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Publication numberUS3889483 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 17, 1975
Filing dateApr 30, 1973
Priority dateApr 30, 1973
Also published asCA999260A1, DE2402142A1
Publication numberUS 3889483 A, US 3889483A, US-A-3889483, US3889483 A, US3889483A
InventorsWilliam R Donnelly
Original AssigneeReadi Temp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Heat transfer package with shaped frangible ampule
US 3889483 A
Abstract
A heat transfer unit in which a receptacle is in containing relation to a substance which may be a food or drink product and is further in containing relation to chemicals in a segregated relation to the product and which when activated have a heating or cooling effect thereon. The product the temperature of which is to be controlled is held in a heat conductive container suitably installed to dispose interiorly of the receptacle. An ampule is in the receptacle and when broken disseminates a fluid activating the chemicals to produce the heating or cooling effect. The ampule is a frangible vessel positioning intermediate the container and deformable wall and shaped substantially in conformance therewith. An impact or hand applied pressure delivered to the deformable receptacle wall breaks the ampule upon the container.
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United States Patent 1 Donnelly June 17, 1975 HEAT TRANSFER PACKAGE WITH SHAPED FRANGIBLE AMPULE [75] inventor: William R. Donnelly, Piqua, Ohio [73] Assignee: Readi Temp, lnc., Piqua, Ohio [22] Filed: Apr. 30, 1973 [2]] Appl. No.: 355,924

[52] US. Cl. 62/4; 126/263; 165/68 [51] Int. Cl. F25d 5/00 [58] Field of Search 62/4; 165/68; 126/263 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,300,793 11/1942 Martin 62/4 2,759,337 8/1956 Katz 62/4 2,968,932 1/1961 Vance 62/4 3,003,324 10/1961 Vance.............,,....H 62/4 3,034,305 5/1962 Ruggieri 1 62/4 3,091,091 5/1963 Ferrante 62/4 3,369,369 2/1968 Weiss 62/4 3.379.025 4/1968 Donnelly 62/4 Primary Examiner-Norman Yudkofl" Assistant Examiner-Frank Sever Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Jerome P. Bloom [57] ABSTRACT A heat transfer unit in which a receptacle is in containing relation to a substance which may be a food or drink product and is further in containing relation to chemicals in a segregated relation to the product and which when activated have a heating or cooling effect thereon. The product the temperature of which is to be controlled is held in a heat conductive container suitably installed to dispose interiorly of the receptacle. An ampule is in the receptacle and when broken disseminates a fluid activating the chemicals to produce the heating or cooling effect. The ampule is a frangible vessel positioning intermediate the container and deformable wall and shaped substantially in conformance therewith. An impact or hand applied pressure delivered to the deformable receptacle wall breaks the ampule upon the container.

12 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures SHEET PATENTEDJUN 17 I975 FIG-l FIG-5 PATENTEDJUN 17 I975 SHEET HEAT TRANSFER PACKAGE WITH SHAPED FRANGIBLE AMPULE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to heat transfer units and particularly to shelf storable self contained units packaging a product which desirably is heated or cooled at the time of use, the unit incorporating in itself a normally inactive means to produce the desired heat transfer effect. Activation of means producing the heat transfer effect is triggered by a squeezing or deforming of a receptacle which is in a containing relation to both the product and means chemically inducing a temperature change. The squeezing or deforming action is used to rupture a sealed envelope or the like which is then free to disseminate its contents within the receptacle for appropriate action upon reaction with normally segregated chemicals.

