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Publication numberUS3884615 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 20, 1975
Filing dateMar 21, 1974
Priority dateMar 21, 1974
Also published asCA1021587A, CA1021587A1, DE2504188A1, DE2504188B2
Publication numberUS 3884615 A, US 3884615A, US-A-3884615, US3884615 A, US3884615A
InventorsSobieski John C
Original AssigneeGen Electric
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Flash Lamp Mount Construction
US 3884615 A
Abstract
A glass bead is provided over an end of a pair of inlead wires for a flash lamp. An opening is provided through the bead between and in communication with both inlead wires, and is filled with primer material. One of the inlead wires may extend through the bead and into contact with combustible material in the lamp. The underside of the bead may be sleeved or shaped to prevent shorting between the inlead wires.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Sobieski May 20, 1975 [54] FLASH LAMP MOUNT CONSTRUCTION 3,823,994 7/1974 De Graaf et al. 431/95 75 I ventor: John C. Sobieski, Russell Tw 1 n Ohio p Primary ExaminerCarroll B. Donty, Jr.

Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Norman C. Fulmer; Asslgneei General Electric p y Lawrence R. Kempton; Frank L. Neuhauser Schenectady, NY.

[22] Filed: Mar. 21, 1974 [57] ABSTRACT pp 453,487 A glass bead is provided over an end of a pair of inlead wires for a flash lamp. An opening is provided through the bead between and in communication with 52 U.S. Cl. 431 95 E Int Cl Fzlk 4 both inlead WIICS, and 1s filled with primer material.

[58] Field 431/93 95 One of the inlead wires may extend through the bead and into contact with combustible material in the References Cited lamp. The underside of the bead may be sleeved or UNITED STATES PATENTS 10/1973 Van der Tas et al. 431/95 shaped to prevent shorting between the inlead wires.

15 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures FLASH LAMP MOUNT CONSTRUCTION CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION Sobieski, Photoflash Lamp Having Non-Shorting Construction," assigned the same as this invention.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The invention is in the field of photoflash lamps of the so-called high-voltage type, which contain a primer material connected across inlead wires, there being no conventional filament in such a lamp. The mount for such a lamp comprises an assembly including inlead wires and primer material.

Photoflash lamps may be classified generally into two voltage types: low-voltage and high-voltage. The lowvoltage types usually are intended to be flashed by a battery, or a charged capacitor, having a voltage of about 1.5 voltsto volts, whereas the high-voltage flash lamps are intended to be flashed by a firing pulse of a few hundred volts or greater such as can be produced by a piezoelectric element. .Conventional lowvoltage flash lamps contain a filament connected across inlead wires. When the filament is heated by a firing current, it ignites a primer material which in turn ignites a combustible material such as metal foil which, with the aid of oxygen in the lamp, produces a flash of light.

In typical high-voltage flash lamp constructions, the primer material is connected directly across and between a pair of inlead wires extending into the lamp envelope. The primer material may be positioned and carried in the lamp on top of a glass or ceramic insulating material member through which the inlead wires extend, or may be carried in a cavity in such a member. In another construction, the primer material is carried on or in a depression in the inner wall of the envelope at the bottom of the lamp. In another high-voltage flash lamp construction, disclosed in US. Pat. Nos. 2,868,003 and 3,000,200, both to Warren Albrecht, the primer material is applied to one or both of the inlead wires within the lamp and the electrical circuit is completed through the combustible shredded metal foil in the lamp.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Objects of the invention are to provide a new and improved mount construction for flash lamps, and to provide flash lamps incorporating such mounts, in which the primer will reliably ignite the combustible material in the lamp, and in which a flashed lamp will reliably have a high impedance 'across its lead-in wires.

The invention comprises, briefly and in a preferred embodiment, a flash lamp mount construction comprising a glass bead or other electrically insulative member provided over an end of a pair of inlead wires. An opening is provided through the bead member between and in communication with both of the inlead wires, and primer material is provided in the opening and electrically bridges across the inlead wires. Preferably the aforesaid opening extends fully through the bead member, in a direction parallel to the inlead wires. Also, preferably, a portion of the bead member extends above and over and overlies at least a portion of the ends of the inlead wires. One of the inlead wires may extend through the top of the bead member and into contact with combustible material in the lamp. The underside of the bead member may be sleeved or shaped to provide increased electrical insulation at the inlead wires to prevent shorting between them.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a side view of a photoflash lamp in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 2 is a top view of the mount in the flash lamp of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a side cross-sectional view of the mount construction.

FIGS. .4, 5, and 6 are side cross-sectional views of modified mount constructions in accordance with the invention.

