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Publication numberUS3884413 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 20, 1975
Filing dateMar 14, 1974
Priority dateMar 14, 1974
Also published asCA1018500A1
Publication numberUS 3884413 A, US 3884413A, US-A-3884413, US3884413 A, US3884413A
InventorsBerquist Frank H
Original AssigneeHarper Wyman Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Oven control
US 3884413 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 Berquist [11] 3,884,413 1 51 May 20, 1975 OVEN CONTROL [75] Inventor: Frank H. Berquist, Clarendon Hills,

Ill.

[73] Assignee: Harper-Wyman Company, Hinsdale,

Ill.

22 Filed: Mar. 14, 1974 211 Appl. No.: 451,216

[52} US. Cl. 236/15 A; 431/280 [51] Int. Cl. F23n 3/06 [58] Field of Search 236/15 A, 99; 431/280 X [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,386,656 8/1968 Bergquist 236/l5 A Primary Exan1iner-William E. Wayner Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Mason, Kolehmainen, Rathburn & Wyss [57] ABSTRACT An oven control particularly useful for ranges having plural burners and mounted in vehicles includes a single control knob for manipulation of a manual valve and a thermostatic valve. The control knob is movable to several manual positions including a position wherein fuel flow to all burner pilots is shut off, a position wherein fuel flow is only supplied to a selected burner pilot such as a range top burner pilot and is shut off to all other pilots such as an oven burner pilot and a normal off position wherein all burner pilots are supplied with fuel so that any of the burners can be utilized. The control knob is also operable to select a desired burner temperature, which temperature is maintained by the action of the thermostatic valve and a high temperature broil setting is provided wherein the oven burner fuel flow is throttled to provide a thermostatically controlled modulated burner flame.

15 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures FROM PRESSURE REGULATOR AND LP GAS SUPPLY TOP BURNER TOP BURNER PILOT OVEN BURNER PILOT OVEN BURNER PATENTED MAY 2 0 I975 SHEEI FROM PRESSURE REGULATOR R m 2 W M T Y T W I I I I I I I I. U M II L B B P P J N/ P P M U E O S M T S m m n w n N F A I w W 3 m 4 2 8 M O 2 4 3 4 l l 3 w R a w M l in, M T W 4 1 B 4 a if @R R H 2 e z N 0 Q r B 0 PILOT 20v oven BURNER PATENTEB HAYZ 01975 SHEET 3 0F 3 1 OVEN CONTROL The present invention relates to oven controls and particularly to an oven control especially useful in ranges having a plurality of burners and designed to be mounted in vehicles and the like. The oven control of the present invention is an improvement on the control shown and described in US. Pat. No. 3,563,457, which patent is assigned to the same assignee as the present application.

In gas fired ranges designed for use in recreational vehicles, boats and the like, there is often provided an oven for baking along with one or more top burner units for frying and boiling. In modern ranges of this type, one or more pilot burners is used for ignition of the top burner units and the main gas flow to these top burners is controlled and adjusted manually. The oven in these ranges also utilizes a pilot burner for ignition of the main burner and the main burner is cycled on and off with a thermostatic valve to maintain a selected temperature.

In some recreational vehicles it is necessary and desirable to provide for a complete shut off of all fuel flow to the pilots and oven burners under certain circumstances as for instance when the vehicle is in motion. In some circumstances it may be desirable to provide fuel for operation of the top burner pilot so that the top burners may be used for heating coffee or simple meals, for example during a brief stop. Since the oven unit of the range is generally not operated with as high a fuel flow rate as are the top burners because the oven burner is thermostatically controlled and when the vehicle is traveling on rough roads or waters it is possible that the oven pilot may become inoperable or a portion of the pilot burner structure may even become dislodged. For this reason it is desirable to provide for complete shut off of the fuel flow to the oven pilot while the pilot for the top burner is still supplied with fuel.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a new and improved oven control, particularly useful in gas fueled ranges designed for vehicles and the like: to provide an oven control having a single control knob operable to manipulate a manual valve through several positions and to control a thermostatic valve in order that a top burner pilot and an oven burner pilot may be easily operated: to provide an oven control capable of shutting off fuel flow to all of the burner pilots and a main oven burner and having an alternate position wherein fuel flow is supplied to a top burner pilot but is shut off to an oven burner pilot and a main oven burner: to provide an oven control for maintaining a selected temperature setting in an oven and having an additional setting for use in a high temperature broil operation wherein the flame of the oven burner is mod ulated to provide a predetermined broil temperature in the oven: to provide a plug type valve for use with LP gas and being capable of withstanding high gas pressure without danger of leakage or failure in case the pressure regulator of the fuel system fails.

