Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3888060 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 10, 1975
Filing dateDec 17, 1973
Priority dateDec 17, 1973
Also published asCA1034398A1, DE2459680A1, DE2459680C2
Publication numberUS 3888060 A, US 3888060A, US-A-3888060, US3888060 A, US3888060A
InventorsHaener Juan
Original AssigneeHaener Juan
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Construction assembly and method including interlocking blocks
US 3888060 A
Abstract
Interlocking blocks are assembled in longitudinally staggered rows. The blocks are planar on their bottom side and include webs with interlocking protrusions on their upper side. The protrusions coact with the webs on adjacent rows of blocks to locate and hold the blocks in position. Corner blocks and end blocks are also provided so that a series of walls may be constructed without the need for the usual mortared joints. The protrusions are chamfered and have associated therewith an excessmaterial-receiving groove to compensate for manufacturing tolerances. A completed wall may be grouted through interconnecting cavities in the hollow blocks to provide additional strength.
Images(5)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 1 Haener 1 CONSTRUCTION ASSEMBLY AND METHOD INCLUDING INTERLOCKING BLOCKS [76] Inventor: Juan Haener, 8215 Harton FL. San

Diego, Calif. 92120 [22] Filed: Dec. 17, 1973 [21] Applv No.: 425,299

[4 1 June 10, 1975 466,776 7/1950 Canada 52/503 Primary Exan-zinerJ. Karl Bell Attorney, Agent, or Firm-John .l. Posta, Jr.

i 1 ABSTRACT Interlocking blocks are assembled in longitudinally staggered rows. The blocks are planar on their bottom side and include webs with interlocking protrusions on their upper side. The protrusions coact with the webs on adjacent rows of blocks to locate and hold the blocks in position. Corner blocks and end blocks are also provided so that a series of walls may be constructed without the need for the usual mortared joints. The protrusions are chamfered and have associated therewith an excessmaterial-receiving groove to compensate for manufacturing tolerances. A completed wall may be grouted through interconnecting cavities in the hollow blocks to provide additional strength.

38 Claims, 23 Drawing Figures PATENTED JUN I 0 I975 SHEET CONSTRUCTION ASSEMBLY AND METHOD INCLUDING INTERLOCKING BLOCKS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Concrete block construction is an important factor in the construction industries of all countries of the world. In many developing nations a large percentage of substantial structures are built according to this technique. The existing technique is to employ concrete blocks which have a plurality of cavities and are planar on all six sides. The blocks are layed up by placing concrete mortar by a trowel and then inserting the blocks into the mortar. Subsequent courses of blocks are layed upon a first course of blocks after mortar is placed along the side walls of the supporting blocks and the end walls of the previously layed blocks.

There is a worldwide shortage of skilled craftsman trained in the techniques of laying concrete blocks and capable of producing a wall ofa predetermined height that is true horizontally and vertically and has the req uisite strength. Because of the labor shortage and the expense of such construction resulting high wages, concrete block construction has not seen the full utilization it would otherwise attain As a result of the deficiencies of the prior art technique. various interlocking or mortarless blocks have been proposed. According to the prevailing theory, in terlocking blocks are so constructed that they may be layed one upon the other, to lay up a wall without the necessity of skilled tradesmen to align the blocks one upon the other, to apply the mortar. and to position the blocks appropriately. Y

The mortarless or interlocking blocks provided thus far have been deficient in several respects. The typical prior art interlocking block is manufactured by the usual moldiing process and then the various interconnecting grooves and protrusions are formed into the block by sawing or other forming techniques. Such a block becomes impractically expensive for most applications.

A further deficiency of prior art interconnecting or mortarless blocks has been that the interlocking structure has required very precise molding or other forming so that usual manufacturing techniques cannot be employed Thus, the blocks must be made according to low producing processes which raises the costs beyond practical limits.

Other prior art techniques have not provided blocks which are adaptable to use with corner blocks, and end blocks, to accomplish the intersection and termination of walls without the use of manual forming and the accompanying skill and labor requirements. Additionally, some prior art techniques have required that the blocks be joined by mortar in the conventional fashion and therefore have been wasteful of material and labor in the joining operation.

