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Publication numberUS3885329 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 27, 1975
Filing dateMay 15, 1974
Priority dateMay 15, 1974
Also published asDE2535793A1
Publication numberUS 3885329 A, US 3885329A, US-A-3885329, US3885329 A, US3885329A
InventorsFrench Charles S
Original AssigneeScott Usa
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ski boot with cantable upper
US 3885329 A
Abstract
A ski boot has an upper shell mounted to a lower shell by an eccentric member which can be rotated to cant the upper shell relative to the lower shell. In one embodiment, the eccentric member is a pivot pin having a pivot shank with an intermediate eccentric neck journalled within a circular aperture in the upper shell. By rotating a slotted head to different lockable positions, the eccentric neck cants the upper by different angles. In another embodiment, the eccentric member is a sleeve having an external, extending arm, movable between a plurality of detent apertures to cant the upper shell by different discreet angles. A fastener extends through the sleeve to attach the upper shell to the lower shell.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

0 United States Patent 1 Il 11 3,885,329

French May 27, 1975 SK] BOOT WITH CANTABLE UPPER Primary Examiner-Patrick D. Lawson Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Wegner, Stellman, McCord, [75] Inventor. Charles S. French, Sun Valley, Wiles & Wood Idaho [73] Assignee: Scott USA, Sun Valley, Idaho [57] ABSTRACT [22] Filed: May 1974 A ski boot has an upper shell mounted to a lower shell [21] Appl. No.: 470,208 by an eccentric member which can be rotated to cant the upper shell relative to the lower shell. In one embodiment, the eccentric member is a pivot pin having [52] US. Cl. a pivot Shank with an intermediate eccentric neck t R 2 journalled a circular aperture in e upp Feld of Search 3 shell. By rotating a slotted head to different lockable positions, the eccentric neck cants the upper by differ- [56] References ent angles. In another embodiment, the eccentric UNITED STATES PATENTS member is a sleeve having an external, extending arm, 3,067,531 12/1962 Scott et a1. 36/25 AL movable between a plurality of detent apertures to 3,545,103 12/1970 Bloomfield et al. 36/25 AL cant the upper shell by different discreet angles. A fas- 3,72l,023 Kastinger AL I tener extends through the sleeve to attach the upper shell to the lower shell.

21 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures SKI BOOT WITH CANTABLE UPPER BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a ski boot having an upper which can be canted by rotation of an eccentric member.

Cant as used with reference to ski boots and ski bindings refers to a lateral offset or tilt in a skiers upper leg with respect to the skiers foot or sole. Normally, the sole of a ski boot would not be perfectly flat when the skier is in a normal skiing posture, should the leg of a skier have a tilt or lateral offset due to bowleggedness or knock-kneed condition. This type of condition is quite common. In fact, many ski boots incorporate a slight cant in the upper shaft, such as 3 but such a fixed cant angle is an unsatisfactory compromise. While most custom canting is accomplished by placing a wedge between the ski binding and the ski, it is considered more desirable to cant the boot itself.

Prior ski boots have included a separate upper connected by metal stays with a lower vamp. The upper has been cantable by bending the metal stays or, by vertically sliding a bracket on the metal stay until a desired tilt is reached for the upper, and then attaching the bracket tothe metal stay by a screw member which is received in one of a plurality of threaded bores in the metal stay. An example of such a ski boot is shown in US. Pat. No. 3,313,046 issued Apr. 11, 1967. It is also known to provide a turnbuckle for adjusting the cant of the upper.

Sky boots having uppers which are canted by bending or sliding movement along a metal stay, or by use of turnbuckles, have several disadvantages. The metal stay and bracket member, or the turnbuckle, besides being unnecessary extra parts, require extra space and special techniques for attachment when the upper is formed by a rigid plastic shell. Also, it is difficult, and sometimes impossible to adjust the cant of the upper while the skier is in the ski boot. Except in boots having metal stays which are bendable or turnbuckles, the only cant adjustment consists of a series of discreet cant positions. In certain conditions, it may be desirable to continuously vary the cant in order to better match the natural cant of a skiers leg.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In accordance with the present invention, a ski boot has an upper which can be canted relative to a lower by an improved canting mechanism consisting of a rotatable eccentric member. By incorporating the eccentric member into the hinge or pivot pin for the upper and lower shells of a rigid plastsic ski boot, almosst no additional parts nor extra space are required. The cant adjustment may be varied by the skier, while the skier has his foot in the ski boot, and continuous cant adjustment is possible.