FIG. 7 is a side view of a flash lamp construction in accordance with another preferred embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 8 is a side cross-sectional view of the mount employed in FIG. 7.

FIG. 9 is a top view of the mount of FIG. 8.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS The lamp shown in FIG. 1 of the drawings is generally the same, except for the mount construction, as that shown in FIG. 5 of US. Pat. No. 3,506,385 to Kurt Weber and George Cressman, and comprises a tubular envelope 11, preferably made of a borosilicate glass or other suitable vitreous material such as lead glass and having a stem press seal 12 at one end thereof through which a pair of inlead wires 13, 14 extend from the ex 16 at the other end thereof from the stem press seal 12.

The lamp may be coated with the usual lacquer or plastic protective coating.

In accordance with the invention, and as shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, the mount 15 includes flash ignition means for igniting the combustible material 16, comprising a glass bead or other vitreous electrically insulative member 18 sealedover and around an endof the pair of lead-in or inlead wires 13 and 14. An opening 19 is provided through the bead 18 and is between and in communication with both of the inlead wires 13 and 14. The bead 18 may be formed by placing a ring 0f glass around the ends of the inlead wires, and heating for a suitable time at a suitable temperature so as to cause the glass ring to shrink into molten contact with the end portions of the inlead wires, leaving the slotlike or other shaped opening 19. Greater accuracy can be achieved by molding the glass ring into place. The ends of the inlead wires 13 and 14 extend only partially into the bead, as shown, and the bead material overlies the ends of the inlead wires. Suitable dimensions for the bead 18 are about 0.080 inch in height, with the slot 19 being about 0.015 inch wide and about 0.040 inch long between the inlead wires 13 and 14. I

The opening 19 is at least partially filled with primer material 21. Various suitable primer materials are known; for example, a mixture may be prepared offlnc particles of zirconium and potassium perchlorate along with a binder such as nitrocellulose and solvent such as amyl acetate, as described in the above-mentioned Albrecht patents. This binder, in liquid form, is applied to the opening 19 with a syringe, or by daubing, or by dipping the inverted mount onto the surface of the liquid primer. The small cross-sectional area of the opening 19, and the opening being open at both ends, causes a capillary action effect which aids in drawing the liquid primer material into the opening. The binder and solvent are then dried out from the primer material 21 in the opening 19. Preferably the mount is sealed in the envelope 11 prior to putting the primer 21 into the opening 19 of the bead l8, and then the combustible material 16 is positioned in the envelope above the head 18 whereby the upper end of the opening 19 is directed toward the combustible material 16, the tippedoff end 17 is necked down, the bulb is evacuated and filled in with oxygen, and then tipped off at 17.

The mount construction of the invention achieves several desirable advantages. Prior to flashing of the lamp, the top ends of the inlead wires 13 and 14, being covered over by the bead material and the primer, cannot become short-circuited by being in contact with shreds of the combustible material 16. The bead 18 is large enough in diameter to reduce the likelihood of strands of material 16 from extending down between the bead and inner wall of bulb 11 so as to short the inlead wires 13 and 14. During flashing of the lamp, with the lamp conventionally being in base-down position as shown in the drawing, voltage applied to the primer 2] via the inlead wires 13 and 14 causes the primer 21 to ignite, causing a blast of sparks both upwardly and downwardly from the opening 19. The upward blast of sparks is directed toward and ignites the combustible material 16, which, with the aid of the oxygen in the lamp, causes a flash of light. The downward blast of sparks from the opening 19, with the aid of gravity, assures complete or substantially complete exiting of primer material from the opening 19, thus insuring an open circuit rather than a short circuit in the flashed lamp between the inlead wires 13 and 14. The aforesaid downward blast of sparks is directed toward the thickened glass at the seal 12 at the bottom of the bulb, which readily withstands the blast. Also, upon flashing of the lamp, the glass bead covering over some or all of the upper ends of the lead-in wires 13 and 14 helps to prevent particles of burned or partly burned metal of the combustible material 16 from falling against the ends of the lead-in wires and causing a short or partial short between them, and the small cross-sectional size of the opening 19 tends to prevent burned metal debris from falling into the opening 19 so as to short across the inleads 13, 14.

In the modification of FIG. 4, one of the lead-in wires 14 extends completely through the bead 18 and is in electrical contact with the combustion metal 16, which is desirable in certain flash lamps so that the combustion material 16 can be electrically grounded, thus reducing the possibility of accidental electrostatic flashing of the lamp.

