Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3890509 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 17, 1975
Filing dateFeb 7, 1974
Priority dateMay 9, 1972
Publication numberUS 3890509 A, US 3890509A, US-A-3890509, US3890509 A, US3890509A
InventorsCarl W Maxey
Original AssigneeBlack Clawson Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic edger set works method and apparatus
US 3890509 A
Abstract
Method and apparatus for scanning lumber, particularly cants, for determining the configuration thereof includes first and second light sources for directing beams of light at a low angle of incidence across the cant. The light reflected from the cant at a plurality of locations provides information on the amount and orientation of useable wood within the cant. This information may be used to orient the cant prior to sawing into studs. By proper orientation and positioning of the cant relative to the saws, maximum yield from each cant may be realized.
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

O Umted States Patent 1 1 1111 3,890,509 Maxey June 17, 1975 [54] AUTOMATIC EDGER SET WORKS 3,565,236 2/l97l Southworth 250/223 M H AND APPARATUS 3,62l,266 ll/l97l Akuta 3,648,743 3/!972 Finch. [75] Inventor: Carl W. Maxey, Everett, Wash. 3,73 9 3 6/1973 Mason. Assigneez The Black Clawson p y, 3,806,253 4/1974 Demon 144/312 H 'lt Oh on Io Primary Examiner-James W. Lawrence [2 Flledi 1974 Assistant ExaminerD. C. Nelms [211 App]. No; 440,505 Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Biebel, French & Bugg Related LS. Application Data [63] 583523;? of May 1972 Method and apparatus for scanning lumber, particularly cants, for determining the configuration thereof [52] Us Cl 250/561, 14432, 250/223 includes first and second light sources for directing [51] 60'1" 21/30 beams of light at a low angle of incidence across the [58] Field 250/223 cant. The light reflected from the cant at a plurality of locations provides information on the amount and ori- 250/560 356/199 209/] 1 L7 entation of useable wood within the cam. This infor- [56] References cued mation may be used to orient the cant prior to sawing into studs. By proper orientation and positioning of UNITED STATES PATENTS the cant relative to the saws, maximum yield from 2,828 9l7 4/1958 Wheeler 250/219 LG each cant may be realized 2,978,943 4/1968 Balint 250/2l9 LG 3,513,321 5/1970 Sherman 2091111.? 1 a m 8 Dr ng F gures a? 11 as 4 r 142 50 INTERFACE ELECTRONICS CHI ADJUSTMENT COMPUTER PATENTEDJUN 17 ms COMPUTER ADJUSTMENT CANT CH l PPER CHIPPER PATENTEBJUN 1 7 1915 PATENTEDJUN 17 ms SHEET CONTROL CIRCUITRY AUTOMATIC EDGER SET WORKS METHOD AND APPARATUS RELATED APPLICATION This application is a continuation of application Ser. No. 251,809, filed May 9, I972, now abandoned.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION In processing lumber. and particularly the manufacture of studs from log blocks, the logs are usually manually oriented prior to being fed through bandsaws which cut the log into cants of either two or four inch thicknesses. The cants are then moved to ganged edgers where they are further cut into studs, thereby yielding either 2 X 2,2 X 4, or 4 X 4 inch studs. The material which remains, either in the form of sawdust or chips, is of less monetary value than the studs, and therefore it becomes apparent that obtaining the maximum number of studs from a given log block will not only increase profitability, but will also maximize the utilization of natural resources.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a method and apparatus for scanning lumber, particularly cants, and orienting the cants with respect to saws to obtain therefrom the most useful and profitable material and to minimize waste of natural resources.

More particularly, this invention includes an optical scanner in which a first beam of light is directed at a low angle of incidence across the cant to illuminate the sawn portion and trailing wane and at the same time place the leading wane in shadow. A second beam of light is directed across the cant, also at a low angle of incidence, to illuminate the sawn portion and the leading wane, with the trailing wane being placed in shadow. The first and second light sources may be operated continuously, in which case an optical barrier will be used to prevent both the leading and trailing wanes from being illuminated at the same time. In another embodiment, the first and second light sources are alternately switched on and off thereby allowing a single set of light detectors to be used to sense the light reflected from the cant at a plurality of locations in a direction transverse to its direction of movement.

