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Publication numberUS3886352 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 27, 1975
Filing dateOct 25, 1973
Priority dateApr 10, 1972
Publication numberUS 3886352 A, US 3886352A, US-A-3886352, US3886352 A, US3886352A
InventorsLai Thomas K Y
Original AssigneeLai Thomas K Y
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Light and chime control system
US 3886352 A
Abstract
A daylight sensor and a headlight sensor are connected in a variable voltage divider. When darkness turns the daylight sensor off and headlights turn a sensor on, a potential is provided to a voltage gate which is sufficient to break down a zener diode and gate current to a timer circuit. A diode in the voltage gate prevents reverse flow of current from a timer.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent u m1 3,886,352

Lai May 27, 1975 LIGHT AND CHIME CONTROL SYSTEM [57] ABSTRACT [76] Inventor: Thomas Laii 38 Niolopa A daylight sensor and a headlight sensor are con- Place' Honolulu Hawa" 96800 nected in a variable voltage divider. When darkness [22] Fiied: Oct 25 1973 turns the daylight sensor off and headlights turn a sensor on, a potential is provided to a voltage gate which [2 l 1 APPL Nod 409662 is sufficient to break down a zener diode and gate cur- Relfled s Application Data rent to a timer circuit. A diode in the voltage gate pre- [63] Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 242,351, April 10, Vents reverse now of from a 1972, Pat. No. 3,790,848. A timer circuit contains a capacitor and resistor which discharges the capacitor. When the voltage is gated to [52] US. Cl 250/215; 3l5/360; 340/31 R; the timer circuit and during the time that capacitor 340/51; 340/392 maintains a sufficient potential, a light switch is held [51] Int. Cl G08g l/14; GlOk 3/00; H05b 4l/36 on. A triac in the light switch control the lights. [58] Field of Search 250/2l5, 206; 340/3! R, Approximately 3 Seconds after the capacitor in the 340/51 392; 315/360 136 timer is charged to its potential, a transistor is switched on, placing a ground potential to the References cued midpoint of the voltage divider to cut off the gate UNITED STATES PATENTS voltage. 666,737 l/l90l Coleman 250/206X A hi erator is activated by sampling the 774,457 3/1930 Singletonm 340/51 potential from the variable voltage divider to slowly 2,360,885 10/1944 Metcalf 340/5 ring a door chime as an automobile is sensed. House 3,530,432 9/1970 Pope 340/3l and g g lights are lighted automatically a short time after a doorbell is rung at night to suggest a human response to the doorbell.

Primary Examiner-James W. Lawrence Assistant Examiner-T. N. Grigsby Attorney, Agent, or FirmJames C. Wray 9 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures DOOR BELL SWITCH SHEET IUFE/w 1mm UOOQ OP 1 LIGHT AND CHIME CONTROL SYSTEM This application is a continuation-in-part of patent application Ser. No. 242,351 now US. Pat. No. 3,790,848 filed Apr. 10, 1972 by Thomas K. Y. Lai for Automatic Light Control System.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The automatic light control system is designed to provide home owner with safety, convenient and security within a garage or passageways or residences with minimum investment lasting a lifetime.

This solid state device is used for controlling and providing temporary lighting in darkened areas usually outside a house or apartment. Lights controlled by this system are usually those lights within a garage, those within a passageway, or those between a parking space and residence, or those placed exteriorly near the front door or inside lights.

The system is designed to operate in any house, garage or carport. Pneumatic switches are provided for homes with driveways, to turn on lights to ring door chimes when vehicles enter the area.

The operation of this system is automatically turned off during the daylight hours.

Parameters of system operation are described as follows:

Power Requirement: 117 volts AC, 60 Hertz, Fuse for half amps.

Circuit Power Supply: Regulated 11.8 volts DC. Circuit DC Current Drain:

Daylight Hours approximately 30 MA.

Night Hours STAND BY less than MA., OPER- ATING approximately 60 MA.

