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Publication numberUS3888497 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 10, 1975
Filing dateNov 8, 1971
Priority dateAug 8, 1969
Also published asDE1949863A1, DE1949863B2, DE1949863C3
Publication numberUS 3888497 A, US 3888497A, US-A-3888497, US3888497 A, US3888497A
InventorsJohann Zahradka
Original AssigneeJohann Zahradka
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Safety ski binding
US 3888497 A
Abstract
In response to the application of a skiing boot to a ski, the safety ski binding automatically establishes therebetween a connection which can be eliminated arbitrarily by the operation of a release member and automatically in response to a force which is dangerous to the skier's leg. The binding comprises an intercepting belt or the like, which establishes an additional connection between the skiing boot and the ski and does not prevent the automatic release of the ski from its firm connection to the skiing boot and is connected at one end to one part of a clutch, which can be opened by the operation of a release member. That part of the clutch to which one end of the intercepting belt or the like is connected forms a linkage member of a linkage which transmits a force from the skiing boot to the ski or vice versa. Said linkage member is connected between the joint for the arbitrary opening of the binding and the joint for the automatic opening of the binding and forms also a part of the safety release mechanism.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent n91 Zahradka 1 1 June 10, 1975 1 1 SAFETY SKI BINDING [76] Inventor: Johann Zahradka. Lassallestrasse 30/21. Wien. Austria 1121 Filed: Nov. 8. 1971 [211 Appl. No: 196585 Related US. Application Data [63] Continuation o1 Ser. No. 866.228. Oct. 14. 1969,

Primary ExaminerRobert R. Song Attorney. Agent, or Firm--Fleit & Jacobson 1571 ABSTRACT in response to the application of a skiing boot to a ski, the safety ski binding automatically establishes therehetween a connection which can be eliminated arbitrarily by the operation ofa release member and automatically in response to a force which is dangerous to the skiers leg. The binding comprises an intercepting belt or the like, which establishes an additional con nection between the skiing boot and the ski and does not prevent the automatic release of the ski from its firm connection to the skiing boot and is connected at one end to one part of a clutch, which can be opened by the operation of a release member. That part of the clutch to which one end of the intercepting belt or the like is connected forms a linkage member of a linkage which transmits a force from the skiing boot to the ski or vice versa. Said linkage member is connected between the joint for the arbitrary opening of the binding and the joint for the automatic opening of the binding and forms also a part of the safety release mechanism.

6 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures PATENTEDJUM 10 m5 3,888,497 SHEET 1 JNVENTOR: JOHANN ZAHRADKA ATTORNEYS PATENTEIJJUH 10 1975 sum 2 Fig.3

a 2 E 1 W /w M N g 1 /4 2 i 5\ 6 6 5 /7 7 a: l J

INVI-IN'I'URt JOHANN ZAHRADKA RYI ATTORNEYS PATENTEDJUH 10 ms a68a497 SHEET 3 INVENTORI JOHANN ZAHRADKA SAFETY SKI BINDING This is a continuation ot'application Ser. No. hbbllb filed ()ct. l4. t me. now abandonedv The present imentton relates to a safety ki inding. which in response to the application of a skiing boot to a ski automatically establishes therebetw een a connection. which can be eliminated arbitrarily by the opera tion of a release member and automatically in response to a force which is dangerous to the skier's leg. said binding comprising an intercepting belt or the iike. which establishes an additional connection between the skiing boot and the ski and does not prevent the automatic release of the ski from its firm connection to the skiing boot and is connected at one end to one part of a clutch. hich can be opened by the operation of a re lease member.

In such a ski binding. which has been known so far only from a printed publication. the clutch for the retaining belt is provided in addition to the safety release mechanism and is disposed beside the same. Such a structure consists of a large number of parts and is expensive as well as easily deranged. This may be the reason why that safety ski binding has not been accepted in practice.

It is an object of the present invention so to design a safety ski binding of the type described first that it has the same desirable properties as the latter in respect of safety and ease of operation but is free of the abovementioned disadvantages.