In the preferred embodiment, a plurality of photodetectors are positioned directly above the cant to observe the light reflected therefrom as the cant is moved by a conveyor. A tachometer or other pulse producing means is attached to the conveyor to provide information regarding to the position of the cant relative to the detectors. The conveyor includes lugs which engage the leading edge of the cant thereby to provide a reference against which all measurements are made.

At each of the plurality of locations across the cam being observed by a photodetector, the leading and trailing edges of the cant will be determined along with the leading and trailing edges of the sawn portion of the cant. This information is processed by a computer which is adjusted to determine the proper orientation and position of the cant with respect to chippers and ganged edgers to obtain maximum yield from each cant.

The output of the computer adjusts the position of alignment means mounted in line with the lugs on the conveyor. These alignment means adjust both the orientation and lateral position of the cant with respect to a fixed chipper. An adjustable chipper is positioned by the computer to remove wood from the opposite edge of the cant, and the cant is then moved through the chippers and then into the ganged edgers.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. I is a plan view of a stud mill in which the method and apparatus of this invention may be utilized;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a portion of a log block and the location of saw cuts which may be made to produce a plurality of cants;

FIG. 3 is a diagrammatic illustration of a cam scanning station showing first and second light sources and a plurality of photodetectors for sensing the light re flected from a cant as it is moved by a conveyor, and also an electrical block diagram of a control circuit for orientating the cant and adjusting the cant chippers;

FIG. 4 is an elevational view of one embodiment of a cant scanning device constructed according to this invention;

FIG. 5 is a plan view of the cant scanning device of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a detailed view of the scanning section of the cant scanner of FIG. 4; and

FIG. 7 shows the measurements made by the cant scanning device of FIGS. 36 with respect to a reference line.

FIG. 8 is an elevational view showing another embodiment of the invention where a single set of photodetectors is used and the light sources are alterna ei switched on and off.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now to the drawings, and particularly to FIG. I, a stud mill is shown into which logs II) are moved by means of a conveyor 12 onto V-blocks l3 and then past an optical scanner 15 where log diameter is measured at a plurality of positions throughout its length. If the logs are not of acceptable quality, they are carried by conveyors l7 and 18 to the exterior of the mill. If the logs are of acceptable quality, they are received by a carriage mechanism 20.

The logs 10 may be rotated manually in order to present the optimum profile prior to scanning by an optical scanning device IS. The output of the optical scanner I5 is applied to circuit means, such as a properly programmed general purpose computer, which takes this information and determines the maximum number of studs which may be cut from the log. The computer therefore takes into consideration the fact that the log will first be cut into cants of either two or four inch thickness. In the embodiment shown, the center cut will be four inches thick since the carriage 20 is in excess of two inches.

The logs I0 are then moved to the right, as viewed in FIG. 1, between slab chippers 22 and 23, both of which are adjustable relative to the carriage 20 under the direction of the computer. These slab chippers will form faces 24 and 25, respectively, on the log 10, as shown in FIG. 2.

The log is then carried by the carriage 20 through adjustably positionable bandsaws 28 and 29 which will make cuts 31 and 32, respectively, in the log to form cants which then separate themselves from the log and are carried are conveyors 33 and 34 to pans 35 and 36. Whether the cuts 31 and 32 are made two or four inches from the surfaces 24 and 25 will be determined by the computer in order to yield the maximum number of studs of acceptable width and length from any given log.

The bandsaws 28 and 29 are then repositioned under the direction of the computer, and the carriage then moves the log through the bandsaws in the opposite direction to form cuts 37 and 38. The resulting cants are then carried by transfer conveyors 40 and 41 to conveyors 42 and 43 and stored temporarily on pans 44 and 45. The saws are then repositioned again, and the entire cycle repeated until the entire log has been di vided into cants having either two or four inch thicknesses. As explained above, the center cant will typically be four inches due to the size of the carriage mechanism 20.

The cants stored on pans 35, 36, 44 and 45 are deposited onto a conveyor which moves each cant past a second optical scanner 55. This scanner provides information to a computer which controls the position of adjustable stops 56 and 57 to orient each cant with respect to cant chippers 58 and 59. In the embodiment shown, cant chipper 58 is fixed while chipper 59 is adjustable. These chippers remove the wane from the cant in such a way as to maximize the number of studs available therefrom.

