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Publication numberUS3886783 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 3, 1975
Filing dateJul 25, 1974
Priority dateJul 25, 1974
Also published asCA1012105A1, DE2516733A1, DE2516733C2
Publication numberUS 3886783 A, US 3886783A, US-A-3886783, US3886783 A, US3886783A
InventorsRichard F Hirsch
Original AssigneeRichard F Hirsch
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic loading blind riveter
US 3886783 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 1 [111 3,886,783

Hirsch 1 1 June 3, 1975 AUTOMATIC LOADING BLIND RIVETER 3.733.882 /1973 Klein 6. 72/391 [76] Inventor: Richard F. Hirsch. 708 W. 38th St,

San Pedro, m: 90731 Primary Examiner-M1lton S. Mehr Assistant EraminerGene P. Crosby [L] hlcd: July 1974 Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Philip M. Hinderstcin [21] Appl. No.: 491,929

[57] ABSTRACT I I I I a a a a a s a a 8 A a 'l which feeds the rivets into the riveter and conducts L l 0 earc 29 Q 3 the sheared mandrels to a central collecting point. The riveter includes moveable guide jaws as well as moveable breaking jaws to substantially reduce the size of [56] References C'ted the tool for use in a wide variety of field situations. UNITED STATES PATENTS The magazine, which is automatically advanced 3.196.662 7/1965 Simmons 72/391 through the riveter, exits therefrom in an empty condi- 3.451,248 6/1969 B ll 72/391 tion and is ready for disposal or reloading and reuse. 3.457.763 7/1969 Freeman 72/391 3,630,067 12/1971 Henshaw 72/391 15 Claims, 13 Drawing Figures z; Z4 Z? I] 10 a a a F m N A 7 14 5 a a 17 a 11 7f fl as Hf Z 5' Z/ z/ 1 y!!! 7 6 252; I!

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PATENTEDJUH 3 i975 SHEET SHEET PATENTEDJUM 1915 SHEET- AUTOMATIC LOADING BLIND RIVETER BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention The present invention relates to an automatic loading blind riveter and. more particularly, to a novel mechanism for automatically feeding and setting blind rivets.

2. Description of the Prior Art The term blind rivet refers to rivets of thc type which are accessible from only one side during a riveting operation. Such rivets include a tubular sleeve having a generally annular preformed head at one end thereof. The sleeve has a mandrel extending axially therethrough and the mandrel has an enlarged head adjacent the other end of the sleeve. During the riveting operation, the rivet is axially inserted through aligned holes in the pieces to be secured together by extending the mandrel head and the other end of the sleeve into such aligned holes until the head of the rivet sleeve contacts one of the work pieces. Thereafter, the head of the rivet sleeve is held against the one work piece while an axial force is exerted on the mandrel in a direction opposite to the force on the rivet sleeve head. This force on the mandrel pulls the enlarged mandrel head towards the rivet sleeve head, deforming the tubular sleeve on the inaccessible side of the work piece setting the rivet. Finally, the mandrel breaks at a point inside of the sleeve, trapping the mandrel head and a short length of the mandrel within the deformed sleeve and permitting removal of the major portion of the sheared mandrel.

Conventional blind riveting tools usually consist of a hand-held gun-type assembly, either hand operated or power actuated, and include components suitably designed to carry out the foregoing operation. Such conventional tools have been manually loaded, with the rivet mandrels being positioned, by hand, in the nose of the tool, one at a time, for each riveting operatiOn- In cases where a large number of rivets are to be installed, this has been an overly time consuming process.

In U.S. Pat. No. 3,733,882, issued May 22, I973, t Jean-Pierre Klein for Blind Rivetting Tool with Auto matic Loading Means, there is disclosed a blind riveting tool which purports to solve this problem. Thus, Kle states that a principal object of his invention is the prO- vision of means for automatically loading blind riv into a riveting too! Another object of the Klein invention is the use of a pre-loaded belt-type magazine for carrying the rivets into the riveting tool. A further object of the Klein invention is the use ofa belt-type magazine as a means for carrying sheared mandrels out O the riveting tool. Still another object of the Klein invention is the provision of a mechanism for intermittently advancing a belt-type magazine through a rivetin tool in time sequence with the riveting operation.

While the objects of the Klein riveting tool are indicative of the requirements of the industry, there are numerous problems associated with the mechanism disclosed by Klein for achieving such objects. More sp cifically, the riveting tool of Klein includes a pair of levers mounted for pivotal movement at the nose of th gun, at the point at which the riveting operation is per formed. Such levers purportedly drop in behind t rivet sleeve head prior to the setting operationv However, such an operation is (.IIffiCUIt to achieve in practice. Furthermore. the pivoted levers at the nose of th gun substantially increase the size of such nose. makin LII the tool unsuitable for use in a wide variety of field situations where there is limited access to the work pieces. In addition, when the trigger of the Klein tool is activated, the rivet is retracted somewhat. out of the work pieces, to enable the levers to drop in behind the rivet head. However, this causes the rivet to be improperly set since the rivet head is not in tight contact with the work pieces.

The magazine of the Klein riveting tool must be specially manufactured for such use and is cumbersome and expensive. Furthermore, when the magazine leaves the riveting tool, it has all of the broken-off pieces of each mandrel reinserted into the openings in the magazine so that the magazine must first be completely unloaded before it may be reloaded for reuse. Numerous other problems with the Klein riveting tool will be obvious to those skilled in the art.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION According to the present invention, there is disclosed an automatic loading blind riveter which overcomes the problems of the Klein riveting tool and satisfies the industry required objects stated therein. The present blind riveter includes moveable guide jaws and moveable breaking jaws which are highly efficient in operation and permit the size of the nose of the riveter to be minimized. Thus, the present riveter may be manipulated into the smallest areas encountered during field use. The present blind riveter uses a magazine made from a type of corrugated paper which is presently readily available. Thus, the magazine is inexpensive and may be readily disposed of after use, if desired. On the other hand, when the magazine leaves the present blind riveter, it is empty since the sheared mandrels have been collected at a central collecting point. Thus, the magazine is immediately ready for reloading and reuse, if desired.