Load: 450 watts maximum, incondescent lamps.

Time Delay: 4 minutes and 9 minutes.

Condition Held System inoperative: Daylight hours hazy, overcast, dawn to dusk.

Light Starting Requirement:

1. 470 ohms control element at voltage divider circuit between midpoint and positive line.

2. three second of exposure of I00 foot-candle illumination on interior photocell.

Self Adjust Sensor Circuit:

Interior photocell PCl becomes de-sensitized to 60 foot-candle illumination in three seconds after the light is started. The interior photocell automatically restores to maximum sensitivity when the area is darkened.

The embodiments of this device take two forms, permanent installation or plug-in types. The system comprises electronic circuitry which is enclosed in the main chassis box with two terminal blocks. One terminal block is a low voltage block to which the remote switching or starting elements are connected, for example, a push-to-light switch near a doorway for starting a system as one leaves the house. A headlight receiving photocell is employed to switch on lights as the automobile approachs the area. A pneumatic switch may be substituted for the photocell sensor in some cases, such as in drive-through carports where no wall is available for mounting of an interior photocell. A daylight sensor photocell is mounted on an exterior of a building to prevention operation of the system during the daylight hours. A chime operator is connected to the system to ring the door chime.

A daylight sensor and a headlight sensor are connected in a variable voltage divider. When darkness turns the daylight sensor off and headlights turn a sensor on, a potential is provided to a voltage gate which is sufficient to break down a zener diode and gate current to a timer circuit. A diode in the voltage gate prevents reverse flow of current from a timer.

A timer circuit contains a capacitor and resistor which discharges the capacitor. When the voltage is gated to the timer circuit and during the time that capacitor maintains a sufficient potential, a light switch is held on. A triac in the light switch controls the lights.

Approximately 3 seconds after the capacitor in the timer is charged to its potential, a transistor is switched on, placing a ground potential to the midpoint of the voltage divider to cut off the gate voltage.

A chime operator is activated by sampling the potential from the variable voltage divider to slowly ring a door chime as an automobile is sensed. House and garage lights are lighted automatically a short time after a doorbell is rung at night to suggest a human response to the doorbell.

A power supply transmits power to the light switch and also provides ll.8 volt DC to the circuit.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS Throughout the drawings, like elements are referred to by like numerals.

FIG. 1 generally indicates the light control system of a preferred embodiment of the present invention. Electric lights 2 represent a lighting circuit which is controlled by the automatic device of the present invention. Plug 4 is representative of a connection for a power source. Box 6 contains the electronic circuits of the present invention and terminal boards.

Photocell 8 is mounted on an exterior of a building, for example, a garage to prevent operation of the system during daylight hours in one embodiment. Photocells 10 are mounted within a garage to detect headlights of cars for starting the system when a car is parked in a garage. In a two-car garage, photocells 10 may be mounted to detect headlights from either car. Photocells 10 may be used with adjustable circuits to detect back up lights when automobiles are backed into a garage.

In some cases, such as in drive-through carports, no wall is available for mounting of an interior photocell. A pneumatic switch may be substituted for photocells 10. A closed air hose supplies a pulse of air to a switch as an automobile crosses the hose. It is convenient to mount a push button starter adjacent a pedestrian entry to the garage. Where more than one entry to a garage is commonly used in darkness hours, two or more push buttons may be connected in parallel.

As shown schematically in FIG. 2, exterior photocell 8 and interior photocell 10 are connected in a variable voltage divider 20. When darkness turns photocell 8 off, and headlights turn photocell 10 on, a potential is provided to voltage gate 22 which is sufficient to breakdown device 24 and gate current to timer circuit 30. Unidirectional device 26 in gate 22 prevents reverse flow of current from timer 30.

Timer circuit 30 contains a capacitor 32 and a resistance 34 which discharges the capacitor. When the potential is gated to the timer circuit 30, and during the time that capacitor 32 maintains a sufficient potential, light switch 36 is held on. Triac 38 is schematically shown within the light switch 36 for controlling lamp 2.

