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Publication numberUS3884129 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 20, 1975
Filing dateApr 10, 1973
Priority dateApr 10, 1973
Also published asCA981297A1, DE2328376A1, DE2328376B2
Publication numberUS 3884129 A, US 3884129A, US-A-3884129, US3884129 A, US3884129A
InventorsThomas J Monahan
Original AssigneeSchjeldahl Co G T
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Intermittent web drive mechanism employing unidirectional clutches
US 3884129 A
Abstract
Means for intermittently advancing a web of flexible film comprising drive means for imparting repeating cycles of intermittent motion and dwell to a web of flexible film with the web motion normally being in only the forward direction. The drive means includes an output shaft having first and second input driver means coupled to the output shaft, with the driver means being arranged in phased relationship, one to another, so as to achieve motion in the output shaft for more than 180 DEG of motion in the input shaft. The driver means are arranged in overlapped phased relationship, one to another, so as to achieve motion from each driver means for less than 180 DEG of motion in the input shaft. Coupling means including first and second unidirectional clutch means such as a one way or overriding clutch are provided for intermittently inter-coupling the first driver means to the input and output shafts for initiating rotation of the output shaft, and for continuing the rotation for a predetermined motion segment of less than one-half cycle of rotation of the input shaft or until the rate of speed of the second driver means overtakes the rate of the first driver, at which point decoupling of the first driver means occurs, along with substantially simultaneous inter-coupling occurring between the second driver means and the input and output shafts for the continued rotation of the output shaft for a second pre-determined motion segment of less than one-half cycle of rotation of the input shaft, at which point, de-coupling the second driver means occurs.
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United tates ?atent [1 1 Monahan [4 1 May 20, 1975 1 INTERMITTENT WEB DRIVE MECHANISM EMPLOYING UNIDIRECTIONAL CLUTCl-IES [75] Inventor: Thomas J. Monahan, Swansea,

Mass.

[73] Assignee: G. T. Schjeldahl Company,

Northfield, Minn.

22 Filed: Apr. 10, 1973 21 Appl, No.: 349,778

[52] US. Cl 93/8 R; 74/121; 74/125.5; 156/515; 226/156; 93/33 H [51] Int. Cl ..B31b 1/10 [58] Field of Search...74/125.5; 120,121; 156/515; 93/DIG. 1, 33 H, 8 R; 226/156, 226/157; 83/401, 436

Primary Examiner-Roy Lake Assistant Examiner.lames F. Coan [57] ABSTRACT Means for intermittently advancing a web of flexible film comprising drive means for imparting repeating cycles of intermittent motion and dwell to a web of flexible film with the web motion normally being in only the forward direction. The drive means includes an output shaft having first and second input driver means coupled to the output shaft, with the driver means being arranged in phased relationship, one to another, so as to achieve motion in the output shaft for more than 180 of motion in the input shaft. The driver means are arranged in overlapped phased relationship, one to another, so as to achieve motion from each driver means for less than 180 of motion in the input shaft. Coupling means including first and second unidirectional clutch means such as a one way or overriding clutch are provided for intermittently intercoupling the first driver means to the input and output shafts for initiating rotation of the output shaft, and for continuing the rotation for a predetermined motion segment of less than one-half cycle of rotation of the input shaft or until the rate of speed of the second driver means overtakes the rate of the first driver, at which point decoupling of the first driver means occurs, along with substantially simultaneous intercoupling occurring between the second driver means and the input and output shafts for the continued rotation of the output shaft for a second pre-determined motion segment of less than one-half cycle of rotation of the input shaft, at which point, de-coupling the second driver means occurs.

9 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures SHEET 2 BF 3 PATENTED Z INTERMITTENT WEB DRIVE MECHANISM EMPLOYING UNIDHRECTIONAL CLUTCHES CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION The present invention is an improvement over that invention disclosed and claimed in co-pending application Ser. No. 151,842, filed June 10, 1971, entitled INTERMITTENT DRIVE MECHANISM, now US. Pat. No. 3,776,804 which application constituted a continuation in part of application Ser. NO. 81369, filed Oct. 16, 1970, also entitled INTERMITTENT DRIVE MECHANISM, now abandoned, both applications being assigned to the same assignee as the present invention, and in which I am named as co-inventor.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention The present invention relates generally to apparatus for intermittently advancing a web of flexible film, and more specifically to drive means in phased relationship, one to another, employing unidirectional clutch means for independently imparting repeating cycles of intermittent motion followed by a dwell cycle to a web of flexible film, the drive means being operated in synchronism with a sealing apparatus which performs an operation on the web, such as, for example, the simultaneous welding and severing ofa pair of superimposed webs so as to form a side-weld bag structure or the like.