As a result of the deficiencies of prior art mortarless or interconnecting blocks. these blocks have seen relatively limited application and the convention prior art technique with its concomitant high labor and skill requirement is the predominating usage.

it is therefore desirable to have a mortarless inter locking block that may be utilized to produce construction assemblies such as walls and similar structures without the necessity of skilled labor and wherein the blocks may be produced by conventional techniques that do not require post-molding forming.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION An exemplary embodiment of the invention incorpo rates an interlocking building block having two longitudinalplanar upright side walls. a plurality of transverse spacing webs and interlocking means protruding from one face of the block. As used herein the term web should be taken as including a projection extending at right angles from the interior surface of a side wall. At least one of the webs must connect between the side walls. but the other webs in a given block may be partial. The webs have integral protrusions extending be yond the face of the block and defining interlocking means in the form of notches in the protrusions. The notches engage the webs on adjacent blocks to position and hbld the blocks. The inside surfaces of the outer most webs are spaced from the ends of the side walls by a distance which. in sum, is equal to the distance between the facing vertical walls of the notches on the protrusions. The resulting blocks interlock in alternate rows with a staggered configuration. The block may be assembled with mortar. mortarless. or with grout or glue as will be described more fully hereinafter.

An exemplary configuration for the blocks incorporates a symetrical configuration with four transverse webs. It is to be understood however. that unsymetrical positioning of the webs and web numbers in excess of the 2, 3, and 4 web configurations that are specifically treated hereinafter are equally a part of the invention. Each web incorporates a protrusion with an interlocking notch. The notches have vertical faces which open toward the center of the block. Each interlocking means comprises a right angularly configured notch in the protrusion of the web beyond the planar upper face of the block. The substantially vertical wall of the block is chamfered to produce a wedging action when in cooperative alignment with the web on the adjacent block. Directly vertically below the vertical wall of the notch is a material receiving groove. This groove is for the purpose of receiving material which is scraped off or otherwise severed from either of the cooperating surfaces of the interlocking blocks.

in laying up a wall utilizing blocks configured according to the invention of the first course of blocks is layed with the flat planar bottom face supported from a concrete floor slab or similar surface. The blocks are layed end to end with the ends of the side walls in engagement..The second course of blocks is then placed on the first course by inserting a block with half of its length overlapping each of two lower blocks. With this orientation the inclined surfaces of the interlocking means guide the block as it is lowered vertically onto the previously layed course. if there is any out of alignment condition resulting from manufacturing conditions or other causes. the sloping surfaces will cause a sufficient amount of material to be removed by abrasion and similar mechanical action so that the blocks become fully engaged. The material scraped from either block in the mating action is received in a groove so that full engagement of the block is accomplished. As necessary, force is applied to cause the engagement and scraping action. Where it is desired to provide a rather merely serves to seal the joints and secure the interlocked blocks.

Upon completion of a wall of the desired height in the aforedescribed manner, further strength may be obtained by pouring grout into the channel created by the hollow cavities formed by the central cavity and alternately the end cavities in the vertically related courses of blocks throughout the entire vertical extent of the wall. The grout, when hardened. creates additional vertical and horizontal strength for the wall.

Where it is desired to intersect a wall with a right angularly related wall, or to provide a finished end for a wall combined corner and end blocks are utilized. The corner blocks have a configuration according to the interlocking blocks over approximately one-half of their length and have a corner interlock configuration over the remainder of their length. The corner interlock configuration incorporates a substantially square vertical opening through the end of the block with recesses at 90 increments. A key. positioned to engage the notches on a cooperating corner block, is located on the upper or lower surface of each corner block and at the innermost edge of the opening.

At the end of a course of blocks, the corner blocks are used in conjunction with short end blocks, to produce a finished end for the wall.

It is therefore an object of the invention to provide a new and improved construction assembly and method incorporating interlocking blocks.

It is another object of the invention to provide a new and improved interlocking block which may be manufactured by conventional techniques.

It is another object of the invention to provide a new and improved interlocking block which is relatively low in unit cost.

It is another object of the invention to provide a new and improved interlocking corner block.

It is another object of the invention to provide a new and improved interlocking end block.

It is another object of the invention to provide a new and improved interlocking block which may be assembled by relatively unskilled labor.

It is another object of the invention to provide a new and improved interlocking block which may be assembled without mortar.

It is another object of the invention to provide a new and improved interlocking block with planar surfaces for framing windows and similar purposes.

It is another object of the invention to provide a new and improved interlocking block which compensates for manufacturing tolerances on the interlocking surfaces.

It is another object of the invention to provide a new and improved interlocking block which may be fully or partially grouted for increased strength.

It is another object of the invention to provide a new and improved interlocking block which is susceptable to symetrical and asymetrical configurations.

It is another object of the invention to provide a new and improved interlocking block assembly method which reduces construction time.

Other objects and many attendant advantages of the invention will become more apparent upon a reading of the following detailed description, together with the drawing in which like reference numerals refer to like parts throughout, and in which:

FIG. I is a perspective view of a basic four web block.

FIG. 2 is a side elevation view of the block. partially cut away.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a block useable as a corner or end block.

FIG. 4 is a side elevation view, partially cut away. of the block of FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of a short end block.

FIG. 6 is a side elevation view, partially cut away, of the block of FIG. 5.