Power supply 40 receives power from source 4, transmits the power to the light switch 36. and reduces and rectifies current which it supplies to the variable voltage divider, the gate and the timer circuit.

A three seconds cut off 50 with a transistor 52 is connected to gate 22 and voltage divider 20 to desensitize the interior photocell 8 to illumination after the system has been on for 3 seconds.

In FIG. 3 a low voltage terminal board generally indicated by TH] has connections A through G. which are found also in the upper part of the figure. High voltage terminal board TB2 has connections A, B and C which also are shown in the upper part of the drawing as, for example, TBZ-A. Terminals A and B on the high voltage board are connected to lamps 2, and terminals B and C are connected to a voltage source which is shown as a plug 4. ln systems which are intended for use in new constructions, lamps 2 generally indicate the basic garage lights, lights within a house and lights near doorsv Source 4 is wired directly to the roughed in electrical wiring. ln add on systems a plug 4 and power lines are supplied. Lamps 2 may be the existing lamps. or lamps may be provided with a kit.

()n the low voltage terminal board TBl, contacts A and B receive push button 16. Terminals C and D receive internal photocell or a roll over switch, or both may be connected in parallel to TBl terminals C and D. Terminals E and F receive low voltage wiring from the external photocell 8. Terminal G is connected to ground.

Referring to the main circuit in FIG. 3, voltage is supplied at source 4. A fuse 42 protects the circuit against voltage surges, which may be caused externally or by a short circuit in the system. Household current is applied through fuse 42 to primary 44 of transformer 46. Secondary 48 reduces the voltage to approximately 12 volts AC. A bridge rectifier generally indicated by the numeral 1 and comprising diodes 3, 5, 7 and 9 changes the low AC voltage to low DC voltage. Capacitor 12 filters AC components and smooths the output of the rectifier. Current limiting resistor 14 and capacitor 18 bias transistor 17 on to supply current flow through the DC electronic components. Zener diode l9 breaks down at excessive voltage effectively shorting capacitor 18, and turning off transistor 17, insuring that voltage between ground 27 positive power line 29 does not exceed a predetermined maximum.

In the variable voltage divider 20, photocells 8 and 10 may have dark resistances of about 5,000 ohms, or more, which are reduced to about 500 ohms when illuminated. When photocell 8 is at a low resistance value, the voltage drops across resistances 58, photocell 8 and resistance 59 cause voltage across resistance 59 suffi cient to bias transistor 54 on. Transistor 54 and resistor 53 drop connector 28 to a level sufficiently low to prevent operation of the voltage gate 22.

[SK ohm resistor 55 is connected in parallel to the path including resistor 53 and transistor 54in the lower portion of divider 20 so that the combined resistance of resistor 53 and resistor 55 is below 500 ohms when external photocell 8 is illuminated during daylight hours. In daylight conditions, the potential of midpoint 28 is thus reduced toward ground potential.

In the upper portion of the divider 20, light cell 10 is connected in series with variable resistor 56, which has a capacity of about K ohms. Adjustment of resistor 56 is made to bring the mid point 28 to a potential above the breakdown voltage of the breakdown device 24 in gate 22. When 12 volts are imposed across lines 27 and 29, resistor 56 may be adjusted so that when photocell 10 is illuminated by headlights during darkness hours, mid point 28 is brought to a potential slightly above a breakdown voltage of 6.8 volts. Correctly adjusting resistor 56 according to the fixed position of photocell l0 insures correct operation ofthe automatic system and insures against starting of the system by spurious illumination of photocell l0.

Photocell 10 may be replaced by an impulse switch or other suitable switch with a series connected resistance.

For convenience, one or more push buttons 16 may be provided at entrances to a garage. Preferably the push buttons are connected in series with a resistor 57, which may have a value of about 470 ohms.