In brief, one embodiment of the present invention comprises an oven control for use with a range of the type designed for vehicles which includes an oven having a pilot operated burner and one or more pilot operated range, top burners. The oven control includes a single control knob for manipulation of a manual gas valve through several manual positions and a thermostatically controlled gas valve for temperature control of an oven burner. The manual positions include a first position wherein the fuel flow to all of the burner pilots of the range is shut off, a second position wherein fuel flow is only supplied to the top burner pilot and is shut off to the oven burner pilot and a normal, off position wherein all burner pilots are supplied with fuel so that the top burner and/or oven burner may be selectively operated when and as desired. The control knob is also operable to select a desired oven temperature for controlling the oven burner and the selected temperature is maintained by the action of a thermostatic valve. A high temperature broil setting is also provided wherein the oven burner fuel flow is throttled to provide a thermostatically controlled modulated burner flame for high temperature broiling in the oven.

The foregoing and other objects and advantages of the present invention will appear from the following detailed description and the claims taken in conjunctionwith the drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a schematic isometric diagrammatic illustration of an oven control embodying the features of the present invention and illustrated as the control is used in a gas range including top burners and an oven;

FIG. 2 is a cross sectional view taken substantially along lines 22 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged isometric exploded diagrammatic illustration of the plug type valve member of the oven control and is illustrated along with portions of the gas passages of a range in which the control is installed, and

FIGS. 4-8 are composite schematic views of the control knob and several cross sections of the valve manipulated thereby and these views somewhat schematically illustrate the several operative positions of the oven control of the present invention.

Referring now more particularly to the drawings and especially to FIG. 1, therein is illustrated a new and improved oven control referred to generally by the refer ence numeral 10 and particularly well suited for use with a modern LP or natural gas range of the type often utilized in vehicles and the like. The oven control is adapted to control and direct the flow of fuel from a source 12 such as a vehicle mounted storage tank for the operation of one or more top burners l4 and a top burner pilot referred to by the number 16. The oven control 10 also controls the operation of a main oven burner 18 and an oven burner pilot 20. Fuel flows to the top burners 14 through a supply manifold 22 connectedto the gas supply tank 12 and each of the individual top burners is supplied from the manifold via a separate branch line 24. A manual control valve 26 is provided in each branch line 24 for direct operator control of the flame setting for the respective top burners 14 and the oven control 10 is supplied from the manifold 22 through an oven control inlet line 28. The oven burner 18 receives fuel from the oven control 10 through an output line 30 and the oven burner pilot 20 is supplied with fuel from the oven control through another output line 32. A safety valve 34 is provided in the oven burner line 30 and this valve normally remains in the closed condition until a heat sensitive element 36 positioned adjacent the oven burner pilot 20 causes the safety valve to open in response to heat generated by the oven burner pilot. If no flame is present at the oven burner pilot 20, the safety valve 34 remains closed and fuel cannot be supplied to the oven burner 18 through the line 30.

The top burner pilot 16 is supplied with fuel from the oven control 10 through an output line 38 and when the top burner pilot 16 is lit, either of the top burner manual control valves 26 may be used to supply fuel to the respective top burners 14, which fuel will be ignited by the pilot flame to provide a cooking flame at the burner. The top burners 14 are controlled by the set-' ting of the respective valves 26 to achieve the desired flame for cooking.

