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Publication numberUS3889817 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 17, 1975
Filing dateJul 25, 1973
Priority dateJul 25, 1973
Also published asCA1005396A1
Publication numberUS 3889817 A, US 3889817A, US-A-3889817, US3889817 A, US3889817A
InventorsBerkman Joseph L
Original AssigneeBerkman Joseph L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rack
US 3889817 A
Abstract
Stackable rack elements and rack assembled therefrom for supporting both magnetic tape cartridges and cassettes. The basic rack element is provided with a generally square-shaped supporting surface, four dividing walls radiating outwardly of the center, and four edge walls of the same height as the four dividing walls extending from the ends of the dividing walls, and together define four front and top opened bins. The bins are further provided with bosses and rib means for accomodating both magnetic tape cartridges and cassettes.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 1 Berkman 1 1 RACK [76] Inventor: Joseph L. Berkman, 48 Country Rd, Mamaroneck, NY. 10543 [22] Filed: July 25, 1973 [21] Appl No.: 382,302

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,572,454 2/1926 Vastola 312/10 3,495,716 2/1970 Gregory l .1 211/40 X 3,543,943 l/l969 Joy et a1. 211/163 X 3,633,761 1/1972 Holliday 1. 211/131 3,635,350 l/1972 Wolf i i 211/40 3,692,376 9/1972 McKinsey et a1.,., 312/11 3,736,036 5/1973 Mathus 312/11 X 3,756,383 9/1973 Kryter 206/DIG. 36 X 3,785,499 1/1974 Gedye 211/163 X 1 June 17, 1975 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLlCATlONS 633 2/1880 United Kingdom 211/144 1,330,916 5/1963 France 856,608 11/1970 Canada 312/10 1,258,372 3/1961 France 211/126 Primary ExaminerRoy D. Frazier Assistant Examiner-Thomas J Holko Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Armand E. Lackenbach 1 5 7 ABSTRACT Stackable rack elements and rack assembled therefrom for supporting both magnetic tape cartridges and cassettes. The basic rack element is provided with a generally square-shaped supporting surface, four dividing walls radiating outwardly of the center, and four edge walls of the same height as the four dividing walls extending from the ends of the dividing walls, and together define four front and top opened bins. The bins are further provided with bosses and rib means for accomodating both magnetic tape cartridges and cassettes.

5 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures PATENTEDJUN 17 I975 J SHEET 2 889,817

RACK

This invention relates generally to racks and, more particularly, to rack elements for both magnetic tape cartridges and cassettes.

It is a primary object of the present invention to provide novel and improved racks and rack elements for supporting both standard magnetic tape cartridges and cassettes.

It is another primary object of the present invention, in addition to the foregoing object, to provide novel and improved rack elements of unitary one piece plastics construction which may be stacked, one above the other, and interlocked through cooperation of bosses forming portions of the integral one piece rack element to provide a multiple level rack for supporting both standard magnetic tape cartridges and cassettes.

Another primary object of the present invention, in addition to each of the foregoing objects, is the provision of such novel and improved racks and rack elements wherein standard magnetic tape cartridges and cassettes may be intermixed while yet maintaining an aesthetic appearance.

Yet still another primary object of the present invention, in addition to each of the foregoing objects, is the provision of such novel and improved racks and rack elements which may be supported for rotational movement for easy selection of cartridges and cassettes stored therein.

Yet still another primary object of the present invention, in addition to each of the foregoing objects, is the provision of such novel and improved racks and rack elements which may be readily expanded by the stacking of additional rack elements.

Another and further primary object of the present invention, in addition to each of the foregoing objects, is the provision of such novel and improved racks and rack elements which provide individual compartments for each of the cartridges and cassettes stored therein.

Yet another primary object of the present invention, in addition to each of the foregoing objects, is the provision of such novel and improved racks and rack elements which store standard magnetic tape cartridges and cassettes while enabling quick and easy selection, removal and replacement thereof.

Another and still further primary object of the present invention, in addition to each of the foregoing objects, is the provision of such novel and improved racks and rack elements which support magnetic tape cartridges and cassettes with the titles thereof being clearly displayed.

Another and still further primary object of the pres ent invention, in addition to each of the foregoing objects, is the provision of such novel and improved racks and rack elements which are economic to manufacture, durable in use and aesthetically appealing.

