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Publication numberUS3883356 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 13, 1975
Filing dateApr 9, 1973
Priority dateApr 11, 1972
Also published asCA977503A, CA977503A1, DE2317741A1
Publication numberUS 3883356 A, US 3883356A, US-A-3883356, US3883356 A, US3883356A
InventorsHofer Kurt, Syrovatka Rudolf
Original AssigneeLever Brothers Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rinse-wax formulation
US 3883356 A
Abstract
Rinse-wax formulation suitable for incorporation into rinse waters during the laundering of cars and automobiles, comprising a cationic surfactant, a mineral oil, a non-alkalimetal soap and water, wherein the mineral oil constitutes a mixture of paraffinic and aromatic/naphtenic material.
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United States Patent [191 Syrovatka et al.

[ 51 May 13, 1975 1 RINSE-WAX FORMULATION [75] Inventors: Rudolf Syrovatka; Kurt Hofer, both of Vienna, Austria [73] Assignee: Lever Brothers Company, New

York, NY.

[22] Filed: Apr. 9, 1973 [21] Appl. No.: 349,165

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data Apr. 11, 1972 United Kingdom 16591/72 [52] US. Cl. 106/8; 106/11; 106/267 [51] Int. Cl. C08h 9/00; C09d l/14 [58] Field of Search 106/8, 247, 285, 243;

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,765,255 10/1956 Swarbrick 252/312 2,956,971 lO/l960 Lam 106/243 3,222,201 12/1965 Boyle 252/312 3,497,365 2/1970 Atherton 106/8 OTHER PUBLICATIONS The Chemical Dictionary, p. 107, 1961.

Primary Examiner-Theodore Morris Attorney, Agent, or Firm-James J. Farrell, Es'q.; Melvin H. Kurtz, Esq.; Arnold Grant, Esq.

[57] ABSTRACT 5 Claims, No Drawings RINSE-WAX FORMULATION BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates to a rinsing formulation for treating cleaned surfaces. More particularly it relates to a so-called rinse-wax formulation for rinsing previously cleaned cars and automobiles.

Automobiles and the like are generally washed and cleaned with alkaline built detergents or anionic detergents. After application of the detergent the automobile finish is rinsed and dried in the conventional manner, i.e., with a cloth or by means of an air blast. A rinsing formulation is generally added to the last rinsing water to facilitate the rinsing and drying of the cleaned surfaces and provide a deposit of a waterrepellent film on the treated surface.

2. Description of the Prior Art A rinsing formulation comprising an oil-in-water emulsion containing a cationic surfactant, a mineral oil and water is known from US. Pat. No. 3,222,213. In U.S. Pat. No. 3,497,365 the addition of wax and/or silicones is suggested to effect an additional protective film.

A serious drawback of using these additives in rinse formulations is that these additives tend to stick and form a very annoying layer onto the windshield and windows of cars and automobiles, obscuring the drivers view.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is an object of the present invention to provide a rinse-wax formulation with an improved hydrophobing effect, without having the above drawback.

It is another object of this invention to provide a rinse-wax formulation, which provides a stable hydrophobic film-finish onto cars and automobiles, rinsed therewith.

Still another object of this invention is to provide a clear liquid rinse-wax formulation which has satisfactory cold-stability.

Accordingly, the present invention provides an improved rinse-wax formulation, which comprises essentially a cationic surfactant, a metal soap, a mineral oil, and water.

DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION It has been found that an improved rinse-wax formulation suitable for incorporation into rinse-waters during the laundering of cars and automobiles, comprising a cationic surfactant, a mineral oil and water, can be prepared by the addition of low levels of a nonalkalimetal soap of long chain fatty acids in combination with a mixed paraffinic and aromatic/naphthenic mineral oil.

Accordingly the rinse-wax formulation of the present invention comprises a cationic surfactant, a mineral oil constituting a mixture of paraffinic and aromatic/naphthenic material. a non-alkalimetal soap of long chain fatty acids, and water.