In accordance with the present invention, the oven control 10 includes a single control knob 40 mounted at the outer end of a valve control shaft 42 and provided with an enlarged frustroconical shaped dial having suitable indicia thereon as indicated in FIGS. 4 through 8. As will be described more fully hereinafter the control knob 40 is rotatable from a normal OFF position of FIG. 4 wherein gas is supplied to both the top burner pilot 16 and the oven burner pilot 20 via the respective lines 32 and 38 in a clockwise direction to a first manual position labeled TOP PILOTS ON as shown in FIG. wherein the oven control supplies gas through the line 38 to the top burner pilot 16 only and in this position gas flow to the oven burner pilot is positively shut off. With the knob in position of FIG. 5, the operator may use the top burners 14 for cooking but the oven cannot be used as the oven pilot receives no fuel. Further clockwise rotation of the knob 40 from the position of FIG. 5 to the position of FIG. 6 results in the shutting off of fuel flow to all of the pilots. In the ALL PILOTS OFF position neither the oven burner pilot nor the top burner pilots can operate and this position is utilized when it is not desirable that any of the burners in the range be used, normally because safety factors dont permit such usage.

The manual positions as illustrated in FIGS. 4, 5 and 6 are provided in addition to a range of temperature controlled, automatic oven settings and a high temperature oven broil position when the knob is rotated in a maximum amount in a counterclockwise direction from the normal OFF position of FIG. 4 to the high temperature oven broil position of FIG. 7, marked by the letter B. In the broil position the top burner pilot 16 is supplied with fuel so that the top burners may be used and the oven burner pilot 20 and the main oven burner 18 are supplied with fuel in a manner whereby a temperature controlled modulating flame is provided at the oven burner in order to accomplish high temperature broiling. In the range of oven temperature controlling settings, between the normal OFF position of FIG. 4 and the broil position of FIG. 7, the knob 40 is rotatable to select a desired oven temperature (the dial settings are labeled in degrees Fahrenheit from 140 to 500) and in this range of settings the supply of fuel to the oven burner 18 via the line is thermostatically controlled to maintain the selected oven temperature. A temperature sensing bulb 44 is provided in the oven enclosure, and is in communication with the oven control 10 through a capillary tube 46 of an oven sensing unit. The capillary tube is secured to a cylindrical cup shaped rear housing 48 mounted on the rear face of a rectangular shaped body 50 of the oven control.

The valve body 50 is provided with an elongated central passage or bore extending between the front and rear faces thereof and the bore includes a forward, frustroconically tapered section 52 interconnected by means of an annular groove 54 with an intermediate small diameter cylindrical bore section 56. The intermediate bore section is in communication with an enlarged rear bore section 58 cooperating with the rear housing cup 48 to form a thermostatic valve chamber 60.

A hollow valve plug or core 62 of matching frustroconical shape is seated within the forward bore sec tion 52 of the valve body and the valve plug includes a forwardly extending hollow sleeve 64 in coaxial telescopic engagement with the inner end portion ofa shaft or stem 42 which carries the knob 40. The stem is biased is an axial direction outwardly of the valve plug 62 by means of a coiled spring 67 positioned within the hollow sleeve 64 and having its outer end seated within a cylindrical recess 42a formed in the inner end of the stem 42. Outwardly of the recess 42a the stem 42 is formed with a transverse cross bore 42b and a key or groove pin 66 is seated in the transverse bore and extends outwardly from one side of the stem as best shown in FIG. 2. The key pin 66 is adapted to seat within a selected one of several positioning grooves which are defined between radially outwardly extending ridges 68 integrally formed on the inside front wall surface of a front cap member 70. The cap member is secured to the front face of the valve body 50 by suitable cap screws 72 and the ridges project radially outward from a central opening in the front wall of the cap member which opening accommodates the valve sleeve 64. The front wall also provides a stop surface for engaging the key pin 66 to limit the outward travel of the stem 42 under the biasing influence of the spring 67.

