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Publication numberUS3885671 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 27, 1975
Filing dateJan 10, 1973
Priority dateApr 28, 1971
Publication numberUS 3885671 A, US 3885671A, US-A-3885671, US3885671 A, US3885671A
InventorsWilliam Spiegel, Jacob Spiegel, Albert Miller
Original AssigneeGilbreth Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Securement of band to card
US 3885671 A
Abstract
A carded package including an article disposed within a heat shrinkable tubing. The tubing is connected to the card via an adhesive thereon. The securement of the adhesive to the card is enhanced by providing plural perforations in the surface of the card and applying the adhesive to the card at the perforated area.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Spiegel et a1.

SECUREMENT OF BAND TO CARD Inventors: William Spiegel, Southampton;

Jacob Spiegel, Philadelphia, both of Pa.', Albert Miller, Sommerdale, NJ.

Gilbreth Company, Cornwell Heights, Pa.

Filed: Jan. 10, 1973 Appl. No.: 319,111

Related U.S. Application Data Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 138,056, April 28, 1971, Pat. No. 3,764,002.

Assignee:

U.S. c1. 206/460; 206/466; 206/471; 206/497; 206/813; 206/478 1111. c1. B650 73 00 Field 01 Search 53/30; 206145.33, 65 s, 206/78 R, 78 B, 79, 80 R, 80 11,1310. 18,

460, 813; 215/37 A; 229/1910. 12, 48 T, 48 sA References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 6/1964 Cozzolino 206/80 R 1451 May 27, 1975 3,194,474 7/1965 Rumberger 229/48 T X 3,208,590 9/1965 3,233,725 2/1966 811181 206/80 A 3,286,835 11/1966 Crane, Jr. 206/80 A 3,367,556 2/1968 Whitby 229/48 sA 3,423,059 1/1969 248/316 3,442,372 5/1969 Carmichael et al 229/1510. 12 3,784,086 1/1974 Forbes, Jr. 206/78 R UX FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 1,400,538 4/1965 France 206/80 A Primary Examiner-William 1. Price Assistant ExaminerSteven E. Lipman Attorney, Agent, or FirmCaesar, Rivise, Bernstein & Cohen [57] ABSTRACT A carded package including an article disposed within a heat shrinkable tubing. The tubing is connected to the card via an adhesive thereon. The securement of the adhesive to the card is enhanced by providing plural perforations in the surface of the card and applying the adhesive to the card at the perforated area.

5 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures SECUREMENT OF BAND TO CARD This application is a continuation-in-part of United States Application Ser. No. 138,056, filed on Apr. 28, l97l now U.S. Pat. No. 3,764,002, and entitled CARDED PACKAGE", the disclosure of which application is incorporated by reference herein.

This invention relates to a carded package and more particularly to a carded package having an improved securement means.

Prior to the invention as set forth in the above noted application, there were generally four basic types of packages for holding articles therein. One type of pack age, commonly called a blister-pack" utilizes a thermo-formed plastic cup which is heat sealed onto a card or held between layers of multi-layered card. Another type of package, commonly called a skin-pack", utilizes the article as a mold by flowing a thermo-plastic heat shrinkable film on the card in a vacuum too immobilize the article. Another type of package, commonly called a stretch-pack" utilizes a die-cut card with a molded plastic window therein, which card is folded over the article and the window is heat shrunk thereabout. Another type of package, commonly called a header-board" package, is formed by disposing an article within a tube of heat shrinkable material and hanging same from a small header-board.

All of the above packaging types suffer from one or more disadvantages, e.g. cost, accessability, strength, etc.

In view of the foregoing US. Pat. No. 3,764,002 disclosed and claimed a carded package comprising an article, a card and a heat shrinkable tube. The tube includes an outside surface which is connected to the card by an adhesive material in contact with the card and the outside surface of the tube. The article is disposed within the tube.

The carded package as disclosed and claimed in said co-pending application, offers various advantages over prior art packaging, e.g. it can be readily produced at a low cost, it securely holds the article disposed therein, it readily accepts printing or descriptive material thereon and is capable of being mounted on a hook for display purposes.

While the carded package as disclosed and claimed in the aforementioned co-pending application has proved satisfactory for its intended purposes, it has been found that the adhesive securement of the heat shrinkable tube to the card as disclosed therein may, in some cases, be insufficient under heavy loading conditions, i.e. a heavy article disposed within the tube.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a carded package capable of relatively heavy loading.

Accordingly, it is a general object of this invention to provide a carded package having improved securement means.

The foregoing as well as other objects of this invention are achieved by providing an improved carded package comprising an article, a card including a surface having plural perforations therein, a heat shrinkable tube and an adhesive material. The adhesive material is applied to the perforated surface area of the card to enhance the securement of the adhesive to the card. The tube is securely connected to the card by the adhesive thereon.