One object of the present invention is the provision of an improved cantable ski boot using a rotatable eccentric member as the cast mechanism.

Other objects and features of the invention will be apparent from the following description and from the drawings. While illustrative embodiments of the invention are shown in the drawings and will be describied in detail herein, the invention is susceptible of embodiment in many different forms and it should be understood that the present disclosure is to be considered as an exemplification of the principles of the invention and is not intended to limit the invention to the embodiments illustrated.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a ski boot having a cantable upperand incorporating an improved cant mechanism;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged side view of the pivot pin portion of the ski boot of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken along lines 33 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged side view, similar to FIG. 2 of an alternate embodiment for the cant mechanism; and

FIG. 5 is a sectional view taken along lines 55 of FIG. 4.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Turning to FIGS. 1-3, a ski boot includes an upper section or shell 10 and a lower section or vamp 12 having an integral sole 13. The upper shell 10 is affixed to the lower vamp 12 by a pair of identical mounting and cant mechanisms 15, located on opposite sides of the boot, and only one of which is illustrated in the drawings. Except for the mounting mechanisms 15, the illustrated ski boot is conventional and further includes a semi-rigid tongue 18 which is movable forwardly against the forward edges 20 of the upper shell 10 to spread the upper shell and thereby allow a controlled amount of forward flex. A metal strip 22 is mounted adjacent each forward edge 20 to reinforce the upper shell 10, which may be formed of a rigid plastic material.

The lower end of metal strip 22 forms a tang 24 insertable in one of a plurality of slots contained in a slotted plate 26 which is affixed to the forward portion of the vamp 12. A buckle 28 allows the two side sections of the upper shell 10 to be connected together. An extending semi-rigid cuff 30 forms a high back ski boot, with the rear cuff being somewhat flexible but still firmly supporting the skiers leg. When the buckle 28 is opened, the upper shell 10 can spread sideways, to clear the tongue 18, and then rotated rearwardly above the mounting mechanism 15, to allow rear entry to the ski boot. After the skier has placed his foot in the vamp 12, with the forward portion of his leg resting against the tongue 18, the upper shell 10 is privoted forwardly and around the skiers leg, the metal tang 24 is placed in one of the slots in the slotted plate 26, and the buckle 28 is closed;

By placing the metal tang 24 in a more forward slot in the slotted plate 26, the forward lean of the upper shell 10 may be increased. When the buckle 28 is closed, the upper shell 10 is rigidly mounted relative to the vamp 12, because the interconnected metal tang 24 and slotted plate prevent any movement of the upper shell. However, the upper portion of the skiers foot may slide forwardly against a controlled amount of forward flex created by forward movement of the tongue 18 against the forward edges 20. During this movement, the buckle 28 serves as fulcrum point.

The custom fit the interior of the ski boot to a particular skiers foot, different thickness cushions or pads 34 may be inserted within the vamp shell 12. The pads 34 may be formed of a resilient plastic material, or a flow type material which will conform to a skiers foot under prolonged pressure but will not change form under impact pressure, or other conventional inner type material. Pads 34 of different size may be nested inside each other, if desired, to reduce the interior dimensions of the vamp shell 12. Different height wedges 36 may be laid againstthe integral sole 13 to provide a downwardly slanted foot contacting upper surface 38, to provide forward lean for the skiers foot.

The above described ski foot, except for the mechanism 15, is conventional and is illustrated by way of example only. The illustrated ski boot (except for mechanism 15) is similar in principle to the ski boot illustrated in US. Pat. No. 3,486,247 issued Dec. 30, 1969. Because the metal tangs 24 are inserted in the slottetd plate 26, the upper is locked relative to the lower during use. Thus, the ski boot is of the locked hinge type (but of adjustable forward lean) and has a rear entry method of access to the ski boot interior. The invention is equally adaptable for use with pivoted uppers which move with the skiers foot during use. In general, the invention is equally adaptable for use with any ski boot having a separate upper anad lower which are connected toogether.