In accordance with the present invention, gas supplied from the oven control inlet line 28 flows upwardly into a relatively large main inlet passage 74 which is in communication at its upper end with the frustroconical bore section 52 intermediate the ends of the bore section. The frustroconical valve plug 62 is hollow with an elongated axial bore 620 closed at the forward end of the valve plug and open at the rear for communication with the annular bore groove 54 and the intermediate bore section 56 in the valve body. The valve body is provided with a relatively wide transverse slot 62b through a portion of the wall thereof and the slot is in alignment with the main inlet passage 74 on a transverse section plane labeled A, as best shown in the schematic illustrations of FIGS. 4 through 8. The transverse slot 62b encompasses slightly more than 180 of the entire circumference of the valve plug and as shown in FIGS. 7 and 8 when the control knob 40 is rotated into the broil or bake position, the slot is aligned with the upper end of the main inlet passage 74 to provide a full flow of fuel into the interior of the axial bore 620 of the valve plug for use in supplying fuel for the oven burner and pilot of the range. When the control knob 40 is positioned in the OFF, TOP PILOTS ON or ALL PILOTS OFF position, as illustrated in FIGS. 4, 5 and 6, no fuel is permitted to flow into the axial bore 62a of the valve plug from the main inlet passage 74 because the transverse slot 62b is not aligned in communication with the open end of the main inlet passage. The main inlet passage 74 also supplies pilot burner fuel via a smaller size passage 76 in communication with the upper end thereof. The passage 76 supplies fuel through a filter 78 into a cross passage 80 having an outlet end in communication with the frustroconical bore section 52 in the valve body at a point spaced axially rearwardly from the slot 62!; in the valve plug toward the smaller diameter end thereof. At this location (labeled section B in FIGS. 4-8) the valve plug 62 is formed with a relatively narrow transverse groove 620 in the outer surface. The groove is closed at opposite ends and does not communicate with the interior bore 62a of the valve plug as does the slot 62b. The groove occupies approximately 300 of circumference around the outer surface of the valve plug. When the knob is positioned to the OFF, TOP PILOTS ON, BROIL or BAKE positions of FIGS. 4, 5, 7 and 8 respectively, fuel passes from the cross passage 80 into the groove 62c for distribution to an oven burner pilot supply passage 82 and/or a top burner pilot supply passage 84, dependent upon the selected position of the valve control knob, as will be described hereinafter.

Referring to FIG. 3 when the control knob is in the position of FIGS. 4, 5, 7 or 8, fuel from the cross passage 80 flow via the groove 620 in the valve plug to the top burner pilot supply passage 84 and this passage supplies fuel to the top burner pilot 16 via the line 38 which is coupled to the passage 84 on the rear face of the valve body 50 by a coupling unit 86. To provide for flame adjustment for the top burner pilot 16, a needle valve pilot adjustment screw 88 is provided in the passage 84. When the control knob 40 is in the position shown diagrammatically in FIGS. 4, 7 or 8, pilot fuel is also supplied to the oven burner pilot supply passage 82 and this fuel flows to the oven pilot burner via a passage 90 (FIG. 3). The passage 90 is connected to the oven burner pilot supply line 32 with a coupling unit 92 mounted on the rear face of the valve body and spaced above the coupling unit 86 for the top burner pilots.

In accordance with the present invention, with the control knob 40 position in the BROIL position as shown schematically in FIG. 7, additional fuel is supplied to the oven burner pilot from the central bore 620 of the valve plug 62. For this purpose the valve plug is provided with a radial passage 62a in the wall thereof spaced forwardly of the slot 62b adjacent the larger diameter end of the valve plug (labeled section C in FIGS. 4-8). When the valve plug 62 rotated into the BROIL position, fuel passes from the bore 62a of the valve plug out through the passage 62d into a passage 94 in communication with the passage 90 which supplies the oven burner pilot line 32 (FIG. 3). An ad justable, oven standby orifice sleeve 96 is provided adjacent the junction of the passage 82, 90 and 94 for metering fuel flowing from the passage 82 into the passage 90. When the control knob 40 is set in the BROIL position in addition to this metered fuel, additional unmetered fuel from the passage 94, flows around a slot on the exterior of the adjustable orifice sleeve 96 to the passage 90 and provides additional pilot fuel for the broiling operation in the oven.

