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Publication numberUS3883964 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 20, 1975
Filing dateJul 5, 1974
Priority dateJul 5, 1974
Also published asCA1014729A1, DE2511605A1
Publication numberUS 3883964 A, US 3883964A, US-A-3883964, US3883964 A, US3883964A
InventorsDonald R Check
Original AssigneeOlin Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ski boot with adjustable instep plate
US 3883964 A
Abstract
A ski boot having a one-piece portion which covers the forward portion of a wearer's foot. A plate is mounted inside of the boot so as to overlie the instep portion of the wearer's foot and threaded adjustment members extend through the one-piece portion of the boot to engage the plate so that the plate can be moved toward and away from the wearer's instep to vary tightness of fit of the boot.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Check SKI BOOT WITH ADJUSTABLE INSTEP PLATE [75] Inventor: Donald R. Check, Glastonbury,

Conn.

[73] Assignee: Olin Corporation, New Haven,

Conn.

[22] Filed: July 5, 1974 21 Appl. No.: 486,267

[52] U.S. Cl. 36/25 AL [5 1] Int. Cl A43b 00/00 [58] Field of Search 36/2.5 R, 2.5 AL

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS Check 36/2.5 AL

[111 3,883,964 [4 1 May 20, 1975 3,820,256 6/1974 Schoch 36/2.5 AL

Primary Examiner-Patrick D. Lawson Attorney, Agent, or Firm-D. R. Motsko; W. W. Jones [57] ABSTRACT A ski boot having a one-piece portion which covers the forward portion of a wearers foot. A plate is mounted inside of the boot so as to overlie the instep portion of the wearers foot and threaded adjustment members extend through the one-piece portion of the boot to engage the plate so that the plate can be moved toward and away from the wearers instep to vary tightness of fit of the boot.

6 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures SKI BOOT WITH ADJUSTABLE llNSTEP PLATE This invention relates to a ski boot having an internal adjustment for varying the tightness with which the boot fits the wearers foot. The tightness adjustment is accessible from the outside of the boot so that the boot need not be opened or removed from the ski or foot to be adjusted.

A very important factor to be considered in connection with ski boots is the tightness or lack thereof with which they fit the skiers foot. There are many provisions made in the ski boot art for establishing a preliminary fit for the wearer. Among these are internal pads which can be removed or added. injection of resinous foam material into a boot while worn, which upon curing provides a form fitting flexible fit, boot size per se, and strap and buckle combinations or laces. After the initial fitting of the boot is accomplished it is still fur ther desirable to provide for varying the tightness of the fit. The boot should be relatively tight on the foot during skiing so as to enable the skier to properly control the skis, but should be capable of being loosened while not skiing, as for example, while on a lift or the like, so as to enable full blood circulation in the skiers foot. Even while skiing, there should be some provision for varying tightness in accordance with the type of skiing being done, as, for example, slalom, down hill, recreational, and the like.

There are a variety of different types of ski boots presently available for the skier, but this variety can be generally classified into two types according to how they are put on, namely, top entry boots, and rear or side entry boots. Top entry boots are provided with a top opening which receives the skiers leg and which extends forward through the instep portion of the boot so as to be capable of being temporarily enlarged enough to enable the wearer to insert his foot through the opening and into the boot. The opening extension is then closed about the skiers foot with laces, buckles, zippers or combinations of the above. The tightness of this type of boot can be varied while skiing by simple tightening or loosening the laces, buckles, or the like, as desired. This variation of tightness of fit usually does not permit an infinite variety of settings. Due to the nature of strap buckles the skier will often feel that one setting is too loose and the next possible setting is too tight.

With rear or side entry boots, the shell of the boot is usually formed with two or more components that are pivotally connected together. One of the components is designed to cover the forward portion of the foot, as for example the instep of the foot and that component is usually formed as a single unitary piece which is not split over the instep as are top entry boots. There is usually one other component which, as noted above, is pivoted to the first component for movement from a closed position to an open position. The other component overlies the heel or side of the skiers foot when in its closed position, and when in its open position is offset from the first boot portion sufficiently to permit the wearer to slide his foot forward or sideways into the first instep part of the boot. When worn, the two or more boot parts are usually held in their closed positions by buckled straps which encircle an ankle and lower leg part of the boot. Due to the unitary nature of the instep portion of the outer shell of a rear or side entry boot, the boot cannot be tightened down onto the wearers foot by straps or laces on the shell instep. Thus 2 tightening is accomplished by internal pads, injected foam, internal straps, or the like, which cannot be varied without removing the wearer's foot from the boot or at least opening the boot. Tightness adjustment of this type of boot can involve guesswork and much inconvenience to the skier.