2. Description of the Prior Art The apparatus of the present invention constitutes an improvement over those devices disclosed and claimed in U.S. Pat. No. 2,947,345, G. T. Schjeldahl, Machine for Making Articles from Multiple Thermoplastic Webs dated Aug. 2, 1960; and US. Pat. No. 2,997,889, G. T. Schjeldahl, et al., Intermittent Engine, dated Aug. 29, 1961, both of these patents being assigned to the same assignee as the present invention.

In each of these prior patents, apparatus is described for the handling of thermoplastic webs, particularly superimposed thermoplastic webs which are treated with a hot-knife performing a simultaneous severing and welding operation on the webs. Each of the devices described in these patents utilizesrack-and-pinion drives for the intermittent actuation of the draw rolls. The apparatus of the present invention also utilizes a rackand-pinion mechanism, the arrangement being modified so as to extend the draw cycle beyond the 180 of machine motion which constituted the maximum previously available with a conventional rack-and-pinion drive.

Machine speed is normally limited by the draw cycle, since the durability of the film being treated will determine the maximum acceleration rate possible in the Web. Inasmuch as the apparatus of the present invention provides an extended draw cycle, it is possible to increase the cycle rate of the apparatus without increasing the rate of acceleration of the draw mechanism, thus providing an increased rate of production over that which would be possible with apparatus equipped with conventional drive mechanisms.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In accordance with the present invention, drive means are provided for imparting repeating cycles of intermittent motion and dwell to a web of flexible film, with the motion normally being imparted to the system with a pair of rack-and-pinion drives. The rack is coupled to an input shaft, with the teeth of the rack being in mesh with a pinion on an output shaft. The individual racks are preferably coupled through means associated with opposite ends of a draw roll, and are arranged in arcuately spaced phased relationship. In order to achieve proper relative motion between the phased racks, unidirectional clutch means, such as a one way or overriding clutch is used between the pinion and the shaft, thereby rendering it possible for automatic shifting of drives to occur. Thus, the first rack will apply initial forward motion to the system, with the second rack taking over when its rate of speed exceeds that of the first rack. In a typical situation, the individual eccentric arms driving the racks may be displaced for of arc, with the first rack driving the output shaft for of motion. Upon achieving 90 of motion, the first rack decelerates and the arcuate rate of speed of the second rack overtakes that of the first and drives the output shaft at that point in the cycle. Since the second rack will, at that time, be advanced 30 from its individual starting point, it will continue driving the output shaft for an additional 150 of motion. At that point, the input shaft has rotated 300 and the remaining 60 are available for the dwell cycle.

Therefore, it is the principal object of the present invention to provide an improved drive means employing unidirectional clutches for use in imparting repeating cycles of intermittent motion and dwell to a web of flexible film, the drive means utilizing rack-and-pinion structures and being capable of imparting motion to the web for more than 180 of machine operation.

It is yet a further object of the present invention to provide means forintermittently advancing a web of flexible film utilizing unidirectional clutches with twin rack-and-pinion drives, the individual racks being disposed in spaced phased relationship one to another, so as to impart motion to the web over more than 180 of input shaft rotation.

It is still a further object of the present invention to provide an improved bag-making machine utilizing drive means for intermittently advancing superimposed webs of thermoplastic sheetfilm, the drive means utilizing twin rack-and-pinion drives, with the racks being coupled to a common input shaft and being disposed in spaced-apart phased relationship so as to achieve drive cycles in excess of 180 of rotation of the input shaft.