The cationic surfactants which can be used in the formulation of the invention are known and generally will be nitrogen-containing compounds which are reaction products of long-chain fatty acids containing from 8 to 22 carbon atoms with alkylene polyamines, alkylol amines or ammonia; the condensation products of a primary fatty amine containing from 8 to 22 carbon atoms with alkylene oxide, such as ethylene oxide or other active epoxides, such as propylene oxide and the like; and the quaternary ammonium salts of fatty amines having at least one alkyl substituent containing from 8 to 22 carbon atoms such as fatty amine acetates, fatty amine chlorides, fatty amine bromides and the like.

Typical illustrative nitrogen-containing compounds which are the reaction products of long-chain fatty acids with alkylene polyamines are l-(2-amino ethyl)- 2-heptadecenyl-2-imidazoline; l-(2-amino ethyl)-2- heptadecadienyl-2-imidazoline, and the like.

Typical reaction products of long-chain fatty acids with alkylol amines are l-(2-hydroxyethyl)-2- heptadecenyl-2-imidazoline; l-(2-hydroxyethyl)-2- heptadecadienyl-Z-imidazoline, and the like.

Typical reaction products of long-chain fatty acids with ammonia are octadecylamide, hexadecylamide, docosylamide, octylamide, and the like.

Typical condensation products of a primary fatty amine with an alkylene oxide or the like are the N,N-di- (monoand polyalkylene-oxyalkylol)- octadecylamines, the N,N-di-(monoand polyalkyleneoxyalkylol)-heptadecylamines, the N,N-di(mono-and polyalkylene-oxyalkylol)-hexadecylamines, the N,N- di-(monoand polyalkylene-oxyalkylol)- tetradecylamines, the N,N-di(monoand polyalkyleneoxyalkylol)-dodecylamines, and the like.

Typical quaternary ammonium salts are the coconut oil quaternary amine acetates, octadecyltrimethylammonium chloride, octadecylbenzyldimethylammonium chloride, hexadecyldimethylethylammonium bromide, dodecyl trimethylammonium chloride, and the like.

The preferred cationic surfactants for the instant for mulations are the quaternary ammonium salts of fatty amines having at least one alkyl substituent containing from 8 to 22 carbon atoms. Particularly preferred are the coconut fatty amine acetates.

By the term metal soap as used herein is meant the non-alkali metal salts of long-chain fatty acids having about 12-22 carbon atoms. It has been established that by the presence of small amounts of metal soap the properties of rinse-wax formulations are greatly improved. Suitable metal soaps for the formulation of the invention are the fatty acid salts of metals of Group IIA, HE and IIIA of the periodic system, such as the Mg-, Ca-, Sr-, Ba-, Zn-, Cdand Al-soaps, of which the stearates are particularly preferred. Metal stearates are for example derived from hardened tallow fatty acids, and technical or pure grade stearic acid, comprising a mixture of predominantly C -C saturated fatty acids.

The mineral oils suitable for the formulation of the invention are the mixed paraffinic and aromatic/naphthenic mineral oils. It is essential that the mineral oil used in the invention contains a certain proportion of aromatic/naphthenic constituents, to get the benefit'of the effect from the metal soap constituent in the formulation. Surprisingly it has been observed that either pure paraffine mineral oil or pure aromatic/naphthenic mineral oil is not suitable for the purpose of the invention, since compositions with or without metal soaps comprising these oils would have substantially equal performance. The combined effect of mixed oils and metal soap is quite surprising. Preferred mineral oils are those having an aromatic/naphthenic content within the range of from about 5-70% by weight, more preferably from 15-50%. In practice the mineral oil employed will have a boiling point of at least 100C, since lower boiling oils would be too volatile.

Preferably the formulation contains a solubilizing nonionic substance. Whereas this latter is not essential to the technical performance of the product, it does promote the solubilization of the mineral oil and other essential ingredients in the aqueous medium, thus making the formulation more manageable and more suitable for use.

The rinse-wax formulation according to the invention therefore comprises an effective amount of cationic surfactant, a non-alkali metal soap derived from long chain fatty acids, a mineral oil constituting a mixture of paraffinic and aromatic/naphthenic material and water. In one preferred embodiment of the invention a substantially clear liquid rinse-wax formulation is provided, containing a solubilizing nonionic substance.