The construction of the present blind riveting tool is highly simplified and efficient so that the tool is relatively inexpensive and has a long service life. The moveable parts are driven by a pair of coaxial operating pistons which are both circular in cross-section and nested one inside the other. This arrangement eliminates bearings, contributing to the simplicity, inexpensiveness, and efficiency of operation.

Briefly, the present riveter for setting blind rivets of the type including a tubular sleeve having an annular head at one end thereof and a mandrel extending through the sleeve, the mandrel having an enlarged head adjacent the other end of the sleeve comprises: a housing adapted to be held stationary during operation of the riveter, the housing having a nose through which the rivets pass; a first elongate, hollow slide member mounted for axial movement relative to the housing, one end of the first slide member being positioned adjacent the nose of the housing; magazine means for feed ing rivets laterally into the housing; a second elongate, hollow slide member mounted for axial movement coaxially with and within the first slide member, one end of the second slide member being operative to contact the head of the rivet sleeve and to advance the rivet through the first slide member to a setting point beyond the one end of the first slide member and the nose of the housing with the rivet mandrel extending into the hollow center of the second slide member; means eonnected to the housing for releasably locking the second slide member at the setting point with the one end thereof engaging the head of the rivet sleeve; a pair of opposed breaking jaw members carried by the second slide member and being mounted for limited axial and lateral movement relative thereto for releasably gripping the rivet mandrel; and means at the one end of the first slide member for engaging the jaw members and for simultaneously urging the jaw members into firm gripping engagement with the rivet mandrel and pulling the jaw members axially, with the first slide member. away from the one end of the second slide member. thereby setting the rivet.

The present blind riveter also includes means responsive to the movement of the first and second slide members through the housing for intermittently advancing the magazine means in time sequence with the riveting operation. The magazine means includes a plurality of spaced lobes defining openings for holding the rivets as the rivets are fed laterally into the housing, the second slide member depositing the broken-off piece of each mandrel onto the magazine, between the lobes. The riveter includes a collecting chute connected to the housing, the magazine conveying the sheared mandrels to the collection chute where they are automatically conducted out of the housing as the magazine means is advanced through the housing.

OBJECTS It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide an automatic loading blind riveter.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a novel mechanism for automatically feeding and setting blind rivets.

It is a still further object of the present invention to provide an automatic loading blind riveter which, because of the size thereof, can be used in a wide variety of field situations.

It is another object of the present invention to provide an automatic loading blind riveter which uses inexpensive paper magazines.

It is still another object of the present invention to provide an automatic loading blind riveter including a magazine which carries rivets thereinto and in which the magazine leaves the riveter unloaded so that it is immediately ready for reloading and reuse.

Another object of the present invention is the provision of an automatic loading blind riveter including coaxial operating pistons for driving the moveable elements thereof.

Still other objects, features, and attendant advantages of the present invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art from a reading of the following detailed description of the preferred embodiment constructed in accordance therewith, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein like numerals designate like parts in the several figures and wherein:

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is an overall perspective view of an automatic loading blind riveter constructed in accordance with the teachings of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is an exploded perspective view of the major elements of the riveter of FIG. 1;

FIGS. 3, 4, 7, l0, and 12 are longitudinal sectional views taken along a vertical plane through the center of the riveter of FIGS. 1 and 2, showing the sequence of operation thereof;

FIGS. and 6 are enlarged sectional views taken 4 along the lines 5-5 and 6-6, respectively, in FIG. 4-, FIGS. 8 and 9 are enlarged sectional views taken along the lines 8-8 and 9-9, respectively, in FIG. 7; FIG. 11 is an enlarged sectional view taken along the line 1l1l in FIG. 10; and

FIG. 13 is a sectional view taken along the line l3l3 in FIG. II.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now to the drawings and. more particularly, to FIGS. 13 thereof, there is shown an automatic loading blind riveter, generally designated 10, for setting blind rivets, generally designated 3, of the type including a tubular sleeve 5 having an annular head 6 at one end thereof and a mandrel 7 extending through sleeve 5, mandrel 7 having an enlarged head 8 adjacent the other end of sleeve 5. As is known in the art, such rivets are used when only one side is accessible during a riveting operation. During the riveting operation, rivet 3 is axially inserted through aligned holes in the pieces to be secured together by extending mandrel head 8 and sleeve 5 into such aligned holes until head 6 of sleeve 5 contacts one of the work pieces. Thereafter, head 6 is held against the one work piece while an axial force is exerted on mandrel 7 in a direction opposite to the force on head 6. This force on mandrel 7 pulls head 8 towards head 6, deforming sleeve 5 on the inaccessible side of the work pieces and setting rivet.3. Finally, mandrel 7 breaks at a point inside of sleeve 5, trapping head 8 and a short length of mandrel 7 within the deformed sleeve 5 and permitting removal of the major portion of the sheared mandrel 7.

In order to automatically achieve this operation and to simultaneously, periodically, and automatically feed additional rivets 3 to the work piece, blind riveter 10 includes an alongate, generally cylindrical, hollow housing 11 which is adapted to be held stationary during the operation of riveter 10. Housing 11 has a nose 12 at one end thereof through which rivets 3 pass. The other end of housing 1 1 is connected adjacent a handle 13 which is adapted to be grasped by the hand of a user, handle 13 supporting a trigger 14 which is the sole actuating element required for the operation of riveter l0.

Riveter 10 may be viewed as including two major subassemblies, the first subassembly being responsible for setting rivets 3 and the second subassembly being responsible for feeding rivets 3 into riveter I0 and conducting the sheared mandrels 7' out of riveter 10. For ease of explanation and understanding, these two subassemblies will be described separately.

Referring now to FIGS. 2-10, the subassembly responsible for setting rivets 3 includes a first elongate, hollow slide member, generally designated 15, mounted for axial movement relative to housing 11. One end 16 of slide member 15 is positioned adjacent nose 12 of housing 11, the remainder of slide member 15 extending through the center of housing 11 and the other end 17 thereof terminating adjacent handle 13. Slide member 15 is a tubular, thin-walled member having a uniform thickness throughout the major portion thereof. On the other hand, end 16 of slide member I5 is formed into an internal. inclined shoulder 18 for reasons which will appear more fully hereinafter. Slide member 15 also includes first and second elongate, longitudinal, vertically aligned, opposed slots 20 and Z1 which extend for a major portion of the length thereof. In addition, the outer wall of slide member is formed, on the opposite sides of each of slots and 21, into pairs of outwardly extending abutments 22 and 23, each such abutment including a flat upper surface 24, which is positioned parallel to the axis of slide member 15, a leading edge 25 which is perpendicular to surface 24, and a trailing edge 26 which is positioned at an angle relative to surface 24, for reasons which will appear more fully hereinafter.

