Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3890893 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 24, 1975
Filing dateMay 13, 1974
Priority dateOct 24, 1972
Publication numberUS 3890893 A, US 3890893A, US-A-3890893, US3890893 A, US3890893A
InventorsKodis Robert D
Original AssigneeAn Controls Inc Di
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Multiple sheet ticket printer
US 3890893 A
Abstract
A device comprising a rotatable print cylinder having rows of raised symbols disposed about its periphery in arcuate columns and an impactor assembly having ballistic elements cooperating with each row of raised symbols for columnar printing of selected symbols in rows on an endless web of multiple sheet ticket stock. The sheets are bound at selected intervals and are formed with sprocket holes disposed in spaced parallel relationship with the longitudinal axis at the margins thereof. The ticket stock is advanced into engagement with a rotating cutter assembly and into registration with the print drum and ballistic elements by means of a sprocket drive mechanism. The rotating cutter assembly separates the sprocketed margins from the ticket body. Symbols are printed when selected ballistic elements urge the ticket stock against selected raised symbols as the ticket is incrementally advanced by the sprocket drive mechanism, certain ones of the sheets being provided with a carbon backing. Upon completion of the printing cycle, the ticket stock is sheared by a solenoid actuated rotary cutter. Thereafter, the printed ticket is propelled from the device by means of an ejection mechanism.
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1191 1111 3,890,893

Kodis 1 1 June 24, 1975 MULTIPLE SHEET TICKET PRINTER Primary Examiner-Clyde I. Coughenour [75] Inventor: Robert D. Kodis, Brookline. Mass. g i Agent or FUmTMOrSe Altman Oates &

e 0 [73] Assignee: Di/An Controls, Inc., Boston, Mass. 1221' Filed: May 13, 1974 1 1 B T A device comprising a rotatable print cylinder having 21 A 1. N 469,354 l 1 pp 0 rows of ralsed symbols d1sposed about 1ts per1phery 1n Related Application Data arcuate columns and an impactor assembly having bal- [63] Continuation of Ser. 'No. 300144, Oct. 24,1972, listic elements cooperating with each row of raised abandoned. symbols for columnar printing of selected symbols in rows on an endless web of multiple sheet ticket stock. [52] US. Cl. 101/69; 83/602; lO1/93.28; The sheets are bound at selected intervals and are 1 101/227 formed with sprocket holes disposed in spaced parallel [51] Int. Cl. B4lf 13/58; B4lf 13/60; B4lj 9/10 relationship with the longitudinal axis at the margins [58] Field of Search 10l/66-69, thereof. The ticket stock is advanced into engagement 101/226, 227, 93.26; 83/602 with a rotating cutter assembly and into registration with the print drum and ballistic elements by means of [56] References Cited a sprocket drive mechanism. The rotating cutter as- UNITED STATES PATENTS sembly separates the sprocketed margins from the 394274 12/1888 Ide 101 227 ticket body' i e fj "2 Selected 747.009 12 1903 Smith et a1 101 227 9 elements urge t agamst Se we 3,177,675 W939 Sherman g 101/227 ralsed symbols asthe tlcket 1s lncrementally advanced 2,290,371 7/1942 101/ X by the sprocket drive mechanism certain ones of the 2,533.31? 12/1950 Hanson 1 101/227 sheets being provided with a carbon backing. Upon 3 1/1957 101/66 completion of the printing cycle. the ticket stock is 3.824.736 2/1958 Allen l01/66 X sheared by a solenoid actuated rotary cutter. Thereaf- 3,568,556 3/1971 Gesell et al. 83/602 ter, the printed ticket is propelled from the device by FBUSY 1 READY I TICKET PRINT I COMMAND PRINT ENABLE CONTROL 1' AND ENCODER OUTPUT TERMINAL 1 1 I l I 1 l I EXTERNAL TERMINAL DATA LINE 1 1 1 1 1 l 1 1 1 1 I 1 l 1 INPUT 1 1 1 l 1 INPUT DATA TERMINAL means of an ejection mechanism.