The two inch cants are carried by conveyor 61 through a four inch gang edger 62 which divides the cam into 2 X 4s and deposits them onto an outfeed conveyor 65. The four inch cants are carried by conveyors 66 and 67 through either a two inch gang edger 68 or the four inch gang edger 62 and then onto the outfeed conveyor 65.

By using an optical device which measures the volume of each log entering the mill, and by careful selection of the widths of the cants into which each log is cut, and the orientation of each cant with respect to the saws which divide it into studs, the number of studs available from any given log is increased over that presently available in manually controlled mills.

The second optical scanner is shown in FIGS. 3-5 with a cant 70 approaching the scanning position. The scanner includes a first source of light 71 which is so positioned as to direct the light at a low angle of incidence across a cant 70. Each cant includes a sawn portion 73 (FIG. 7), a leading wane 74 and a trailing wane 75. The leading wane 74 is defined as that portion of the cant 70 between the leading edge of the sawn portion 73 and the leading edge 76 of the cant. Similarly, the trailing wane is defined as that portion of the cant between the trailing edge of the sawn portion and the trailing edge 77 of the cant. The first light source 71 therefore illuminates the sawn portion 73 as well as the trailing wane 75.

Each cam 70 is carried to the optical scanner by a conveyor 50 which moves the cant at a first rate of speed. Within the area of the optical scanner 55, however, the cant 70 engages lugs 80 and 81 which are moved by a second conveyor 85. The second conveyor is moved at a second or slower rate of speed and therefore the conveyor 50 will force the leading edge 76 of the cam into positive engagement with the lugs 80. As will be explained, these lugs provide a reference against which the locations of the leading and trailing edges of the cant and the leading and trailing edges of the sawn portion of the cant is measured. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 4, equally spaced lug pairs 80 are carried by the conveyor 85. The conveyor 85 is moved at the second rate of speed by a motor 86 with its speed measured by a shaft encoding device or tachometer genera tor 90.

The optical scanner 55 also includes a second light source 91 which directs light at a low angle of incidence across the cant to illuminate the sawn portion 73 and the leading wane 74. In the embodiment shown, a light screen or baffle 95 is provided to maintain these two light sources separate so that the cant is illuminated by only one light source at a time. It is also within the scope of this invention, however, to provide switch means which will alternately energize the light sources in which case there would be no need for such a light screen.

A plurality of spaced photodetectors are positioned to sense the light reflected by the cant from the light sources 71 and 91. This reflected light provides information on the location of the edges of the cant as well as the edges of the sawn portion and will enable appropriate electronic circuitry to determine the maximum number of studs which may be cut from the cant and to orient the cant with respect to chippers and saws to yield this result.

In the embodiment shown in FIGS. 3-5, two sets of photodetectors and are employed, each set including 27 individual photodetectors spaced substantially equally across the cant. The photodetector set 100 observes the light reflected by the cant from light source 71 while the photodetector set 105 detects the light reflected by the cant from light source 91. Located within the viewing area of each photodetector set are baffles 106 which function merely to prevent stray light from causing erroneous readings by the photodetectors. Additional screens 107 are provided, also to prevent stray light from being directed into the viewing area and cause erroneous indications.

By combining the outputs from the individual photodetectors of the sets 100 and 105 with the output of the tachometer 90, a rectilinear representation of the available wood in the cant may be gene rated. Since the leading edge 76 of the cant may not be reasonably straight, a reference coordinate 110 against which this information is referenced is established ahead of the cant by approximately 10 inches and is generated by a detector located below the conveyor which senses the passage of one of the lugs 80 carried by the conveyor 85. Of course, other means for establishing a reference may be employed, such as a photodetector sensing the passage of a cam just prior to its moving into the viewing area.

Referring now to FIGS. 6 and 7, a cant 70 is moved by the conveyor 85 past the first set of photodetectors 100 and since the sawn portion 73 and the trailing wane 75 are illuminated by light from the source 71, both of these surfaces will reflect light into the photodetectors. Therefore, each photodetector output will show an increase of light at the beginning of the sawn portion and will not show a significant decrease in the level of illumination until after the trailing edge 77 of the cant passes. A photodetector output is shown by waveform with an increase in light intensity representing the leading edge of the sawn portion occurring at Y1 and a decrease in light intensity, representing the trailing edge of the cant occurring at (3.