As heretofore known, certain disadvantages have attended use of such heat transfer units due at least in part to inconsistent and sometimes unsatisfactory results in rupturing of the sealed envelope. Prior art constructions have made the envelope itself inherently deformable and hence have required excessive or indeterminate amounts of squeeze to be applied to the receptacle wall. Also, the envelope is free to assume various positions and attitudes in the receptacle so that there is no uniformity from one unit to another in the direction and degree of squeeze to be applied. Also, prior art constructions do not always insure the complete sealing and integrity of the receptacle and do not in all instances lend themselves well to mass production techniques.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The instant invention has in view a heat transfer unit incorporating prior art concepts into a package unit offering obvious improvements in its adaptation to production techniques and in its facility and reliablity of use. A receptacle is provided which through a spin welding or like process becomes effectively a one-piece article but which has aspects to assembly or fabrication facilitating its loading or charging with chemicals and related fluids. It is made of a tough, durable and lightweight material which while fully self stabilizing incorporates inherent squeeze capabilities by which a wall portion may be deformed to trigger the heating or cooling effect. The product container is suspended within the receptacle from an upper mouth thereof, flangelike means about the receptacle mouth achieving such secure bearing engagement with the container as not only to hold it in a suspended position but to inhibit tilting movements of the container under laterally applied pressures. The container is held substantially rigidly in a concentric position within the receptacle, spaced from side walls thereof. Within the receptacle external to the container is a chemical charge and an ampule containing an activating fluid. The ampule is a sealed vessel having a frangible wall structure and may be made of one of the lightweight plastic materials which while relatively unyielding is easily fractured. It is shaped to conformance with a deformable side wall of the receptacle and with the suspended container, positioning in the generally annular space therebetween to be in substantially common contact therewith. With the receptacle held in the hand and a squeeze pressure applied at the location of the ampule, a reactant force applied by the container breaks the ampule and allows its contents to discharge into the receptacle. The arrangement enables a locating of the ampule which is constant from one unit to another and provides for a positive breaking action, using a limited uniform pressure. The shaping of the ampule insures continuous contact with the container and receptacle wall over an arcuate distance of any selected length, providing a relatively large area on the surface of the ampule wherein ampule breaking pressures may be applied. A crescent shaped ampule occupying about half the annular space between the container and receptacle wall is found to have advantages of simplified use.

An object of the invention is to present a generally new heat transfer unit of stable, unitary construction lending itself readily to economical manufacturing techniques.

Another object of the invention is to provide a heat transfer unit offering an assured, simplified means of actuation.

A further object of the invention is to provide a heat transfer unit in which contained rupturable means is uniformly located and is readily responsive to'hand applied and like actuating pressures.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a heat transfer unit in which the contained rupturable means is a shaped ampule having a frangible wall structure.

A still further object of the invention is to shape an ampule in conformance with the product container and a spaced receptacle wall to be in substantially wide bearing contact with both thereof.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a new ampule of general utility in a heat transfer type unit.

With the above and other incidental objects in view, as will more fully appear in the specification, the invention intended to be protected by Letters Patent consists of the features of construction, the parts and combinations thereof and the mode of operationas hereinafter described or their equivalents.

Referring to the drawings, wherein some but not necessarily the only forms of embodiment of the invention are shown:

FIG. 1 is an exploded view in perspectiveof a heat transfer unit in accordance with a first illustrated embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a view in longitudinal section of the heat transfer unit of FIG. 1, shown in an assembled condition and as it appears on the shelf or prior to use;

FIG. 3 is a view like FIG. 2, showing the heat transfer unit thereof being collapsed in an activating step taken preparatory to use;

FIG. 4 is a view similar to FIG. 1, showing a heat transfer unit in accordance with a second illustrated embodiment of the invention; and

FIG. 5 is a view like FIG. 2, showing the heat transfer unit of FIG. 4 is an assembled condition and as it appears on the shelf or prior to use.

In the drawings, a heat transfer unit in accordance with that fonn of the invention illustrated of FIGS. 1 to 3, comprises an outer shell 10 which since it is in a containing relation to other containers or sub-containers, will hereinafter be referred to as a receptacle.