3 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures TICKET STOCK SENSOR SHEET PATENTED JUN 2 4 I975 MULTIPLE SIIEET TICKET PRINTER This is a continuation, of application Scr. No.

300.144, filed Oct. 24, I972 nowabandond.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of Invention v The present invention relates to printing devices and. more particularly, is directed towards a high speed ro tary ticket printer for multiple sheet tickets.

2. Description of the Prior Art High speed rotary printers are well known in the art as a means for printing the output of an electronic computer on ticket stock. In one type of ticket printer. the ticket stock is fed into a print gate by means of arotating drum which is energized at predetermined increments. Such printers have suffered from the disadvantage that, when multiple sheet tickets are used, the rotating drum tends to buckle some of the sheets. Another disadvantage found in prior art ticket printers is the use of scissor-type cutters which require precise alignment and frequent resharpening. It is apparent that a need exists for improvements in multiple sheet, high speed rotary ticket printers.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is an object of the present invention to provide a multiple sheet ticket printer which does not suffer from the heretofore mentioned disadvantages. The ticket printer comprise a rotatable print cylinder having rows of raised symbols disposed about its periphery in arcuate columns and an impactor assembly having ballistic elements cooperating with each row of symbols for columnar printing of selected symbols in rows on an endless web of multiple sheet ticket stock. The sheets are bound at selected intervals and are formed with sprocket holes disposed in spaced parallel relationship with the longitudinal axis of the'ticket stock along the margins thereof, the sprocket holes of one sheet being in registration with corresponding sprocket holes of the adjacent sheet. A sprocket drive assembly engages the sprocket holes and incrementally advances the ticket stock into registration with the print drum and impactor assembly. As the ticket stock is advanced, the marginal areas thereof are engaged by a rotating cutter and thesprocketed margins are separated from the ticket body. Printing is accomplished by energizing selected ones of the ballistic elements and urging the multiple sheet ticket stock against the raised symbols in registration therewith, certain ones of the sheets being provided with a carbon backing. Whenall rows have been printed and the ticket stock is at a predetermined location, a solenoid actuated rotary cutter is energized and the printed ticket is sheared from the endless strip. Thereafter, the printed ticket is propelled from the ticket printer by means of an ejection mechanism.

The invention accordingly comprises the ticket'stock and ticket printer possessing the construction,combination of elements, and arrangement of parts that are exemplified in the following detailed disclosure.-the scope of which will be indicated in the appended claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS- For a fuller understanding of the nature and objects of the present invention,references shouldbe had to the following detailed description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a block and schematic diagram, partly in perspective of a ticket printer embodying the invention;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the ticket stock embodying the present invention;

FIG. 3 is a side elevation. somewhat exaggerated. of the ticket stock of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a bottom plan view of the ticket stockof FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is a plan view of an alternative form of the ticket stock embodying the invention;

FIG. 6 is an alternative embodiment of the ticket stock embodying the invention;

FIG. 7 is a-perspective of the ticket ing the invention; s

FIG. 8 is a side elevation of the ticket printing mechanism of the ticket printer of FIG. 7; and

FIG. 9 is a perspective of the cutting mechanism of the ticket printer of FIG. 7.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION I Referring now to the drawings, particularly FIG. 1, there is shown'a' system 10 for printing and dispensing multiple sheet tickets, for example airline tickets. In the illustrated embodiment, printing system 10 is interconnected with an' online, real time computer communications system generally shown in block form at 1.1. System l0.comprises a rotatable print cylinder 16, for example a print drum, having rows of raised symbols disposed about its periphery in arcuate columns and an impactor assembly 17 including a plurality of ballistic elements 18 for printing selected symbols on an endless web of multiple sheet ticket stock 14 which stored in a hopper 19. In the illustrated embodiment, by way of example, print drum 16 includes six rows of 47 characters each, adjacent rows of characters being in spaced parallel relationship to one another, and the number of ballistic elements 18 is six, one ballistic element 18 cooperating with one row of characters.