Referring to FIGS. 1, 2 and 3, the main fuel flow to the oven burner 18 via the line 30 is controlled by an oven sensing element assembly 98 positioned in the thermostatic valve chamber 60 and supported from the rear housing 48 by means of a flanged hollow stud 100 and a coupling nut 102. The capillary tube 46 extends through the bore of the hollow stud 100 into the valve chamber and is connected to a diaphragm assembly 104 which expands and contracts in accordance with the temperature sensed by the oven temperature sensor unit 44. The diaphragm assembly includes a cupshaped cover member 106 and a disk 108 and these members move toward and away from one another dependent upon the temperature in the oven. The disk 108 of the diaphragm assembly is attached to a flanged nib 110 having a threaded stem which is engaged within the bore of a hollow lead screw 112 coupled to the open end of the valve plug 62 by a transverse cross pin 114. The cross pin extends into a transverse longitudinal slot 112a formed at the forward end of the lead screw to couple the lead screw and nib for rotation together. The nib 110 includes an enlarged flange 110a for supporting a cup shaped valve retaining washer 116 and this cup shaped washer supports and centers the rear end of a coil type valve seating spring 118 which biases a valve disk 120 toward a rearwardly facing annular valve surfacce 57 defined in the valve body between the intermediate bore 56 and the rear bore section 58. The hollow lead screw 112 includes a radial flange 112b intermediate its ends and the valve disk 120 is seated against this flange. As best shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, the valve disk 120 is formed with a plurality of ports 120a for passing fuel into the valve chamber 60 from the bore 56 when the valve disk 120 is fully seated against the seating surface 57. This flow of fuel is further controlled by a high limit disk 122 also centered on the lead screw 112 and positioned for movement between the valve disk 120 and the cup shaped washer 116. A high limit coil spring 124 is positioned between the high limit disk and the cup shaped washer 116 for biasing the high limit disk toward the valve disk. As shown in FIG. 2, the 122 disk is formed with an annular ridge 122a having a mean diameter approximately equal to the spacing diameter between the holes or ports 1200 in the valve disk. An annular space is formed between the surface of the ridge 122a and the valve disk 120 and this space defines a collecting chamber for the fuel flowing through the ports 120a of the valve disk when seated. When the fuel pressure within this chamber is high enough to overcome the bias of the high limit spring 124, the disk 122 is forced away from the valve disk 120 and the gas within the annular chamber flows radially outwardly into the valve chamber 60.

Fuel from the valve chamber flows into the oven burner 18 through the line 30 by means of a relatively large passage 126 in communication with one side of the rear bore section 58 of the valve body. The passage 126 is connected to the oven burner line 30 at the rear face of the valve body via a coupling unit 128. With the oven control knob 40 in the BAKE position as shown in FIG. 8 and when the oven sensor 44 is calling for heat, additional fuel is supplied to the dual rate oven pilot 20 from the thermostatic valve chamber 60 via a bypass passage 130 having one end connected to the passage 90. The other end of the passage 130 is in communication with the valve chamber 60 and opens onto the annular valve seating surface 57 (as best shown in FIG. 3), so that any time the valve disk 120 is unseated away from the surface 57 additional oven pilot fuel is supplied by the passage. Fuel flowing from the thermostatic valve chamber 60 via the passage 130 does not pass through the oven standby pilot orifice 96 and thus adds unmetered fuel to the dual rate oven pilot burner 20 like the unmetered additional fuel supplied by the passage 94 in a broil operation.

Referring now to the schematic diagrams of FIGS. 4 through 8 which represent the various operating positions of the valve, the uppermost schematic cross sectional view in the figures (section B) illustrate a cross section through the valve plug 62 taken adjacent the smaller diameter end portion in line with the supply passage 80 which supplies filtered fuel for the pilots of system from the main inlet passage 74. The next lower sectional views (section A) are taken on a transverse plane at about mid-point through the valve plug 62 in alignment with the main inlet passage 74 and large slot 62b. Finally, the lowermost sectional views (section C) in FIGS. 4-8 is taken on a cross section aligned with the passage 94 in the valve body 50 and the port 62d in the valve plug 62.