The novel mechanism 15 for connecting the upper to the lower 12 also serves as the cant mechanism for canting or tilting the upper relative to the lower. By adjustment of the cant mechanism, the upper 10 may be moved sideways or laterally, as illustrated by arrows 40, relative to the vamp. This is accomplished by raising and/or lowering the side sections of the upper, to thereby produce a lateral tilt to the shaft of the upper.

In FIGS. 2 and 3, one embodiment for the mechanism is seen to consist of an eccentric pivot pin having an eccentric threaded shank 44 relative to a neck 46 and an enlarged head 48. The neck 46 has a smooth circular periphery and is journalled in a circular bearing aperture 15 in the upper shell 10. The thickness of the neck 46 is slightly greater than the thickness of the upper shell 10, to allow sliding movement of the upper relative to the lower. The threaded shank 44 extends through a smaller diameter, circular aperture in lower shell 12. A nut 52 is threaded on shank 44.

To change the cant of the upper 10, the nut 52 is loosened and the eccentric pivot pin is rotated by a screwdriver or coin placed in a slot 56 in the head 48. As seen in FIG. 2, movement of the neck 46 about the eccentric threaded shank 44 moves the upper shell vertically (and longitudinally to some extent) to a new position, such as illustrated by the dashed lines 10. The bottom surface 60 of the neck 46 may be serrated so that upon tightening of the nut 52, the neck will be locked against rotation from the selected position. The exterior surface of the upper shell 10 carries angle degree markings 62 which indicate, in relation with a markings 64 on the head 48 (or in relation with the slot 56) the angular cant of the upper.

When the duplicate side pivot pins 15 locate the axes of their necks 46 vertically below the axes of their shanks 44, no cant is provided to the shaft of the upper. This represents the most stable position for the pivot pins. By rotating the slotted head of only one of the pivot pins, the upper shell 10 will be displaced upwardly on only that side, thus canting the shaft of the upper toward the other pivot pin. Alternatively, by rotating the opposite pivot pin, a cant of opposite slant with respect to vertical is provided. The canting mechanism is preferably located below the ankle bone of the skier. In the illustrated embodiments, the pivot mechanism is locatd below the sole contacting surface 38.

By loosely screwing nut 52 against the lower shell 12, inserting the wedge 36 and then inserting his foot within the ski boot and closing the buckle 28, the skier can continuously adjust the cant angle by rotation of head 48, while his foot is in the ski boot, until the proper cant angle is reached. A mechanical canting machine may be utilized to aid the skier in determining his proper cant angle. Once the proper cant angle has been determined, the skier would remove his foot from the ski boot, remove the insert wedge 28, and tighten nut 52 to prevent any further rotation of the head 48. The ski boot is now properly canted and ready for onslope use.

In FIGS. 4 and 5, an alternate embodiment for mechanism 15 is illustrated. A collar or sleeve has an eccentric bore 72 which receives the shank 74 of a button-head rivet 76. The end 78 of the rivet is flattened to thereby secure the upper shell 10 and the lower shell 12 between the flattened end and the button-head. The length of the shank 74, between the button-head and the flattened end 78, is sufficient in length to allow sliding movement between the upper shell 10 and the lower shell 12. While a separate rivet is illustrated, the connecting member could be a post integral with shell 12 and extending outward, the post being flattened to secure the sleeve 70 thereon.