Slide member 15 also includes a pair of elongate, longitudinal, horizontally aligned, opposed slots 28 and 29 through which rivets 3 are fed into and sheared mandrels 7' conducted through riveter 10, as will be explained more fully hereinafter. In addition, the construction of other end 17 of first slide member 15 will also be described more fully hereinafter.

Riveter 10 further comprises a second elongate, hollow slide member, generally designated 30, mounted for axial movement coaxially with and within first slide member 15. As seen most clearly in FIGS. 2 and 5, one end 31 of slide member 30 is essentially solid but divided along a horizontal plane to form a pair of guide jaws 32 and 33 having an outer diameter approximately equal to the inner diameter of nose 12 of housing 11 and the smallest inside diameter of end 16 of slide member 15. Thus, and as shown in FIG. 7, end 31 of slide member 30 is adapted to extend beyond end 16 of slide member 15 until the end of slide member 30 is essentially coplanar with the end of nose 12 of housing 11.

As will appear more fully hereinafter, guide jaws 32 and 33 perform two functions. In the first instance, guide jaws 32 and 33 are operative to contact and grasp mandrel 7 of rivets 3. Furthermore, the leading faces of guide jaws 32 and 33 are adapted to contact head 6 of sleeve 5 of rivets 3 and to hold head 6 stationery during the riveting operation.

Immediately behind guide jaws 32 and 33, slide member 30 includes a pair of elongate, longitudinal, vertically aligned, opposed slots 34 and 35 and a pair of elongate, longitudinal, horizontally aligned, opposed slots 36 and 37. Slots 34 and 35 provide a channel for movement ofa pair of breaking jaws 38 and 39, respectively. More specifically, jaws 38 and 39 are generally rectangular members having parallel sides and parallel leading and trailing surfaces. The inner surfaces 40 and 41 of breaking jaws 38 and 39, respectively, are generally semi-cylindrical, with sharp teeth, to grip the opposite sides of mandrels 7 of rivets 3. Furthermore, the outer surfaces 42 and 43 of breaking jaws 38 and 39, respectively, are inclined at an angle equal to the angle of shoulder 18 at end 16 of slide member 15.

Breaking jaws 38 and 39 are supported for limited axial and lateral movement relative to slide 47, 30, in slots 34 and 35, respectively, by means ofa pair of rods 44 and 45, respectively, first ends of which are rigidly connected to jaws 38 and 39, respectively. Rods 44 and 45 extend through slots 34 and 35, respectively, and into a pair of outwardly projecting abutments 46 and 47, respectively, made integral with slide member 30 and defining one end of slots 34 and 35. Abutments 46 and 47 have bores 48 and 49, respectively. therein, which are positioned approximately parallel to each other and receive the ends of rods 44 and 45, respectively, thereby supporting rods 44 and 45 for axial movement therethrough. On the other hand. breaking jaws 38 and 39 are biased into contact with the other ends of slots 34 and 35, respectively, adjacent guide jaws 32 and 33, respectively, by means of springs 52 and 53, respectively, which surround rods 44 and 45, respectively, and extend between jaws 38 and 39, respectively, and abutments 46 and 46, respectively. Thus, the movement of rods 44 and 45 through bores 48 and 49, respectively, provide breaking jaws 38 and 39 with limited axial movement whereas the flexibility of rods 44 and 45 and the fact that bores 48 and 49 are larger than the diameters of rods 44 and 45 permit limited lateral movement of breaking jaws 38 and 39.

Abutments 46 and 47 are generally rectangular, having a width slightly less than the width of slots 20 and 21 in first slide member 15 so that abutments 46 and 47 pass therethrough during movement of slide member 30 relative to slide member 15. The leading and trailing edges of abutments 46 and 47 are perpendicular to the axis of slide member 30, whereas the outer surfaces 54 and 55, respectively, are inclined forwardly for reasons which will appear more fully hereinafter.

Referring now primarily to FIGS. 2, 7, and 9, riveter 10 includes a pair of pawls 60 and 61 connected to housing 11 for releasably locking slide member 30 when slide member 30 is in its forwardmost position with guide jaws 32 and 33 extending into nose 12 of housing 11. More specifically, one end of pawls 60 and 61 are pivoted on shafts 62 and 63, respectively, connected to a plurality of abutments 59 made integral with housing 11. Shafts 62 and 63 mount pawls 60 and 61, respectively, for pivotal movement in a vertical plane into and out of contact with abutments 46 and 47, respectively. The inner surfaces at the other ends of pawls 60 and 61 are formed into hooks 64 and 65, respectively, having inclined leading surfaces 66 and 67, respectively, and trailing surfaces 68 and 69, respectively, which are positioned perpendicular to the axis of slide member 30 so as to engage the trailing surfaces 50 and 51 of abutments 46 and 47, respectively. Furthermore, the inclined leading surfaces 66 and 67 of pawls 60 and 61, respectively, are adapted to engage inclined outer surfaces 54 and 55, respectively, of abutments 46 and 47, respectively, as slide member 30 moves forwardly in housing 11, as will be explained more fully hereinafter. For the time being, it member be particularly noted that pawls 60 and 61 are wider than abutments 46 and 47, respectively, as shown most clearly in FIG. 9, so as to slidingly engage abutments 22 and 23, respectively, on slide member 15. Thus, as slide member 15 moves rearwardly relative to housing 11, surfaces 26 of abutments 22 and 23 contact hooks 64 and 65, respectively, pivoting pawls 60 and 61, respectively, outwardly around shafts 62 and 63, respectively. 47,