As the cant 70 moves past the photodetector set 105, a second output waveform will be developed. Since the cant is now illuminated by the light source 91, the sawn portion 73 and the leading wane 74 are illuminated and therefore the photodetector will sense light at the leading edge of the cant, identified in the waveform at Y0, and the light intensity will fall off at the trailing edge of the sawn portion, identified at Y2, since the trailing wane 75 will be in shadow.

In FIG. 7, the distances Y0, Y1, Y2 and Y3 are shown measured from the reference 110 which is established when one of the lugs 80 passes the detector 1 15. Although not shown in FIG. 7, it is understood that these Y" distances are established for each of twentyseven positions across the cant.

As mentioned previously, it is within the scope of the invention to provide a single set of photodetectors and to provide two light sources with means to switch alternately between the sources, thus eliminating the need for a light screen.

Referring to FIG. 8, a set of photodetectors 130 are positioned on a line extending transversely across the conveyor system 55. A first light source 131 is positioned to the right, as viewed in FIG. 8, to direct light at a low angle of incidence across the cant 70 to illuminate the sawn portion 73 and the trailing wane 75. Similarly, a second light source 132 is positioned at the left in FIG. 8, to direct light at a low angle of incidence across the cant to illuminate the sawn portion 73 and the leading wane 74.

Each light source 116, 117 may include a plurality of light emitting diodes (LED) arranged with one or more LEDs for each photodetector position across the cant. The LEDs within each light source 131 and 132 may be connected in series and driven from a common power supply. The light sources 131 and 132 may be energized alternately and the output from the photodetectors 130 sampled during the period of energization to determine the amount of reflected light under the direction of a control circuit 135. Alternately, the light sources 131 and 132 may be switched at the same repetition rate but out of phase, and the photodetectors sampled in synchronism with the phase of the light sources. The switching rate may be governed by the tachometer generator 90 in accordance with the speed of movement of the cant.

In FIG. 8 where light emitting diodes may be used, they would be positioned closer to the cant than the steady state quartz-line lamps 71 and 91 shown in FIG. 3 since the intensity of the light output from light emitting diodes at present is less than that of other conventional light sources. A cylindrical lens may be used to focus the light onto the cant.

Once the grid coordinates of the leading and trailing edges of the sawn portion and of the cant itself are determined, the cant may be so positioned so that the leading wane may be removed by a fixed chipper 58 and the trailing wane removed by an adjustable clipper 59. To orient the wane with respect to the fixed chipper, a pair of adjustable stops 56 and 57, which are substantially in line with the lugs 80 and 81, are adjusted by the output of an electronic circuit 140 (FIG. 3). The adjustable stops 56 and 57 are attached to and positioned by stacked cylinder devices 141 and 142. These devices are pneumatically actuated cylinders which move in a digital manner through preset distances under the control of the circuit 130. The precision to which these devices may adjust the stops 56 and 57 depends upon movement of the smallest cylinder within each stack. Since the adjustable stops 56 and 57 are in line with the lugs 80, undulations in the leading edge of the cant will not effect the orientation of the cant with respect to the chipper. It may be seen in FIG. 4 that the lugs 80 disengage from the cant after the cant has passed through the scanning area and therefore the cant will accelerate to the speed of the conveyor until it engages the adjustable stops 56 and 57.

The position of the adjustable chipper 59 is also determined by the circuit 140 and will remove all or a substantial part of the trailing wane after the cant has been transferred from the conveyor 50 onto the conveyor 61 (FIG. 1). The positioning mechanism for the adjustable chipper 58 in a preferred embodiment of the invention is a device manufactured by General Electric under the trademark Accupin.

It is also possible within the scope of this invention to provide other means for positioning the cant with respect to the chippers 58 and 59. For example, the lugs could be adjustable independently of each other in order to position the cant. Also, while the cant is shown moving transversely through the scanner, it could also move longitudinally through the scanner with other means provided to orient the cant with respect to the clippers.

Also located within the scanning area is a sensing device which determines whether the cants are two or four inches in thickness. Memory means are pro vided to follow the cant through the chippers and to cause the cant to be directed either to the two inch or the four inch gang edges 62 or 68, depending on the size of studs required.