FIG. 7 is a perspective view ofa typical wall structure using the three types of blocks.

FIG. 8 is an enlarged sectional view taken on line 88 of FIG. 7, with an inverted finish course of blocks added on top of the wall.

FIG. 9 and I0 are enlarged sectional views illustrat ing the interfitting action of the blocks.

FIG. II is a side elevation view, partially cut away, of a two web form of block.

FIG. 12 is a sectional view of a wall structure using the two web block.

FIG. 13 is a longitudinal sectional view ofa three web block.

FIG. I4 is a sectional view of a wall structure using the three web block.

FIG. 15 is a perspective view of a first modified form of the block in a four web configuration.

FIG. 16 is a sectional view taken on line I6l6 of FIG. 15.

FIG. I7 is a perspective view of a second modified form of the block in a four web configuration.

FIG. I8 is a side elevation view, partially cut away, of the block in FIG. 17.

FIG. I9 is a longitudinal sectional view of a typical block with critical dimensions labeled.

FIG. 20 is a perspective view of a third modified form of the block in a four web configuration.

FIG. 21 is a perspective view of the first modified form of the block in a two web configuration.

FIG. 22 is a perspective view of a fourth modified form of the block in a three web configuration.

FIG. 23 is a side elevation view, partially cut away, of the block made according to a hand molding process.

Referring now to the drawings, there is illustrated three forms of the interlocking blocks according to the invention. In FIGS. 11 and 12 the form of the block incorporating two transverse webs l2 and 14 is illustrated. The webs interconnect side walls 16. The inner faces 18 and 20 of the transverse webs l2 and 14 are spaced from the ends 22 and 24 of the side walls 16 by the same total distance as separates the substantially vertical faces 26 and 28 of the interlocking means 30 and 32. Also the faces 26 and 28 of the interlocking means 30 and 32 are spaced from the respective ends 22 and 24 the same total distance as separates the inner faces I8 and 20.

In a similar manner to that illustrated in FIGS. 1 I and 12, an embodiment of the block according to the invention with three transverse webs is illustrated in FIGS. 13 and 14. The webs 34 and 36 include facing interlocking means 38 and 40. The third web 42 is spaced from the end 46 of the side wall 44 and includes interlocking means 48. The sum of the distances from the ends 46 and 50 of the side walls 44 to the inner edges of the outer webs 42 and 36 is equal to the spacing between the facing vertical faces of the interlocking means 38 and 40. Further the sum of the distances from the face 39 to the end 46 and the face 4] to the end 50 is substantially equal to the spacing between the vertical faces 35 and 37. Thus when these spacing relationships exist, the blocks will mate and interlock irrespective of the use of three webs and irrespective of the spacing between webs 34 and 42, so long as the spacing between webs 34 and 42 are consistant for each block used and interlocked together. So with this construction. unequal spacings between the webs and the ends of the blocks can be used and still obtain the correct interlocking as illustrated in FIGS. 12 and 14.

FIGS. 1, 2. l and 17 illustrate several forms of the four web blocks that will be used for exemplary purposes hereinafter. The four webs are symetrically oriented. Referring specifically to FIGS. 1 and 2, inner webs 52 and 54 include facing interlocking means 56 and 58. The outer webs 60 and 62 include interlocking means 64 and 66, which also face toward the interior of the block. The outer webs 60 and 62 are spaced from the ends 68 and 70 of the side walls 72. The sum of the distances from the ends 68 and 70 to the inner edges 6l and 63 of the outer webs 60 and 62 is equal to the spacing between the surfaces 57 and 59 of the substantially vertical portions of the notches in the interlocking means 56 and 58. Also the sum of the distances between face 65 and end 68 and between face 67 and end 70 'is substantially equal to the spacing between surfaces 85 and 87. The effect of this spacing relationship is clearly illustrated in FIG. 8 wherein a plurality of four symetrically webbed blocks 74 are illustrated in engagement with one another. It will be noted that the inner webs 52 and 54 have their interlocking means 56 and 58 in engagement with outer webs 60 and 62 on blocks in the vertically related course of blocks. This produces engagement of the ends 68 and 70 of the side walls 72. Similarly, the outer interlocking means 64 and 66 engage the webs 54 and 52 of the vertically related blocks. The size relationship makes it possible to invert the uppermost course of blocks to present a planar upper surface as is illustrated.

The upper horizontal exterior edges of the block have horizontal chamfered edges I40 and the vertical exterior edges have chamfered edges 142. These chamfered edges enhance the appearance of the block and form a drip edge to prevent water from entering joints.