The receptacle It) includes a generally cylindrical wall portion 11 which may if desired be made, as illustrated, with a base end thereof somewhat wider than an upper end. The base end of the wall portion is open initially, the wall extremity at its base end being later in fabrication turned inward to define a relatively narrow flange 12. A disc 13 forms the bottom of the receptacle and has a downwardly turned peripheral flange 14 seating to the inturned flange 12 folded over the same by a spin welding or like process. The flanges l2 and 14 are thus unitarily joined together so that the receptacle wall 11 and bottom wall 13 constitute in effect a closed and sealed one-piece structure. In the disc or bottom wall 13 are intersecting extrusions 15 and 16 having strengthening purposes. To facilitate their being joined together, the wall portion 11 and bottom means l314 are or may be made of the same material. While this material may be of any suitable kind it is in the illustrated instance a plastic selected for strength with lightness of weight and for characteristics of non-reaction with contained chemicals. Wall portion 11 is rigid in the sense of being substantially incompressible in a longitudinal sense but is flexible in that it may be deformed by a laterally applied squeezing or like pressure. The wall is resilient and tends to reassume its normal shape when the squeezing pressure is released.

in the illustrated instance the receptacle is configured to a bottle-like shape with wall portion 11 representing the body of the bottle and including an extension at its upper end forming a frusto-conical poriton 17 portion in a generally cylindrical bottle neck. At its lower extremity, portion 17 has a diameter approximating that of the upper end of wall 11 in accordance with the illustrated embodiment of the invention such base unitarily joins to portion 11 in such manner that the frusto-conical portion 17 is an integral part of the receptacle. In the alternative, as will be understood, portion 17 may be an element separate from the wall 11 and permanently joined directly thereto in any suitable manner or so attached through the medium of an adapter means.

In the illustrated instance, the base of portion 17 is slightly flared and connects to wall portion 11 through a generally cylindrical portion 18. The arrangement is one not only to positively unite the wall portion 11 and portion 17 but, on a sealing connection thereof, to provide a joint therebetween whereby the cylindrical wall portion 11 may flex without appreciably stressing portion 17. At its upper or apex end, portion 17 terminates in an upstanding cylindrical neck portion 19. At its juncture with neck 19, portion 17 may be formed with a circumferential series of strengthening ridges 21 while the neck 19 itself may be formed with circumferential strengthening beads 22. Neck 19 forms what may be regarded as a mouth of the bottle-like receptacle.

Suspended within the receptacle 10 and integrated therewith is a container or sub-container 23 made of a light-weight metal or other material of good heat conductivity. The container 23 has a cylindrical cup-like body 24 open at its top. In the example illustrated, which is not limiting, a disc-shaped element 25 is welded or otherwise secured to bridge and seal the cup 24. The disc 25 has scored weakened areas defining a portion to which is connected a ring manipulator 26. As will be understood, this provides a self-contained opener capable of being peeled off to form an opening in container 23. The container 23 is adapted, for example, to be pressed into the receptacle 10 through the mouth thereof and when fully installed occupies a position substantially as indicated in FIG. 2 where the upper part of the cup-like body lies within the transverse plane of the upstanding cylindrical neck portion 19 at the mouth of the receptacle. Portion 19 may, as shown in FIG. 2, have a portion 27 thereof turned over upon the rim of the cup-like body 24 by a spin welding process to assume a retaining integrated relation thereto.

It will be understood that the container 23 is fit in the receptacle, the upper end of the container being rela tively tightly gripped by neck 19. Principles of elastic memory, shrink fitting, or the like are, in accordance with conventional manufacturing techniques, used to close receptacle portion 19 upon the container in a manner which both seals against the entrance of moisture into the receptacle around the container body and secures the container against accidental removal or axial displacement. Neck portion 19 has a relatively long bearing engagement with the container body effectively inhibiting tilting movements of the container relative to the receptacle.

The container 23, thus centrally positioned in the receptacle 10, forms therewith a sealed chamber 28. The container 23 is substantially concentric with respect to receptacle wall 11 to form thereabout a generally annular portion of the chamber 28 and terminates at its bottom short of the bottom wall 13 to add a generally cylindrical segment to said chamber.

In forming the invention package, there is introduced into the bottom of the receptacle 10 a charge 29 of heat transfer chemicals in a normally inactive, relative loose, dry state. The chemicals of the charge 29 will rise to a level in the chamber 28 to a degree dependent on the application.