Other and further objects of the present invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art upon a study of the following specification, appended claims, and accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a side elevational view of the rack-andpinion drive means employed in the present invention, and illustrating in solid lines, a rack-and-pinion assembly together with its unidirectional clutch on the near side of the apparatus, and illustrating, in phantom, the identical rack structure on the opposite side of the structure;

FIG. 2 is an end elevational view of the structure and illustrating the arrangement and disposition of the twin rack drives and unidirectional clutch, each of which is coupled to one end of the draw roll;

FIG. 3 is a plot of rotation of the input shaft versus draw rate for a typical operational cycle in one operational mode, and illustrating the active portion of the draw for the individual drivers in solid line, and illustrating idle portions for the individual driver mechanisms in dashed lines;

FIGS. 40 and 4b are schematic illustrations of the rack-and-pinion structures taken from opposite sides of the machines, and illustrating the spaced phase relationship existing between the individual rack structures, with FIG. 4a illustrating the rack and unidirectional clutch on one side of the structure at the start of its draw cycle, and with FIG. 4b illustrating the disposition of the rack on the opposite side of the structure in the disposition where its draw cycle is initiated after 120 rotation of the driver shaft;

FIG. 5 is a partial vertical sectional view of the rackand-pinion structure shown in FIG. 1, and illustrating this portion of the apparatus in greater detail, this view being taken generally along the line and in the direction of the arrows 5-5 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 is a view similar to FIG. 1, and additionally illustrating the details of the reciprocating hot-knife structure employed in a bag-making machine utilizing the drive mechanism of the present invention;

FIG. 7 is a partial vertical sectional view taken through the center axis of the apparatus, and illustrating details of the draw roll and sealing sections of the apparatus; and

FIG. 8 is a detail view showing the arrangement of the overriding clutch as it is mounted with relationship to the draw roll.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT In accordance with the preferred modification of the present invention, the bag-making apparatus generally designated 10 is provided with a frame structure including a base 11, and upright frame mounting mem bers 12, 13, 14, l5, l6 and 17. Details of a conventional bag-making machine utilizing a conventional drive are set forth in US. Pat. No. 2,947,345, as referred to hereinabove. A drive motor is mounted on the base member 11 by conventional means, the shaft of motor 20 being coupled at 21 to drive shaft 22, shaft 22 being coupled to the input of a conventional clutchbrake assembly generally designated 23. Shaft 24 rotates with shaft 22 through clutch portion 25, or is idle when the clutch-brake assembly 23 is stopped against its brake portion 26. Drive gear 27 is fast upon shaft 24, and is in mesh with gear 28, which, in turn, is fast upon the end of input shaft 29. It will be observed that input shaft 29 extends across the entire width of the apparatus, and is appropriately journaled for rotation with suitable hearings in each of the upright post members 12-17 inclusive.

At opposite ends of the input shaft 29, there are disposed driver units such as the driver units generally designated 30 and 31, these being of the rack-andpinion type. With particular attention being directed to FIGS. 1 and 2 of the drawings, a crank element is secured to each end of the shaft 29, such as the crank elements 33 and 34, each comprising a component part of drivers 30 and 31 respectively. Each of the cranks 33 and 34 is provided with a screw adjustment such as the screw adjustment column 36 for radially adjusting the respective crank pins, such as the pin 37 at a desired radial distance from the axis of shaft 29. A gear rack 28 is pivotally secured to pin 37 and a similar gear rack 39 is pivotally secured to pin 40 which is a portion of driver 31. At each side of the machine, a rack guide such as the rack guide 41 is provided, along with a pinion gear 42 (illustrated in detail in FIG. 5) which is alternately driven in one direction and then in the other during the rotation of input shaft 29 and its respective cranks. Each of the pinions 42 is secured fast onto shafts such as the respective shafts 44 and 45, these shafts being provided with gearing 46 and 47 respectively. Gears 46 and 47 drive pinions 48 and 49 secured to shafts 50 and 51 respectively, shafts 50 and 51 being 10 journaled in parallel relationship to shafts 44 and 45.