Other objects and many of the attendant advantages of this invention will be readily appreciated as the same becomes better understood by reference to the following detailed description when considered in connection with the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. I is an exploded perspective view of a carded package in accordance with this invention prior to the insertion of an article within the heat shrinkable tube.

FIG. 2 is a greatly enlarged sectional view taken along line 2-2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a carded package in accordance with this invention prior to the heat shrinkage of the heat shrinkable tube;

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken along line 44 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of a carded package in accordance with this invention after the heat shrinkable tube has been shrunk by the application of heat thereto; and

FIG. 6 is a sectional view taken along line 6-6 of FIG. 5.

Referring now to the various figures of the drawing wherein like reference characters refer to like parts, there is shown in FIG. 5 an improved carded package 400. Package 400 basically comprises a card 402, a heat shrinkable tube 404 and an article 406 disposed within said tube. The heat shrinkable tube serves to hold the article disposed therein onto the card. To that end, an adhesive material is provided between a portion of the surface of the card and a portion of the out side surface of the tube.

Although the article shown in FIG. 5 is a bottle, it is to be understood that the article can be any type of merchandise.

The card is a generally flat member which, in the embodiment shown, is a piece of cardboard upon which printing may be applied. However, the card may be formed of various other materials such as plastics, metals, etc.

The heat shrinkable tube can be formed of either a seamless or seamed band of material, such as polyvinyl chloride, which shrinks upon the application of heat thereto. The heat shrinkable tube may be transparent to permit visibility of the merchandise disposed therein or may be translucent or opaque in varying colors. Furthermore, the heat shrinkable tube may include printing thereon.

In the exploded perspective view in FIG. 1, there is shown the manner in which the heat shrinkable tube is adhesively connected to the card 402. Card 402 is formed of a cardboard material and may contain printed material, designs, lettering, etc. printed thereon. The surface of the cardboard is relatively smooth thereby rendering difficult the securement of the adhesive thereto. In order to enhance the securement of an adhesive to the cardboard, a plurality of perforations are provided therein.

In FIG. 1 there is shown area 408 on card 402. Area 408 includes a plurality of perforations 410 therein. Each of the perforations penetrates below the surface of the cardboard. In the sectional view of FIG. 2, there are shown two perforations 410 in card 402. As can be seen therein, perforations 410 extend through the surface 412 of the card 402 for some distance into the cardboard substrate 414.

The perforations 410 may be formed by the use of a roller having plural pins in the periphery thereof, by use of a plate having plural pins projecting from a surface thereof or by any other suitable means.

An adhesive material 416, such as a water or resin based adhesive, is applied to area 408 of card 402 by any suitable means, such as a windowing machine, whereupon the adhesive flows into the perforations in the area as well as affixing itself to the surface of the cardboard, thereby enhancii it. securement to the card 402.

In the sectional view of FIG. 2, the disposition of the adhesive within the perforations 410 can be seen.

As can be seen in FIG. 1, most of the periphery of the perforated area 408 of the card 402 is enclosed by a pair of opposed Ushaped slits 418 and 420 in card 402. A bend" line 422 connects the two ends of U-shaped slit 418 and a similar bend line 424 connects the two ends of U-shaped slit 420.

The portion of the card 402 bounded by slit 418 and bend line 422 forms an ear 426 when said portion is bent out of the plane of the card. In a similar manner, the portion of the card bounded by slit 420 and bend line 424 forms another ear 428 when said portion is bent out of the plane of the card.

Both of the ears are adapted for providing a greater adhesive surface contact area with the heat shrinkable tube than would other k be possible if the card did not contain such ears.

The heat shrinkable 04 is pressed into contact with the adhesive on the surface area 408 with both of the ears 426 and 428 thereof in the plane of the card. This results in tube 404 being adhesively connected to card 402 via the entire surface area 408 thereof.

Once the tube is securely affixed to the card, the article is disposed within the tube. This arrangement is shown in FIG. 3, wherein bottle 406 is shown disposed tube 404 prior to the shrinkage of the tube. As can be seen in the corresponding sectional view of FIG. 4, the ears 426 and 428 are in the plane of the card 402 when the article is disposed within the tube prior to the tubes shrinkage.

After the article is disposed within the tube as shown in FIGS. 3 and 4, heat is applied to the tube to cause it to shrink around the article to hold the article tightly therein. The heat shrinking step can be carried out in various ways known in the art including the use of a heat gun or a conventional heat tunnel.

When the tube shrinks around the article, the ears 426 and 428 of the card bend out of the plane of the card and thus are enabled to remain affixed to the tube. As should be appreciated by those skilled in the art, with the large adhesive contact area like that shown,

without the use of ears 426 and 428, the tube upon shrinking would either pull away from the card in the area defined by such ears or deform the card by causing the card to bend around the article.

If only a narrow band of adhesive were used, ears 426 and 428 would not be necessary since the tube would be enabled to shrink tightly about the article disposed therein without deforming the card or pulling away therefrom. However, a narrow band of adhesive does not provide as much securement as a relatively large area of adhesive like that of area 408. Accordingly, for a large or heavy article, the use of ears is desirable.