Referring now specifically to FIG. 6, when the control knob 40 is in the ALL PILOTS OFF position, the gas flow to the valve chamber 60 from the main inlet supply passage 74 is shut off by the valve plug and as shown at section B filtered fuel from the passage 80 is likewise shut off so that no gas is available for the top burner pilots, oven burner pilots and oven burner.

Referring now to FIG. 5, when the operator of the range desires to use the top burners only while maintaining the oven pilots off because of travel over a rough or bumpy road or like, the control knob 40 is turned to the top pilots ON position. In this position main gas flow to the interior of the valve plug 62 is still blocked (section A), however, filtered fuel from the passage 80 is supplied via the groove 62c in the valve plug to the top burner pilot passage 84 but not to the oven burner pilot passage 82. In this position, the top burner pilots may then be utilized for operating the top burners 14 whenever the manual burner valves 26 are opened and adjusted to the desired flame level but the oven may not be used.

Referring now to FIG. 4 when it is desired to use both the top burners and the oven of the range in a normal manner and to maintain all pilots operational ready for use, the control knob 40 is rotated to the OFF position. In this position the valve plug 62 again blocks the flow of gas into the chamber 60 until such time as the control knob is moved into a range of BAKE positions (FIG. 8) where a selected temperature is desired or into the BROIL position (FIG. 7). In the OFF position (FIG. 4), the supply of filtered fuel from the passage 80 is directed into the groove 62c of the valve plug and flows into the respective pilot supply passages 82 and 84 connected to the oven burner pilot and the top burner pilot. These pilots may then be lit and maintained in readiness for igniting the top burners and the oven burner when desired.

When it is desired to use the oven in a baking operation a selected temperature is chosen by rotating the knob 40 to the desired setting (FIG. 8) and when this occurs, the slot 6217 on the valve plug is aligned with the main inlet passage 74 to supply fuel to the interior bore 62a of the valve plug. This fuel flows toward the valve chamber 60 and flow is controlled by the operation of the valve disk 120 and high limit disk 122. When the knob 40 is set to any selected temperature in the range of 140 to 500, fuel is also supplied from the passage 80 and moves through the pilot passages 82 and 84 and the oven burner pilot is operated at a standby pilot rate. The main gas flow to the oven burner is thermostatically controlled by the valve disk 120 which moves in accordance with the temperature sensed and transmitted to the diaphragm assembly 104. From the thermostatic valve chamber 60 the fuel flows via the passage 126, coupling 128 and line to the oven burner safety valve 34. When the oven pilot is operative the safety valve is opened and the gas flows to the burner 18. At the same time, when the valve disk is spaced away from the seating surface 57 gas is also supplied to the oven pilot burner 20 via the passages 130, 90, coupling 92 and line 32. Once the temperature selected by the control knob 40 is obtained, the valve disk 120 tends to seat against the surface 57 and the gas flow is reduced so that the oven burner shuts off until the oven is again calling for heat. When the valve disk 120 is away from the seat 57, fuel is supplied to the oven burner pilot 20 at a metered or standby rate via the by passage 84 with a flow of filtered gas and additional fuel flows to the oven pilot via the passage 130.

When the control knob 40 is in any of the positions shown in FIGS. 4, 5, 6 and 8, at section C on the valve plug 62, no flow is provided because the port 62d is not in alignment with the passage 94 which supplies additional fuel to the oven burner pilot for a broiling operation. When the control knob 40 is then moved to the BROIL position. as illustrated in FIG. 7, the port 62d in the valve plug 62 becomes aligned with the passage 94 and this provides additional pilot fuel to the oven pilot burner 20 even though the valve disk 120 may be seated. In this conductive filtered gas is constantly flowing to the oven pilot at a metered rate through orifree member 96. In the BROIL position, the gas flow to the oven burner is modulated by the high limit disk 122 in order to provide a modulating broiling flame for high temperature operation. In the BAKE position, the oven burner is cycled on and off to maintain a selected temperature. In the BROIL position, however, the oven burner remains on but the flow of fuel is modulated to maintain the high broil temperature.