During daylight hours, the low resistance of photocell 8 and resistor 53 and the parallel resistor 55 will always keep mid point 28 below the level of breakdown voltage required by breakdown device 24. When photocell 8 imposes its high darkness resistance, the potential of mid point 28 is raised above the breakdown voltage by reducing resistance in photocell 10 or by completing any of the switches.

Gate 22 contains breakdown device 24 which is preferably a zener diode. When voltage at midpoint 28 exceeds breakdown voltage, zener diode 24 conducts, supplying current to capacitor 32 and to timer 30 and to electronic switch 36. Storage capacitor 32 is charged immediately upon application of voltage to the timer circuit. Resistors 33 and 34 discharge voltage from capacitor 32 after the applied voltage has been discontinued. The rate at which resistors 33 and 34 discharge voltage from capacitor 32 controls the period of timer 30. Discharge of capacitor 32 through voltage divider 20 is prevented by unidirectional element 26, which is a diode. Discharge of the timer through the light switch 36 is prevented by a high input impedence device.

As an example, the capacitor 32 may have a value of 500 microfarads. Resistor 34 may have a value of from about 150 to about 2 megaohms.

Cutoff 50 includes a transistor 52 which is biased on by capacitor 51 in about three seconds after sufficient voltage is supplied through resistor 33 from zener diode 24 and from capacitor 32. Transistor 52 has an effect similar to transistor 54 in dropping the level of midpoint 28 to a value insufficient to break down zener diode 24 so that lights 2 may not raise the level of midpoint 28 by reducing the resistance of photocell l0. Cutoff 50 in effect desensitizes interior photocell 10 or renders its effect operative to raise the level of mid point 28. Capacitor 51 maintains the on bias on transistor 52 until it discharges sufficiently through resistor 34, which is after capacitor 32 has discharged sufficiently to turn off swithc 36.

The function of the resistors 66, 67 and 69 and of the cascaded transistors 68 and 68' is to forward bias the light switch 36 while preventing substantial discharge of capacitor 32.

When transistor 68' is biased on by voltage from the timer section 30, DC power is supplied to reed relay 63 via current limiting resistor 65. Power terminals 70 and 71 of reed relay 63 close, completing the AC circuit to diac 60. Capacitor 61 and resistor 62 cooperate as an AC voltage divider so that the appropriate potential is applied via diac 60 to the biasing terminal of triac 38. Power terminals of triac 38 complete the circuit be tween power source 4 and lights. 2.

As shown in FIG. 3, diode 64 protects the transistor 68' from sudden surges when the field collapses in the coil of relay 63. At the same time, diode 64 keeps the relay polarized.

In summary, FIG. 3 is a schematic diagram of the main circuit. 1 17 volts AC is applied across Terminal Block TBZ on Terminal B and C. Fuse 42 protects the circuit against the damage whenever short circuit or voltage surge occurs. The AC voltage is then fed to step down Transformer 46. The secondary of 48 develops a lower AC voltage, which is rectified by a full wave bridge rectifier 3, 5, 7, and 9. The rectified DC voltage output is filtered by capacitor 12 and is coupled to the collector of transistor 17 and to the base of 17 through resistance 14. 12 volt zener diode l9 regulates the base bias voltage, keeping the emitter voltage at constant I I8 volts.

During daylight hours, both photocells 8 and resistances drop to approximate 450 ohms. A base bias develops across photocell 8, and resistor 59 switches on transistor 54, placing a ground potential on the collector end of resistor 53. Resistor 53 and resistor 55 are electrically connected in parallel, and their total resistances are low, as compared to 400 ohms of photocell l0 resistance. The voltage at the midpoint 28 is kept below the break down level of zener diode 24.

When night falls, the resistance of PCI and PC2 rise beyond 5,000 ohms. Transistor 54 cuts off the ground path of resistor 53. The midpoint voltage at 28 still is below the zener diode 24 break down level, because resistance of photocell 10 is high as compared with resistor 55.