Eccentric sleeve 70 has an integral arm 80 with an extending detent nipple 82 which is received in one of a plurality of detent recesses 84 formed in the upper Shell 10. Th length of arm 80 and the resiliency of the material forming the arm are selected to allow the nipple 82 to be manually moved out of engagement with the recess 84, and the arm rotated until the nipple 82 is received in the next recess. Movement of the arm 80 to different detent positions rotates the eccentric sleeve 70 relative to the rivet shank 74, thus vertically displacing the upper (and somewhat longitudinally moving theh upper) as to the new position 10'. Each different detented position of the arm 80 forms a different cant angle of the shaft of the upper shell. The arm 80 (not illustratd) associated with the pivot pin on the opposite side of the boot would, of course, be maintained in its zero degree cant detented position, in order to cant the shaft of the upper toward the not illustrated pivot pin. The cant adjustment is readily adjustable by the skier, and can be changed on a ski slope. The position of arm 80, relative to the pivot recesses 84, provides a visual indication of the cant angle, which may be marked directly on the upper, if desired.

As previously noted, a duplicate connecting mechanism 15 (not illustrated) is located on the opposite side of the ski boot of FIG. 1. However, only one cant mechanism 15 is essential, and the opposite connecting mechanism could be a conventional pivot screw or rivet. In such a case, the eccentric member would normally be located in an intermediate position, at which position the upper would be set to be of equal height with respect to the upper or the opposite side. By rotating the eccentric member to either side of the intermediate position, the upper would be raised or lowered relative to the opposite side, thus allowing cant to either side of a central vertical plane. Of course, only one cant mechanism is necessary if the upper shaft is to be tilted to only one side of the vertical plane.

Although the upper of the illustrated ski boot is locked during use, and thus does not move relative to the lower 12, it will be appreciated that either cant mechanism of FIGS. 2-3 or 4-5 is adaptable to ski boots having uppers which are pivoted during use. In addition, either cant mechanism 15 is adaptable for use with any ski boot having separate uppers and lowers, including permanently locked hinge ski boots. In the case of a permanently locked hinge ski boot, an additional locking bolt would be provided, in a manner which would not interfere with the canting action of the mechanism 15. For example, such a locking bolt could be connected at the center rear of the ski boot, and thus would allow tilting action to both sides of a vertical plane extending longitudinally through the ski boot. Alternatively, the locking bolt could be inserted through the side of the ski boot, within a vertical slot in the upper, to allow for the slight upward movement produced when the boot is canted.

While the eccentric member has been illlustrated as being associated with the upper shell, the eccentric member could be associated with the lower shell. Other modifications and changes will be apparent in view of the above.

I claim: 1. A ski boot having an upper section which can be canted relative to a lower section, comprising:

an eccentric member mounted within one of said sections and rotatable about a connecting member associated with the other of said sections, the axis of the eccentric member being offset from the axis of the connecting member, and

adjustment means for allowing rotation of the eccentric member to change the position of the one section relative to the other section and for locking said eccentric member against rotation to thereby maintain a selected cant.

2. The ski boot of claim 1 wherein the eccentric member comprises an eccentric neck on a connecting pin having a shank corresponding to the connecting member, the shank extending from the neck and having an axis offset from the axis of the neck.

3. The ski boot of claim 2 wherein the shank is threaded and extends through an aperture in the other section and into the interior of the ski boot, and the adjustment means includes a nut threaded on the shank to draw the eccentric neck against the other section and thereby prevent rotation of the connecting pin.

4. The ski boot of claim 3 wherein the eccentric neck has a ribbed surface in abutment with the other side.

5. The ski boot of claim 1 wherein the connecting member comprises a shaft extending from the other section, and the eccentric member comprises a sleeve rotatable about the shaft, said sleeve having an axis offset from the center axis of the shaft.

6. The ski boot of claim 5 wherein the shaft extends through an excentric bore in the sleeve and has an enlarged head for capturing the sleeve rotatably between the enlarged head and the other section.

7. The ski boot of claim 5 wherein the shaft comprises a rivet extending through an aperture in the other section and terminating in a flattened end for rotatably capturing between the enlarged head and the flattened end the upper and lower sections.

8. The ski boot of claim 5 wherein the sleeve has an extending arm carrying a detent means engageable with a detent means on a surface of one of the sections to maintain the sleeve in afixed position, the arm and the detent means corresponding to the adjustment means.

9. The ski boot of claim 8 wherien the detent means on the arm comprises a nipple receivable within one of a plurality of recesses located on the surface and corresponding to the other detent means, the arm being rotatable to each of the plurality of recesses to provide a plurality of discreet cant angles for the upper section.