Referring now primarily to FIGS. 1, 3, 4, 7, 10 and 12, riveter 10 further includes an annular-shaped housing segment 70 and a cylindr-ically-shaped housing segment 71 defining first and second chambers 72 and 73, respectively. Housing segment 71 is a generally cylindrical, tubular member positioned coaxially with slide members 15 and 30 and housing 11. The inner end of housing segment 71 is open whereas the outer end 74 is closed. The end of slide member 30 opposite from end 31 is formed into a shaft 75 which terminates in a piston 76. Piston 76 supports a O-ring 77 which forms a fluid-tight connection between piston 76 and the inner surface of chamber 73. The inner wall of housing segment 71 also supports. near the open end thereof, a second O-ring 78 which forms a fluid-tight connection between shaft 75 and the open end of chamber 73. Shaft 75 has an axial bore 91 extending therethrough, through which extends an open ended tube 92 defining a passageway 80. The diameter of tube 92 is less than that of bore 91 to permit fluid conduction therebetween. Fluid entering tube 92 exits from bore 91 through openings 93 in shaft 75, near piston 76. A fluid-tight connection is formed between piston 76 and tube 92 by means of an O-ring 95. Thus, by conducting fluid pressure into chamber 73, between piston 76 and outer end 74 of housing segment 71, such as by means of a passageway 79, piston 76, shaft 75 and slide member 30 may be driven forwardly, towards nose 12 of housing 11. On the other hand, by conducting fluid pressure into chamber 73, between piston 76 and O- ring 78, such as by means of a passageway 80, bore 91, and openings 93, piston 76, shaft 75 and slide member 30 may be driven rearwardly, away from nose 12 of housing 11.

Housing segment 70 surrounds housing segment 71 and connects housing segment 71 to housing 11. Housing 70 includes a rear wall 81, the inner edge of which is connected to housing segment 71, at 82, to provide a rigid connection. Housing segment 70 includes a front Wall 83, the inner edge of which is connected to housing 11, at 84, to provide a second rigid connection. It should be particularly noted that the inner edge of front wall 83 is spaced from housing segment 71. Furthermore, end 17 of slide member 15 extends between housing segment 71 and the inner edge of front wall 83 of housing segment 70. An O-ring 85 is positioned between the inner edge of front wall 83 of housing segment 70 and end 17 of slide member 15 to provide a fluid-tight connection. Furthermore, end 17 of slide member 15 terminates in a piston 86 which supports O-rings 87 and S8 in its outer and inner surfaces, respectively. Thus, by conducting fluid pressure into chamber 72, between piston 86 and rear wall 81 of housing segment 70, such as by means of a passageway 89, piston 86 and slide member 15 may be driven forwardly, until end 16 of slide member 15 contacts nose 12 of housing 11. On the other hand, by conducting fluid pressure into chamber 72, between piston 86 and front wall 83 of housing segment 70, such as by means of a passageway 90, piston 86 and slide member 15 may be driven rearwardly, until piston 86 contacts rear wall 81 of housing segment 70.

Turning now to a discussion of the subassembly responsible for feeding rivets laterally into housing 11 and conducting sheared mandrels 7' out of housing 11, reference should be made primarily to FIGS. 2, 9, 11 and 13. More specifically, rivets 3 are fed into riveter 10 by means of a belt-type magazine, generally designated 100, having a plurality of spaced openings 101 therein for holding rivets 3 as rivets 3 are fed laterally into housing 11. More particularly, and in accordance with the preferred embodiment of the present invention, magazine 100 may simply be a length of corrugated paper, ofa type well known in the packaging and shipping art. That is, such a length of corrugated paper includes a first, thin, flexible, elongate sheet 102 and a second, thin, flexible, elongate sheet 103 connected to one side of sheet 102, sheet 103 including a plurality of parallel, semicircular lobes 104, which define openings 101, and which are spaced by flat sections 105. As

shown most clearly in FIGS. 11 and 13, openings 101 are of such a size that they snuggly receive mandrels 7 of rivets 3 and the width of sheets 102 and 103 is approximately equal to the length of that portion of mandrels 7 which extends beyond head 6 of sleeve 5. Furthermore, head 6 of sleeve 5 of each rivet 3 is positioned in contact with one side of magazine means 100.

Riveter 10 includes guide means, generally designated 110, for guiding magazine laterally through housing 11. According to the preferred embodiment of the present invention, guide means comprises a pair of spaced, parallel plates 111 and 112 which are spaced by an amount approximately equal to the total thickness of magazine 100. Plates 111 and 112 extend laterally through the center of housing 11, through slots 28 and 29 in slide member 15, through slots 36 and 37 in slide member 30, and through a pair of elongate, longitudinal, horizontally spaced, opposed slots 113 and 114 in housing 11.

As will be explained more fully hereinafter, slide member 30 is operative to contact head 6 of sleeve 5 of rivet 3 and to advance rivet 3 out of its respective opening 101 in magazine 100 and to advance rivet 3 to a point beyond nose 12 of housing 11 and to, thereafter, deposit the broken-off piece of each mandrel 7' between guide plates 111 and 112, between adjacent lobes 104 of magazine 100. Such a sheared mandrel 7' is shown in FIGS. 9 and 12. In this manner, semicircular lobes 104 of sheet 103 push sheared mandrels 7' along the top surface of plate 112. Such movement continues until sheared mandrel 7' reaches an elongate opening 115 in bottom plate 112, opening 115 being positioned parallel to the axis of slide members 15 and 30, perpendicular to the direction in which magazine 100 moves through housing 11, and of a dimension greater than the size of sheared mandrel 7. Thus, mandrel 7 automatically falls through opening 115 as magazine 100 conveys mandrels 7 through housing 1.1. In addition, riveter 10 includes a generally rectangular, hollow chute 116 which is open at the top and bottom thereof, and which is connected to plate 112, immediately below opening 115 therein. The bottom of chute 116 extends through an opening 117 in housing 11. Thus, chute 116 conducts sheared mandrels 7 out of housing 11. Finally, riveter 10 optionally includes a collecting bin (not shown) connected to the lower end of chute 116 for the purpose of collecting mandrels 7 as they fall from riveter l0. Riveter 10 also may optionally include an air jet to blow sheared mandrels 7' from housing 11 should the necessity arise.