In a safety ski binding. which in response to the application of a skiing boot to a ski automatically establishes therebetween a connection which can be eliminated arbitrarily by the operation of a release member and automatically in response to a force which is dangerous to the skicr's leg. said binding comprising an intercepting belt or the like. which establishes an additional connection between the skiing boot and the ski and does not prevent the automatic release of the ski from the firm connection to the skiing boot and is connected at one end to one part of a clutch. which can be opened by the operation of a release member. this object is accomplished according to the invention in that that part of the clutch to which one end of the intercepting belt or the like is connected forms a linkage member of a linkage which transmits a force from the skiing boot to the ski or vice versa. and said linkage member is connected between the joint for the arbitrary opening of the binding and the joint for the automatic opening of the binding and forms also a part of the safety release mechanism.

The known safety ski binding comprises a toeholding device and a heclholding device; these devices are to be secured to the ski before and behind the skiers foot. However. the invention is not restricted to such devices but can be embodied in a particularly good and simple manner in safety ski bindings which are disposed under the skiers foot. If properly designed. these safety ski bindings need not comprise separate devices for holding the skiing boot at two points which are substantially spaced apart.

In a development of the invention. the linkage member to which one end of the intercepting belt or the like is connected may be disposed between the ski and that joint in the force-transmitting linkage which serves for the automatic opening of the linkage. whereas the sec ond end of the intercepting belt is connected to the skiing boot.

Alternatively. said linkage member may be connected between the skiing boot and the joint which is provided in the linkage and serves for the arbitrary opening of the binding. whereas the second end of the intercepting belt is connected to the ski.

In the safety ski bindings which consist of a toeholding device and a heel-holding device for the skiing boot. it has proved desirable. particularly for structural reasons. to include said linkage member in the linkage for transmitting a force acting on the heel-holding device.

A desirable embodiment of the safety ski binding according to the invention will be obtained if at least one safety release mechanism is accommodated in the sole ofthe skiing boot. Particularly in such embodiment. the safety release mechanism may comprise elements for taking up torsional and tensile forces.

Two embodiments of the invention will now be described by way of example with reference to the accompanying drawings. in which FIG. I is a side elevation of the heel-holding device of a safety ski binding.

FIG. 2 is a transverse sectional view taken on line IIII in FIG. and showing the device.

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken on line IIIIII.

FIG. 4 is a central longitudinal sectional view showing a heel-holding device according to a second em bodiment.

FIG. Sis a sectional view taken on line V\/ in FIG. 4 and FIG. 6 is a top plan view showing the device of FIG. 4 partly cut open to improve the showing of details.

The heel-holding device shown in FIGS. 1-3 is held on the ski 3 by means of a bridge member I. which is connected to the ski by screws 2. Two angle members 4, 5 are held between two vertical walls of the bridge member so as to be displaceable transversely to the longitudinal direction of the ski. The horizontal flange of each angle member rests on the ski and has a recess which receives a stop 6 that is provided on the bridge member. The stops are abutted by leaf springs 7, which act on the angle members 4, 5 and tend to hold them in their inner limiting position. A pull rod 8 which ex tends out of the bridge member 1 toward the rear end of the ski serves to displace the angle members 4, 5 outwardly against the force of the leaf springs 7. The pull rod is operable, e.g., by means ofa ski stick in a manner not shown.

As is apparent from FIG. 2, the two upwardly dircctcd flanges of the angle members 4. 5 are outwardly offset and have each a slot I0. which is parallel to the surface of the ski. Two locking portions 11 of a clutch part 12 extend into said slots in the normal operating position of the safety ski binding. The clutch part 12 shown in FIG. 2 is substantially U-shaped and receives a guide member 13. which together with the clutch part is accommodated in a recess 14 of the sole of a skiing boot 15, which is indicated in dash-dot lines. The guide member I3 is firmly connected to the skiing boot. e.g.. by screws 16, and consists of a sleeve. which extends transversely to the longitudinal direction of the ski and receives two locking members 17. which are biased by two helical compression springs I8 and are normally held in their outer limiting position shown in FIG. 2. In that position. the outer ends of the locking members engage the underside of locking noses formed by the limbs of the clutch part [2. Seen from the inner ends of the locking noses. the limbs of the clutch part diverge and form oblique cumming surfaces One end of an intercepting belt 19 is riveted to that limb of the clutch part [2 which is on the right in FIG. 2. The other end of the intercepting belt is not shown and has. e.g.. a buckle. by which it is secured to the skiing boot.