In the modification of FIG. 5, a glass sleeve 23 ex tends downwardly from the bead l8 and around one of the lead-in wires 13, and functions to help prevent debris from the combustion material 16 from shorting between the lead-in wires 13 and 14 at the underside of the bead 18 after the lamp has flashed. In the modification of FIG. 6, the bead 18 is shaped so as to extend downwardly and partially around each of the lead-in wires 13 and 14, for the same purpose as that of FIG. 5, Le, to help prevent debris from the combustible material 16 of the flashed lamp from shorting across the lead-in wires below the bead 18.

The alternative embodiment of the invention shown in FIGS. 7, 8, and 9 is generally the same as that of FIGS. 1, 2, and 3, except that the opening 19 through the bead 18 is a circular tapered hole having a larger diameter toward the bottom of the bead and facing the seal 12, as shown. It will be noted that FIGS. 8 and 9 do not show primer material in the opening 19. In a successful construction of this embodiment, the height of the bead 18 is 0.080 inch, the smaller (upper) diameter of the opening 19 being approximately 0.024 inch, and the diameter of the larger (bottom) end of the circular opening being approximately 0.040 inch. It will be noted that, near the small upper end of the opening 19, the glass or other material of the bead 18 completely covers over the upper ends of the lead-in wires 13 and 14, thus virtually assuring that no metallic debris from the flashing of the combustible material 16 will be able to fall into the opening 19 and short across the lead-in wires 13 and 14.

It is believed that tapering the opening 19, as best shown in FIGS. 8 and 9, with the larger end downward in the lamp (it being understood that flash lamps are usually oriented base-down when flashing) helps the flashing primer material debris to fall downwardly and out of the opening 19, as well as being blasted down out of the opening toward the thickened glass at the seal 12, therefore helping to insure that no substantial amount of primer material will remain in the opening 19 after flashing which could cause a short or low impedance across the lead-in wires 13 and 14, while at the same time a sufficient amount of primer blast sparks blast upwardly from the opening 19 so as to reach and ignite the combustible material 16 when the lamp is flashed. The slot-like opening 19 shown in FIGS. 1-6 could also similarly be tapered so as to have a larger cross section at the bottom of the head 18 than at the top thereof. The embodiment of FIGS. 7-9 can employ the modifications of FIGS. 4-6.

It has been found that the invention achieves the objectives of providing a high-voltage flash lamp which will reliably flash, and which will reliably have an open circuit or high impedance across its lead-wires after flashing, these objectives being achieved by constructing a mount comprising a bead or other electrically insulative member provided over an end of a pair of substantially parallel lead-in wires, there being an opening through the bead between and in communication with both of the lead-in wires, the opening being filled or partially filled with primer material and being open at both ends thereof at different locations on the surface of the insulative member to the interior of the flash lamp, so that when the primer ignites it can readily blast out and exitfrom the opening at both ends thereof, thus insuring that little if any residue of the primer will remain in the opening after flashing.

Preferably, a clear glass bead 18 having rounded sides is employed, as shown, whereupon the curved sides of the bead function as a magnifying lens for aidterial in the opening 19, the primer material 21 usually being of a black or dark color. The lead-in wires 13 and 14 preferably are shaped as shown, being substantially mutually parallel and being farther apart where they enter the inside of the bulb 11 than at their upper ends at the bead 18 (which spacing at the bead is a function of desired firing breakdown voltage), thus providing more spacing between them on the bottom of the inside of the bulb and making it less likely that any falling metallic debris from the combustible material 16 which reaches the bottom of the bulb will cause a short across the lead-in wires 13 and 14. Alternative inlead arrangements include bringing the ends of the inleads in through opposite sides of the bead 18.

While preferred embodiments and modifications of the invention have been shown and described, various other embodiments and modifications thereof will become apparent to persons skilled in the art and will fall within the scope of the invention as defined in the following claims.

What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

l. A photoflash lamp of the type having a bulb and a mount comprising a pair of inleads extending within the bulb and having flash ignition means connected across said inleads within said bulb, said bulb containing combustible material ignitable by said flash ignition means, wherein said flash ignition means comprises an electrically insulative member, said inleads extending into said insulative member, an opening through said' insulative member between and in communication with both of said inleads, said opening having ends thereof at different locations on the surface of said insulative member and communicating with the interior of saidbulb, at each of said ends, and primer material contained in said opening and connected electrically across said inleads said primer material being exposed to said interiorof the bulb at both said ends of said opening.

2. A flash lamp as claimed in claim 1, in which one end of said opening through the insulative member is directed toward said combustible material.

3. A flash lamp as claimed in claim 2, in which said insulative member overlies at least a portion of the ends of said inleads.