10. The ski boot of claim I including an indicator movable with movement of the eccentric member and a series of markings spaced on an external section surface to visually indicate relative to the indicator the relative cant angle of the upper section.

11. In a ski boot having an upper shell separate from a lower shell, an improved connecting means which allows canting of the upper shell relative to the lower shell, comprising:

a pivot pin having a shank extending through a pair of different diameter bores located in the upper shell and the lower shell,

the shank having an eccentric neck offset from the axis of the shank and located in one of the bores, and

a lock member connectable on the shank for fixing the position of the eccentric neck relative to the shank.

12. The improvement of claim 11 wherein the pivot pin includes an enlarged head of greater diameter than the diameters of the bores, the shank being threaded and the lock member comprises a nut threaded on the shank for clamping the upper and lower shells between the enlarged head and the nut.

13. The improvement of claim 12 wherein the eccentric neck has a ribbed surfacewhich engages the adjacent shell for locking the pivot pin relative thereto.

14. The improvement of claim 12 wherein the enlarged head includes an elongated slot for rotating the eccentric neck to a desired position and for visually indicating the relative cant angle of the upper shell relative to the lower shell.

15. The improvement of claim 12 wherein the length of the eccentric neck is greater than the thickness of the surrounding shell to allow free pivotal movement of the shell about the eccentric neck.

16. The improvement of claim 15 wherein the upper shell forms a rear entry door for the ski boot, means for locking the rear entry door in a forward position for skiing, the locking means being openable to allow the rear entry door to be pivoted about the pin into a rear entry position.

17. In a ski boot having an upper shell separate from a lower shell, an improved connecting means which allows canting of the upper shell relative to the lower shell, comprising:

a shaft extending outward from an inner shell and at least partly through a bore in an outer shell,

an eccentric sleeve rotatably received in the bore and having an interior bore rotatably receiving the shaft and with an axis offset from the center axis of the sleeve, and

an adjustment member extending from the eccentric sleeve for rotating the sleeve to different lockable positions to produce different cant angles for the shells.

18. The improvement of claim 17 wherein the adjustment member comprises an arm extending along an external surface of the outer shell, and means for detentthe shells and having a pair of enlarged ends for rotatably capturing therebetween the shells.