Also secured to each of the shafts and 51 are gears 52 and 53 respectively, which, in turn, drive gears 54 and 55 which are secured to sleeves 56 and 57, sleeve 56 being journaled across frame members 16 and 17, sleeve 57 being journaled across frame members 12 and 13. Sleeve 56 is secured to clutch-brake assembly 60, while sleeve 57 is coupled to clutch-brake assembly 61. As is apparent in the drawing, sleeve 56 is coupled to clutch member 62 in clutch-brake assembly 60, while sleeve 57 is secured to clutch member 63 in clutch-brake assembly 61. The core 64 in clutch-brake assembly is operatively coupled through an overriding clutch assembly 65a to one end of the draw roll drive shaft 65 while core 66 of clutch-brake assembly 61 is operatively coupled through an overriding clutch assembly 670 to draw roll drive shaft 67 at the other side. Brake 68 in clutch-brake assembly 60, as well as brake 69 in clutch-brake assembly 61, are each adapted to hold the draw roll shaft stationary until either of the clutch members 62 or 63 is energized, whereupon the draw roll or output shaft 70 will rotate with either of the drivers 30 or 31 through the overriding clutches 65a 0r 67a respectively. (See FIG. 8 for details of this portion of the structure.) Thus, the draw roll shaft is initially energized by one of the drivers, for example, driver 30 through its overriding clutch 65a, and at its point in the driving cycle where its arcuate rate of speed decelerates to match the accelerating rate of speed of driver 31, driver 31 will control the delivery of motion to the draw roll through its overriding clutch 67a. Thus, the clutch-brake assemblies may be simultaneously energized, and phased driving of the assemblies occurs without the need of an electrical flip-flop circuit. The overriding clutch assemblies are accordingly utilized as a replacement for the flip-flop circuits which would otherwise be required.

The use of a pair of racks on opposite sides of the draw roll enhance the dynamic balance of the apparatus, however it will be appreciated, of course, that both driver mechanisms may be provided on only one side or the other of the structure. Also, in addition to rack and pinion devices, Geneva drives or stepping motors may be employed.

Draw roll 70, which is the output shaft of the structure, is suitably journaled in bearings within frame posts 14 and 15, and is arranged in parallel relationship with a mating roll 71, disposed immediately thereabove. Roll 71 is, of course, journaled in axial parallel relationship or alignment with roll 70, and is preferably slidably mounted at each side of the apparatus in posts 14 and 15 respectively. Means are provided for permitting the upper roll 71 to be disposed in pressure engagement with the draw roll or output shaft 70.

It is preferable that a resilient sleeve surround each of the shafts 70 and 71, as shown in FIG. 7, such as the resilient sleeves 73 and 74. These resilient sleeves are preferably provided with a series of axially spaced circumferential slots such as the slotted area 75, each slot being adapted to retain a finger 76, as shown in FIG. 7. The fingers each preferably terminate in a forwardly bent portion and prevent web material from clinging to the drive rolls and becoming wrapped therearound.

Another axially aligned roll assembly 80 lies parallel to the roll sections 70 and 71 as shown in FIG. 7, and is also rotatably journaled for rotation on shaft 81 across frame elements 14 and to permit independent rotation thereof. A further roll assembly 82 is journaled on shaft 83 which is on substantially the same plane as shaft 81, and is provided with means journaling the shaft for rotation within the frame members 14 and 15.

A synchronizing roll assembly 84 is also provided and arranged in axial alignment with the other roll assemblies. Shaft 84 is mounted for rotation within a pair of spaced blocks 8585, these spaced blocks being threadedly mounted upon a vertical screw rod 86 which is mounted for rotation between spaced brackets at the upper portion of each of the frame posts 14 and 15. Handle element 87 is used to control the motion of the screw rod 86, and if desired, a worm drive arrangement as shown at 88 and 89 may be used to drivably in ter-connect a pair of oppositely disposed screw rods 86. The details of this structure are discussed in US. Pat. No. 2,947,345 referred to hereinabove.

Also in alignment with draw rolls 70 and 71 is a backup paid roll 91 for cutting and sealing webs. Roll 91 is tough and resistant to heat, and is preferably provided with an exterior layer of polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon). The upper surface of roll 91 is substantially on the horizontal plane with the nip of the rolls 70 and 71, with the web 92 being arranged to pass thereover. The cutting and sealing roll 91 has a central shaft 93 which is journaled in the frame elements 14 and 15, and preferably has an axial extension to which sprocket 93a is secured. Sprocket 93a is drivably inter-connected with sprocket 94 by means of roller chain 95. Thus, whenever draw roll 70 rotates, the cutting and sealing roll 91 will also rotate in the same direction. Since the roll 91 must rotate sufficiently fast to accommodate web travel, it is preferable to move the sealing roll at a somewhat more rapid peripheral rate of speed than the web speed so as to eliminate wrinkle or buckling of the web.