4. A flash lamp as claimed in claim 2, in which said inleads are substantially mutually parallel and enter into the bulb through a seal region at which the bulb wall is relatively thicker than the rest of the bulb wall,

said opening extending substantially straight through the insulative member in a direction substantially paral- 5 lel to said inleads, the other end of said opening being directed toward said seal region.

5. A flash lamp as claimed in claim 4, in which said opening is tapered with the larger cross-section area thereof being at said end directed toward said seal region.

6. A flash lamp as claimed in claim 4, in which said opening is in the shape of a slot extending between said inleads and through said insulative member.

7. A flash lamp as claimed in claim 6, in which said slot has a height of about 0.080 inch through said insulative member, a length of about 0.040 inch between said inleads, and a width of about 0.015 inch.

8. A flash lamp as claimed in claim 4,-in which said opening has a substantially circular cross-sectional shape.

9. A flash lamp as claimed in claim 8, in which said circular opening is tapered with the larger diameter end thereof being at said end directed toward said seal region.

10. A flash lamp as claimed in claim 9, in which said insulative member overlies at least a portion of the ends of said inleads.

11. A flash lamp as claimed in claim 9, in which said tapered circular opening has a length of about 0.080 inch, a small end diameter of about 0.024 inch, and a larger end diameter of about 0.040 inch.

12. A flash lamp as claimed in claim 4, in which one of said inleads extends entirely through said insulative member and into electrical contact with said combustible material. 0

13. A flash lamp as claimed in claim 4, including at least one sleeve of insulative material positioned around one of said inleads and attached to and extending from said insulative member toward said seal re: gion.

14. A flash lamp as claimed in claim 4, in which said insulative member extends toward said seal region alongside at least one of said inleads.

15. A flash lamp as claimed in claim 4, in which said inleads are shaped to be relatively farther apart at said seal region than at said insulative member.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3768957 *Sep 21, 1971Oct 30, 1973Philips CorpFlash bulb
US3823994 *Feb 13, 1973Jul 16, 1974Philips CorpMethod of making combustion flash bulb
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4008040 *Nov 24, 1975Feb 15, 1977Gte Sylvania IncorporatedPhotoflash lamp and method of making same
US4040777 *Apr 28, 1975Aug 9, 1977General Electric CompanyFlash lamp array having shorting lamps
US4041300 *Oct 28, 1975Aug 9, 1977General Electric CompanyPhotoflash array with discharge path for electrostatic charges
US4049369 *Dec 29, 1975Sep 20, 1977Gte Sylvania IncorporatedPhotoflash lamp and multilamp unit with electrostatic protection
US4082494 *Dec 8, 1976Apr 4, 1978Gte Sylvania IncorporatedPhotoflash lamp
US4105392 *May 17, 1977Aug 8, 1978Gte Sylvania IncorporatedPhotoflash lamp
US4128858 *Apr 14, 1975Dec 5, 1978General Electric CompanyMultiple flashlamp system
US4229161 *Jan 2, 1979Oct 21, 1980Gte Products CorporationPhotoflash lamp and method of making
US4309166 *Dec 11, 1978Jan 5, 1982U.S. Philips CorporationCombustion flashbulb
US4363622 *Jun 7, 1979Dec 14, 1982U.S. Philips CorporationCombustion flashbulb
US4369556 *Jul 21, 1980Jan 25, 1983Gte Products CorporationMethod of making a photoflash lamp having new lead seal structure
US4388065 *Apr 18, 1980Jun 14, 1983U.S. Philips CorporationCombustion flash bulb
US4614494 *Dec 10, 1985Sep 30, 1986Gte Products CorporationPrimer insulating base
US4659308 *Dec 10, 1985Apr 21, 1987Gte Products CorporationPhotoflash lamp with improved primer
US4696641 *Aug 11, 1986Sep 29, 1987Gte Products CorporationPrimer material and photoflash lamp
DE2739388A1 *Sep 1, 1977Mar 9, 1978Gte Sylvania IncPiezoelektrisch zuendbare photoblitzlampe und methode zu ihrer herstellung
EP0044551A1 *Jul 20, 1981Jan 27, 1982GTE Products CorporationMethod of making a pressurized electrically-activated high-voltage photoflash lamp
EP0044552A1 *Jul 20, 1981Jan 27, 1982GTE Products CorporationElectrically-activated high-voltage photoflash lamp excluding a press-sealed end portion and method of making same
Classifications
U.S. Classification431/362
International ClassificationF21K5/16, F21K5/08, F21K5/00
Cooperative ClassificationF21K5/02
European ClassificationF21K5/02