In one example of system operation, a printing cycle is initiated by enabling a control and encoder unit 22 which generates command signals. A print enable unit 20 generates a Busy/Ready signal in response to control and encoder 22 command signals. The Busy/Ready signal, which denotes a Ready state at this time, is applied to a computer (not'shown) via an input/output terminal 12. The computer generates data signals which represent the first row of characters to be printed on ticket stock 14. These v data signals are applied to a storage unit 24 via an-input data terminal 26. A Print Command generated by the computer is applied to control and encoder 22 via a delay 28 and the Busy/Ready signal changes to the Busy state. In response to a command signal generated by control and encoder 22, the character data signals in storage 24 are applied to character comparator 30, 32, 34, 36, 38, and 40. A sensor 42 generates Code Line signals which denote the relative position of the characters on print drum 16 with respect to ballistic elements 18. Sensor 42 is mounted in registration with an apertured encoder wheel 44 which is directly coupled to print drum 16 via a shaft 46. Since encoder wheel 44 is directly coupled to print drum 16, at any instant of time, Code Line signals generated by sensor 42 and derived from encoder wheel 44 correspond to the character on print drum 16 that is in registration with the correlative ballistic element 18. The Code Line signals generated by sensor 42, formprinter embodyample an optical sensor which senses luminance emitted from a source 48, are applied to comparators 30, 32, 34, 36, 38 and 40 via control and encoder 22 and an amplifier 50. When like signals generated by sensor 42 and storage 24 are presented at the input terminals of any one or all of character comparators 30, 32, 34, 36, 38 and 40, the correlative character comparator generates a signal which is applied to corresponding hammer controls 52, 54, 56, 58, 60 and 62. Character comparators 30, 32, 34, 36, 38 and 40 are connected to hammer controls 52, 54 56, 58, 60 and 62, respectively. One hammer control is connected to one ballistic element 18 which cooperates with only one row of characters on type drum 16. That is, hammer control 52 is associated with the first row of characters, ham mer control 54 is associated. with the second row of characters hammer control 56 is associated with the third row of characters, and hammer control 58 is associated with the fourth row of characters, hammer control 60 is associated with the fifth row of characters and hammer control 62 is associated with the sixth row of characters. When a comparison occurs. the corresponding hammer control generates a signal which energizes ballistic element 18 associated therewith. The energized ballistic element 18 causes ticket stock 14 in registration therewith to be pressed against print drum 16, whereby the appropriate character is printed on ticket stock 14. The Code Line signals derived from encoder wheel 44 are gated with the Print Command in control and encoder 22 which generates Character Stroke signals to ensure that printing occurs only when the selected character is properly aligned and a Print Command is present, the Character Stobe signals being applied to hammer controls 52, 54, 56, 58, 60 and 62.

When print drum l6 and encoder wheel 44 have completed one revolution, one column of characters will have been printed on ticket stock 14. At this point, the Ready/Busy signal is in the Busy state and a Paper Feed pulse is generated by control and encoder 22. The Paper Feed pulse is applied to a ticket driver mechanism 64 and ticket stock 14 is moved an equivalent distance of one row preparation for the printing of the next column of characters. After ticket stock 14 has been advanced, the Ready/Busy signal reverts to the Ready state. Data signals representing the next row of characters to be printed is applied to storage 24. During the next revolution of print drum 16, these characters are printed in columnar form on ticket stock 14. The sequence continues until all columns have been printed.

When all columns have been printed, an End Ticket signal, generated by the computer is applied to control and encoder 22 via terminal 12. The End Ticket signal energizes a slew ticket logic 66 in control and encoder 22 and the Ready/Busy line becomes Busy. As hereinafter described, ticket stock 14 is slewed into registration with a rotary cutter 68 which is controlled by a cutting mechanism 70. This slewing action positions ticket stock 14 in proper orientation for printing of the first column of characters on the next ticket. In addition, the End Ticket signal energizes an eject assembly 72 which maintains tension on ticket stock 14 while it is being severed by cutter 68 and propels the ticket stock through a ticket slot (not shown) as soon as the cut is completed. A ticket stock sensor 89, for example a microswitch, generates a command signal indicating that hopper 19 has been emptied. The details of ticket stock 14 are shown in FIGS. 2, 3, and 4.