Forwardly of the cutting and sealing roll 91 is an endless delivery belt assembly 102 which is trained about roller means 103 to pick off severed and sealed articles from the roll 91 as shown in FIG. 7. A rocking frame 104 is pivotally mounted at 105 just above the upper stretch of belt 102 and carries a pick-off roller 106 normally biased out of contact with belt 102 but depressible at the end of cutting and sealing of an article so as to pull it away from the roll 91 and cause it to travel on belt 102, the individual articles may be disposed of in a manner common in the art, such as by stacking, or the like. The details of actuation of solenoid 108 are described in US Pat. No. 2,947,345.

If desired, the web advancing may be controlled by an electric eye control system similar to that described in detail in US. Pat. No. 2,947,345, and also in other techniques well known in the art. In this event, however, the termination of coupling of driver 31 through clutch-brake assembly 61 will control the ultimate length of draw, with the initiation of the draw cycle being determined by driver 30.

CUTTING AND SEALING OPERATION In order to properly cut and seal the web 92, a single straight hot knife blade overlies the cutting and sealing roll 91 normally in spaced relation and is adapted to be depressed thereagainst when the superimposed webs forming web 92 have been advanced to their proper positions on roll 91. Hot knife 115 is heated to a constant temperature through electric leads 116 from a controlled source of energy, not shown. Hot knife 115 has a latticed frame mounting 117 so constructed as not to permit accumulation of heat or the development of unevenly heated areas along the length of the blade 115. The knife 115 is caused to slide vertically with respect to frame elements 14 and 15 and in guided relation therewith. The frame 117 is eccentrically mounted at a side of the machine to a pivot block 118, the pivot block 118, in turn, being secured to a shaft 119, as shown in FIG. 6. A handle is secured forwardly on each of the pivot blocks 118 so that, when either handle 120 is raised, the knife 115 will be kept upwardly in spaced relation with the roll 91 at all timesv The shaft 119 is rotatably mounted adjacent each end in arm 122, the latter being pivotally suspended at 123 from a link 124, in turn pivotally mounted at a fixed position 125 at corresponding sides of the frame elements 14 and 15. On each of the arms 122 between the pivot points 119 and 123 is pivotally secured at 126 a depending yoke 127 which, in turn, rides loosely upon an eccentric 128, as shown in FIG. 6. Eccentrics 128 are secured in the same relative position to a shaft 129 which extends across the frame elements 14 and 15 and operates simultaneously. A crank arm 130 is secured to shaft 129 so that, whenever the crank 130 is secured to shaft 129 so that, Whenever the crank 130 is moved counter-clockwise for a short distance, the yoke 127 will be permitted to lower at each position and will permit the knife 115 to descend toward the roll 91. If the handles 120 are in lower position, the hot knife 115 will actually contact the roll 91 and press thereagainst With its own weight suspended thereon. Bearing pressure will then be removed from each of the yokes 127 and its corresponding eccentric 128. In practice, a small clearance such as one-sixteenth on an inch is sufficient to permit the knife blade 115 to rest its weight upon roll 91 without being forced downwardly thereagainst.

The crank 130 is actuated by a piston rod 131 which is pivotally connected thereto at 132. The piston rod 131, in turn, is connected to a piston 133 which is slidably received within the hydraulic cylinder 134. A compression spring 135 biases the piston 133 normally rearward so as to maintain the crank 130 rearward and the knife blade 115 in raised position. Cylinder 134 is rigidly mounted to a bracket 136 which, in turn, is secured to frame elements 14 and 15. A hydraulic inlet tube 137 communicates with the rear end of the cylinder 134 for causing the piston to move forwardly against compression spring 135. Upon release of pressure, the spring 135 will cause the piston to return and force fluid outwardly through the tube 137. An adjustably abutment screw 138 is threadably mounted in the rear end 139 of the cylinder 134 and has a thumb nut 140 at the outer end thereof for adjusting the abutment stop 141, which, in turn, determines the rearmost position of piston 133 under biasing influence of compression spring 135. Another nut 142 has an annular groove 143 which is adapted to slidably receive a yoke 144 as shown in FIG. 6. The yoke 144 extends forwardly in bracketed sliding engagement with the cylinder 134 and has mounted thereon a switch 145 which is operated by an actuator 146 having a bifurcated forward end 147 and normally biased forwardly by compression spring 148. Crank arm 130 carries a pin 149 which is received in the bifurcated portion 147 of the switch actuator 146. When the arm 130 and piston 133 are biased rearwardly, the switch 145 will establish one circuit while, when moved forwardly under the pressure of hydraulic fluid in line 137, will establish another circuit, as will be described in detail under'the operation of the machine.