The blocks 74 have two planar side walls which side walls terminate in planar edges 68, 70 and 84. The webs are coplanar with the bottom edges 84 and therefore the only portion of the block which deviates from a planar exterior configuration are the protrusions of the interlocking means. This configuration for the block makes it possible for it to be molded in a conventional mold with no undercuts. It is therefore possible to form all the interlocking structure and all the other structural features of the block by a molding process alone. 7

Referring to FIGS. 3 and 4, the combined end and corner block 88 is illustrated. Over substantially one half of its length, the corner block 88 has a configuration identical to that for the block 74. The remaining portion of the block 88 is configured for terminating the block at a corner. A hole 90 is substantially rectangular in configuration and has notches 92, 94 and 96 which receive a tang 98 depending on the orientation of the block at the corner. An end wall 130 provides a planar flush terminal face.

FIG. 5 illustrates a short end block 100 which is utilized in conjunction with the corner block 88 to terminate a wall with a closed planar end. The end block 100 is substantially square being made up of walls 101, I32, I34 and 136 with wall l0l including a tang 102. The tang 102 engages the inner face of wall in a corner block 88.

Referring to FIG. 7 a construction assembly comprising walls 104 and 108 is illustrated. The construction assembly comprises a plurality of blocks 74 and includes a plurality of corner blocks 88 and short end blocks 100. The tang 98 on the middle combined end and corner block 88 is received within the recess 92 on the uppermost combined end and corner block 88.

In the termination of the wall to produce a planar end surface, corner blocks 88 are utilized in association with short end blocks 100. The tang 102 on the end block is received against the inner face of wall 90 on the block 88 thus maintaining the integrity of the interlocked relationship.

In FIGS. 9 and 10, the detailed configuration for the interlocking means 56 associated with a typical web 52 is illustrated. The interlocking means 56 comprises a protrusion 110 from the web 52 which extends beyond the planar upper edges of the walls 72. The protrusion is generally rectangular in configuration and has a chamfered surface I12 on the substantially vertical wall 114. Directly below the vertical wall H4 is arranged a material receiving channel 116. The surface 1 [8 corresponds to the upper surface of the web 52 and is co-planar with the upper edges of the walls 72. The relationship between the web 62 of a vertically related block (not shown) to the interlocking means 56 is illustrated in the example. The manufacturing tolerances or other causes have resulted in the slight mis-alignment between the vertical face on the web 62 and the corresponding vertical face I14 on protrusion H0 of web 52. Thus, in order for the lower horizontal surface 122 of the web 62 to be forced into engagement with the corresponding horizontal surface 118 of the web 52, there must be material removed either from the web 62 or protrusion 110.

In FIG. 9 material is scraped or abraded from the web 62 to produce a proper fit. The excess material 124 is received in the groove 116, which permits full mating contact between the surfaces 118 and 122. In FIG. 10, the material is removed from the vertical face 114 and deposited in a groove 119. It is to be understood that in some situations the material may be removed from both the web 62 and the protrusion 110. In extreme mis-alignments, it is possible that the entire protrusion 110 will be broken away; however, since there are four such interlocking devices on each block there will still be adequate interlocking contact between the vertically related blocks to maintain them in position.

FIG. 19 represents a generalized configuration for the interlocking block according to the invention. The following formulas define the parameters for blocks having one or more webs, which blocks will interlock with associated blocks as long as the relationships are maintained:

L=B +B +A +A +C,+C

C, B B,

C A, A,

The length L may alternatively be expressed as:

In the application of the above formulas to the form of the block illustrated in FIGS. I3 and I4. it will be seen that the dimension C is equal to zero. thereby resulting in a single web on the left half of the block as viewed in that drawing. Similarly for the two web block such as is illustrated in FIGS. II and I2, thedimensions C, and C are both equal to zero.

In symetrical blocks the dimensions A and A are equal, resulting in a half overlap of blocks in adjacent rows. Thus many variations are possible from the exemplary configurations illustrated in the drawings within the limits of the above formulav Referring now to FIG. l5, there is illustrated a first modified form of the interlocking block means according to the invention. The interlocking means are illustrated in a block having four complete transverse webs 150, 152. I54 and I56. Each web has shoulder portions 158 and I60. These shoulders have knock-out portions 162 and 164, which knock-out portions are separated from the side walls and main body portion of the webs by grooves 166. The knock-out portions may be removed by a hammer or similar tool to make it possible to insert longitudinal reinforcing bars within the confines of the block. Thus it is possible to meet the requirements of code for certain installations requiring such reinforcing.

The protruding portion of the interlocking means such as the typical protrusion I70 is received between the opposed faces of the shoulders IS8-and 160 on the web of adjacent blocks. Thus, in this modified form of the invention a centering effect of enhanced strength is produced.