Referring now primarily to FIGS. 2, 9, 1 1 and 13, riveter 10 further includes a feed mechanism, generally designated 120, which is responsive to movement of slide members 15 and 30, for intermittently advancing magazine 100 through housing 11 in time sequence with each riveting operation. two-step mechanism for moving magazine 100 m two distinct steps. More specifically, at the start of a riveting operation, one of spaced openings 101 in magazine 100 is aligned with the axis of slide members 15 and 30 so that the rivet 3 therein may be removed therefrom and conducted to nose 12 of riveter 10. During the riveting operation, magazine 100 is moved by a first amount, sufficient to align one of the spaces between lobes 104 with the axis of slide members 15 and 30 so that sheared mandrel 7 may be deposited between guide plates 111 and 112, between such spaced lobes Feed mechanism 120 is a 104. Thereafter, a second movement of magazine 100 is required to align a second opening 101 with the axis of slide members and to permit removal of a second rivet 3 to repeat the operation.

For this purpose, feed mechanism includes an L-shaped arm 121. one side 122 of which extends parallel to housing 11, on the outside thereof. The free end of side 122 receives a pin 123 which is rigidly connected to housing 11 in any convenient manner thereby permitting pivotal movement of arm 121 toward and away from housing 11. The other side 124 of arm 121 extends perpendicular to side 122 and through slot 114 in housing 11 to a point closely adjacent the outer surface of slide member 15. The outer end of side 124 of arm 121 has an inclined surface 125 which is adapted to contact the inclined surface 126 of an abutment 127 connected to the side of slide member 15, immediately above slot 29 therein. Thus, as slide member 15 moves axially relative to housing 11, as will be explained more fully hereinafter, surface 126 of abutment 127 contacts surface 125 and pivots arm 121 about pin 123.

Side 122 of arm 121 has an inwardly extending abutment 128 connected thereto, near pin 123, which engages one end 131 of a second arm 130. Arm is mounted for pivotal movement about a pin 132 connected to housing 111, on the inside thereof. in any suitable manner. Arm 130 extends through slot 114 in housing 11 to permit end 131 thereof to engage abutment 128 on arm 121. On the other side of pin 132, arm 130 extends through slot 29 in slide member 15 to a point closely spaced from slide member 30. Slide member 30 includes an abutment 133 connected to the side thereof which is adapted to engage the end 134 of arm 130 opposite from end 131 thereof. Thus, as slide member 30 moves axially away from nose 12 of riveter 10, abutment 133 contacts end 134 of arm 130, causing arm 130 to rotate in a clockwise direction. as viewed in FIG. 11. This clockwise rotation of arm 130 causes end 131 thereof to contact and move abutment 128, causing rotation of arm 121 in a counterclockwise direction, as viewed in FIG. 11.

Arm 121 is biased with side 122 closest to housing 11, as shown in solid lines in FIG. 11, by a spring 135 which is wrapped around pin 123 and contacts housing 11 and arm 121. Arm 121 is moved to an intermediate position, shown in phantom in FIG. 11, by abutment 127, and is then moved to a final position, also shown in phantom in FIG. 11, by abutment 133. These three positions of arm 121 correspond to the starting. intermediate, and final positions of magazine 100 referred to previously.

To interconnect arm 121 with magazine 100, arm 121 supports a second arm 140, one end 141 of which is connected to the intersection between sides 122 and 124 of arm 121. Such connection may be made by means of rivets 142. Arm is a thin, flexible member which supports, at its other end 143, a post 144 h h is shown most clearly in FIG. 13. Post 144 cxtfinds downwardly from end 143 of arm 140, through a slot 145 in guide plate 111. The lower surface 146 of post 144 is inclined at a slight angle so as to face inwardly of housing 11. The sharp corner 147 formed between surface 146 of post 144 and the outer side 148 thereof is adapted to extend into spaced openings 106 formed in sheet 102 of magazine 100. Movement of arm 140 outwardly causes side 148 of post 144 to conta 11nd move sheet 102 of magazine 100 therewith. On the other hand, the return movement of arm 140 inwardly causes inclined surface 146 to push post 144 upwardly and out of openings 106. By making arm 140 quite flexible. arm 140 readily bends, permitting arm 140 to move without a corresponding movement of magazine 100, post 144 riding along the top surface of magazine 100 until it falls into the next opening 106.

Riveter may also include a generally rectangular housing segment 94 connected to the side of housing 11, as shown in FIG. 1, to enclose feed mechanism 120. In such case, housing segment 94 would have a slot 95 in the side thereof through which magazine 100 may pass as it leaves housing 11.

OPERATION The sequence of operation of riveter 10 starts with pistons 76 and 86 in their retracted positions, as shown in FIG. 3. In this position, and as will be explained more fully hereinafter, breaking jaws 38 and 39 and guide jaws 32 and 33 have both been spread apart by plates 111 and 112 and are positioned in contact therewith. on opposite sides thereof. As will be explained more fully hereinafter, feed mechanism 120 has also indexed magazine 100 so that a rivet 3 is positioned coaxially with slide members 15 and 30.

In order to move the next rivet 3 to a position where it may be set, trigger 14 is released which has the effect of conducting fluid pressure to chambers 72 and 73, via passageways 79 and 89, respectively. This has the effect of moving both slide members 15 and 30 forwardly, towards nose 12 of housing 11. Considering first slide member 15, it moves forwardly, as shown in FIG. 4, until end 16 thereof contacts nose 12 of housing 11 and until piston 86 contacts front wall 83 of housing segment 70. As slide member 15 moves forwardly, pawls 60 and 61 pivot inwardly, under the influence of suitable biasing springs, not shown, as they slide down surfaces 26 of abutments 22 and 23, respectively.

Returning for a moment to FIG. 3, it is seen that as slide member 30 begins moving towards nose 12 of housing 11, the leading surfaces of guide jaws 32 and 33 contact head 6 of sleeve 5 of rivet 3, thereby pushing rivet 3 forwardly, out of its opening 101 in magazine 100. Furthermore, as soon as guide jaws 32 and 33 reach the leading edges of guide plates 111 and 112, respectively, the spring tension of the material from which slide member 30 is formed causes guide jaws 32 and 33 to spring inwardly, into contact with the opposite sides of mandrel 7. As slide member 30 further continues to move forwardly, breaking jaws 38 and 39 reach the leading edges of guide plates 111 and 112, respectively, and upon passing same also spring inwardly into contact with the opposite sides of mandrel 7. This intermediate position of slide member 30 is shown in FIGS. 4-6 where guide jaws 32 and 33 and breaking jaws 38 and 39 are seen to be in contact with mandrel 7 and where the front surfaces of guide jaws 32 and 33 are seen to be in contact with head 6 of sleeve 5.