ELECTRICAL CIRCUIT AND OPERATION In order to establish a side-welding operation for the preparation of bags or other elongated structures from the web 92, the web is initially positioned on the roll system, with the folded web being advanced by the output shaft operating the draw rolls 70 and 71. The hot knife 115 will be maintained at a constant temperature suitable for-cutting and welding the particular thermoplastic web in the desired thickness. The main drive motor 20 is constantly energized and rotates the input shaft 29 through gears 27 and 28 whenever clutchbrake assembly 23 is energized, it being understood that no rotation is imparted to input shaft 29 when clutch 25 is de-energized and brake 26 is energized. Cams 150, 151, 152 and 153 are all fixed to, and rotate with shaft 29 to establish the sequence of operation.

In operation, an operational cycle of the apparatus includes one complete rotation of input shaft 29 beginning with the individual crank arms 33 and 34 in out-ofphase alignment, but with the crank arm 33 in upright position and in alignment with the gear rack 38. Thus, the position illustrated in FIG. 1 is subsequent to this point in the cycle, with the crank arms having progressed a short arcuate distance from the starting point. The individual crank arms are disposed 120 from each other, with the arm 33 leading the arm 34. Energization of clutches 62 and 63 may occur simultaneously with the commencement of the draw cycle, and with clutch 62 being dominant in the beginning of the cycle. With attention being directed to FIG. 3 of the drawings, it will be observed that the rate of motion of the web increases until a peak or top speed is reached at 90 of motion of the input shaft 29, and thereafter the rate decreases on a sinusoidal rate until 150 of motion has been achieved. At that point, clutch 63 continues to be energized so as to become dominant and couple driver 31 to the output shaft 70 through overriding clutch 67a, thus constituting the draw roll of the system. The driver 31 controls the motion for the portion of the cycle between 150 and 300 of rotation of the input shaft 29. The remaining 60 are utilized for dwell, during which the sealing operation will occur. With this arrangement, long bag structures, up to 30 inches or more in length, may be fabricated at rapid machine rates. The peak speed for a 30-inch bag compares to that for an 18-inch bag fabricated by machines utilizing conventional draw cycles extending for only 180 of rotation.

In this normal operational mode, cam wheel 150 controls the clutch-brake system 23, and cam wheel 153 controls the clutch-brake systems 60 and 61 which in turn drive and retain the output shaft or draw roll 70. Cam wheel 151 initiates the cutting and sealing movement of hot knife and a timing cycle which determines the dwell period thereof. Cam wheel 152 is utilized to control the operation of an electric eye in the system; when utilized.

The operation of the circuitry is set forth in detail in US. Pat. No. 2,947,345, and reference is made to that disclosure for the details of operation of the present structure, it being understood that the present arrangement is for a single web rather than a dual web as discussed in US. Pat. No. 2,947,345, and further that the clutch assemblies 62 and 63 are normally simultaneously energized for the entire draw cycle and simultaneously de-energized during the dwell cycle.

It will be appreciated, also, that the operation of cam wheels and 153 is closely coordinated and controlled in order that the actuation occurs on a smooth basis, thus eliminating any tendency for the film to be abruptly jerked during the draw cycle.