Still further in the receptacle 10 is another container or sub-container 31. This is a sealed ampule shaped to position within the chamber 28 between the container 23 and receptacle wall 11. While it may have any desired configuration, ampule 31, in the preferred embodiment illustrated, has a crescent shape in transverse section and occupies approximately half the annular space of chamber 28 about the container 23. The ampule 31 contains a charge of liquid 32 which may be water or some other chemical or mineral composition which will on contact with the charge 29 activate the same to produce a heat transfer effect. The ampule is made of frangible material so that its wall structure can be fractured under applied pressure and its contents disseminated within the receptacle 10 as and when required. In the process, the liquid is dispersed within the materials of charge 29. By a proper selection of materials this combining of the chemicals 29 and the liquid of body 32 may produce a chemically induced action in which heat is either given off or absorbed. The result is to produce within the receptacle 10 a heat transfer action resulting in either heating or cooling, according to the selection of chemicals. The wall structure of receptacle 10, including portion 17, is a relatively poor conductor of heat whereas the container 23 is made of a thin lightweight material such as aluminum and is a good heat conductor. The generated heating or cooling effect accordingly is exerted primarily with respect to the cup 24 and its contents.

Various combinations of chemicals within the body 10 are possible within the practices of the art, as presented, for example, by applicant's prior US. Pat. No. 3,379,025. in accordance with the teachings of that patent, therefore, ampule 31 may be regarded as containing water which acts merely as a wetting activating agent upon the chemicals 29. These in turn are inactive when dry but when wet produce the desired heating or cooling effect. Other arrangements are possible, for example one in which the chemicals 29 are of differentially selected portions which not only are activated when wet but capable of further reacting with each other when wet to produce an extended heat transfer effect.

Returning to a consideration of ampule 31, it is made of a lightweight material relatively unyielding but easily fractured or broken upon application of localizedpressure. A number of commercially known plastic materials have these physical characteristics and are suitable as a construction material. The ampule has what may be regarded as inner and outer wall segments providing inner and outer faces 33 and 34 which are uniformly spaced and each formed on a uniform radius. Such inner and outer wall portions are joined by arcuate side, top and bottom walls to form a flask-like container having in the example shown a preferred arcuate extent of about l80. On the bottom wall of the ampule is a boss-like portion 37 defining an opening to the flask-like ampule 31 which is sealed and closed by a cap 38 once the charge of liquid 32 is introduced therein. Thus, the boss 37 provides a means of filling the ampule which subsequently is closed and sealed by installation of the cap 38. The ampule 31, in the case illustrated, is formed with a protruding lateral bulge at its bottom providing a projected ledge 39.

In its thickness, that is, in its dimension from inner to outer faces 33-34, the ampule corresponds approximately to the width of the annular portion of chamber 28. This annular portion accordingly defines a kind of pocket in which the ampule is inserted. When so positioned in such pocket, the ampule is substantially in contact at its inner face with the container 23 and at its outer face with the receptacle wall portion 11. By virtue of its conforming configuration, moreover, the ampule has a long arcuate contact both with the container and with the receptacle wall. In an installed position, the ampule occupies what may be regarded as an inverted position, with fill cap 38 thereon resting upon the receptacle bottom 13. Ledge 39 at this time positions beneath container 23 where it contributes to the nested relationship of the parts. At the same time, the relationship of the ampule to the bottom of the container is such that the latter exerts a restraining influence cooperating with bottom wall 13 in inhibiting longitudinal displacement of an installed ampule and firming the position of the container 23.

In the assembly and charging of a heat transfer unit in accordance with the described embodiment of the invention, the can-like container 23 is filled with a product which at a time of use desirably should have a temperature different from that of ambient surroundings. The contents may be a food or drink product or other product requiring a temperature change for use. The closure seal or lid 25 is applied under vacuum conditions and appropriately sealed in place. The container 23 is then inserted into the mouth of receptacle l0 and caused to assume a position substantially as shown in FIG. 2 wherein the upper end of the container body is gripped within the cylindrical neck portion 19. As heretofore noted, additional process steps may be applied to assure a tightly gripping sealed contact of the neck portion 19 with the body of container 23. Extremity 27 of neck portion 19 is spun over upon the installed container body to complete the related seal. The body of container 23 extends inwardly or downwardly of the receptacle to nest therein in a manner to be spaced from the side walls 11 and to define therewith the interior annular portion of chamber 28. A charge of dry chemcials 29 and a filled sealed ampule 31 are preferably introduced into the base portion of the receptacle through the bottom thereof which is open at this time. The ampule is pressed into place to occupy a position substantially as indicated within annular space of chamber 28 in a conforming mutually contacting relation to the container and to the receptacle wall. When this has been done the disc forming the bottom wall 13 is set in place and the flanges l2 and 14 are joined together in a spin welding process to form a sealed joint at the bottom preiphery of the receptacle. With the receptacle standing upright on its base portion, the ampule 31 therein seats to the bottom wall 13 and is partly embedded within the chemicals 29.