21. The improvement of claim 17 including platform means located within the inner shell for defining a sole engaging surface for a skiers foot, and the shaft being located between the platform means and the bottom of the inner shell.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3067531 *Mar 15, 1961Dec 11, 1962Aspen Boot LtdSki boot
US3545103 *Feb 5, 1969Dec 8, 1970Sports TechnologyClosure for boot door
US3721023 *Sep 28, 1971Mar 20, 1973Kastinger MSports boot
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4334368 *Oct 31, 1980Jun 15, 1982Lange International S.A.Adjustable fastener for plastic ski boots
US4349971 *Jan 19, 1981Sep 21, 1982Lange International S.A.Forward lean adjuster for ski boots
US4499676 *Dec 2, 1982Feb 19, 1985Lange International S.A.Ski boot
US4539764 *May 25, 1983Sep 10, 1985Salomon S.A.Adjustment apparatus for ski boot
US4575958 *Jul 30, 1984Mar 18, 1986Lange International S.A.Ski boot
US4601118 *Jul 5, 1983Jul 22, 1986Calzaturificio Tecnica SpaSki-boot with a boot leg having adjustable side inclination
US4611415 *Jul 16, 1984Sep 16, 1986Nordica S.P.A.Device for adjusting flex in ski boots and the like
US4615128 *Jan 22, 1985Oct 7, 1986Nordica S.P.A.Ski boot incorporating a flex control device
US4685226 *Mar 6, 1984Aug 11, 1987Caber Italia S.P.A.Ski boot having an opening quarter formed of more interconnected parts
US4945659 *Sep 16, 1988Aug 7, 1990Salomon S.A.Ski boot having an interchangeable sole portion for controlling global wedging angle of the boot
US5212893 *May 28, 1991May 25, 1993Nordica S.P.A.Flexibility adjustment fastener particularly for ski boots
US5363572 *May 4, 1993Nov 15, 1994Calzaturificio Tecnica SpaLateral-inclination adjusting device for ski-boots
US5454173 *Oct 4, 1993Oct 3, 1995Salomon S.A.Sports boot with a journalled collar
US5675917 *Mar 16, 1995Oct 14, 1997Salomon S.A.Sports boot with a journalled collar
US5873172 *Jul 15, 1997Feb 23, 1999Surefoot LlcTo determine the cant angle formed between a skier's leg and a ski
DE3135170A1 *Sep 4, 1981Apr 29, 1982Lange Int SaBoot
DE3831930A1 *Sep 20, 1988Apr 13, 1989Salomon SaSohle eines skischuhs
DE3831930C2 *Sep 20, 1988Oct 22, 1998Salomon SaSkischuh
EP0150800A1 *Jan 23, 1985Aug 7, 1985NORDICA S.p.ASki boot incorporating a flex control device
EP0570053A1 *May 5, 1993Nov 18, 1993TECNICA SpAImproved lateral-inclination adjusting device for ski-boot
EP0845223A2 *Nov 3, 1997Jun 3, 1998Benetton Sportsystem S.p.A.Device for adjusting the inclination of a quarter with respect to the shell of a sport shoe
EP2090185A1 *Jan 24, 2008Aug 19, 2009Rossignol Lange S.R.L.Rivet for a sports shoe
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/118.7
International ClassificationA43B5/04
Cooperative ClassificationA43B5/0466
European ClassificationA43B5/04E16
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DateCodeEventDescription
Feb 10, 1988AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: SALOMON S.A., LA RAVOIRE, METZ-TESSY, 74370 PRINGY
Effective date: 19871211
Owner name: SCOTT USA LIMITED PARTNERSIP
Feb 10, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: SALOMON S.A., LA RAVOIRE, METZ-TESSY, 74370 PRINGY
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:SCOTT USA LIMITED PARTNERSIP;REEL/FRAME:004828/0001
Effective date: 19871211
Owner name: SALOMON S.A., A FRENCH COMPANY,FRANCE
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:SCOTT USA LIMITED PARTNERSIP;REEL/FRAME:004828/0001
Jul 14, 1986ASAssignment
Owner name: SCOTT USA LIMITED PARTNERSHIP, 110 LEWIS STREET, K
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Effective date: 19820615
Jul 10, 1986ASAssignment
Owner name: SCOTT U.S.A., INC., P.O. BOX 2030, SUN VALLEY, IDA
Free format text: RELEASED BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNORS:GRAVES, ALAN F.;LITTLEWOOD, PAUL A.;WEISS, JOHANNES S.;REEL/FRAME:004587/0586
Effective date: 19851115
Jul 10, 1986AS17Release by secured party
Owner name: GRAVES, ALAN F.
Owner name: LITTLEWOOD, PAUL A.
Owner name: SCOTT U.S.A., INC., P.O. BOX 2030, SUN VALLEY, IDA
Owner name: WEISS, JOHANNES S.
Effective date: 19851115
Jul 3, 1986AS99Other assignments
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Jul 3, 1986ASAssignment
Owner name: SCOTT U.S.A. INC., A LIMITED PARTNERSHIP
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Owner name: SCOTT U.S.A. INC., A CORP. IDAHO
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May 10, 1982ASAssignment
Owner name: SEGAL, ROGER G. TRUSTEE FOR , SCOTT USA. SCOTT SPO
Free format text: COURT APPOINTMENT;ASSIGNOR:SCOTT USA, SCOTT SPORTS CO, MOTO PRODUCTION CO.+ SUNRISE DISTRIBUTION+ MISSION GOGGLE CO+ UNIVERSAL SPORT GLASS, SNOW GOODS LTD.;REEL/FRAME:003996/0688
Effective date: 19810401
Jul 23, 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: SCOTT U.S.A., INC., P.O. BOX 2030, SUN VALLEY, IDA
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Owner name: SEGAL, ROGER, TRUSTEE IN BANKRUPTCY SCOTT USA
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