At this time, breaking jaws 38 and 39 are only loosely in contact with mandrel 7. On the other hand, as guide jaws 32 and 33 reach the end of slots 20 and 21, respectively, in slide member 15, jaws 38 and 39 are moved inwardly into a more firm contact with mandrel 7. In this position, and as shown in FIG. 4, slide member 30 continues its forward movement, advancing rivet 3 through slide member 15 to a setting point beyond end 16 of slide member 15 and beyond nose 12 of housing 11. The furthestmost position of slide member 30 is shown in FIG. 7. In this position, the from surfaces of guide jaws 32 and 33 are parallel to the outer end of nose 12 of housing 11 and sleeve and head 8 of mandrel 7 are extending beyond nose 12. In this position, sleeve 5 is adapted to be extended through the aligned holes 150 and 151 in a pair of work pieces 152 and 153, respectively, until head 6 of sleeve 5 contacts work piece 152. Rivet 3 is now ready to be set.

It should be particularly noted that when slide mem ber 30 has moved to its forwardmost position, outer surfaces 54 and 55 of abutments 46 and 47, respec tively, attached to slide member 31], have contacted surfaces 66 and 67, respectively, of pawls 60 and 61, respectively, pivoting pawls 60 and 61 outwardly until abutments 46 and 47, respectively, pass thereby. As soon as this occurs, hooks 64 and 65 of pawls 60 and 61, respectively, snap in behind abutments 46 and 47, respectively, with surfaces 68 and 69 of pawls 60 and 61, respectively, contacting surfaces 50 and 51, respectively, of abutments 46 and 47, respectively.

In order to set rivet 3, trigger 14 is retracted. Such action operates through conventional means to remove the fluid pressure from passages 79 and 89 and to apply such pressure to passages 88 and 90. This reverses the force on pistons 76 and 86 so as to cause their movement rearwardly. However, while pressure is now applied to chamber 73, between O-ring 78 and piston 76, piston 76 and slide member 30 cannot move rearwardly since they are being held stationary by pawls 6t) and 61. Thus, pawls 60 and 61 releasably lock slide member 30 at the setting point, with end 31 thereof engaging head 6 of sleeve 5 of rivet 3.

On the other hand, slide member is permitted complete freedom of movement under the control of piston 86. Thus, slide member 15 immediately begins moving backward, away from nose 12. At this time, shoulder 18 engages inclined outer surfaces 42 and 43 of breaking jaws 38 and 39, respectively. Since breaking jaws 38 and 39 are permitted to move axially and laterally relative to slide member 30, this movement of slide member 15 relative to slide member 30 has two effects on breaking jaws 38 and 39. In the first instance, and referring now to FIG. 10, shoulder 18 urges jaws 38 and 39 inwardly into firm gripping engagement with mandrel 7 of rivet 3. Simultaneously, shoulder 18 pulls jaws 38 and 39 axially, with slide member 15, away from nose 12 of housing 11, compressing springs 52 and 53 and moving rods 44 and 45 axially through bores 48 and 49, respectively, in slide member 30. Since, at this time. guide jaws 32 and 33 are firmly holding head 6 of sleeve 5 in contact with work piece 152, this movement of mandrel 7 is relative to sleeve 5, thereby setting rivet 3.

Slide member 15 continues to move axially, slide member 30 remaining stationary, until mandrel 7 breaks within sleeve 5. Abutments 22 and 23 on slide member 15 are positioned so that surfaces 26 thereof contact hooks 64- and 65 of pawls 6t) and 61, respectively, shortly after the breaking of mandrel 7. Thus, continued movement of slide member 15 rearwardly causes abutments 22 and 23 to pivot pawls 6t) and 61, respectively, outwardly until books 641 and 65, respectively, release abutments 46 and 47 on slide member 30. At this time, the pressure within chamber 73 causes slide member 30 to immediately move rearwardly relative to housing 11. As slide member 30 moves rearwardly relative to slide member 15, springs 52 and 53 return jaws 38 and 39 to the ends of slots 20 and 21, respectively.

Slide member 15 continues to move rearwardly until piston 86 comes into contact with rear wall 81 of housing segment 70. However, after slide member 15 has stopped its movement, slide member 30 continues to move axially relative to slide member 15 and housing 11. As slide member 30 moves rearwardly, breaking jaws 38 and 39 come into contact with plates 111 and 112, respectively, of guide means 110. As shown in FIG. 13, inner surfaces 40 and 11 of breaking jaws 38 and 39, respectively, the rear edges of which are slightly inclined upwardly, contact plates 111 and 112, respectively, and are spread thereby, breaking jaws 38 and 39 moving laterally outwardly into slots 20 and 21, respectively, in slide member 15. While breaking jaws 38 and 39 have, at this time, released sheared mandrel 7', mandrel 7' continues to be gripped by guide jaws 32 and 33. Furthermore, and as shown in FIG. 13, mandrel 7' has begun its movement between plates 111 and 112. As will be explained more fully hereinafter. feed mechanism 120 has moved magazine so that man drel 7' is placed on magazine 100, between spaced lobes 104 thereof.

As slide member 30 continues its movement, guide jaws 32 and 33 contact plates 111 and 112, respectively, and are spread thereby, releasing mandrel 7', guide jaws 32 and 33 assuming positions on opposite sides of guide means 110. This final position of slide member 30 corresponds to the starting position thereof and is shown in FIG. 3. Here it is seen that end 31 of slide member 30 has moved beyond the front edge of guide means 110, permitting feed mechanism to advance magazine 100 so as to position a second rivet 3 in the position shown in FIG. 3, coaxial with axes of slide members 15 and 30 and in position to be advanced to nose 12 of housing 11 to repeat the riveting operation. As mentioned previously, this is achieved by releasing trigger 14 which reverses the pressure on pistons 76 and 86, moving them forward as described previously.