With the parts of the heat transfer unit so assembled and so positioned, it is available for shelf storage or the like until such time as a user may be ready to consume or to dispense, for other use, the product sealed within container 23. The length of shelf time, or the time within which the unit may be held as a package awaiting use is relatively extended or compares most favorably with the storage life of conventional canned and bottled goods. It may be noted in this connection that the cylindrical neck portion 19 is tightly closed about the container 23 inhibiting access of moisture to the chamber 28 and to the chemicals 29. Spin welding of the bottom wall 13 in place similarly acts as a positive seal against entrance of moisture, and, in addition, enables the bottom wall to combine with the side wall 11 to form a strong, self stabilizing unit.

Preparatory to a use of the unit, that is, preparatory to a consumption or dispensing of the contents of container 23, a laterally directed impact or pressure is applied to the receptacle wall 11 at the location of ampule 31. For example, and as shown in FIG. 3, the unit may be held within the grasp of a hand of the user with a thumb or fingers positioned to press against the ampule 31. Hand applied squeezing pressure, firmly and deliberately applied, is transmitted through the flexible wall portion 11 to the ampule 31 which since it is substantially unyieldable, is crushed against the container body 24 and fractured or broken substantially in the manner illustrated. The contents of the ampule accordingly are liberated to flow into chemicals 29, triggering the heat transfer action before discussed. The wall 11 yields in response to the exerted squeeze but is inherently resilient and tends to be self-restoring to its original position when the applied gripping pressure is released. It will be understood, in this connection, that the space 28 provides a relatively large chamber surrounding the container 23. Should it be desired to accelerate the cooling or heating process, therefore, a substantial space within the receptacle around the container 23 is available for improved surface contact in response to shaking or inverting of the unit. When the cooling or heating process has been completed, the ring 26 is lifted to break the seal 25 and expose the contents of container 23 for consumption or dispensing.

The rigid mounting of container 23 within the receptacle has been discussed and it will be observed that such mounting is useful in a facile and effective fracturing of the ampule 31. Thus, a squeezing of the receptacle wall 11 finds container body 24 exerting a substantially equal and opposite effect as a result of which the ampule is broken upon the container. The ampule is in a substantially mutually contacting relation to the container body and to the receptacle wall 11 so that the transmission of applied forces is accomplished with little or no lost motion.

Some modifications of the structure of the discussed invention embodiment have been noted and others, of course, are possible. For example, it is convenient that the unit have the bottlelike configuration as shown but this is not necessary. The unit may have a straight sided configuration, with the container 23 being supported in an upper wall thereof. The ampule 31 is disclosed as occupying an arcuate segment representing approximately one-half the annular space 28. The width of the ampule could be increased or reduced to alter the dimensions of this segment, if desired. [ts transverse shape may be changed to conform to a surrounding space referenced to a container such as 23, to fill the same required. A significant advantage is achieved thereby, facilitating use and triggering of the invention units.

In the second illustrated form of the invention, shown in FlGS. 4 and 5, a receptacle 41 is made substantially identical to the receptacle in configuration but unitarily molded. Within the receptacle 41 is a charge of heat transfer chemicals 42, a product container 43 and an ampule 44. The functional relationship of the parts is the same as in the first considered embodiment and the manner of assembly and the manner of use are the same. Thus, the chemicals 42 and contained liquid in ampule 44 are normally in a segregated relation but upon the delivery of an applied impact or squeeze to the receptacle wall at the location of ampule 44, the latter is crushed against and broken upon the container 43, with its contents being disseminated within the chemicals 42.

