27, 1997Jarvis Products CorporationVacuum steam wand for sanitizing a carcass
US5655255 *Jul 6, 1995Aug 12, 1997Bissell Inc.Water extractor and nozzle therefor
US5815869 *Mar 17, 1997Oct 6, 1998Venturi Technology Enterprises, Inc.Apparatus and method for cleaning carpets and fabrics
US5907879 *Dec 5, 1996Jun 1, 1999Downey; MikeHigh flow steam carpet cleaner
US6125499 *Mar 24, 1999Oct 3, 2000Downey; MikeHigh flow steam carpet cleaner
US6206980Jul 1, 1998Mar 27, 2001Kaivac, Inc.Multi-functional cleaning machine
US6276015 *Sep 10, 1999Aug 21, 2001Pure Rinse Systems, Inc.Method of cleaning a soiled surface
US6311353Jan 24, 2000Nov 6, 2001Brian H. PhillipsonSubmerged surface pool cleaning device
US6751822Nov 2, 2001Jun 22, 2004Pavelssebor Family TrustSubmerged surface pool cleaning device
US6898820Jul 23, 2001May 31, 2005Bissell Homecare, Inc.Extraction cleaning with heating
US6905553 *Mar 22, 2004Jun 14, 2005Harris Research, Inc.Device for removing residues from surfaces and a method for accomplishing the same
US7028925May 5, 2004Apr 18, 2006Castle Rock Industries, Inc.Spray gun for use with an all surface cleaning apparatus
US7406739Oct 18, 2005Aug 5, 2008Karcher Floor Care, IncGrout tool for use with an all surface cleaning apparatus
US7533435Feb 15, 2005May 19, 2009Karcher North America, Inc.Floor treatment apparatus
US7717354 *Aug 2, 2005May 18, 2010Kaivac, Inc.Cleaning system including operator-wearable components
US7862623Jun 8, 2000Jan 4, 2011Bissell Homecare, Inc.Extraction cleaning with oxidizing agent
US8245345Oct 5, 2007Aug 21, 2012Karcher North America, Inc.Floor treatment apparatus
US8302240Jul 29, 2009Nov 6, 2012Karcher North America, Inc.Selectively adjustable steering mechanism for use on a floor cleaning machine
US8438685Jul 20, 2012May 14, 2013Karcher North America, Inc.Floor treatment apparatus
US8485203May 9, 2010Jul 16, 2013Edward Michael KubasiewiczSurface cleaning with concurrently usable prespray and rinse units
US8528142May 6, 2013Sep 10, 2013Karcher North America, Inc.Floor treatment apparatus
US8713749 *Jul 18, 2011May 6, 2014Koblenz Electrica S.A. de C.V.Extractor tool for a wet/dry vacuum
US8887340Dec 18, 2013Nov 18, 2014Kärcher North America, Inc.Floor cleaning apparatus
US8978190Jun 28, 2011Mar 17, 2015Karcher North America, Inc.Removable pad for interconnection to a high-speed driver system
US9015887Aug 10, 2013Apr 28, 2015Kärcher North America, Inc.Floor treatment apparatus
US9192276Oct 1, 2014Nov 24, 2015Karcher North America, Inc.Floor cleaning apparatus
US20010039684 *Jul 23, 2001Nov 15, 2001Kasper Gary A.Extraction cleaning with heating
US20040182420 *Mar 22, 2004Sep 23, 2004Rodeback Shawn T.Device for removing residues from surfaces and a method for accomplishing the same
US20040226578 *Dec 15, 2003Nov 18, 2004Michael GuestPriming pump for multi-functional cleaning machine
US20040226584 *May 14, 2003Nov 18, 2004Michael GuestMultifunctional surface cleaning machine and method of using the same
US20040256483 *May 5, 2004Dec 23, 2004Castle Rock Industries, Inc.Spray gun for use with an all surface cleaning apparatus
US20050060833 *Sep 2, 2004Mar 24, 2005Castle Rock Industries, Inc.Cleaning wand with multiple cleaning heads for use with an all surface cleaning apparatus
US20050081898 *Oct 15, 2003Apr 21, 2005Steve WilliamsAll purpose cleaning machine
US20050132527 *Feb 15, 2005Jun 23, 2005Roger PedlarApparatus for floor cleaning and treatment
US20050251954 *Jul 19, 2005Nov 17, 2005Michael GuestMobile blower assembly for use with a multi-functional cleaning machine
US20060037171 *Oct 18, 2005Feb 23, 2006Michael GuestGrout tool for use with an all surface cleaning apparatus
US20060064844 *Oct 17, 2005Mar 30, 2006Venard Daniel CFloating deck for use with a floor cleaning apparatus
US20060124770 *Feb 9, 2006Jun 15, 2006Castle Rock Industries, Inc.Spray nozzle and mixing block
US20060156498 *Feb 9, 2006Jul 20, 2006Castle Rock Industries, Inc.Floor cleaning and treatment apparatus
US20110023248 *Feb 3, 2011Karcher North America, Inc.Selectively Adjustable Steering Mechanism for Use on a Floor Cleaning Machine
US20130019430 *Jan 24, 2013Koblenz Electrica S.A. de C.V.Extractor tool for a wet/dry vacuum
USD654234Dec 8, 2010Feb 14, 2012Karcher North America, Inc.Vacuum bag
USD693529Sep 10, 2012Nov 12, 2013Karcher North America, Inc.Floor cleaning device
WO1997015196A1 *Feb 13, 1996May 1, 1997Jarvis ProductsVacuum steam wand for sanitizing a carcass
Classifications
U.S. Classification8/158, 15/322, 15/321
International ClassificationA47L11/34
Cooperative ClassificationA47L11/34, A47L11/4083, A47L11/4044, A47L11/4088
European ClassificationA47L11/40N6, A47L11/40F6, A47L11/40N2, A47L11/34