Referring now to FIGS. 2, 3, and 4, it will be seen that ticket stock 14 comprises an endless web of individual ticket blanks 90, for example multiple sheet airline passenger ticket blanks, composed of a fibrous material such as paper. In the preferred embodiment. ticket stock 14 is folded in a Z configuration along fold lines 92 and stored in hopper 19. Each ticket blank includes an upper stratum 94, intermediate strata 96. 98, v

100, I02, 104 and 106, and a bottom stratum 108. As viewed in FIG. 2, the upper and lower margins of each stratum 94, 96, 98, 100, 102, 104,- 106 and 108 are formed with longitudinally extending perforations 110 which defined tear lines, perforations 110 on one stratum being in registration with perforations 110 in the adjacent stratum. Interposed between tear lines 110 and the upper and lower edges of each stratum 94, 96, 98, I00, I02, 104, I06 and 108 is a series of spaced sprocket holes 112 which extend in space parallel relationship to the longitudinal axis of ticket stock 14, sprocket holes 112 on one stratum being in registration with sprocket holes 112 on the adjacent stratum. In order to facilitate removal of each sheet of the printed ticket, each stratum 94, 96, 98, I00, 102, 104, 106 and 108 is provided with perforations 114 which extends between and in perpendicular relationship to tear lines 110. The left margin of each stratum 94, 96, 98, 100, 102, 104, 106 and 108 is bound as shown at the cross hatching denoted by reference character 116. In the illustrated embodiment, a passenger ticket area 118 is defined as that area which is bounded by tear lines 110, perforations 114 and fold line 92.

As best shown in FIG. 4, the left margin of each ticket 90 is bound by means of adhesive strips 120, 122. The upper and lower edges of ticket 90 are bound by means of adhesive strips 124, and 126, respectively. In

the illustrative embodiment, by way of example, adhesive strips 120, 122, 124 and 126 are provided on the underside of strata 94, 96, 98, 100, 102, 104, 106 and 108. The underside of strata 94, 96, 98, 100, 102, 104, and 106, in registration with passenger ticket area 118 is provided with a carbon backing 128. As hereinafter described, when ticket stock 14 is urged against print drum 16 by means of ballistic elements 18, the appropriate character is printed on intermediate strata 96, 98, 100, 102, 104, 106 and 108 as a result ofthe carbon backing on the adjacent sheet. That is, a character is imprinted on bottom stratum 108 as a result of the carbon backing on intermediate stratum 106, a character is imprinted on intermediate stratum 106 due to the carbon back on intermediate stratum 104 and so on. It is to be noted that no characters are imprinted on upper stratum 94. In the illustrated embodiment, strata 94, 96, 98, 100, 102, 104, 106 and 108 are paper sheets having like weights. In alternate embodiment upper andlower strata 94 and 96 define cover sheets having a weight which is heavier than intermediate strata 96, 98, 100, 102, 104 and 106. Alternate forms of ticket stock 14 are shown in FIGS. 5 and 6.

Referring now to FIG. 5 there is shown a ticket stock 120 which includes a passenger ticket area 122 and an endorsement area 124. Ticket stock 120 is provided with longitudinally extending perforations 126 along the upper and lower margins as viewed in FIG. 5. A series of space sprocket holes.l28 are interposed between perforations 126 and the upper and lower edges of ticket stock 120. sprocket holes 128 being in spaced parallel relationship with the longitudinal axis of ticket stock 120. The left margin of ticket area 122 is bound at'the cross hatching denoted by reference character 132 and endorsement area 124 is bound at the cross hatching denoted by reference character I34. Removal of printed passenger tickets is facilitated by means of perforations 136 and 138 which extend in perpendicular space relationship to perforations 126, passenger ticket area 122 being bounded by perforations 126, 136 and 138. Perforations 140 which extend in perpendicular spaced relationship to perforations 126 are provided for facilitating removal of printed endorsement information, endorsement area 124 being bound by perforations 126, 140 and fold line 130. It is to be understood that, in the illustrated embodiment, ticket stock 120 is a multiple sheet ticket blank which is similar in construction to ticket 90.