The term solubilizing nonionic substance is used herein to indicate a non-detergent organic nonionic material having solubilizing properties. Specifically contemplated within this definition are the lower ethyloxylated nonionics containing 2-4 ethylene oxide groups per molecule; the glycols and their derivatives, such as ethylene glycol, diethylene glycol, butyldiglycol, and the like; the low-molecular weight monohydroxy alcohols, such as butanol and isobutanol, and mixtures thereof.

In a rinse-wax formulation of the invention, the cationic surfactant may be present in amounts in the range of l20% by weight, the preferred range being from 210% by weight. The metal soap is present in the formulation usually in an amount in the range of 0.0 l2.0% by weight and preferably in an amount from about 0.050.75% by weight. The mineral oil as hereinbefore defined is present usually in an amount of at least 10%. by weight up to about 30% by weight of the formulation. Preferably the formulation of the invention contains aromatic/naphthenic oil material within from 0.5-6.0% by weight, based on the total composition prior to dilution.

The amount of solubilizing nonionics preferably employed in the formulation is about 515% by weight.

Other ingredients may also be added in the formulation, if desirable, such as for example low-foaming nonionic surfactants, perfume, colouring substances, etc.

The rinse-wax formulation according to the invention is applied to the cars in the conventional manner by diluting it with water in a ratio of the order of about 111,000 and spraying it onto the cars after they have been washed and rinsed, or while they are being rinsed.

Surprisingly rinse-wax compositions formulated as herein described according to the invention show remarkably better properties and performance on use as compared with the conventional compositions, particularly with respect to water-breakand hydrophobing effect, and film stability.

Whereas some conventional rinse-wax formulations are relatively sensitive to the hardness of the water used for rinsing, the performance of the formulation of the invention is substantially uneffected when used in either soft or hard water.

A noticeable improvement in cold-stability has also been observed.

A further improvement is that rinse-wax formulations of the invention maintain their effectiveness irrespective of the type of detergents used in the cleaning and washing stage of the vehicle, i.e., not susceptible to anionic detergents.

Typical rinse-wax formulations and their properties are illustrated in the following Examples; which are not to be considered as limitative in any respect.

EXAMPLES I III Formulations I, II and III within the invention compared with Formulations A, B and C as regards hydrophobing effect and stability of the hydrophobic film.

the range of from about 0.5-% by weight, preferably 40 The results are tabulated below:

TABLE Ingredients:

Formulation in by weight "Expressed as number of drops of a rinse wax solution (cone. 2 g/l) from a burette necessary for water break on a lacquered surface being wettcd before with a solution of 0.2 g/l sodium-alkylbenzene sulphonatc.

'Expressed in minutes necessary for re-wetting by spraying water onto a hydrophobizcd surface.

*From technical stearic acid.

The above Table shows that formulations 1, 11 and 111 according to the invention were clearly better than formulations A, B and C which are outside the scope of the present invention.

The above formulations 1 111 can be diluted with water in a ratio of about 1-2 parts of the formulation to about 1,000 parts of water and sprayed on cleaned cars prior to drying.

Similar results were obtained when the coconut fatty amine acetate in the formulation was replaced by:

1. tallow fatty amine-ethoxylates with 5 moles of ethylene oxide;

2. octadecylamide.

What is claimed is:

1. A rinse-wax formulation suitable for incorporation into rinse waters during the laundering of cars or automobiles, comprising an aqueous medium having therein solubilized a cationic surfactant selected from the group consisting of reaction products of long-chain fatty acids containing from 8-22 carbon atoms with alkylene polyamines, alkylolamines or ammonia, the condensation products of primary fatty amines containing from 8-22 carbon atoms with an alkylene oxide, the quaternary ammonium salts of fatty amines having at least one alkyl substituent containing from 8-22 carbon atoms; and mixtures thereof; a mineral oil having an aromatic material content of from about -70% by weight; and a non-alkalimetal salt of long chain fatty acids having from about 12-22 carbon atoms in the chain, selected from the group consisting of magne sium, calcium, strontium, barium, zinc, cadmium, aluminum salts and mixtures thereof; said formulation comprising essentially about l-% by weight of said cationic surfactant, about 10-30% by weight of said mineral oil, about 0.0l-2.0% by weight of said nonalkalimetal soap, and the balance water.