However, whereas in the first illustrated embodiment, the container 23 is constructed with a single diameter from top to bottom, in the instance of the second embodiment container 43 has differential diameters 45, 46 and 47. The container accordingly has a stepped configuration, progressing from a portion of largest diameter to a portion of smallest diameter. Portion 45 is a portion of largest diameter and has a rela tively short longitudinal length conforming approximately to the upstanding neck end 48 of the receptacle 41. This portion of the container accordingly exists in large part to provide a full bearing engagement with the receptacle so that it will be secured in a rigidly suspended position in the manner heretofore discussed as being desirable. Progressively smaller diameter portions 46 and 47 are spaced from side walls of the container, and, in providing a large interior chamber 49 increase the facility with which reacting chemicals in the receptacle may exert their cooling action upon the container wall.

Ampule 44, in accordance with this illustrated form of the invention, has on its inner face two bulbous portions providing offset shoulders 51 and 52. The ampule accordingly has a configuration conforming to that of the container 43 and remains with an inner face thereof in an adjacent substantially contacting relation to the body of container 43 irrespective of the stepped configuration of the container. The arrangement places the shoulder 5l beneath an offset or setback portion 53 of the container 43 intermediate its ends and places the shoulder 52 in a similar relation to the inner end or bottom of the container. The nested relationship of the container and ampule accordingly is substantially the same in the second illustrated form of the invention as in the first.

From the above description it will be apparent that there is thus provided a device of the character described possessing the particular features of advantage before enumerated as desirable, but which obviously is susceptible of modification in its form, proportions, detail construction and arrangement of parts without departing from the principle involved or sacrificing any of its advantages.

While in order to comply with the statute the invention has been described in language more or less specific as to structural features, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited to the specific features shown, but that the means and construction herein disclosed comprise but one of several modes of putting the invention into effect and the invention is therefore claimed in any of its forms or modifications within the legitimate and valid scope of the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, 1 claim:

1. A heat transfer package comprising a receptacle including a base and, projecting therefrom, a self stabilizing upstanding wall structure, a first container adapted to pass heat to the contents which are to be subjected to heat transfer, said first container being mounted to have a portion thereof depend within and define with said wall structure a relatively sealed chamher, a portion of which chamber is defined by a spaced between the dependent extremity of said first container and said base, a second container, one portion of said second container positioned between a side portion of said first container and said wall structure, said space between the dependent extremity of said first container and said base and said second container respectively containing materials characterized by being in an inactive state when separated by said second container but adapted, on contact, to interact and produce a heat transfer effect with respect to the contents of said first container, said second container being frangible and said wall structure embodying means to break said second container on said side portion of said first container whereby to produce, in said chamber, a heat transfer effect, as a result of which the temperature of the contents of said first container is charged.

2. A heat transfer unit according to claim 1, wherein said second container is made of a relatively nondeflectable material and said means for breaking said second container on said first container is a deformable portion of said wall structure.

3. A heat transfer unit according to claim 1, wherein said ampule is arranged to be in a substantially common contact with said receptacle and said container.

4. A heat transfer unit according to claim 1, wherein a portion of said second container projects laterally of said one portion in an underlying relation to the dependent extremity of said first container.

5. A heat transfer unit according to claim 1, wherein the outer surface of said first container has a stepped configuration and the surface of said second container has a conforming stepped configuration in the area thereof adjacent said side portion of said first container.

6. A heat transfer unit according to claim 1 wherein said receptacle and said first container nest in substantially concentric relation to define therebetween a substantial portion of said sealed chamber which extends substantially the length of said container, in direct and open communication with the space between the dependent extremity of said first container and said base, and said one portion of said second container is shaped to circumscribe a portion of the outer peripheral surface of said first container and to substantially bridge the space between said first container and the adjacent wall structure, to provide thereby that a substantial expanse of said second container may be brought into simultaneous bearing contact with said first container and said wall structure as pressure is applied through said wall structure to cause a breaking of said second container on said first container.