FIG. 21 illustrates a two web version of the first modified form of the interlocking block according to FIGS. I5 and I6. A typical web 184 with shoulders 186 and 188 is comparable to the corresponding web and shoulders illustrated in FIGS. I5 and 16.

A second modified form of the block is illustrated in FIGS. 17 and I8. The block there illustrated is useful in substantially the same situations as the blocks illustrated in FIGS. and 16; and differs in that the shoulders, such as typical shoulders I72 and 174, incorporate reinforcing bar receiving recesses I76 and 178. In those installations requiring reinforcing bars it is only necessary to break away the thin wall portions 180 and 182 for each of the bars to provide a longitudinally extending recess along the entire length of the block.

FIG. 20 illustrates a third modified form of the interlocking block according to the invention. In this form of the invention partial webs I90 and 192 are illustrated. The web I90 is typical and is made up of shoulders I94 and 196 extending from the side walls and having interlocking means I98 and 200 that cooperate with the inner faces of webs 202 and 204 on vertically related blocks. In this block the reinforcing bar receiving provisions need be only in the webs 202 and 204, since the reinforcing bars may pass by the shoulders I94 and 196. Accordingly a substantially U-shaped groove 210 is provided on either side of each of the webs 202 and 204. In this form of the invention it is not necessary to knock out or otherwise deform the original configuration of the block, in that the block contains reinforcing provisions in its original configuration.

Referring now to FIG. 22 a fourth modified form of the interlocking block according to the invention is illustrated. This block contains a central enlarged thick ness web 220. The central web 220 has no interlocking function and is provided with no interlocking means. Essentially the block interlocks in the same manner as a two web block as the two web block illustrated in FIGS. 11 and I2 or in FIG. 21. The central web 220 serves the purpose of connecting the two side walls and because of its central location may be used as a convenient handle for the workman in setting up the block. Then handle location is advantageous since the block balances about its center. facilitating the lifting and transportation of the block. The partial webs 230 and 232 are comprised of a plurality of shoulders of which shoulder 234 is typical. The inner face 236 of the shoulder is the working face against which the interlocking means of the vertically related blocks cooperate. The

exterior face such as the face 238 is not a working surface and therefore may be faired into the side walls as is illustrated.

Referring now to FIG. 23.. there is illustrated the symetrical four web configuration of the invention which is especially adapted to hand molding. The webs. such as typical web 240 taper away from the flat face 242 so that the block may be easily withdrawn from a mold.

In use. as is illustrated in FIGS. 7 and the blocks are layed end to end in the desired orientation for the wall or other structure. The blocks are supported by a concrete slab, footing. or other suitable planar support (not shown). As required or desired they may be mortared into position or secured by concrete glue or grout. such a glue or thin groutserves thepurpose of sealing the block to the associated structure and seals between the several courses of yertically related blocks. A second course of blocks is layed upon the first in a longitudinally staggered relationship. The blocks are inserted so that each block on the second row of blocks overlies two blocks on the row below. This results in a contact between the interlocking surfaces on the webs and protrusions as is illustrated in FIG. 8. If, as will normally be the case, there is some interference resulting from manufacturing tolerances between one or more of the webs or protrusions, the worker will force the block vertically downward causing the webs to move along the charnfered surfaces and to scrape or abrade off a sufficient amount of material to allow the blocks to move into edge to edge contact. The excess material produced by this action will be received in' the grooves I16 and will therefore not build up to a sufficient degree to prevent full mating of the planar surfaces on the mating blocks.

At the terminal portions of the wall and around windows and similar openings the corner block and short end block are utilized to terminate the wall with a planar face. Similarly at corners of the wall the corner blocks are utilized with the tangs being received in the appropriate notches to develop a right angularly related wall. The blocks 74 for the last course of blocks in a wall are inverted to produce a planar upper surface for the wall which may be joined to the roof structure or other mating structure such as conventional lintels and bond beams.

After the wall has been physically completed in th aforedescribed manner it may be desirable to insert grout into the channels interconnecting the various rows of blocks. Such grouting provides additional horizontal and vertical strength and may be augmented by 9 the insertion of a reinforcing rod prior to pouring of the grout, For the four web block 74 it is possible to grout the blocks through the central Ctl\ll and end cavity of alternate rows or intermediate the outer webs Grouting intermediate the mating webs and in the end cavities is illustrated for three web blocks at 120. The two and three web blocks may be completely filled with grout or partially grouted as at 120 in FIGS. 12 and 14.

The fully completed wall will be true vertically and horizontally because of the influence of the interlock ing means causing the worker to obtain proper alignment without elaborate measurement or other set up. The concrete glue or grout seals between the mating surfaces to provide a watertight finish, and the cham fered edges of the block provide a drip edge to prevent the joint adhesive from being exposed to water flow.