Referring now to FIG. 6, there is shown an alternate embodiment of ticket 90 in the form of a ticket stock 142. As viewed in FIG. 6, the upper and lower margins of ticket stock 142 are provided with a series of spaced sprocket holes 144 which are disposed in spaced parallel relationship with longitudinal axis of ticket stock 142. It is to be noted that sprocket holes 144 are within a passenger ticket area denoted by reference character 146. Ticket stock 142 is folded in a Z configuration along the fold line denoted by reference character 148. The left hand side of ticket stock 142 is bound as shown in the cross hatching denoted by reference character 150. In order to facilitate removal of a printed passenger ticket, there is provided perforations 152 which extend in spaced perpendicular relationship to the longitudinal axis of ticket line 142. It is to be noted that ticket blank 90 and ticket blank 142 are similar with the exception that the sprocket holes provided ticket stock 142 are internal to the passenger area while the sprocket holes provided in ticket blank 90 are external to the passenger area. In the following discussion of the details of ticket printer 10, by way of example, it is assumed that the ticket blanks stored in hopper 19 are of the type denoted by reference character 90.

Referring now to FIG. 7, it will be seen that ticket printer is organized about a housing 160 having a pivoted frame portion 162. Ticket stock blank 90 is threaded about a guide 164 and is engaged by drive mechanism 64, guide 164 being mounted to housing 160. It will be noted that drive mechanisms 64 engages oppose sides of ticket 90. For clarity, only one side of drive mechanism 64 is shown. It is to be understood that the hidden side of drive mechanism 64 isstructurally and functionally similar to the side of drive mechanism 64 which is shown in FIG. 7. Drive mechanism 64 includes a double ended motor 166 having a pulley 168 which is drivingly connected to a pulley 170 via a belt 172. Pulley 170 is coupled to a sprocket drive pulley 174 by means of a shaft 176. A sprocketed belt 178 is operatively connected between a sprocketed pulley 180 and sprocketed pulley 174. Sprocketed belt 178 is adapted to engage sprocket holes 112 of ticket stock blank 90. A rotating cutting blade 182 is coupled to sprocketed pulley 180 in registration with tear lines 110. As cutter blade 182 engage-s ticket stock 90, sprocket holes 112 are separated from the ticket body along perforations 110. Ticket stock 90 is threaded into ticket printer 10 by lifting frame 162 which is pivoted about a pin 184. When frame 162 is in the closed position as shown in FIG. 7, print drum 16 is in registration with ballistic elements 18. Print drum 16 is rotatably mounted to frame 162 by means of shafts 186 and 188. A pulley 190, which is mounted to shaft 186, is connected to a pulley 192 via a belt 194. On a common shaft 195 with pulley 192 is a pulley 196 which is con-' nected to a pulley 198 via a belt 200. Pulley 198 is coupled to a motor 202. Also connected to pulley 198 on a common motor shaft 199 is a belt 204 which is connected to a pulley 206. A nip roller 208 is driven by pulley 206. ticket stock blank being threaded between nip roller 208 and a nip roller 210. It is to be understood that nip rollers 208, 210 operate to maintain tension on ticket stock blank 90 during the printing cycle and operate to propel the printed ticket from printer 10 after the cutting operation.