The present invention resides in the combination, construction, arrangement and disposition of the various component parts and elements incorporated in rack elements and rack structures constructed in accordance with the principals of this invention. The present invention will be better understood and objects and important features, other than those specifically enumerated above will become apparent when consideration is given to the following details and description, which when taken in conjunction with the annexed drawing, describes, discloses, illustrates and shows a preferred embodiment or modification of the present invention and what is presently considered and believed to be the best mode of practice in the principals thereof. Other embodiments or modifications may be suggested to those having the benefit of the teachings herein and such other embodiments or modifications are intended to be reserved especially as they fall within the scope and spirit of the subjoined claims.

IN THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is a perspective illustration of a cartridge and cassette rack constructed in accordance with the principals of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a perspective illustration similar to FIG. 1 showing two of the rack elements of the present inven tion stacked one above the other;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged cross-sectional planned view taken along line 3-3 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is an elevational cross-sectional view taken along line 44 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a partial elevational cross-sectional view taken along line 5-5 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 6 is a partial elevational cross-sectional view taken along line 66 of FIG. 3;

FIG. '7 is an enlarged elevational partial crosssectional view taken along line 7-7 of FIG. 2; and,

FIG. 8 is a bottom planned view of the rack shown in FIG. 1, on a reduced scale.

With reference now to the drawing, there is shown and illustrated a rack 10 for supporting and storing a plurality of standard eight track magnetic tape cartridges and cassettes in standard norelco style boxes. The rack 10 comprises a top cover 12, a base plate 14 and a plurality of stacked, unitary and one piece rack elements 16 stacked one above the other between the top cover 12 and the base plate 14. There may be further provided a turntable base 18, a support rod 20 extending generally perpendicularly upwardly centrally thereof and a handle member 22 secured with the upper end portion of the support rod 20, as by means of holding means 26. The holding means 26 may be internally threaded to cooperate with external thread provided on the upper end of portion 24 of the support rod 20. The lower end portion 28 of the support rod 20 may be mounted with the turntable base 18 as by being provided with a pair of slots 30 into which a pair of C washers may be engaged on opposite sides of the turntable 18 so that the rack 10 may rotate about the support rod 20 and the turntable base 18. A series of upwardly extending dimples 34 arranged, for example, in a circle around the upper surface of the turntable base 18 may engage the underside of the base plate 14 to provide rotative support thereto.

Each of the rack elements 16, as heretofore pointed out, comprises a unitary one piece plastics molding fabricated, for example, of styrene, in accordance with the present invention has a generally square periphrey. The base plate 14 is of similar square configuration and is provided along its outer edges with a generally upstanding peripheral wall 36 to define a generally square shaped shallow recess 38 for engaging and supporting the lower most one of the stack rack elements 16.

Each of the one piece, unitary rack elements 16 comprises a plate-like supporting surface 40 of generally square configuration and four arm-like dividing walls 42 of substantially similar uniform height corresponding generally to the thickness of a standard magnetic tape cartridge extending generally perpendicular of the plate-like surface and radiating generally outwardly of the center of the rack element generally perpendicular the edges thereof. At the center, each of the one piece unitary rack elements 16 may be provided with four center walls 44 defining a generally square bore 46 extending through each of the rack'like elements 16 through which the center post or support rod fits. The center walls 44 may, as shown, be substantially the same height as the dividing walls 42. Further, as shown, the dividing walls 42 may be slightly offset from the center position as shown.

The one piece unitary rack element further comprises four edge walls 48 extending along the edges of the plate-like supporting surface 40 from the outboard end of each of the dividing walls to one of the corners of the supporting surface 40. As shown, with the dividing walls 42 being offset, the edge walls 48 extend to the opposite corner, that is, the corner opposite the direction of offset. The edge walls 48 are also ofa height substantially the same as the height of the dividing walls 42. Accordingly, the one piece unitary rack like element is divided into four similar, generally rectangular, generally open top and open ended bins having an open front side and being closed on two non-adjacent sides by a pair of side walls consisting of one of said dividing walls and one of said edge walls and at the back side, that is, the side opposite the open front, by an adjacent one of said dividing walls. The generally open and unobstructed front opening extends between the dividing wall defining the side wall of the bin and the adjacent one, that is, the corner towards which the dividing wall is offset.