Typically, in the normal operational mode, the extent of overlap of the individual drive cycles for the drivers 30 and 31 will be equal to the length of the dwell. Since 60 dwell is typical, a 60 overlap is normally employed, thus providing for the 120 phase shift. It will be appreciated that the modest ripple which occurs or appears in the draw cycle is less severe for the web than the rigorous treatment previously afforded by conventional units utilizing draws. The apparatus of the present invention has been found capable of producing bags 31 inches in length at a cycle rate of 120 cycles per minute. Also, in a typical operational cycle of this type, the dwell cycle includes 80 of timing, with 30 of the dwell time being devoted to the actual sealing operation. The remaining 50 of dwell are utilized with one-half being devoted to a lowering of the knife, and one-half being utilized for the raising of the knife. Longer knife dwell times may be utilized for some sealing operations, such as for periods of up to at least 54. At a sealing rate of 50 of dwell and for l /2 mil polyethylene, a bar temper ature of 800 F. is employed, while temperatures ranging from between 750 and 850 F. may be found satisfactory. The conveyor speed for the output is held or maintained at a rate of 400 feet per minute, with rates from 350 feet per minute to 400 feet per minute being typical.

It will be appreciated that the times and temperatures set forth hereinabove, are typical of certain operational modes. It is possible, therefore, to utilize lower temperatures with longer dwell times and satisfactory seals are still obtained. In one operation, it has been found that l /2 mil polyethylene may be sealed with a sealing bar having a temperature of 300 F., however the dwell time is 30 of a 90 cycle per minute rate. It will also be appreciated that side-weld and bottom seals may be prepared utilizing this mechanism.

The utilization of one-way or overriding clutches inthe drive mechanism has been found to provide smooth mechanical switch-over from one input to the other, and any anomolies which occur in mechanical switching will notadversely affect performance. This is help ful in certain cases with webbing which could be adversely affected by abrupt changes in rates of speed of draw.

I claim:

1. Means for intermittently advancing a web of flexible film comprising:

a. drive means for imparting repeating cycles of intermittent motion and dwell to said web with the motion normally being along a certain predetermined web direction; said drive means including output shaft means having first and second input driver means operatively coupled thereto;

b. input shaft means and means for drivably rotating said input shaft in one rotational direction;

c. unitary output shaft means adapted to be operatively coupled to said web for imparting motion thereto;

d. first and second driver means arranged in phased relationship one-to-another and being responsive to the rotation of said input shaft means and operatively coupled to said output shaft for drivably rotating said output shaft in one rotational direction, each driver means being effective for the rotation of said output shaft for a driving cycle of said output shaft, with continuously varying rates of rotational velocity having acceleration from dwell to maximum velocity and deceleration from maximum velocity to dwell, and further being effective only during one-half of each rotational cycle imparted to each of said driver means by said input shaft;

e. means including first unidirectional clutch means inter-coupling said first driver means to said input and output shafts for initiating rotation of said out put shaft and for continuing said rotation for a first motion segment not exceeding one-half cycle of rotation of said input shaft and for de-coupling said first driver means at the end of said first motion segment;

f. means including second unidirectional clutch means for intermittently inter-coupling said second driver means to said input and output shafts in phased relationship to said first driver means and for achieving over-riding de-coupling of said first driver means from said output shaft for continuing rotation of said output shaft for a second motion segment not exceeding one-half cycle of rotation of said input shaft and for de-coupling said second driver means upon completion of said second motion segment; and

g. means for maintaining said output shaft means in locked disposition while said first driver means and said second driver means are simultaneously decoupled from said output shaft to impart a dwell cycle to said web.

2. The apparatus as defined in claim 1 being particularly characterized in that said first and second motion segments are substantially equal.

3. The apparatus as defined in claim 1 being particularly characterized in that said first and second driver means are arranged in phased relationship one-toanother by an arcuate distance of less than 180.

4. The apparatus as defined in claim 1 being particularly characterized in that brake means are coupled to said output shaft means, and means are provided for energizing said brake means for that dwell portion of the cycle remaining after termination of said first and said second motion segments.

5. The apparatus as defined in claim 1 being particularly characterized in that said first and second driver means are in phased relationship, one-to-another by an arcuate distance of between 45 and 165.

6. The apparatus as defined in claim 1 being particularly characterized in that said first and second driver means are rack-and-pinion drivers.

7'. The apparatus as defined in claim 6 being particularly characterized in that said rack-and-pinion driver means are disposed on opposite ends of 'said input and output shafts.