In FIG. 5 there is shown the completed carded package 400. As can be seen therein, heat shrinkable tube 404 is tightly shrunk about bottle 402 and holds it securely therein while the adhesive area 408 securely holds the tube with the bottle therein on card 402.

As shown in FIGS. 1, 3 and 5, a hole 430 is provided in the top portion of card 402 to serve as a means for hanging the card from a hook for display purposes.

Without further elaboration, the foregoing will so fully illustrate our invention that others may, by applying current or future knowledge, readily adapt the same for use under various conditions of service.

What is claimed as the invention is:

l. A carded package comprising an article, a heat shrinkable tube and a planar card including a surface having a predetermined area with an adhesive material applied over said entire area, said area including a portion bent out of the plane of said card and conforming in shape to said tube, said article being disposed within said tube, with said tube being heat shrunk thereabout, and said (heat shrinkable) tube being adhesively secured to said entire predetermined area.

2. The package as specified in claim I wherein two portions of said area are bent out of the plane of the card.

3. The package as specified in claim 2 wherein said portions are defined by U-shaped slits in the card.

4. The carded package of claim 1 wherein said prede termined area includes plural perforations therein, said perforations extending only partially into said card, said adhesive material being applied to said area and within said perforations to enhance the securement of the adhesive to said card.

5. The package as specified in claim 4 wherein said portion is defined by a U-shaped slit in the card.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3135384 *May 8, 1962Jun 2, 1964Union Bag Camp Paper CorpDisplay package
US3194474 *Aug 23, 1961Jul 13, 1965Kvp Sutherland Paper CoHeat-sealing cartons
US3208590 *Oct 22, 1963Sep 28, 1965Blish Matthew BDisplay package
US3233725 *May 14, 1964Feb 8, 1966Diamond Int CorpCard display packaging
US3286835 *Jun 19, 1964Nov 22, 1966United Shoe Machinery CorpDisplay package and method of making the same
US3367556 *Jan 6, 1966Feb 6, 1968Southern Special Products CorpBox
US3423059 *Jan 9, 1967Jan 21, 1969Fedtro IncDual-purpose display card and wall mounting
US3442372 *Sep 19, 1967May 6, 1969Du PontShipping structure
US3784086 *Dec 30, 1971Jan 8, 1974Westvaco CorpDisplay package
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4505389 *Jan 10, 1984Mar 19, 1985Whiteside Michael GPackage assemblies
US5074415 *Mar 5, 1991Dec 24, 1991Halpak Plastics, Inc.Safetly sealed, tamper evidencing; ultrasonic welding to remove all trapped air; noncontanination
US5111953 *Oct 30, 1990May 12, 1992Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanySeal system and method for containers
US5325967 *May 28, 1992Jul 5, 1994Gonzales Juanita APackaging device using membrane, platform and aperture as a means of restraint
US5366777 *Jun 30, 1993Nov 22, 1994Recot, Inc.Display strip for packages of consumer product
US5836450 *May 14, 1997Nov 17, 1998Gonzales; Juanita A.For protecting an object from damage due to rough handling
US5887717 *Nov 12, 1996Mar 30, 1999Delkor Systems, Inc.Package assemblies for containers
US5901852 *May 6, 1998May 11, 1999Simpson; Eugene D.Integrated packaging for protecting objects
US6029674 *Apr 5, 1999Feb 29, 2000Han; YonghoAdhesive device for attaching a false eyelash to an eyelid
US6182422May 18, 1998Feb 6, 2001Delkor Systems, Inc.Temporary package and method
US6308716Aug 7, 2000Oct 30, 2001Yongho HanCore for an adhesive device for attaching a false eyelash
US6499596Nov 22, 1999Dec 31, 2002Delkor Systems, Inc.Temporary package and method
US6874633Dec 31, 2002Apr 5, 2005Delkor Systems, Inc.Temporary package and method
US7273146Mar 4, 2002Sep 25, 2007Pwp Industries CorporationContainer whose side wall includes a surface discontinuity to hold shrinkwrap thereto
US7392905Apr 4, 2005Jul 1, 2008Delkor Systems Inc.Temporary bonded container package and method
US7918342 *Jun 14, 2010Apr 5, 2011Sleever International CompanyProtective and packaging wrapper for a container, the wrapper being constituted by a sleeve of heat-shrink plastics material
WO1995011175A1 *Oct 17, 1994Apr 27, 1995Feldhoff Gmbh & Co BarthelsSales package for shoe laces
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/460, 206/478, 206/466, 206/813, 206/471, 206/497
International ClassificationB65D73/00, B65D23/08
Cooperative ClassificationY10S206/813, B65D73/0014, B65D23/0878
European ClassificationB65D73/00B1, B65D23/08D5