The safety release mechanism of the heel-holding device which has just been described is firmly connected to the skiing boot [5. For an arbitrary elimination of the connection between the skiing boot and the ski 3. the skier must pull the pull rod 8 toward the rear end of the ski, e.g.. with the point of his ski stick. In this operation. the trapezoidal inner end ofthe pull rod exerts a pushing wedge action on the angle members 4, to displace the same outwardly against the force of the leaf springs 7. In their outermost [JOSiIlOtL the angle members release the locking members ll ofthe clutch part [2 so that the skiing boot can now be lifted from the ski so that the clutch part 12 remains connected to the skiing boot by the locking members 17 and the guide member 13. It will not be necessary then to disconnect that end of the intercepting belt 19 which is not shown from the ski before the skiing boot is lifted. For skiing. it is sufficient for the skier to place his boot 15 on the proper part of the ski 3. This causes the locking portions 1] of the clutch part 12 to run up on the oblique surfaces on the inside of the upwardly directed flanges of the angle members 4, 5 and push the same apart against the force of the leafsprings 7. When the clutch part 12 comes to rest on the bridge member 1, its locking members 11 will register with the slots 10 so that the leaf springs 7 move the angle members 4, 5

back to their normal position. in which they prevent an unintended lifting of the clutch part from the ski.

If the heel of the skiing boot I5 is subjected to an approximately vertically upwardly directed tensile force which is dangerous for the leg of the skier. said force will cause a displacement of the locking members 17 against the force of the springs 18 in that the outer ends of the locking members run up on the locking noses formed by the limbs of the clutch part and finally disengage from said noses. As the locking members disengage from the locking noses. the firm connection between the skiing boot and the ski is eliminated so that the leg of the falling skier cannot suffer a typical skiing injury. During that safety release. the clutch part 12 remains connected to the ski. so that the same cannot continue to fly or slip without restraint because the ski remains connected to the skiing boot by the intercepting belt 19.

The connection by the intercepting belt need not be eliminated before the skiing boot is subsequently placed on the ski. In this case. the free ends of the locking members 17 engage the oblique camming surfaces formed on the free limb ends of the clutch part 12 and as the skiing boot is forced down the free ends of the locking members 17 are forced inwardly against the force of the helical compression springs 18 so that they can disengage the locking noses of the clutch part. Hence. the skiing condition is very quickly reestab lished.

If the heel-holding device just described is subjected to laterally and upwardly directed. oblique forces, these will result in a release sooner than a vertically upwardly directed force because they cause a pivotal movement olonly one of the locking members 17 from its locking position about a fulcrum formed by the free end of the other locking member. That lateral pivotal disengagement substantially prevents ankle injury. The 5 heel-holding device is intended to cooperate with a suitable safety toe iron, which responds to torsional forces. For this reason the heel-holding device has a sufficient freedom of pivotal movement about the pivotal axis of the skiing boot in both directions.

The hecl-hoiding device shown in FIGS 4-6 is car ried on the ski 22 beside a skiing boot 21 shown in dashdot lines. The bascplate 23 can bc screw connected to the ski by means which are not shown. Two strong leafsprings Z5. 26 are held on the bascplatc by suitable means. e.g.. by an intermediate member 24. and have inwardly angled free end portions. which form locking cams 27, 28 (sec FIGS. 5 and 6 l. A locking member 29 is normally held interlocked between the end portions of the leaf springs and is firmly con nected to one end of an intercepting belt 30. The other end is connected to the ski directly or by a fixed part of the device. That connection is not shown. A backing wall 31 extending upwardly from the baseplate is dis posed closely behind the locking member. A slider 32 extends in the longitudinal direction of the ski and is capable ofa limited displacement in that direction. The slider 32 has a free end portion which extends through and is guided in an aperture in the backing wall. The slider has a vertical aperture 33. through which the intermediate member 24 extends to limit the displacement of the slider. An upwardly extending arm 34 of the slider is acted upon by a helical compression spring 35. which bears on the backing wall 31 and holds the slider normally in its outer limiting position.