Having described my invention, I now claim:

I. An interlocking block for use in wall construction assemblies, which assemblies involve the interlocking of a plurality of substantially identical blocks to create a substantially continuous planar wall surface, and wherein said wall construction assemblies have a plurality of linear courses of blocks. with each said linear course comprising a plurality of abutting blocks laid end to end. and wherein the blocks in the courses lying staggered and below any linear course are in stabgered relationship to the blocks in its underlying or overlying linear course, said block comprising:

a pair of spaced parallel side walls having flat upper and lower faces,

means to maintain said side walls in a spaced relationship,

a plurality of first locking means connected to said side walls, and disposed between the upper section of said side walls,

said first locking means including a plurality of projections extending above the upper face of said side walls,

cooperative locking means having cooperating portions connected to said side walls and disposed between the lower section of said side walls,

said cooperating locking means terminating at the plane of said lower face,

the thickness of said projections being less than the thickness of said cooperating portions,

whereby the projections above the upper face of the side walls on one block are adapted to cooperate in locking relationship with the lower cooperating portions of a block placed above said one block to prevent transverse or longitudinal displacement of the blocks relative to one another.

2. The interlocking block as set forth in claim 1 wherein each of said projections include a recessed portion therein.

3. The interlocking block as set forth in claim 2 wherein two adjacent projections having facing recessed portions.

4. The interlocking block as set forth in claim 3 wherein said recessed portions comprise substantially right angular notches in said projections.

5. The interlocking block as set forth in claim 3 wherein the sum of the distances from the ends of said side walls to the inner side of the cooperating portions is equal to the distance between the vertical surfaces of the facing recessed portions.

6. The interlocking block as set forth in claim 3 wherein the sum of the distances from the ends of the side walls to the vertical surfaces of the facing recessed portions is equal to the distance between the inner sides of said cooperating portions.

7. The interlocking block as set forth in claim 3 wherein the sum of the distances from the ends of the side walls to the inner side of the cooperating portions is equal to the distance between the vertical surfaces of the facing recessed portions, and

wherein the sum of the distances from the ends of the sidewalls to the vertical surfaces of the facing recessed portions is equal to the distance between the inner sides of said cooperating portions.

8. The interlocking block as set forth in claim 4 wherein the vertical faces of said right angular notch in said projections are chamfered at an angle to enable ease of assembly of interlocking blocks.

9. The interlocking block as set forth in claim 4 wherein the lower horizontal portion of the right angular notch is grooved adjacent to the vertical face thereof.

10. The interlocking block as set forth in claim I wherein said block includes only three transverse webs.

H, The interlocking block as set forth in claim 3 wherein said block consists of four symmetrically positioned webs, with the recessed portions on the inside webs facing each other.

12. The interlocking block as set forth in claim I wherein said means to maintain said side walls iri a spaced relationship'consists of a single web.

13. A construction assembly comprising:

a plurality of interlocking blocks,

each of said blocks comprising two substantially planar parallel side walls, said side walls having upper and lower planar faces,

a plurality of transverse webs located between said side walls, g each of said webs having protrusions which extend above the upper planar face of the side walls,

each of said webs having lower cooperating portions integral with said webs which are entirely located between the side walls above the lower planar face of the side walls,

said protrusions adapted to cooperate with the lower cooperating portions of the webs on vertically related blocks, said protrusions having a smaller thickness than the thickness of said lower cooperatingv portions of said webs,

said plurality of blocks being laid up in a plurality of vertically stacked courses,

said blocks in alternative courses being longitudinally staggered.

14. The construction assembly as set forth in claim 13 wherein the lower face of the lower cooperating portions lie in the same plane as the lower face of the side walls.

15. The construction assembly as set forth in claim 14 wherein the lower cooperating portions are integral with and essentially the same thickness as the webs.

16. The construction assembly as set forth in claim 15 wherein said protrusions are arranged along the upper face of each of said blocks and are inserted within and engage the lower cooperating portions of the webs of vertically related blocks above them.

l7. The construction assembly as set forth in claim 16 wherein said protrusions being formed by creating a right angular notch in said web with only the reduced l 1 thickness portion of said web extending above the upper planar face of said side walls.

18. The construction assembly as set forth in claim l5 and further including a plurality of corner blocks, said corner blocks terminating a wall of blocks in a planar finished end and interlocking said wall with a substantially right angular related wall.

19. The construction assembly as set forth in claim 17 wherein two adjacent webs have facing notches.

20. The construction assembly as set forth in claim 19 wherein each of the outermost of the webs is spaced from the longitudinal end of said side walls.

2]. The construction assembly as set forth in claim 20 wherein the sum of the distance from the ends of the side walls to the inner walls of the outermost webs is equal to the distance between the vertical surfaces of said facing notches.