Although the present invention has been described with reference to a single illustrative embodiment thereof, it should be understood that numerous other modifications and embodiments can be devised by those skilled in the art that will fall within the spirit and scope of the principles of this invention.

What is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent of the United States is:

l. A control valve for use with a gas range having a plurality of pilot burners for igniting main burners, said valve comprising a valve body having an inlet for gas and a plurality of outlets for supplying gas to said pilot burners, a manually operable valve member carried by said valve body for selectively controlling the flow of gas between said inlet and said outlets, said valve including passage means controlled by the position of said valve member relative to said body for selective communication between said inlet and said outlets when said valve member is moved between first, sec- 0nd and third positions, said passage means aligned to communicate between said inlet and said plurality of outlets in said first position, aligned to communicate between said inlet and less than all of said outlets in said second position and aligned to provide no communication between said inlet and said plurality of outlets in said third position, and a thermostatic valve means controlled by the position of said valve member relative to said body for maintaining a selected temperature range at the main burner of one of said pilot burners when said valve member is positioned within a range of automatic temperature controlling positions, said passage means aligned to communicate between said inlet and said outlets and a main outlet for supplying gas for one of said main burners in said temperature controlling range.

2. The control valve of claim 1 wherein said thermostatic valve means includes thermally responsive means for sensing the temperature at said one main burner for modulating said valve means, said passage means including a main fuel flow passage between said valve member and said main outlet, said thermostatic valve means positioned to control the fuel flow through said main passage in response to the temperature condition sensed by said thermally responsive means.

3. The control valve of claim 2 wherein said passage means includes a pilot passage between said main fuel passage controlled by said thermostatic valve means and said outlet for said one pilot burner, said pilot passage providing fuel flow to said one pilot burner controlled by said thermostatic valve means in addition to fuel supplied between said inlet and said one outlet externally of said main fuel passage.

4. The control valve of claim 3 wherein said thermostatic valve means includes a valve disk movable toward and away from a valve seat defined in said main fuel passage, said pilot passage having one end in communication with said valve seat for supplying additional fuel to said one pilot burner when said disk is away from said seat.

5. The control valve of claim 4 wherein said valve disk includes one or more ports therein and said thermostatic valve means includes a second valve element movable toward and away from said disk to modulate fuel flow through said ports when said disk is seated on said valve seat for sustaining a modulating flame at said one main burner when said valve member is positioned in a high temperature broil position.

6. The control valve of claim 5 wherein said passage means includes a broil passage in communication between said main fuel passage and said outlet for said one pilot burner when said valve member is in said broil position for supplying additional fuel for said one pilot burner.

7. The control valve of claim 2 wherein said passage means includes a bore defined in said valve body and said valve member is mounted for rotation in said bore between said first, second and third positions, and said temperature controlling positions.

8. The control valve of claim 7 wherein said main passage comprises a hollow bore in said valve member closed at one end and open at an opposite end in communication with said thermostatic valve means.

9. The control valve of claim 8 wherein said main passage includes a slot in said valve member to provide communication between a portion of an exterior circumferential surface of said member and said hollow bore and aligned with said inlet of said valve body, said valve member including an adjoining solid circumferential portion aligned with and adjacent said slot blocking communication between said hollow bore of said valve member and said inlet when said valve member is in said first, second and third positions, said slot operative to provide communication from said inlet to said hollow bore when said valve member is in said range of temperature controlling positions.