On its side facing the skiing boot. the locking mem' ber 29 has a vertical recess. which is dovetail-shaped in cross-section and serves to receive a corresponding dovetail-shaped part 36 of a connecting member 37, which is provided at the rear end of the sole of the boot and is connected to the sole of the boot in a suitable manner. e.g., by being vulcanized or screw'connccted thereto. The connecting member comprises a stop 38 (sec particularly FIG. 4). which prevents the locking member 29 from being pulled upwardly from the dovetail-shaped part 36. On that side of the part 36 which is opposite to the locking member 29, the connecting member 37 is provided with a U-shaped element 39, which at its free end carries an outwardly directed nose 40. The U shaped element is shown in FIG. 4 in its nor mal position, from which it is pivotally movable to the right in FIG. 4 against its inherent elasticity or against spring force. When the U-shaped element is in its normal position. the nose 40 prevents the locking member 29 from being pulled down from the dovetail-shaped member 36. The locking member can be pulled down from the dovetail-shaped member 36 when the nose is forced back by the slider 32. The latter is upwardly offset at its end which is directed to the rear end of the ski to form an operating handle M. The slider can be operated by a ski stick point 42, which is indicated in dashdot lines and which can be engaged with the baseplatc 23 and during a pivotal movement of the ski stick to the right in the drawing bears on an abutment formed by a bent-up end portion 43 of the baseplate.

FlGS. 4-6 show the heelholding device and the skiing boot in a locked position. The connection between the skiing boot and the heel-holding device can be arbitrarily eliminated in that the slider 32 is displaced. e.g.. by the ski stick point 42. toward the skiing boot 2] against the force of the helical compression spring 35. This causes a pivotal movement of the t'-shaped element 3) to move the nose 40 away front the heelholding device so that the skiing boot can he lifted and the part 36 can be pulled upwardly out of the aperture of the locking member 29. The interlock between the locking member 29 and the ends of the leaf springs 25, 26 is maintained. Because the locking member is connected to the outer end olthe intercepting belt. it is not necessary to disconnect the intercepting belt before the skiing boot is lifted from the ski.

in this embodiment too. it is sufficient for the skier to insert the boot 21 into the binding before he can start skiing. As the boot 2] is inserted into the binding. the nose 40 engages on the locking member 29 and is forced aside under the action of the oblique camming surface. Thereafter. the dovetail-shaped part 36 enters the recess ofthe locking member. When the sole of the boot comes to rest on the surface of the ski directly or indirectly by means of supporting and sliding plates. the U-shaped element 39 springs back so that the nose 40 again engages the locking member to prevent an unintended release of the skiing boot from the locking member.

When the heel of the skiing boot 2] is subjected to an approximately vertically upwardly directed tensile force which is dangerous to the skiers leg. said force will cause the locking member 29 to spread the leaf springs 25, 26 apart until the locking cams 27, 28 of said spring release the locking member. As the locking member is released from the leaf spring ends. the firm connection between the skiing boot and the ski is eliminated. Because the locking member 29 is held firmly to the skiing boot 2] by the connecting member 37, the connection between the skiing boot and the ski 22 is maintained by the intercepting belt 30 so that the ski cannot fly or slip away under no restraint.

This connection by the intercepting belt need not be eliminated before the skiing boot is subsequently placed back on the ski. When the skiing boot is placed on the ski, the locking member 29 enters back between the ends of the two leaf springs 25, 26. which are thus forced apart so that the locking member can return to its normal position, in which it is reliably held by the cams 27. 28.

As is apparent from HO. 4, the ends of the leaf springs 25, 26 slightly engage the locking member 29 on the side facing the skiing boot. This will ensure that the locking member cannot be readily pulled off forwardly when the skiing boot is not in the binding and that the locking member can be released in response to dangerous torsional forces acting on the skiing boot. Hence. it will not be necessary to provide a conventional safety toe iron if the heel-holding device is properly designed. It will be understood that excessively large diagonal forces will also result in a release of the locking member so that this heel-holding device affords maximum safety.

If it is desirable to provide a heel-holding device which can be adjusted to different values of the force required fora release, this adjustment will easily be enabled if the baseplate 23 carries two eccentric members 44, which are respectively engaged by the leaf springs 25 and 26. These eccentric members. which are indicated in dash-dot lines. can be rotated to vary the initial stress of the springs and the force required for a release.

What is claimed is:

1. A safety ski binding which. upon the placing of a ski boot on a ski. automatically effects the connecting thereof by a coupling. said coupling being adapted to be disconnected intentionally by actuation of a release and unintentionally upon the occurrence of a force which is dangerous for the leg of the skier. and comprising a retaining means secured to said ski and a retaining means secured to said boot. an intermediate element positioned between and releasably connected to both said retaining means. a catch element connected to said intermediate element. said catch element serving as additional connection between ski boot and ski. and means on both sides of said intermediate element providing for a separate point of disconnection of the coupling. one of said points serving for the intentional opening of the binding and the other for the unintentional opening of the coupling.