While the form of apparatus herein described constitutes a preferred embodiment of the invention, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited to this precise form of apparatus, and that changes may be made therein without departing from the scope of the invention which is defined in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A method of scanning cants having leading and trailing wanes to obtain the maximum yield therefrom including the steps of directing a beam of light at an angle of incidence across said cant such that a sawn portion and the trailing wane are illuminated and the leading wane is placed in shadow,

directing a second beam of light across said cant at an angle of incidence such that said sawn portion and the leading wane are illuminated and the trailing wane is placed in shadow, and sensing the light reflected from said cant at a plurality of locations to provide information on the location of the leading and trailing edges of the cant and the leading and trailing edge of the sawn portion,

whereby the locations of the sawn portion of the cant and the leading and trailing edges of the cant are identified at said plurality of locations. 2. Apparatus for scanning a cant optically to provide information regarding the location of the leading and trailing edges of the cant and a sawn portion thereof comprising conveyor means including a pair of indexing lugs adapted to engage the leading edge of the cant,

means for directing a first source of light at an angle of incidence across a cant for illuminating the sawn portion thereof and the trailing wane,

means for directing a second source of light at an angle of incidence across said cant for illuminating the sawn portion thereof and the leading wane,

a plurality of photodetectors positioned to sense the location of the leading and trailing edges of the sawn portion and the leading and trailing edges of the cam at said plurality of locations by observing the light reflected from said first and second light sources, and

circuit means responsive to the outputs of said plurality of photodetectors for locating the leading and trailing edges of the cant and the leading and trailing edges of the sawn portion with respect to said lugs.

3. Apparatus of claim 2 wherein said plurality ofphotodetectors includes a first set positioned to receive light reflected by said cant from said first source thereby sensing the location of the leading edge of the sawn portion and the trailing edge of the cant, and a second set positioned to receive light reflected by said cant from said second source thereby sensing the location of the trailing edge of the sawn portion and the leading edge of the cant.

4. Apparatus of claim 3 further including a light screen positioned between said first and second sets of photodetectors to prevent the first and second sources from illuminating said cant and reflecting light into said second and first set of photodetectors, respectively.

5. Apparatus of claim 2 wherein said plurality of photodetectors are mounted in a line substantially perpendicular to the direction of movement of said cant, said apparatus further including means to energize said first and second sources of light alternatively.

6. Apparatus for scanning a cant optically to determine the location of the leading and trailing edges of the cant and the sawn portion thereon, comprising a first source of light for illuminating the sawn portion and the trailing wane of the cant.

a second source of light for illuminating the sawn portion and the leading wane of the cam,

a plurality of photodetectors positioned to sense the location of the leading and trailing edges of the sawn portion and the leading and trailing edges of the cant at a plurality of locations across the cant by observing light reflected from said first and second light sources.

means for causing relative movement of the cant with respect to said photodetectors, and

means for providing information regarding the position of the cant relative to said photodetectors.

7. A method of optically scanning cants having a sawn portion and leading and trailing wanes including the steps of directing a beam of light at an angle of incidence across said cant such that at least the trailing wane is illuminated and the leading wane is placed in shadow,

directing a second beam of light across said cant at an angle of incidence such that at least the leading wane is illuminated and the trailing wane is placed in shadow, and

sensing the light reflected from said cant whereby the location of the leading and trailing edges of the cant and the leading and trailing edge of the sawn portion may be determined.

8. A method of optically scanning cants having a sawn portion and leading and trailing wanes including the steps of directing a beam of light at an angle of incidence across said cant such that at least the trailing wane is illuminated and the leading wane is placed in shadow,

directing a second beam of light across said cant at an angle of incidence such that at least the leading wane is illuminated and the trailing wane is placed in shadow,

moving the cant with respect to a plurality of light sensing means positioned above the cant, and sensing the light reflected from said cant with respect to the position of the cant as it moves relative to the light sensing means whereby the location of the leading and trailing edges of the cant and the leading and trailing edge of the sawn portion may be determined.

9. Apparatus for optically scanning a cant having a sawn portion and leading and trailing wanes to provide information regarding the configuration thereof, said apparatus comprising means for directing a first source of light at an angle of incidence across a cant for illuminating at least the trailing wane,

means for directing a second source of light at an angle of incidence across said cant for illuminating at least the leading wane,

a plurality of photodetectors positioned to sense the location of the leading and trailing edges of the sawn portion and the leading and trailing edges of the cant at said plurality of locations by observing the light reflected by the cant from said first and second light sources, and

conveyor means for moving said cant relative to said photodetectors,

circuit means responsive to the outputs of said plurality of photodetectors for locating the leading and trailing edges of the cant and the leading and trailing edges of the sawn portion with respect to said conveyor means.