Each of the bins is of a dimension such that a standard cartridge, when inserted therein with its rear surface against the back wall will have a predetermined extension of the front thereof outwardly through said front opening, The width of each of said bins is selected so as to coincide with the width of a standard norelco type cassette box. Since the width of a standard norelco type cassette is slightly wider than the width of a standard cartridge, each of the side walls of each of the bins are provided with a plurality of ribs defined by a forward pair of ribs 50 and a rearward pair of ribs 52 extending generally perpendicular the side walls and the plate-like surface and extending into the bins generally equidistantly so as to define a gap between each pair of ribs substantially defined by the width of a conventional or standard magnetic tape cartridge. The ribs 50 and 52 are of a height substantially equal the height of the walls 42 and 44. The forward pair of ribs 50 within each bin or compartment are spaced rearwardly from the front opening thereof, a distance, as shown, such that when a standard norelco type cassette box is inserted thereagainst, the forward edge of the cassette box will extend forwardly outwardly of the bin a distance equal the projection of the cartridge when the cartridge is enclosed within the bin. Hence, cartridges and cassette boxes may be intermixed in a series of stacked bins and provide a similar projection and an aesthetically pleasing appearance thereby.

lf desired, for savings of plastics material, or for design purposes, the plate-like supporting surface 40 may be cut away or relieved within the middle portion of each of the bins.

The forward pair of ribs 50 in each bin or compartment align the cartridge generally centrally therein and the rearward pair of ribs 52 further locate the cartridge by precluding rotation thereof within the compartment or bin. The forward pair of ribs 50 further define the rearward extent or stop for a cassette box and the dimensioning of the bins, that is, the length of the side walls 48 and the depth to the forward pair of ribs 50 is such that each of the cartridges and cassette boxes inserted therein project substantially uniformly outwardly from the bins.

As heretofore pointed out, each of the rack elements 16 consists of a one piece unitary plastics molding which interlocks and stacks one above the other to de fine the body portion of the rack 10. To provide for such interlocking, each of the rack elements comprises an integrally formed pair of bosses 54 depending from the plate-like supporting surface 40 generally oppositely each of the walls 42 and 44 and oppositely the front opening of each of the bins or compartment for engagement between the side walls of the subjacent bin or compartment. The bosses 54 extend generally perpendicularly the supporting surface 40 opposite the outboard end portions of each of the walls 42 and 44 and offset therefrom a distance equal to the thickness of the walls 42 and 44. Accordingly, each of the bosses 54 house an outer edge which fits within the subjacent bin and abuts against the inside surface of the side wall thereof. Since each of the bins or compartments of each rack element extends in an opposite direction, the locking of the bosses 54 within each of the bins or com partments fully position each of the rack elements with the succeeding rack element and fully interlocks such elements together precluding any transverse movement or rotation therebetween.

To more securely interlock each of the rack elements 16 with the succeeding elements, each of the bosses 54 may be longitudinally extensive extending along each of the side walls from the front opening of the bin generally parallel the side walls rearwardly of the bin terminating for engagement with the forward pair of ribs 50 of the succeeding rack element. As shown, the bosses 54 may be relieved, generally immediately, so that each boss is of generally elongated C-shaped configuration having a longitudinally extensive side wall 56, a front wall 58 and a rear wall 60 with the front and rear walls 58 and 60 engaging the side wall of the succeeding rack element and the rear wall 60 of the boss 54 of one rack element engaging the forward rib 50 of the succeeding rack element 16 when in the stacked, interlocked configuration. The bosses 54 may be of a width substantially equal to the width of the ribs 50 and 52 so as to enable a tape cartridge inserted within the bin or compartment of the succeeding rack element to fit therebetween. Moreover, inasmuch as a standard norelco type cassette box is thiner than the height of a standard cartridge, the walls 42 and 48 being generally equal to the height or thickness of a standard cartridge, the bosses 54 may be of a height substantially equal to the difference in height or thickness between a standard norelco type cassette box and a standard cartridge so as to restrict the edge portion of the compartments formed between succeeding stacked and interlocked rack elements to fit a standard norelco type cassette box. In other words, when the rack elements 16 are stacked and interlocked, the distance between the lower edges of the bosses 54 of one rack element and the upper surface of the plate-like supporting surface 40 of the succeeding rack elements defines a space for receiving the height or thickness of a standard norelco type cassette box.