The ski boot of this invention includes an outer shell and an inner instep plate mounted within the outer shell. Adjustment controls are connected to the instep plate and are accessible to the skier on the outside of the shell without removing or unstrapping any part of the boot. The adjustment controls are manipulated by the skier to move the instep toward or away from the instep portion of the foot to respectively tighten or loosen the fit of the boot. The adjustment controls are preferably in the form of one or more threaded pins, however, they could also take the form of cams, wedges or other suitable mechanisms capable of shifting the position of the inner instep plate toward or away from the foot.

It is, therefore, an object of this invention to provide a ski boot having an adjustment for varying the tightness of fit of the boot on a wearers foot.

It is another object of this invention to provide a ski boot of the character described wherein the tightness adjustment can be accomplished from the outside of the boot without unstrapping the boot or removing the wearers foot therefrom.

It is an additional object of this invention to provide a ski boot of the character described wherein the boot includes an outer shell having a unitary instep portion and an internal instep overlying member which can be moved toward or away from the instep of the wearers foot.

It is yet another object of this invention to provide a ski boot of the character described wherein a substantially infinite number of tightness fittings can be obtained.

These and other objects and advantages of this invention will become more readily apparent to those skilled in the art from the following detailed description of one embodiment of the invention taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a side elevated view of an embodiment of a ski boot made in accordance with this invention, which ski boot is of the rear entry type;

FIG. 2 is a front elevated view of the boot of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 3 is a fragmented vertical sectional view of the boot of FIG. 1 showing the internal instep plate and adjustments therefor.

Referring now to the drawings, there is shown a ski boot of the rear entry variety. The boot includes a relatively flexible outer shell having a forward part 2 which is formed from a single unitary piece of material and which overlies the instep and front portion of the wearers foot and leg. For convenience, this part of the boot will be referred to as the instep portion of the boot shell, or the shell instep part. The shell instep part 2 is fixedly secured to a sole part 4 and also carries a broad cuff 6 secured thereto by means of a rivet 8. The boot also includes a rear shell part 10 which overlies the heel and rear part of the foot and lower leg of the wearer. For convenience the rear part 10 of the shell can be referred to as the shell heel. The shell heel 10 is pivotally connected to the shell instep 2 and sole 4 by means of a pair of pins 12 (only one of which is shown) on oppo- '3 site sides of the boot. The permit entry of the skiers foot into the boot, the shell heel is pivoted rearwardly about the pins 12 to the position 10' (shown in phantom) and then returned to its original position to hold the foot within the boot. There are provided a pair of cable loops 14 which are secured to extensions (not shown) of the cuffS by means of mounts l6 and which are releasably engaged by conventional buckles 18 mounted on the shell instep part 2 to provide a releasable connection between the shell instep 2 and shell heel 10.

There is also provided an inner boot member or liner denoted generally by the numeral 20 which is formed from soft resilient material which is disposed inside of the shell and which actually receives the skiers foot. This liner is split by a vertically extending parting line 22 so as to form a front liner part 24 and a rear liner part 26 which are pivotable with respect to each other by reason of the resilient nature of the material from which the liner 20 is made. Thus the rear liner part 26 will pivot back with the shell heel part 10 to permit entry of the skiers foot into the boot. Mounted on the upper surface of the instep part 2 of the shell are a pair of adjustment members 28.

Referring now to FIG. 3 there are shown details of the tightness adjustment mechanism of the boot of this invention. The adjustment members 28 include an enlarged head part 30 which is outside of the shell and which is preferably large enough to be easily manipulated by a skier even with gloves on. A threaded shank 32 is secured to the head 30 for rotation therewith. The shank 32 is threaded through an internally threaded grommet 34 which is embedded in the instep part 2 of the shell. The shank 32 extends into the interior of the shell and is rotatably connected to an internal plate member 36 which overlies the instep part of the boot liner 20. The shank 32 can be connected to the plate 36 by means of a ball and socket joint 38 or the like which permits rotation of the shank 32 to be converted to upward or downward movement of the plate 36 without imparting rotational movement to the plate 36. The plate 36 is preferably contoured to the shape of the instep of the foot F and is formed from a relatively rigid material. The plate 36 may be provided with some padding if desired, however.