8. Thermoplastic web treating apparatus comprising, in combination, drive means for intermittently advancing superimposed webs of thermoplastic sheet film material and for stopping said superimposed webs for a pre-determined period of dwell, and hot knife means for thermally welding said superimposed webs together at predetermined spaced intervals therealong, said drive means comprising:

a. drive means for imparting repeating cycles of intermittent motion and dwell to said web with the motion normally being along a certain pre-determined web direction, said drive means including output shaft means having first and second input driver means operatively coupled thereto;

b. input shaft means and means for drivably rotating said input shaft in one rotational direction;

c. unitary output shaft means adapted to be operatively coupled to said web for imparting motion thereto;

d. first and second driver means arranged in phased relationship one-to-another and being responsive to the rotation of said input shaft means and operatively coupled to said output shaft for drivably rotating said output shaft in one rotational direction, each driver means being effective for the rotation of said output shaft for a driving cycle of said output shaft, with continuously varying rates of rotational velocity having acceleration from dwell to maximum velocity and deceleration from maximum velocity to dwell, and further being effective only during one-half of each rotational cycle imparted to each of said driver means by said input shaft;

e. means including first unidirectional clutch means inter-coupling said first driver means to said input and output shafts for initiating rotation of said output shaft and for continuing said rotation for a first motion segment not exceeding one-half cycle of rotation of said input shaft and for de-coupling said first driver means at the end of said first motion segment;

f. means including second unidirectional clutch means for intermittently inter-coupling said second driver means to said input and output shafts in phased relationship to said first driver means and for achieving over-riding de-coupling of said first driver means from said output shaft for continuing rotation of said output shaft for a second motion segment not exceeding one-half cycle of rotation of said input shaft and for de-coupling said second driver means upon completion of said second motion segment;

g. means for maintaining said output shaft means in locked disposition while said first driver means and said second driver means are simultaneously decoupled from said output shaft to impart a dwell cycle to said web; and

saidhot knife means comprising:

h. heated blade means disposed generally transversely of the web axis and normally spaced from said web axis during advance of the web, and means for reciprocably moving said blade relative to said web to bring said blade into contact with adapted to move reciprocably toward and away from said superimposed webs, and into contact with said webs.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE QETEFICATE 0F CORRECTIQN PATENT NO. I 3,884,129 DATED May 20, 1975 INVENTOR(S) Thomas J. Monahan It is certified that error appears in the ab0ve-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 3, line 64, "gear rack 28" should read gear rack 38 Column 6, lines 34 and 35, delete the repeated phrase "the crank 130 is secured to shaft 129 so that, whenever" Baigncd and Sealed this Attest:

RUTH C. MASON C. MARSHALL DANN Arresting Officer Commissioner uflalenls and Trademarks

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3992981 *Nov 19, 1975Nov 23, 1976Fmc CorporationWeb stripping apparatus
US4055109 *May 4, 1976Oct 25, 1977Dai Nippon Insatsu Kabushiki KaishaMethod and apparatus for producing self-standing bags
US4077306 *Oct 21, 1976Mar 7, 1978Fmc CorporationBag machine cycle interrupt
US4371413 *Jul 7, 1981Feb 1, 1983Windmoller & HolscherApparatus for applying transverse weld or weld-severing seams to a web of thermoplastic or hot-sealable material
US4460431 *Nov 18, 1982Jul 17, 1984Josef KellerApparatus for forming transverse seam welds or separated transverse seam welds in tubular or semitubular plastic film webs
US4553377 *May 29, 1984Nov 19, 1985Eurobreva Engineering TrustPackaging machine with sealing means
US5582569 *Feb 28, 1994Dec 10, 1996Ward Holding Company, Inc.Shaft mounting and drive for carton blank processing machine
Classifications
U.S. Classification493/194, 156/515, 493/209, 493/223, 493/203, 74/121, 74/125.5, 226/156
International ClassificationB65H20/04, B31B23/02, B31B23/00, B31B19/10
Cooperative ClassificationB31B19/10, B31B2237/10, B31B2237/406, B31B2219/022, B65H20/04, B31B2237/40, B31B23/00
European ClassificationB31B23/00, B31B19/10, B65H20/04