7. A heat transfer unit according to claim 1, wherein the projecting portion of said wall structure mounts means defining an opening to said receptacle having an extended bearing engagement with said first container, which opening is bridged by the uppermost end of said first container, said first container depending in spaced relation to said wall structure to provide peripherally thereof a portion of said sealed chamber the uppermost end of which is annular and has a conically expanding configuration in the direction of said base and is continued by an annular portion of generally uniform cross sectional configuration and said one portion of said second container has a crescent-like shape to nest within said annular portion of said sealed chamber.

8. A heat transfer unit according to claim 7, wherein the axial length of said first container is comprised of successive portions having a progressively smaller cross sectional area, and said second container is shaped to conform thereto.

9. A heat transfer unit according to claim 1 characterized by said base being abutted to means inhibiting longitudinal displacement of said second container relative to said first container in said receptacle.

10. A heat transfer package comprising a self stabilizing receptacle embodying a deformable wall portion, a container, the peripheral wall of which is rigid in comparison to said deformable wall portion, positioned within said receptacle in spaced relation to said deformable wall portion, an ampule containing an inactive component of a heat transfer medium positioned within said receptacle to nest a portion thereof between said deformable wall portion and said container, said ampule being a sealed vessel made of a frangible material and shaped to lie in a substantially conforming relation to portions of said container and said deformable wall portion so that pressure delivered through deformable wall portion has a fracturing effect on said ampule, said container serving as a reactant means in the absorbing of said thrust or impact, and an additional component of a heat transfer medium in said receptacle placed to come into contact with said first mentioned component on a fracturing of said ampule.

I]. A heat transfer unit including a container having particular advantage to serve per se as a heat transfer receptacle the contents of which are to be subjected to a heat transfer operation, said container comprising a relatively rigid cup-like body including a peripheral wall structure which is elongated in an axial sense and formed to provide said body with longitudinally extending sections which differ in cross sectional area a receptacle for said container having a cup-like configuration and including at the mouth thereof a portion defining a neck within which the mouth of said container is fixed to have said container depend within said receptacle and form therewith a chamber for receiving heat transfer materials and means containing a portion of said heat transfer materials positioned in partially surrounding relation to said container and in immediate proximity thereto, which means is a relatively rigid frangible structure the breaking of which is required for the activation of said heat transfer materials.

12. A heat transfer unit including a self stabilizing receptacle including a base and an upstanding wall structure, a container for material to be subjected to heat transfer within said receptacle, means positioning said container in a fixed relation to said receptacle to form thereabout a relatively sealed chamber, a frangible sealed ampule including a breakable casing portion positioned peripherally of said container within said receptacle, and means for transmitting a force applied externally of said receptacle to break said ampule upon said container.

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Referenced by
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US4597917 *Apr 19, 1983Jul 1, 1986Lunsford Kevin SHumidifying therapeutic gas
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Classifications
U.S. Classification62/4, 165/68, 126/263.7
International ClassificationF25D31/00, B65D81/34, A47J36/28, F24J1/00, F25D5/02
Cooperative ClassificationB65D81/3484, F25D31/007, F25D5/02, F25D2331/805, F25D2331/809, F24J1/00, A47J36/28
European ClassificationF24J1/00, A47J36/28, F25D5/02, B65D81/34S
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Dec 30, 1981AS17Release by secured party
Owner name: JAMMAL, MOTIE A. 6470 FORTUNE ROAD, FT. WORTH, TX
Owner name: STAMPER, MAXWELL H. TRUSTEE
Effective date: 19811129
Dec 30, 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: JAMMAL, MOTIE A. 6470 FORTUNE ROAD, FT. WORTH, TX
Free format text: RELEASED BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:STAMPER, MAXWELL H. TRUSTEE;REEL/FRAME:003938/0918
Effective date: 19811129
Nov 2, 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: STAMPER, MAXWELL H., 175 LOOKOUT DRIVE, DAYTON, OH
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:MATHENA, ALLEN C.;REEL/FRAME:003924/0773
Effective date: 19810527
Nov 2, 1981AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: MATHENA, ALLEN C.
Owner name: STAMPER, MAXWELL H., 175 LOOKOUT DRIVE, DAYTON, OH
Effective date: 19810527