10. Apparatus of claim 9 wherein said conveyor means includes a pair of indexing lugs adapted to engage the leading edge of the cant to provide a reference against which the location of the leading and trailing edges of the cant and the leading and trailing edges of the sawn portion of the cant is measured.

11. The apparatus of claim 10 wherein said conveyor means further includes a tachometer generator to sense its rate of movement.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2828917 *Sep 27, 1954Apr 1, 1958Green Mavis JBoard dimension recorder and lumber volume calculator and recorder
US2978943 *Sep 17, 1956Apr 11, 1961Controls & Comm Co IncPhotoelectric control circuit in combination with a toggle actuated cutter device
US3513321 *Aug 3, 1967May 19, 1970Weyerhaeuser CoLog tally system with minimum diameter measuring means
US3565236 *Oct 21, 1968Feb 23, 1971Us Plywood Champ Papers IncFeeder for veneer crowder
US3621266 *Nov 18, 1969Nov 16, 1971Yawata Iron & Steel CoMethod and apparatus for measuring the lengths of objects being conveyed
US3648743 *Jan 14, 1970Mar 14, 1972Giussani GiorgioEquipment for longitudinally cutting tree logs
US3736968 *Nov 25, 1970Jun 5, 1973Sun StudsMethod and apparatus for processing logs
US3806253 *Dec 13, 1972Apr 23, 1974Weyerhaeuser CoSweep measuring scheme
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3963938 *Apr 16, 1975Jun 15, 1976Saab-Scania AktiebolagApparatus for scanning cants to determine optimum edging cuts
US3970128 *Apr 16, 1975Jul 20, 1976Saab-Scania AktiebolagOrientation of cant for translatory feed through edging cutters
US3983403 *Jun 12, 1975Sep 28, 1976Rema Electronic Ltd.Method and device for optical scanning of a series of transversal dimensional values at a board or plank
US4086496 *Mar 18, 1977Apr 25, 1978Sun Studs, Inc.Method for optically measuring a cant to locate the narrowest flat side and its boundaries and manufacturing lumber therefrom
US4105925 *Mar 14, 1977Aug 8, 1978General Motors CorporationOptical object locator
US4122525 *Jul 12, 1976Oct 24, 1978Eaton-Leonard CorporationMethod and apparatus for profile scanning
US4164248 *Dec 30, 1977Aug 14, 1979Alpo RystiMethod and apparatus for cutting off defective portions of lengths of timber
US4185672 *Dec 4, 1975Jan 29, 1980Reed Ltd.Integrated tree processing mill
US4186310 *Jun 19, 1978Jan 29, 1980Maxey Carl WAutomatic wane detector
US4188544 *Aug 22, 1977Feb 12, 1980Weyerhaeuser CompanyMethod and apparatus for automatically processing a workpiece employing calibrated scanning
US4196648 *Aug 7, 1978Apr 8, 1980Seneca Sawmill Company, Inc.Automatic sawmill apparatus
US4201378 *May 16, 1978May 6, 1980Bell & Howell CompanySkew detector
US4205568 *Mar 27, 1978Jun 3, 1980Far West Equipment & Control Corp.Method and apparatus for optimizing edge cut of boards from cants and the like
US4228886 *Dec 26, 1978Oct 21, 1980Ppg Industries, Inc.Position sensor
US4269245 *Feb 21, 1979May 26, 1981Kockums Industri AktiebolagInfeed mechanism
US4281695 *Nov 13, 1978Aug 4, 1981Plan-Shell OyMethod and system of aligning lumber, especially blocks from which the first pair of cants has been removed
US4281696 *Aug 27, 1979Aug 4, 1981Aaron U. JonesAutomatic sawmill method and apparatus
US4286149 *Aug 9, 1979Aug 25, 1981Ncr Canada Ltd - Ncr Canada LteeApparatus and method for detection of overlapping objects
US4301373 *Jul 5, 1979Nov 17, 1981Saab-Scania AbScanning of workpieces such as lumber cants
US4377743 *Oct 9, 1980Mar 22, 1983Molins LimitedCigarette rod optical inspection
US4378827 *May 28, 1981Apr 5, 1983Sun Studs, Inc.Veneer lathe lug charger system having enhanced accuracy and rate of production