Operation of the boot is as follows. Once the skiers foot is inserted into the boot and the boot is closed, the adjustment members 28 are manipulated to move the plate 36 against or away from the skiers instep, as desired. By reason of the threaded connection between the boot shell and adjustment members, a substantially infinite number of tightness settings can be provided for the plate 36 within a limited range. Readjustment of tightness is simple and can be accomplished without opening the boot, taking the boot off of the skis, or

even removing gloves. The skier can easily and quickly establish'a tight fitting for skiing and a loose fitting for lift riding or the like, and can vary the fitting for different types of skiing.

Since many changes and variations of the disclosed embodiment of the invention may be made without departing from the inventive concept, it is not intended to limit the invention otherwise than as required by the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A boot comprising an outer shell of relatively flexible material, said outer shell having an instep portion being formed as an unitary member; a plate member disposed within said boot inwardly of said instep portion, said plate member being positioned to overlie the instep of a foot disposed in said boot; and adjustment means extending through said instep portion of said boot shell, said adjustment means engaging said plate and being operative to move said plate toward and away from the instep ofa foot disposed in said boot to vary the tightness of fit of said boot on the foot, and said adjustment means being manipulatable from the exterior of said boot to permit tightness adjustment without removing the foot from said boot.

2. The boot of claim 1 wherein said adjustment means includes at least one threaded member extending through a threaded opening in said instep portion of said shell.

3. The boot of claim 1, wherein said heel portion of said shell is pivotally connected to said instep portion of said shell and said boot is a rear-entry variety.

4. The boot of claim 1, wherein said plate member is shaped to conform generally to the shape of the instep portion of a human foot.

5. The boot of claim 1, wherein said plate member is formed from relatively rigid material.

6. A boot comprising an outer shell having at least two parts pivotally connected together to permit entry of a foot into said boot, one of said parts being a one piece instep member made of relatively flexible material and adapted to receive the instep of the foot; a plate mounted within said instep member, said plate being movable with respect to said instep member toward and away from the instep of a foot disposed in said boot; at least one threaded opening formed in said instep member of said shell; threaded adjustment means mounted in said threaded opening and accessible from the exterior of said shell for manipulation, said adjustment means engaging said plate and being operable when rotated in said threaded opening to move said plate toward and away from the instep of the foot disposed in said boot to vary the tightness with which the boot fits on the foot.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3,883,964 Dated May 20, 1975 Inventor(s) Donald R. Check It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

In Column 3, first line please delete "The" and insert In Column 3, line 7, please delete "5" and insert 6-;

In Column 4, Claim 3, line 31, please insert after "is" and before "a" the word --of-.

Signed and Sealed this eleventh Of November 1975 [SEAL] A ties r:

RUTH C. MASON (.MA-RSHALL DANN H N ('mnmissimwr uj'lare'ms um/ 'lrudwnurkx

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3599351 *Feb 4, 1970Aug 17, 1971Sports TechnologySki boot with rigid outer shell
US3820256 *Jun 11, 1973Jun 28, 1974Weinmann AgPlastic latch for ski boot
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4064642 *Dec 23, 1976Dec 27, 1977The United States Of America As Represented By The National Aeronautics And Space AdministrationWalking boot assembly
US4193215 *Jul 10, 1978Mar 18, 1980Koflach Sportgerate Gesellschaft M.B.H.Fastener for instep portion of ski shoe
US4205467 *Mar 7, 1977Jun 3, 1980Etablissements Francois Salomon Et FilsSki boot
US4338735 *Jun 15, 1981Jul 13, 1982Spademan Richard GeorgeDynamic internal fitting system for a sport shoe
US4494324 *Jun 20, 1979Jan 22, 1985Spademan Richard GeorgeDynamic internal fitting system with a movable foot bed for a sport shoe
US4510703 *Dec 17, 1982Apr 16, 1985Harrison EiteljorgSki boot
US4557061 *Oct 19, 1982Dec 10, 1985Salomon S.A.Alpine ski boot
US4580357 *Aug 2, 1984Apr 8, 1986Hans MartinSkiing boot
US4581831 *Dec 6, 1983Apr 15, 1986Bernhard KirschSki-boot
US4590691 *Jan 22, 1985May 27, 1986Icaro Olivieri & C. S.P.A.Device for pressing the tongue of a ski boot on to the instep of the wearer of the boot
US4638578 *Apr 16, 1985Jan 27, 1987Eiteljorg Ii HarrisonSki boot
US4747221 *Jun 2, 1986May 31, 1988Hayes Jaye BSki boot and sport shoe assembly
US5001851 *Mar 13, 1989Mar 26, 1991Nordica S.P.A.Foot securing device for a footwear, particularly for ski boots
US5253436 *Dec 14, 1990Oct 19, 1993Lange International S.A.Ski boot with foot wedging means
US5265350 *Feb 3, 1992Nov 30, 1993Macpod Enterprises Ltd.Sports footwear and support system
US5394628 *Mar 20, 1992Mar 7, 1995Salomon S.A.Alpine ski boot with an energy flap journalled on the shell base
US5459949 *Nov 29, 1993Oct 24, 1995Macpod Enterprises Ltd.Fit and support system for the foot
US6178665Jun 12, 1997Jan 30, 2001Macpod Enterprises Ltd.Fit and support system for the foot
US6438872Nov 12, 1999Aug 27, 2002Harry Miller Co., Inc.Expandable shoe and shoe assemblies
US6574888Sep 10, 2001Jun 10, 2003Harry Miller Company, Inc.Expandable shoe and shoe assemblies
US6807754Aug 26, 2002Oct 26, 2004Inchworm, Inc.Expandable shoe and shoe assemblies
US6817116Jul 9, 2002Nov 16, 2004Inchworm, Inc.Expandable shoe and shoe assemblies
US6883254May 16, 2003Apr 26, 2005Inchworm, Inc.Expandable shoe and shoe assemblies
US7080468May 14, 2004Jul 25, 2006Inchworm, Inc.Expandable shoe and shoe assemblies
US7287294Oct 22, 2004Oct 30, 2007Harry Miller Co., Inc.Method of making an expandable shoe
US7581337Jun 24, 2004Sep 1, 2009Inchworm, Inc.Expandable shoe having screw drive assemblies
DE2709694A1 *Mar 5, 1977Sep 15, 1977Salomon & Fils FSkistiefel mit einem system zum halten des vorderfusses, insbesondere mit hilfe von baendern
DE3236259A1 *Sep 30, 1982Apr 28, 1983Salomon & Fils FSkistiefel
EP0169831A1 *Jul 11, 1985Jan 29, 1986Sportschuhfabrik Dachstein International Anton LintnerSki boot
WO1980002789A1 *Jun 12, 1980Dec 24, 1980R SpademanA dynamic internal fitting system with a movable foot bed for a sport shoe
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/117.7
International ClassificationA43B5/04
Cooperative ClassificationA43B5/0445, A43B5/048
European ClassificationA43B5/04E34, A43B5/04E12M1
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jul 1, 1991ASAssignment
Owner name: SITCA ACQUISITIONS, INC., A CORPORATION OF WA
Free format text: TO CORRECT U.S. PROPERTIES IN A PREVIOUSLY RECORDED ASSIGNMENT, RECORDED ON 10-23-89, AT REEL 5165,FRAMES 990-992. ASSIGNOR HEREBY CONFIRMS THE ASSIGNMENT, NUNC PRO TUNC OF 8-31-89.;ASSIGNOR:TRISTAR SPORT, INC., A CORPORATION OF DE;REEL/FRAME:005755/0211
Effective date: 19910614
Oct 23, 1989ASAssignment
Owner name: SITCA ACQUISITIONS INC., (SITCA), 19215-99TH AVE.
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:TRISTAR SPORTS INC.;REEL/FRAME:005165/0990
Effective date: 19890831
Oct 23, 1989AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: SITCA ACQUISITIONS INC., (SITCA), 19215-99TH AVE.,
Owner name: TRISTAR SPORTS INC.
Effective date: 19890831