When an automobile enters the premise, its headlights strike the sensor photocell 10. The photocell resistance suddenly drops to 500 ohms. Voltage a midpoint 28 rises above 10 volts of which cause zener diode 24 to break down. A DC current is induced through diode 26, charging capacitor 32. Transistor 68 is turned on by the voltage which develops across base resistor 67 by capacitor 32. The emitter voltage across resistor 66 switches on transistor 68', placing a ground potential to relay 63 and energizing it.

1 17 volts AC from terminal block T132 on terminals V and C applies to resistor 62 and capacitor 61 when closing relay contacts 70 and 71. The diac 60 which receives AC voltage from resistor 62 and capacitor 61 transmits trigger pulses to the gate of triac 36. Incondescent lamp 2 is turned on by the triac.

Approximately three seconds following the sudden rise of potential in capacitor 32, a voltage is developed across resistors 33 and 34, charging capacitor 51 to a potential that sufficiently forward biases transistor 52. Once again resistor 53 is electrically connected in parallel with resistor 55 by the collector-emitter path of transistor 52 to the ground. The midpoint voltage immediately drops below the zener gated level. That cuts off the charging current to capacitor 32. Capacitor 32 begins to discharge through resistors 33 and 34. The voltage in 32 slowly drops to a level that turns off transistors 68 and 68' and relay 63 and then the light switching circuit. The period which takes capacitor 32 to discharge to a cutoff level is approximately 9 minutes. The time delay could be reduced to approximately 4 minutes by adding a discharge path with another resistor connected in parallel to capacitor 32.

Terminal block TB] is used for interconnecting low voltage switch elements to the main circuit.

Terminal block TB2 provide connections between the light switch triac 36 and its load. TBZ also supplies AC power to the main circuit.

When the push to light switch 16 is depressed. it applies l l.8 volts DC to 470 ohms resistor 51. The midpoint voltage at 28 rises above the gated level of zener diode 24.

A door chime operator generally referred to by the numeral is shown in FIG. 4.

Two conditions activate the door chime; when vehicle head lights are detected by PC] photocell, and when automobile rolls over the pneumatic switch hose.

This system utilizes the same two or more tone door chime as in a house. The vehicle entering a garage immediately activates the door chime to produce a ding tone first and then three seconds later a dong tone. The reason for the dragging tone is to enable homeowner to distinguish the ringing sound of an incoming car and that of a person at the door.

The contacts 93 and 94 of the chime relay 92 are normally open. Referring to FIG. 4, they are connected in parallel to the door chime button switch 79 by a pair of wires from TB3 terminal board terminals M and L.

When vehicle head lights are detected by photocell 10 in the main chassis circuit in FIG. 3 the resistance of the photocell suddenly drops, causing a positive 11.8 volts DC to appear at T8] terminal A through resistor 56. This voltage is transferred from terminal block TBl to chime operator box TB3 terminal 4, the voltage causes the 5.6 volt zener diode 88 to break down. Capacitor 102 picks up this positive pulse and couples it to the base of the transistor 91. This pulse energizes the relay 92. Relay contacts 93 and 94 complete the current path of the door chime, which rings its first tone ding. At approximately three seconds later, the positive voltage in terminal .1 of TB3 drops below the zener diode 88 break down level by the action of transistor 52 in the main chassis. Transistor 91, losing its base bias voltage then subsequently switches off the relay 92. The relays contacts 93 and 94 are again opened to release the door chime solenoid holding current. lts ac tion rings the second tone, dong. Diode 97 is used to short out any negative pulse at the base of transistor 91 during the capacitor 102 discharge period. Resistor 103 discharges the voltage of capacitor 102.

When the light switch 16 is depressed momentarily, a positive I l.8 volts DC from terminal B of TB] to terminal K of TB3 is transferred to terminal J by way of diode 87. The zener diode 88 breaks down and induces a positive pulse to the base of transistor 91. but the pulse is grounded by collector to emitter of transistor 98, which is turned on by the base bias that is developed across resistors 99 and 100. This positive Dc volt age is made possible from TB3 terminal I. The results is no chime operation when the light button switch 16 is pushed.