US4378830 *May 28, 1981Apr 5, 1983Sun Studs, Inc.Veneer lathe log charger system having enhanced accuracy and rate of production
US4379476 *May 28, 1981Apr 12, 1983Sun Studs, Inc.Veneer lathe log charger system having enhanced accuracy and rate of production
US4384601 *May 28, 1981May 24, 1983Sun Studs, Inc.Veneer lathe log charger system having enhanced accuracy and rate of production
US4386641 *May 8, 1981Jun 7, 1983Saab-Scania AktiebolagRetractable cant supports for lumber cant positioner-feeders
US4398580 *May 28, 1981Aug 16, 1983Sun Studs, Inc.Veneer lathe log charger system having enhanced accuracy and rate of production
US4417150 *Aug 13, 1981Nov 22, 1983Ppg Industries, Inc.Optical system for determining peripheral characterization and dimensions of a sheet
US4468992 *Dec 13, 1982Sep 4, 1984Mcgeehee Ronald WAutomatic sawing system
US4468993 *Jun 11, 1982Sep 4, 1984International Paper CompanySmall log bucking system
US4709605 *Apr 8, 1985Dec 1, 1987Strippit/Di-Acro-Houdaille, Inc.Method of working sheet material workpieces by a sheet material working machine tool
US4738533 *Oct 29, 1985Apr 19, 1988Meinan Machinery Works, Inc.Plywood surface defect detecting head
US4767924 *Aug 19, 1987Aug 30, 1988B.A.T. Cigarettenfabriken GmbhApparatus for optical monitoring with a high pressure lamp connected to a fiber optic cable
US4782238 *Oct 20, 1987Nov 1, 1988Eastman Kodak CompanyApparatus for generating edge position signals for use in locating an address element on a mailpiece
US5006719 *Jul 26, 1989Apr 9, 1991Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AgDevice for detecting the edge location of an object
US5079729 *Aug 4, 1988Jan 7, 1992Nowakowski Karol LAlignment measuring system & method
US5120976 *Jul 25, 1990Jun 9, 1992The Boeing CompanyStrip lay-up verification system with width and centerline skew determination
US5262956 *Jun 26, 1991Nov 16, 1993Inovec, Inc.Statistically compensated optimization system
US5457635 *Jan 12, 1994Oct 10, 1995Interpine Export(Nz) LimitedPortable apparatus for determining cut positions in logs
US5605216 *Dec 30, 1994Feb 25, 1997Hi-Tech Engineering Inc.Board turning apparatus
US5892808 *Jan 30, 1997Apr 6, 1999Techne Systems, Inc.Method and apparatus for feature detection in a workpiece
US6272437Apr 17, 1998Aug 7, 2001Cae Inc.Method and apparatus for improved inspection and classification of attributes of a workpiece
US6929043Jul 19, 2002Aug 16, 2005Valley Machine Works Ltd.Optimized board edger and method of operation thereof
US7543615Dec 16, 2004Jun 9, 2009U.S. Natural Resources, Inc.Optimized board edger and method of operation thereof
US7571751Dec 16, 2004Aug 11, 2009U.S. Natural Resources, Inc.Optimized board edger and method of operation thereof
US7820104 *Nov 18, 2002Oct 26, 2010Iris Deutschland GmbhTest strip analysis apparatus
US7938156 *Apr 20, 2006May 10, 2011Weyerhaeuser Nr CompanyMethod for optimizing lumber
US7975830May 28, 2007Jul 12, 2011Microtec S.R.L.Method and device for measuring the properties of moving objects
US8079457 *Apr 29, 2008Dec 20, 2011GreCon Dimter Holzoptimierung Süd GmbH & Co. KGDevice for feeding boards to crosscut saws
US8229803Jul 24, 2012Eb Associates Inc.Systems and methods for tracking lumber in a sawmill
US8346631 *Jan 1, 2013Eb Associates, Inc.Systems and methods for tracking lumber in a sawmill
US8370222 *Jun 21, 2012Feb 5, 2013Eb Associates, Inc.Systems and methods for tracking lumber in a sawmill
US9036161 *Apr 1, 2013May 19, 2015Gregory Jon LyonsLabel edge detection using out-of-plane reflection
US9091532Apr 8, 2015Jul 28, 2015Gregory Jon LyonsLabel edge detection using out-of-plane reflection