22. The construction assembly as set forth in claim 20 wherein the sum of the distance from the ends of the side walls to vertical surfaces of said facing notches is equal to the distance between the inner faces of said two adjacent webs.

23. The construction assembly as set forth in claim wherein said protrusions are formed by creating a substantially right angular notch in the portion of the web which extends above the upper planar face of the sides, wherein the vertical face of said notch is chamfered at an angle.

24. The construction assembly as set forth in claim 23 wherein the lower horizontal portion of said notch is grooved adjacent to said vertical face of said notch.

25. The construction assembly as set forth in claim 15 wherein said block includes at least three transverse webs.

26. The construction assembly as set forth in claim [,5 wherein said block includes four symmetrically posi tioned webs.

27. The construction assembly as set forth in claim 15 and further including a plurality of corner blocks terminating the course of said interlocking blocks and mating said course of interlocking blocks with a right angularly related course of interlocking blocks,

said corner blocks being the same length as said interlocking blocks and including a corner mating means at one end thereof for locking engagement with a right angularly related corner block.

28. An interlocking block for use in a wall construction assembly, which assembly is constructed from a plurality of longitudinally extending, vertically stacked courses of interlocking blocks, with the blocks in alternate courses being longitudinally displaced, said interlocking block comprising:

a pair of spaced parallel side walls having flat upper and lower faces,

a first web extending between said side walls,

a second web extending between said side walls,

the top portion of each web extending above said upper face,

the bottom portion of each web terminating in the same plane as said lower face,

said top portion having a substantially right angular notch provided therein,

the thickness of said top portion being smaller than the thickness of said bottom portion,

the thickness of the bottom portion being essentially the same thickness as the web, wherein two adjacent webs have facing notches, wherein the sum of the distances from the ends of the side walls to the inner faces of the bottom portion of the outermost webs is equal to the distance between the vertical surface of said facing notches,

whereby the top portions of each web in the interlocking block in a given course are adapted to cooperate in locking relationships with the bottom portions of the interlocking blocks in the course immediately above.

29. An interlocking block as set forth in claim 28 wherein there are only a first and a second web provided, and wherein said block is symmetrical.

30. An interlocking block as set forth in claim 28 wherein only a first web. a second web and a third web are provided, and wherein said block is asymmetrical.

31. An interlocking block as set forth in claim 28 wherein said block has two inside webs with upper portions having their notches facing one another,

and wherein said block has two outside webs with upper portions having their notches facing one another, said block being symmetrical.

32. An interlocking block as set forth in claim 28 wherein the horizontal face of the notches is grooved at the vertical face of the notch.

33. An interlocking block as set forth in claim 28 wherein said webs include reinforcing bar receiving means for receiving and locating a receiving bar within the confines of said side walls.

34. An interlocking block as set forth in claim 33 wherein said receiving means includes a thin wall knockout portion in said webs.

35. An interlocking block as set forth in claim 29 wherein the top portion of the first web on a block in one course is interlocked with the bottom portion of the second web in the course above.

36. An interlocking block as set forth in claim 28 wherein the top portion of the outermost webs of abutting blocks in one course is interlocked with the bottom portion of the webs in course above which have their top portion notches facing one another.

37. An interlocking block as set forth in claim 28 wherein the blocks in alternate courses are longitudinally displaced approximately one-half the length of each block.