Diode 87 is used to prevent the circuit of transistor 91 from operating whenever a positive DC voltage appears at terminal J of TB3.

A Light Ringer circuit is generally referred to by the numeral in FIG. 5.

After a guest or burglar rings the door bell, the exterior lights automatically turn on approximately 40 seconds later.

As the door bell 79 is pushed, the l() or 16 volts AC from the secondary coil of the chime transformer is applied to terminals P and Q of terminal board T84 75 through the chime solenoid, door bell switch 79 and wires 80 and 81. The diode 111 converts this AC voltage to DC voltage across resistors 114 and 113. This DC voltage causes transistor 117 to conduct. The emitter current that flows through emitter resistor 118 develops a voltage across it. The AC ripple in this voltage is filtered by capacitor 123.

When the circuit stands idle, the silicon control rectifler 116 is in an off state. The transistors 146, 143, 137 and 138 are also in off state. The positive voltage from terminal N through resistors 131, 132 and 133 charges capacitor 135 to a positive 11.5 volts.

If the door bell button is depressed momentarily, its action creates a temporary short circuit across terminals P and O. This action switches the transistor 117 from conduction to off and back on again. A positive pulse is generated across resistor 118 and the pulse is coupled to the gate of the SCR 116 by way of resistor 126 and capacitor 125. This positive pulse turns on SCR 116 which places a ground potential at the junction of resistors 132 and 133. The positive voltage stored in capacitor 135 slowly discharges through resistor 133 and SCR 116 to ground. Approximately forty seconds later, the voltage of capacitor 135 drops to a level where transistors 138 and 137 begin to switch on through a base bias path from resistors 134 and 133 and SC R 116.

As transistor 138 turns on, its collector current starts to flow through resistor 136, causing a positive voltage to develop across it. Simultaneously the same voltage feeds through resistors 129 and 127 and capacitor 128 to the base of transistor 130 to turn it on. The collector and emitter provide a momentary ground path at the junction of 131 and 132. This short circuit condition removes the current path which holds SCR in the on state, SCR 116 switches off and subsequently turns off transistors 138 and 137.

When transistor 137 is in an on state as described previously, its collector current flows through resistors 139 and 141. A positive pulse is coupled by capacitor 140 and resistor 142 to the base of transistor 143 to switch it on momentarily. The collector current of transistor 143 flows through resistors 144 and 145 and develops a voltage across them. This voltage turns on transistor 146.

As transistor 146 is momentary in conduction, the collector-emitter transfers the positive voltage on terminal N to terminal in form of a positive pulse that is applied to the main chassis of the system or to the chime operator. which subsequently activates all lights within the system.

Diode 124 is employed in the circuit to prevent a negative spike of the transit pulse that might be destructive to the gate of SCR 116. Diode 119 is used in the circuit to isolate the power supply source from terminal N to the unfiltered DC voltage of the diode 111.

The system installation is generally shown in FIG. 6. The system is provided with two photocells. One photocell is mounted on the exterior of a building such as a garage to prevent the operation of the system during daylight hours. It is recommended to mount the exte rior photocell on a shaded area to avoid direct sun and rain. The interior photocell is mounted within a garage at the same level as headlights, or 20 /8 inches from the ground to detect headlights of cars for triggering system when a car is parked in garage. In a two-car garage, the interior photocell may be centrally mounted between the two cars to detect either or both car headlights.

In some cases, such as in drive through carports, no wall is available for mounting of an interior photocell, a pneumatic switch may be substituted for the interior photocell. A closed air hose supplies a pulse of air to switch on the system as an automobile crosses the hose. A pair of wires connected between the pheumatic switch and TBl terminals C and D of the main chassis are polarized so the switch won't operate if wire is hooked up in wrong polarity.