The top cover 12 interlocks. stacks with and interengages with the upper most one of the rack elements 16 by means of two separate structural arrangements. Firstly, the top cover is provided with a generally down wardly depending outer wall 62 which extends around the periphrey thereof for engagement with the periphrey of the edge walls 48 of the upper most one of rack elements 16. Second, the top cover 12 is provided with a number of downwardly depending corner bosses or extensions 64 and intermediate side bosses 66 which extend downwardly into engagement with the upper most one of the rack elements 16 and provide similar interengagement and latching thereof against lateral movement and rotation similar to the restraint provided by the bosses 54 and, further, restrict the front opening of the upper most one of the rack elements 16 to define an opening for standard norelco type cassette boxes therewithin.

Yet, further, the top cover 12 is provided with a plurality of central walls 68 defining a generally central bore 70 through which the central support rod 20 we tends. The central walls 68 are ofa height such that the handle 22 may not be screwed too tight upon the support rod 20 so that the binding thereof is precluded.

The support rod 20, as shown, may comprise a plurality of screw threaded sections enabling the rack structure 10 to be sequentially assembled to substantially any desired height.

While the invention has been described, disclosed, illustrated and shown in terms of an embodiment or modification which it has assumed in practice, the scope of the invention should not be deemed to be limited by the precise embodiment or modification herein described, disclosed, illustrated or shown, such other embodiments or modifications as may be suggested to those having the benefit of the teachings herein being intended to be reserved especially as they fall within the scope and breadth of the claims here appended.

What is claimed is:

1. Rack element adapted for storing both magnetic tape cartridges and cassettes, comprising: a plate-like supporting surface of generally square configuration, four arm-like dividing walls of substantially uniform height radiating outwardly of the center generally perpendicular the edges, four edge walls of substantially similar uniform height extending along the edges of said supporting surface from the outward end of each of said dividing walls to each corner, of said supporting surface, thereby defining four similar generally open topped generally rectangular bins enclosed on two nonadjacent sides by a pair of side walls consisting of one of said dividing walls and one of said edge walls and at the back by a back wall comprising an adjacent one of said dividing walls and having a generally open and unobstructed front opening extending between a said one of said edge walls and one of said dividing walls opening outwardly along an edge of said surface; at least a pair of bosses extending generally perpendicularly of said supporting surface opposite the said walls and offset therefrom by the thickness thereof so that a plurality of such rack elements may be stacked in general alignment one above the other and be retained in such general alignment by engagement of said bosses of one rack with the side walls of the next adjacent rack element; and rib means on said rack element serving as stop means for a magnetic tape cassette box, wherein said side walls are spaced apart a distance substantially equal to the width of a magnetic tape cassette box, and said rib means being spaced inwardly of said front opening a distance such that a cassette box abutted against said rib means projects at one side thereof from said opening ofa bin a distance substantially equal the projection of a magnetic tape cartridge inserted within a bin against said backwall, thereby providing an aesthetically pleasing appearance to said rack element with said cartridges and cassettes in general projecting alignment.

2. Rack element defined in claim 1 wherein each of said back walls are offset from the center of said rack a distance substantially equal to the difference between the width of a standard cassette box and the length of a cartridge less the desired projection of said cartridge outwardly of said rack to provide said rack with a balanced and square configuration.

3. Rack element defined in claim 1, wherein each of said rib means for a bin constitute a forward pair and are spaced apart a distance substantially equal to the width of a standard tape cartridge.

4. Rack element defined in claim 3, further comprising a rearward pair of rib means positioned between each pair of said first pair of rib means and each of said backwalls to maintain a tape cartridge inserted therebetween in correct position and preclude rotation and angular disorientation thereof.

5. Rack element defined in claim 1, wherein said bosses are of a height substantially equal to the difference in height between a standard tape cartridge and a standard tape cassette box and extend, when a plurality of such racks are stacked, into a space adjacent each of said side walls and forward of said forward rib means of the succeeding rack element to define a bin space for receiving in alignment the height or thickness of a standard tape cassette box inserted into said rack.

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Referenced by
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US4003468 *Mar 24, 1975Jan 18, 1977Berkman Joseph LCase and insert for differently sized magnetic tape enclosures
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Classifications
U.S. Classification211/163, G9B/23.17, 312/9.46, 211/40, 206/387.14, 211/131.1, 206/387.15
International ClassificationG11B23/023
Cooperative ClassificationG11B23/0236
European ClassificationG11B23/023C