US20030019545 *Jul 19, 2002Jan 30, 2003Woodford James D.Optimized board edger and method of operation thereof
US20050109423 *Dec 16, 2004May 26, 2005Valley Machine Works Ltd.Optimized board edger and method of operation thereof
US20050163661 *Nov 18, 2002Jul 28, 2005Ziegler Walter M.Test strip analysis apparatus
US20070246125 *Apr 20, 2006Oct 25, 2007Philip LatosMethod for optimizing lumber
US20080276778 *Apr 29, 2008Nov 13, 2008Grecon Dimter Holzoptimierung Sud Gmbh & Co. KgDevice for Feeding Boards to Crosscut Saws
US20090095377 *Oct 16, 2007Apr 16, 2009Earl BarkerSystems and methods for tracking lumber in a sawmill
US20090255607 *Apr 15, 2009Oct 15, 2009Earl BarkerSystems and methods for tracking lumber in a sawmill
US20090273795 *May 28, 2007Nov 5, 2009Microtec S.R.LMethod and device for measuring the properties of moving objects
DE4019882A1 *Jun 22, 1990Jan 3, 1991Saab Automation AbArrangement for detecting and measuring irregular workpieces - has three beam sources, detector element and signal computer
EP0007079A1 *Jul 9, 1979Jan 23, 1980Saab-Scania AktiebolagMethod and device for scanning and measuring elongated irregular workpieces such as planks
EP0183974A1 *Oct 26, 1985Jun 11, 1986Meinan Machinery Works, Inc.Plywood surface defect detecting head
EP0312980A2 *Oct 18, 1988Apr 26, 1989EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY (a New Jersey corporation)Apparatus for generating edge position signals for use in locating an address element on a mailpiece
EP0568460A1 *Apr 29, 1993Nov 3, 1993MPB TECHNOLOGIES Inc.Method and apparatus for non-contact and rapid identification of wood species
EP1050388A2 *Mar 31, 2000Nov 8, 2000IMA Maschinenfabriken Klessmann GmbHMachine for machining edges with a workpiece conveyor chain
EP2253405A1 *May 17, 2010Nov 24, 2010Georg BurgerMethod and process for cutting tree trunks
WO2008038319A1May 28, 2007Apr 3, 2008Microtec S.R.L.Method and device for measuring the properties of moving objects
Classifications
U.S. Classification250/559.25, 144/379, 250/223.00R, 144/357
International ClassificationB27B1/00, B27B31/06, G01N21/86
Cooperative ClassificationG01N21/8986, B27B31/06, B27B1/00
European ClassificationG01N21/898B, B27B1/00, B27B31/06
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
May 26, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: BC FOREST PRODUCTS SYSTEMS, INC., A WASHINGTON COR
Free format text: RELEASED BY SECURED PARTY;ASSIGNOR:HELLER FINANCIAL, INC. F/K/A WALTER E. HELLER & COMPANY, INC. A WA. CORP.;REEL/FRAME:004716/0423
Effective date: 19861015
Aug 29, 1984AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: ACROWOOD CORPORATION A CORP. OF DE
Owner name: BC FOREST PRODUCTS SYSTEMS, INC., A WA CORP.
Effective date: 19840622
Aug 29, 1984ASAssignment
Owner name: ACROWOOD CORPORATION A CORP. OF DE
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:BC FOREST PRODUCTS SYSTEMS, INC., A WA CORP.;REEL/FRAME:004294/0791
Effective date: 19840622
Jun 25, 1984AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: BC FOREST PRODUCTS SYSTEMS, INC., P.O. BOX 1028, E
Effective date: 19840613
Owner name: BLACK CLAWSON COMPANY, THE, AN OH CORP
Jun 25, 1984ASAssignment
Owner name: BC FOREST PRODUCTS SYSTEMS, INC., P.O. BOX 1028, E
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:BLACK CLAWSON COMPANY, THE, AN OH CORP;REEL/FRAME:004284/0363
Effective date: 19840613
Jun 4, 1984ASAssignment
Owner name: WALTER E. HELLER & COMPANY, INC., 101 PARK AVE., N
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:BC FOREST PRODUCTS SYSTEMS, INC.;REEL/FRAME:004277/0824
Effective date: 19840130