10. A control valve for use with a gas range having a plurality of pilot burners for igniting main burners, said valve comprising a valve body including a bore in communication with an inlet for gas and a plurality of outlets for supplying gas to said pilot burners, a manually operable valve member rotatably mounted in said bore of said valve body for selectively controlling the flow of gas between said inlet and said outlets, said valve including first passage means controlled by the rotative position of said valve member in said bore for providing selective communication between said'inlet and said outlets when said valve member is moved between first, second and third mianual positions, said first passage means positioned to communicate between said inlet and said plurality of outlets in said first position, positioned to communicate between said inlet and less than all of said outlets in said second position and positioned to provide no communication between said inlet and said plurality of outlets in said third position, a thermostatic valve means also controlled by the rotative position of said valve member in said bore of said body for maintaining a selected temperature range at the main burner of one of said pilot burners when said valve member is rotated within a range of automatic temperature controlling positions out of said first, second and third positions, and second passage means in said valve aligned to communicate between said inlet and a main outlet for supplying gas for one of said main burners when said valve member is positioned in said temperature controlling range.

11. The control valve of claim 10 wherein said thermostatic valve means includes thermally responsive means for sensing the temperature at said one main burner for modulating said valve means, said second passage means including a main fuel flow passage between said valve member and said main outlet, said thermostatic valve means positioned to control the fuel flow through said main passage in response to the temperature condition sensed by said thermally responsive means.

12. The control valve of claim 11 wherein said second passage means includes a pilot supply passage between said main fuel passage and said main outlet for said one pilot burner, said pilot supply passage providing fuel flow to said one pilot burner controlled by said thermostatic valve means in addition to fuel supplied between said inlet and said one outlet via said first passage means.

13. The control valve of claim 12 including a thermostatic valve chamber in said second passage for containing said thermostatic valve means and in communication between said main fuel passage and said main fuel outlet, said thermostatic valve means including a valve disk movable toward and away from a valve seat defined between said main fuel passage and said valve chamber, said pilot supply passage having one end in communication with said valve: seat for supplying additional fuel to said one pilot burner via said first passage means when said disk is away from said seat.

14. The control valve of claim 13 wherein said valve disk includes one or more ports for communication between said main fuel passage and said valve chamber, said thermostatic valve means includes a second valve element movable toward and away from said disk to modulate fuel flow through said ports when said disk is seated on said valve seat for sustaining a modulating flame at said one main burner when said valve member is rotatively positioned in an automatic temperature controlled broil position.

15. The control valve of claim 14 wherein said valve includes a second pilot supply passage in communication between said main fuel passage and said outlet for said one pilot burner, said second pilot supply passage aligned for supplying additional pilot fuel for said one pilot burner from said main fuel passage via said first passage means.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3386656 *Mar 6, 1967Jun 4, 1968Harper Wyman CoTwo burner oven systems and controls
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4007760 *Aug 15, 1975Feb 15, 1977Robertshaw Controls CompanyFuel control system and control device therefor or the like
US5102039 *Jan 15, 1991Apr 7, 1992Robertshaw Controls CompanyFuel control device and method of making the same
US5787874 *Dec 27, 1995Aug 4, 1998Cramer GmbhGas-fired ceramic-cooktop burner
US5979430 *Feb 6, 1998Nov 9, 1999Universal Tubular Systems, Inc.Supply device for gas appliance manifold
US6082388 *Mar 17, 1998Jul 4, 2000Sit La Precisa S.R.L.Control device for gas burners
US6627828Sep 6, 2000Sep 30, 2003Maytag CorporationGas appliance valve and switch actuator assembly including knob actuated depressible ignition contactor
US7967006Oct 19, 2009Jun 28, 2011David DengDual fuel heater
US7967007Mar 15, 2010Jun 28, 2011David DengHeater configured to operate with a first or second fuel
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Classifications
U.S. Classification236/15.00A, 431/280
International ClassificationG05G1/00, F16K11/02, F16K5/00, F16K11/083, F24C3/12, F23N1/00, G05G1/02, F16K5/12
Cooperative ClassificationG05G1/02, F23N2035/18, F23N2035/12, F23N2041/14, F24C3/128, F23N2037/02, F23N2035/24, F23N1/007, F16K11/0836, F16K5/12
European ClassificationF16K11/083R, F16K5/12, F23N1/00F, G05G1/02, F24C3/12F2