Simultaneously with the movement of slide members 15 and 30 and the setting operation just described, feed mechanism 120 is operative to manipulate magazine 100 in order to intermittently advance magazine 100 through housing 11. More specifically, and with reference primarily to FIGS. 11 and 13, at the start of the riveting operation with slide members 15 and 30 in their forwardmost position and with a rivet 3 extending beyond nose 12 of housing 11, arms 121 and 140 are biased in their most inward position by means of spring 135. Such position is shown in phantom in FIGS. 11 and 13. As slide member 15 moves rearwardly during the setting operation, surface 126 of abutment 127 on slide member 15 contacts inclined surface of side 124 of arm 121, causing arm 121 and arm to pivot outwardly around pin 123. The dimensions of abutment 127 and its relationship relative to arm 121 is adjusted to cause movement of end 143 of arm 140 by an amount equal to approximately one-half the spacing between adjacent lobes 104 in magazine 1110. Since the spring tension of arm 140 is now maintaining post 144 extending into and through one of openings 106 in sheet 102 of magazine 100, magazine 100 moves a corresponding amount so as to align one of the spaces between lobes 104 with the axis of slide members 15 and 30, as shown in solid lines in FIG. 13.

As the riveting operation continues, as described previously, magazine 100 has still not moved again when slide member reaches the position shown in FIG. 12 where guide jaws 32 and 33 are inserting mandrel 7' between guide plates 111 and 112. Thus, sheared mandrel 7' is deposited between lobes 104, as shown in FIG. 13.

The spacing of abutment 133 on slide member 30 is such that it contacts end 134 of arm 130 at the moment guide jaws 32 and 33 pass the front edges of plates 111 and 112, respectively. Therefore, the additional movement of slide member 30 rearwardly, slightly beyond the front edges of plates 111 and 112, causes pivotal movement of arm 130 about pin 132 and a corresponding rotation of arms 121 and 140 about pin 123. This additional movement of arms 121 and 140 is sufficient to cause movement of end 143 of arm 140 by an amount equal to approximately one and a half times the spacing between adjacent lobes 104 in magazine 100. Since post 144 is still engaged with one of openings 106 in sheet 102 of magazine 100, magazine is moved by a corresponding amount, aligning one of openings 101 with the axis of slide members 15 and 30, also as shown in phantom in FIGS. 11 and 12.

It will be obvious to those skilled in the art that the operation just described causes feed mechanism to align alternate openings 101 in magazine 100 with the axis of housing 11. The reason for this will appear most clearly in FIG. 9 where it is seen that the diameter of head 6 of sleeve 5 of rivet 3 is sufficiently large to prevent a rivet 3 from being placed in each of openings 101 without interfering with each other. In addition, while alternate openings 101 in magazine 100 may be omitted, it is considered desirable to include them so as to minimize the open space between adjacent lobes 104, in order to limit the freedom of movement of sheared mandrels 7'.

As slide members 15 and 30 move forwardly, as described previously, to remove a second rivet 3 from magazine 100 and to convey such rivet to the setting point of riveter l0, beyond nose 12 of housing 11, abutments 133 and 127 release arm 130 and side 124 of arm 121, respectively, permitting spring to return arms 121 and to the starting position shown in phantom in FIGS. 11 and 12. However, such movement of arms 121 and 140 does not move magazine 100 since arm 140 is sufficiently flexible to permit surface 146 at the bottom of post 144 to slide along sheet 102 until it falls into the next opening 106.

During the next setting operation, as feed mechanism 120 moves magazine 100 laterally through housing 11, sheet 103 of magazine 100 automatically pushes sheared mandrel 7' until it reaches opening 115 in plate 112 and mandrel 7' falls through opening 115 and chute 116 out of housing 11.

It can therefore be seen that in accordance with the present invention, there is disclosed an automatic loading blind riveter 10 which overcomes the problems of previous riveting tools and satisfies the industry required objects stated hereinbefore. Riveter 10 includes moveable guide jaws 32 and 33 and moveable breaking jaws 38 and 39 which are highly efficient in operation and permit the size of nose 12 of riveter 10 to be minimized. Thus, riveter 10 may be manipulated into the smallest areas encountered during field use. Riveter 10 uses a paper magazine 100 of a type which is presently readily available. Thus. magazine 100 is inexpensive and may be readily disposed of after use, if desired, On the other hand, when magazine 100 leaves riveter 10, it is empty since sheared mandrels 7' have been collected at a central collecting point. Thus, magazine 100 is immediately ready for reloading and reuse, if desired.

The construction of blind riveter 10 is highly simplified and efficient so that the overall tool is relatively inexpensive and has a long service life. The moveable parts are driven by a pair of coaxial operating pistons 76 and 86 which are both circular in cross-section and nested one inside the other. This arrangement eliminates bearings, contributing to the simplicity, inexpensiveness, and efficiency of the present operation.

While the invention has been described with respect to the preferred physical embodiment constructed in accordance therewith, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various modifications and improvements may be made without departing from the scope and spirit of the invention. For example, those skilled in the art will know of other techniques for driving first and second slide members 15 and 30 and for feeding magazine 100 into and through housing 11. Other modifications will also be apparent. Accordingly, it is to be understood that the invention is not to be limited by the specific illustrative embodiment, but only by the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A riveter for setting blind rivets of the type including a tubular sleeve having an annular head at one end thereof and a mandrel extending through the sleeve, the mandrel having an enlarged head adjacent the other end of the sleeve, said blind riveter comprising:

a housing adapted to be held stationary during operation of said riveter, said housing having a nose through which said rivets pass;

a first elongate, hollow slide member mounted for axial movement relative to said housing, one end of said first slide member being positioned adjacent said nose of said housing;

magazine means for feeding rivets laterally into said housing;

a second elongate, hollow slide member mounted for axial movement coaxially with and within said first slide member, one end of said second slide member being operative to contact said head of said rivet sleeve and to advance said rivet through said first slide member to a setting point beyond said one end of said first slide member and said nose of said housing, said rivet mandrel extending into the hollow center of said second slide member;

means connected to said housing for releasably locking said second slide member at said setting point with said one end thereof engaging said head of said rivet sleeve;

a pair of opposed jaw members carried by said second slide member and being mounted for limited axial and lateral movement relative thereto for releasably gripping said rivet mandrel; and

means at said one end of said first slide member for engaging said jaw members and for simultaneously urging said jaw members into firm gripping engagement with said rivet mandrel and pulling said jaw members axially, with said first slide member, away from said one end of said second slide member, thereby setting said rivet.