2. A safety ski binding according to claim I, wherein said ski retaining means comprises a plurality of slot defining angle members secured to said ski and said boot retaining means comprises a recess and a plurality of locking members slidably mounted in said recess. said intermediate element having portions which are engagable in said slots and portions which engage said locking members with the intermediate element lying on the ski side as seen from the place of disconnection of the coupling for the unintentional opening of the binding. while the catch element is connected with the ski boot.

3. A safety ski binding according to claim I. wherein said ski retaining means comprises a plurality of slot defining members and said boot retaining means comprises a recess and locking means mounted in said recess, said intermediate element having portions which are mounted in said slots and portions which engage said locking means with the intermediate element lying on the side of the ski boot. as seen from the place of disconnection of the coupling. for the unintentional opening of the binding, with the second end of the catch ele ment being connected with the ski.

4. A safety ski binding according to claim 1. wherein the coupling is arranged at least in part in the sole of the ski boot.

5. A safety ski binding according to claim I. wherein the coupling has means to take up turning and pulling forces.

6. A device for fastening a ski boot to a ski, which binds the boot automatically to the ski when the ski boot is applied to the ski, so that the binding can be released intcntionally through the operation of a release and unintentionally upon the occurrence of a force which endangers the leg of the skier; said binding comprising coupling means which binds the ski boot to the ski, closes automatically when the boot is placed on the ski and is manually releasable, characterized by an intermediate element positioned between the boot and the ski, locking means releasably holding said intermediate element to the ski for intentional releasable lock ing to the ski; said locking means comprising angle members attached to the ski. said angle members defining slots with said intermediate member being mounted in said slots. pull means slidably mounted on said ski adapted to move said angle members. and springloaded catch piece means releasably holding said intermediate element to the boot. said spring-loaded catch means comprising a recess defined by said sole. and two spring-loaded members slidahly mounted in said recess. said two spring-loaded members engaging said intermediate element. so that said spring-loaded eaieh pieee means is adapted to release from said intermedL Ill

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3007707 *Sep 21, 1959Nov 7, 1961Jr Churchill G BlackwellSki binding
US3122380 *Jul 31, 1961Feb 25, 1964Eckel HeinrichSki binding
US3359009 *Apr 7, 1964Dec 19, 1967Hinterholzer HansSki binding
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4182525 *Nov 21, 1977Jan 8, 1980Spademan Richard GeorgeStep-in side-clamp safety ski release system
US4973073 *Mar 17, 1989Nov 27, 1990Raines Mark ASnowboard binding
US5695210 *Jul 26, 1996Dec 9, 1997Goss; Bruce R.Releasable snowboard binding
US5697631 *May 4, 1995Dec 16, 1997F2 International Ges.M.B.H.Snowboard binding
US5722680 *May 29, 1996Mar 3, 1998The Burton CorporationStep-in snowboard binding
US5957480 *Nov 18, 1997Sep 28, 1999The Burton CorporationStep-in snowboard binding
US6017042 *Jun 4, 1997Jan 25, 2000Salomon S.A.Apparatus for retaining a boot on a glide board
US6102429 *Nov 18, 1999Aug 15, 2000The Burton CorporationStep-in snowboard binding
US6123354 *Jan 8, 1997Sep 26, 2000Laughlin; JamesStep-in snowboard binding
US6126179 *Jan 8, 1996Oct 3, 2000The Burton CorporationMethod and apparatus for interfacing a snowboard boot to a binding
US6203052Aug 26, 1999Mar 20, 2001Burton CorporationStep-in snowboard binding
US6270110Jun 29, 2000Aug 7, 2001The Burton CorporationStep-in snowboard binding
US6354610Jun 23, 1999Mar 12, 2002The Burton CorporationMethod and apparatus for interfacing a snowboard boot to a binding
US6460871Oct 18, 2000Oct 8, 2002The Burton CorporationStep-in snowboard binding
Classifications
U.S. Classification280/624, 280/623
International ClassificationA63C9/085, A63C9/00, A63C9/084, A63C9/086
Cooperative ClassificationA63C9/002, A63C9/086, A63C9/0846, A63C9/0847, A63C9/084
European ClassificationA63C9/084H, A63C9/084M, A63C9/086, A63C9/00C, A63C9/084