2. A substantially clear liquid rinse-wax formulation suitable for incorporation into rinse waters during the laundering of cars or automobiles, comprising an aqueous medium having therein solubilized a cationic surfactant selected from the group consisting of reaction products of long-chain fatty acids containing from 8-22 carbon atoms with alkylene polyamines, alkylolamines or ammonia, the condensation products of primary fatty amines containing from 8-22 carbon atoms with an alkylene oxide, the quaternary ammonium salts of fatty amines having at least one alkyl substituent containing from 8-22 carbon atoms; and mixtures thereof; said formulation comprising essentially about 1-20% by weight of said cationic surfactant, about 10-30% by weight of said mineral oil, about 0.0l2.0% by weight of said non-alkali metal soap, about 5-15% by weight of a solubilizing nonionic substance, selected from the group consisting of non-detersive lower ethoxylated nonionic compounds having from 2-4 ethylene oxide groups per molecule, glycols and their derivatives selected from the group consisting of ethylene glycol, diethylene glycol and butyldiglycol, butanols and mixtures thereof, and the balance water.

3. A rinse-wax formulation according to claim 1, which contains about 05-10% by weight of aromatic/- naphthenic oil based on the total composition.

4. A rinse-wax formulation according to claim 1, in which the non-alkali metal soap is present in an amount from about 0.05-0.75% by weight of the total formulation. i

5. A rinse-wax formulation according to claim 1, in which the cationic surfactant is a coconut fatty amine acetate.

Patent Citations
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US3222201 *Dec 28, 1962Dec 7, 1965Union Carbide CorpCleaning and coating formulation
US3497365 *Jul 25, 1968Feb 24, 1970Armour Ind Chem CoProtective polish
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5827451 *Mar 17, 1993Oct 27, 1998Witco CorporationMicroemulsion useful as rinse aid
US6339054Dec 15, 1999Jan 15, 2002Ecolab, Inc.Composition and method for road-film removal
US6350725Apr 20, 1999Feb 26, 2002Ecolab, Inc.Composition and method for road-film removal
US6551974Jun 23, 2000Apr 22, 2003Ecolab Inc.Polish compositions for gloss enhancement, and method
US6602350Nov 30, 2001Aug 5, 2003Ecolab Inc.Composition and method for road-film removal
US6864220Nov 30, 2001Mar 8, 2005Ecolab Inc.Composition and method for road-film removal
US7223722Mar 14, 2003May 29, 2007Ecolab Inc.Polish compositions for gloss enhancement, and method
US7482315Mar 7, 2005Jan 27, 2009Ecolab Inc.Composition and method for road-film removal
US7494547 *Oct 31, 2003Feb 24, 2009Car Wash Partners, Inc.Automatic vehicle wash and wax system
US7699897Sep 14, 2007Apr 20, 2010L'orealMethod of coloring hair
US7951245May 31, 2011Ecolab Usa Inc.Composition and method for road-film removal
US8475778Oct 6, 2006Jul 2, 2013L'orealAqueous polyamine-containing anti-frizz composition for hair
US8658140Sep 14, 2007Feb 25, 2014L'orealCompositions and methods for treating keratinous substrates
US20050199272 *Mar 7, 2005Sep 15, 2005Ecolab Inc.Composition and method for road-film removal
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US20080085253 *Oct 6, 2006Apr 10, 2008L'orealAqueous polyamine-containing anti-frizz composition for hair
US20090071493 *Sep 14, 2007Mar 19, 2009L'orealCompositions and methods for conditioning hair
US20090074683 *Sep 14, 2007Mar 19, 2009L'orealCompositions and methods for treating keratinous substrates
US20090188533 *Jan 26, 2009Jul 30, 2009Ecolab Inc.Composition and method for road-film removal
WO2000063331A1 *Mar 9, 2000Oct 26, 2000Ecolab Inc.Composition and method for road-film removal
WO2004065505A1 *Dec 23, 2003Aug 5, 2004Vahid GhodoussiWater based protectant containing a reaction product of two ionic surfactants
Classifications
U.S. Classification106/8, 106/267, 106/11
International ClassificationC11D9/00, C11D3/18, C11D3/43, C11D1/38
Cooperative ClassificationC11D3/43, C11D3/18, C11D1/38, C11D9/002
European ClassificationC11D1/38, C11D3/43, C11D3/18, C11D9/00B