2. A blind riveter according to claim 1 further comprising:

means operatively connected to said first slide member and moveable therewith for automatically releasing said second slide member after said rivet is set, said second slide member being operative, upon the release thereof, to continue movement of said jaw members axially towards said magazine means.

3. A blind riveter according to claim 2 further comprising:

means responsive to the movement of said first and second slide members for intermittently advancing said magazine means in time sequence with said riveting operation, said magazine means including a plurality of spaced lobes defining openings for holding said rivets as said rivets are fed laterally into said housing, said second slide member depositing the broken-off piece of each mandrel onto said magazine, between said lobes.

4. A blind riveter according to claim 3 further comprising:

a collecting bin connected to said housing, said magazine conveying said broken-off mandrels to said collection bin, said broken-off mandrels automatically falling from said magazine means into said collection bin as said magazine means is advanced through said housing.

5. A blind riveter according to claim 3 further comprising:

guide means mounted within said second slide member and connected to said housing for guiding said magazine means laterally through said housing, said guide means being adapted to contact and spread said jaw members as said second slide member moves to deposit said broken-off mandrel onto said magazine, said jaw members passing on opposite sides of said guide means and said magazine.

6. A blind riveter according to claim 5 wherein said second slide member has opposing sides at said one end thereof adapted to releasably grip said rivet mandrel, said sides of said second slide member moving said broken-off mandrel onto said magazine after said jaw members have been spread, said guide means being further adapted to contact and spread said opposing sides at said one end of said second slide member, after said second slide member has moved said broken-off mandrel onto said magazine, said opposing sides at said one end of said second slide member passing on opposite sides of said guide means and said magazine.

7. A blind riveter according to claim 5 wherein said guide means comprises:

a pair of spaced, parallel plates extending laterally through said housing, said magazine means passing between said plates.

8. A blind riveter according to claim 7 wherein said magazine means comprises:

a first thin, flexible, elongate sheet; and

a second thin, flexible, elongate sheet connected to one side of said first sheet, said second sheet including a plurality of parallel, spaced lobes therein. with intermediate flat sections, said lobes defining said spaced openings for holding said rivets as said rivets are fed laterally into said housing, and wherein:

said second slide member deposits the broken-off piece of each mandrel between said plates of said guide means, between adjacent lobes, said lobes pushing said broken-off piece of each mandrel laterally through said housing.

9. A blind riveter according to claim 8 wherein one of said plates of said guide means has an elongate opening therein, parallel to the axis of said first and second slide members, said broken-off mandrel automatically falling through said hole as said magazine conveys said broken-off mandrels through said housing and further comprising:

chute means connected to said one plate and surrounding said opening thcrein for conducting said broken-off mandrels out of said housing.

10. A blind riveter according to claim 1 wherein said means at said one end of said first slide member includes inclined shoulders on the inside of said first slide member, at said one end thereof, adapted to contact said jaws to close them as they are carried by said second slide member axially towards said nose of said housing, said shoulders being so located as to engage said jaws and close said jaws about said mandrel when said rivet is at said setting point.

11. A blind riveter according to claim 10 further comprising: 7

first drive means for controlling movement of said first slide member axially relative to said housing, said shoulders being operative upon movement of said first slide member to simultaneously urge said jaw members into firm gripping engagement with said rivet mandrel and pulling said jaw members axially away from said nose of said tool.

12. A blind riveter according to claim 11 further comprising:

second drive means for controlling movement of said second slide member axially relative to said housing, said first drive means moving said first slide member relative to said second slide member until said second slide member is automatically released permitting axial movement of said jaw members back towards said one end of said second slide member, said second drive means thereafter moving said second slide member to said magazine means to return the broken-off mandrel to said magazine means and to contact and convey a second rivet from said magazine means to said nose of said housing.

13. A blind riveter according to claim 12 wherein said housing includes a first chamber positioned at the opposite end thereof from said nose, and wherein said first drive means comprises:

first piston means operatively connected to the other end of said first slide member and being positioned within said first chamber.

14. A blind riveter according to claim 13 wherein said housing includes a second chamber positioned adjacent to said first chamber, and wherein said second drive means comprises:

second piston means operatively connected to the other end of said second slide member and being positioned within said second chamber.

15. A blind riveter according to claim 14 wherein said second chamber is generally cylindrical and positioned coaxially with said second slide member, said other end of said second slide member reciprocating therethrough, and wherein said first chamber is generally annular and surrounds said second chamber, said first piston means consisting of an annular head made integral with said other end of said first slide member, said annular head extending around said second chamber into said first chamber.

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Referenced by
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US4027520 *Sep 2, 1975Jun 7, 1977Gesipa Blindniettechnik Gesellschaft Mit Beschrankter HaftungBlind riveter with automatic rivet feed
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Classifications
U.S. Classification29/812.5, 29/243.523
International ClassificationB21J15/16, B21J15/02, B21J15/06, B21J15/34, B21J15/36, F16B19/10, B21J15/32, B21J15/00
Cooperative ClassificationB21J15/323, F16B19/10, B21J15/105
European ClassificationB21J15/32H, B21J15/10B, F16B19/10
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 11, 1988ASAssignment
Owner name: EMHART ENTERPRISES CORP.
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:USM CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004876/0901
Effective date: 19871104
Owner name: EMHART INDUSTRIES, INC., A CONNECTICUT STOCK CORP.
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNOR:EMHART ENTERPRISES CORP., A NJ CORP.;REEL/FRAME:004870/0112
Effective date: 19871216
Owner name: EMHART INDUSTRIES, INC.,CONNECTICUT
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNOR:EMHART ENTERPRISES CORP., A NJ CORP.;REEL/FRAME:4870/112
Sep 2, 1982ASAssignment
Owner name: USM CORPORATION; 426 COLT HIGHWAY, FARMINGTON, CT.
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:HIRSCH, RICHARD F.;REEL/FRAME:004030/0209
Effective date: 19820819
Sep 2, 1982AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: 426 COLT HIGHWAY, FARMINGTON, CT. A CORP OF NJ.
Owner name: HIRSCH, RICHARD F.
Owner name: USM CORPORATION
Effective date: 19820819