38. An interlocking block as set forth in claim 28 wherein the blocks in alternate courses are longitudinally displaced a distance other than approximately one-half the length of each block.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US460177 *Mar 2, 1891Sep 29, 1891 Building-block
US2294776 *Jan 9, 1941Sep 1, 1942Freeman Miles EBuilding block
US2684589 *Feb 7, 1948Jul 27, 1954Formbloc IncInterlocking hollow building block
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3968615 *Aug 15, 1975Jul 13, 1976Ivany George RMethod, building structure and block therefor
US4075808 *Apr 28, 1976Feb 28, 1978Sanford PearlmanBuilding construction system using mortar-less modular building block elements
US4573295 *Jun 13, 1984Mar 4, 1986Wilkinson Rudolph PSet of building articles and method of making and using the set to construct a predesigned, pre-engineered structure
US4573301 *Feb 18, 1983Mar 4, 1986Wilkinson Rudolph PInterlocking building blocks
US4633630 *Feb 25, 1986Jan 6, 1987G. R. Block Research and Development CorporationStructural blocks and structural system utilizing same
US4640071 *Jul 12, 1985Feb 3, 1987Juan HaenerInterlocking building block
US4671039 *Jul 19, 1984Jun 9, 1987Cecon International NvBlock
US4854103 *Nov 12, 1987Aug 8, 1989Kyle KlymBuilding system with interlocking blocks
US4887403 *Jun 17, 1988Dec 19, 1989Bonner David WInternally indexed building block and method of construction
US4896472 *Jan 23, 1989Jan 30, 1990Hunt Terence JosephBuilding block and system
US5261205 *Feb 7, 1990Nov 16, 1993Sandor Frederick JMethods and apparatus for fabricating plastic block panels
US5505034 *Nov 2, 1993Apr 9, 1996Pacific Pre-Cast Products, Ltd.Retaining wall block
US5575128 *Jun 27, 1994Nov 19, 1996Haener; JuanInterlocking mortarless building block system
US5794921 *Nov 12, 1993Aug 18, 1998Harold & Edith Greenberg Family Revocable TrustMasonry fence system
US5822939 *Feb 24, 1997Oct 20, 1998Haener; JuanFor use in a wall construction
US5827015 *Sep 2, 1997Oct 27, 1998Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Composite masonry block
US5879603 *Nov 8, 1996Mar 9, 1999Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Process for producing masonry block with roughened surface
US5894702 *May 1, 1997Apr 20, 1999Newtec Building Products Inc.Interlocking building block
US6029943 *Feb 28, 1997Feb 29, 2000Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Splitting technique
US6065265 *Oct 26, 1998May 23, 2000Newtec Building Products Inc.Corner and end block for interlocking building block system
US6122880 *Apr 15, 1996Sep 26, 2000Josef KolbBuilding module and building module system for producing flat construction, especially walls
US6134853 *Oct 9, 1998Oct 24, 2000Haener; JuanInterlocking insulated building block system
US6142713 *Sep 25, 1998Nov 7, 2000Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Composite masonry block
US6178704Jul 1, 1999Jan 30, 2001Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Splitting technique
US6183168Feb 3, 2000Feb 6, 2001Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Composite masonry block
US6312197Sep 18, 2000Nov 6, 2001Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Composite masonry block
US6513292 *Apr 6, 2000Feb 4, 2003Kumon Building Constructor's Office, Inc.Building panel having door panel, pair of longitudinal frame members, and panel strip formed as single piece by extrusion, in which upper and lower ends of each frame member constitute tenons and plurality of fixing holes penetrate frame member
US6616382Sep 17, 2001Sep 9, 2003Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Composite masonry block
US6907704Apr 12, 2001Jun 21, 2005Universiti Putra MalaysiaInterlocking mortarless load bearing building block system
US6948282 *Apr 17, 2003Sep 27, 2005Allan Block CorporationInterlocking building block
US7007436Jan 12, 2005Mar 7, 2006Kelley Jay RSnap-in-place building block
US7048472Jun 11, 2003May 23, 2006Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Composite masonry block
US7174687 *Oct 21, 2005Feb 13, 2007Fsn Research LlcWeb offset lug dry-stack system
US7360970Dec 8, 2005Apr 22, 2008Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Composite masonry block
US7461490 *Jun 18, 2004Dec 9, 2008Omar ToledoConstruction block system
US7694485Mar 15, 2007Apr 13, 2010Gregory SienerMortarless interlocking building block for a building block system
US7712281Apr 6, 2005May 11, 2010Allan Block CorporationInterlocking building block
US7748192 *Jan 21, 2003Jul 6, 2010Global Ryder Holdings Pty Ltd.Building blocks and location devices for reinforced concrete walls
US7971407May 21, 2008Jul 5, 2011Keystone Retaining Wall Systems, Inc.Wall block and wall block system for constructing walls
US8572916 *Jan 4, 2012Nov 5, 2013Concrete Products Group LLCMasonry unit systems and methods
US8800236Sep 30, 2011Aug 12, 2014Tetraloc Pty LtdConstruction block
US20110203211 *Apr 29, 2011Aug 25, 2011Hans Josef MettenMasonry system
EP0267334A1 *Nov 12, 1986May 18, 1988Juan HaenerImproved interlocking building block
WO1986004947A1 *Feb 19, 1986Aug 28, 1986Hunt Terence JosephBuilding system
WO1995013442A1 *Nov 12, 1993May 18, 1995Harold H GreenbergMasonry fence system
WO1996000331A1 *May 8, 1995Jan 4, 1996Haener JuanInterlocking mortarless building block system
WO1998037284A1 *Nov 4, 1997Aug 27, 1998Haener JuanInsulated building block system
WO2004063475A2 *Jan 9, 2004Jul 29, 2004Block Allan CorpInterlocking building block
WO2006009633A2 *Jun 10, 2005Jan 26, 2006Omar ToledoConstruction block system
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/284, 52/592.4, 52/503
International ClassificationE04B2/42, E04B2/02
Cooperative ClassificationE04B2002/0215, E04B2/42
European ClassificationE04B2/42