The pneumatic switch is also useful for homes with driveways. Place the hose switch on driveway to alert the homeowner of approaching vehicles by means of the door chime and lights.

Manual pushbutton switch for convenience should be installed near the entrance to garage and home. The chime operator box should be mounted next to the main chassis.

The wiring is indicated by the chime operator diagram in FIG. 6 as follows. The push-to-light switch 16, normally connected to TB] terminals A and B of the main chassis, is connected to K and .1 terminals of TB3 in the chime operator box. Jumper wires are connected between terminals H, .l and K of T133 to terminals G, A and B of TB1. it is important to check for correct wiring because KB terminals of both blocks are positive line and H-G terminals are grounded. A pair of wires from terminal M and L is connected in parallel with the door chime button switch to provide chime operation.

The basic garage lights may be wired by licensed electrician to house power lines using existing lamps in garage or passageway. This system can be wired into any garage light system without disturbing its normal electrical function. Door lights and interior lights may replace or augment garage lights.

Lights may be wired into the main chassis. An installer may mount the main box at a suitable place in the garage, run the l 17 volts AC line to the nearest AC outlet, and connect all switch elements as described.

I claim:

1. A system for responding to intentionally indicated presence of persons comprising a power source,

a response means connected to the power source for receiving power from the source and performing a discernible response,

a controller connected to the source and to the response means for selectively completing a circuit from the source to the response means, whereby the response means operates,

a time delay means connected to the controller for delaying complete operation of the response means,

intentionally activated indicator means connected to the controller for setting the controller and time delay means in operation upon actuation of the in dicator means wherein the intentionally activated indicator means comprises an automobile presence sensing indicator means and a doorbell pushbutton switch mounted along side of a door, wherein the response means comprises door chime means, and wherein the controller comprises a circuit connected between the indicator and the chime for ringing a first tone of a chime and wherein the time delay means comprises an electronic time delay for delaying a ringing of a second tone of a chime thereby to differentiate between indicator means activated by a doorbell pushbutton switch and by the automobile presence sensing indicator.

2. A system for responding to intentionally indicated presence of persons comprising a power source,

a door chime means connected to the power source for receiving power from the source and performing a discernible response,

a controller circuit connected to the source and to the chime means for selectively completing a circuit from the source to the chime means, whereby the chime means operates,

a time delay means connected to the controller circuit for delaying complete operation of the controller circuit and an automobile presence sensing indicator means connected to the controller for setting the controller circuit and time delay means in operation upon actuation of the indicator means, wherein the controller comprises a circuit connected between the indicator and the chime means for ringing a first tone of a chime means and for delaying a ringing of a second tone of a chime means thereby to differentiate between indicator means activated by a doorbell pushbutton switch and by the automobile presence sensing indicator,

wherein the controller circuit further comprises a relay having normally open contacts and having a drive, wherein the door chime means is electrically connected to the normally open contacts of a relay in the controller circuit, wherein the automobile presence sensing indicator means comprises electrical pulse generating means, and wherein the controller circuit further comprises gate means connected to the pulse generating means and transistor means controllably connected to the gate means, the transistor having a control terminal connected to the gate means and having power terminals completing a connection between the relay drive and the power source, and wherein the time delay means comprises charge storing means connected between the gate and the transistor control terminal and discharging means connected to the charge storing means for slowly discharging the charge storing means, whereby the indicator pulse generating means turns the transistor on, completing power to the relay and closing the contacts, supplying power to the chime for a first tone, and whereby the generating means concurrently charges the storage means, which maintains power transmission through the transistor, holding the contacts closed, and whereby the discharging means causes the charge storing means to be discharged and the transistor to be turned off after a delay, stopping power to the relay, permitting the relay contacts to open, and permitting the chime to ring a second tone.

3. For the system of claim 2, wherein the controller means further comprises a circuit for lighting lights upon sensing presence of an automobile, and wherein the intentionally activated indicator means further comprises push-to-light switch means for activating the light controlling circuit, and wherein the chime controlling circuit comprises means for isolating the pushto-light switch means from operation of the chime, wherein the isolating means comprises a second transistor having power terminals connected between a base of the first relay power controlling transistor and ground, the second transistor having a base connected to the push-to-light switch means for biasing the second transistor on and grounding the base of the first transistor preventing on biasing of the first transistor upon pushing of the push-to-light switch means.

4. A system for responding to intentionally indicated presence of persons comprising a power source,

a response means connected to the power source for receiving power from the source and performing a discernible response,

a controller connected to the source and to the response means for selectively completing a circuit from the source to the response means, whereby the response means operates,

a time delay means connected to the controller for delaying complete operation of the controller, and

intentionally activated indicator means connected to the controller for setting the controller and time delay means in operation upon actuation of the indicator means,

wherein the controller includes a voltage divider circuit connected between a power supply and a gate, wherein the intentionally activated indicator means is connected on one side of the voltage divider for raising voltage level ofa midpoint in the divider circuit sufficiently high to flow current through the gate, and wherein the voltage divider further comprises deactivating means connected between the midpoint and ground and receiving power from the gate for reducing voltage level of the midpoint sub sequent to gating of current and thereby deactivating the indicator.

5. The apparatus of claim 4, wherein the deactivating means comprises first and second resistances serially connected from the gate to ground, and a storage device connected from a point between the resistances to ground, whereby the storage device is charged by gated current, and further comprising a transistor having a base connected to the storage device for on biasing the transistor when the storage device is sufficiently charged and wherein the transistor has power terminals connected between the midpoint and ground-for lowering voltage level of the midpoint upon on biasing of the transistor, and whereby the transistor discharges through a resistance to reactivate the indicator.

6. The system for responding to intentionally indicated presence of persons comprising a power source, an intentionally activated indicator means comprising a doorbell pushbutton switch mounted near a door of a house and a response means comprising lights associated with the house, and a controller means comprising an electronic circuit connected to the power source, to the pushbutton and to the lights and including a time delay means for supplying power from the power source to lights associated with the house after a time delay which is consistent with a normal human response to a doorbell, whereby a person pressing a doorbell is aware of a normal human response to the ringing of the doorbell.

7. The system of claim 6 wherein the doorbell pushbutton switch has terminals connected to a chime and chime power source and wherein the terminals are connected through a diode and resistance to ground, wherein the resistance is connected between ground and a base ofa first transistor and wherein power terminals of the first transistor are connected to a control terminal of a SCR switch, wherein the circuit further comprises a storage means connected to the power source for charging the storage means and connected to control terminals of electronic switches for reversely biasing the switches off, and wherein the SCR is connected to the storage device for slowly discharging the storage device when the SCR is on whereby the electronic switches are turned on as the reverse bias charge drains from the storage means, and wherein the electronic switches further comprise power terminals connected to a light system for turning on the light system after the storage means has been discharged sufficiently to permit turning on of the electronic switches.

8. The apparatus of claim 7 wherein the electronic switch means comprises a second transistor with power terminals connected for supplying a pulse to a third transistor for momentarily switching the third transistor on, and wherein the third transistor has power terminals connected to a sensor input in an automatic light control system for starting the automatic light control system after a time delay during discharge of the storage means.

9. The apparatus of claim 7 further comprising a transistor having power terminals connected between one power terminal of the SCR and ground for grounding the SCR, and turning the SCR off, the transistor having a base connected to the electronic switch for turning on the transistor and grounding the SCR when the electronic switch is turned on.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3991415 *Oct 2, 1975Nov 9, 1976Baar Sr Haward AAlarm and light system
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Classifications
U.S. Classification250/215, 315/360, 340/393.3, 340/326, 340/815.7, 340/600, 340/942
International ClassificationH03K17/292, H05B37/02, H03K17/28
Cooperative ClassificationH05B37/02, H03K17/292
European ClassificationH03K17/292, H05B37/02