Referring now to FIG. 8, it will be seen that impactor assembly 17 includes an actuator 211 which is in registration with an impactor arm 212 having an impactor 213. Ballistic hammer 18 comprises a housing 214 and a hammer 215. Housing 214 is formed with a guideway 216 which is adapted to slidably receive hammer 215. A bias element 217, for example a compression spring, is spiraled about hammer 215 within guideway 216. A retaining ring 218 is mounted to hammer 215 for holding spring 217 in such a manner that hammer 215 is biased downwardly within guideway 216. When actuator 211, for example an electromagnetic actuator, is energized by the command signal generated by sensor 42, impactor arm 212, which is pivoted about a pin 219, is pulled toward actuator 211. In consequence, impactor 213 contacts hammer 215 which is driven towards print drum l6. Thereafter, impactor arm 212 decouples from hammer 215 and returns to a rest position. Hammer 215 continues its upward flight and strikes the underside of ticket stock blank 90, momentarily forcing ticket stock blank 90 against a raised character on print drum 16. Hammer 215, aided by compressed spring 217, returns to the rest position. Upon completion of the printing cycle, the completed, ticket is separated by means of cutting mechanism 70.

Refeering now to FIG. 9 there is shown the details of cutting mechanism 70. A cam plate 220 having an cecentric cam track 222 is mounted to shaft 186. A crank arm 224 having a cam follower 226 is mounted to a shaft 227 which is fixed to cutter 68. An extending arm 228 of an actuator 230 is mounted to crank arm 224 by means of a pin 232. When actuator 230 is energized, cam follower 226 is engaged by cam track 222 and cutter 68 is rotated. As best shown in FIG. 1, cutter 68 is formed with a concave cutting edge 234 which engages ticket stock blank 90 when cutter 68 is engaged by cam track 222. A cutter block 236 is mounted in registration with cutting edge 234, ticket stock blank 90 being threaded between cutter 68 and block 236. In consequence, when cutter 68 is rotated, ticket stock blank 90 issevered by the scissor-like action of cutting edge 234 and cutting block 236.

Since certain changes may be made in the foregoing disclosure without departing from the scope herein involved, it is intended that all matter be construed in an illustrated and not in a limiting sense.

What is claimed is:

1. A high speed rotary printer for printing selected symbols on an endless web of multiple sheet stock formed with sprocket holes disposed in spaced parallel relationship with the longitudinal axis thereof, said printer comprising: I a

a. a rotatable printing cylinder having rows of raised characters disposed about its periphery in arcuate columns;

b. an impactor assembly including a plurality of actuators, impactors and hammers, one of each said actuator associated with one of each said impactors, one of each said impactors associated with one of each said hammers, one of each said hammer associated with one of each said rows of raised characters, each said actuator having energized and deenergized states, each said impactor operative between a rest position and an actuated position, each said hammer restrained for reciprocal movement between a rest position and a strike position, said impactor moved from its rest position to its actuated position when said actuator associated therewith is momentarily in its energized state, said moved impactor momentarily engaging said hammer associated therewith, said engaged hammer .moving from its rest position to its strike position and decoupling from said moved impactor, said moved impactor returning to its rest position, said engaged. hammer striking the multiple sheet stock and momentarily forcing the multiple sheet stock against one of said raised symbols in said row in registration with said engaged hammer, said hammer returning to its rest position, said raised symbol pressed against the multiple sheet stock being printed on each of the multiple sheets;

. first sprocket drive means;

second sprocket drive means;

. a belt engaging said first and second sprocket drive g. rotary cutter means positioned in said path after said second sprocket drive means, said rotatable printing cylinder disposed in said path between said first sprocket drive means and said rotary cutter means, said rotary cutter means disposed in perpendicular relationship to the longitudinal axis of the multiple sheet stock and operative to sever the multiple sheet stock after said symbols are printed thereon; and

. tension means engaging opposite faces of the multiple sheet stock, said tension means disposed in said path after said rotary cutter means, said tension means providing tension on the multiple sheet stock and ejecting the printed multiple sheet stock from the printer when severed by said rotary cutter means.

The high speed rotary printer as claimed in claim 1 wherein said rotary cutter means includes:

cylindrical cutter means formed with an openinghaving a substantially concave cutting edge adapted to engage the multiple sheet stock; I

a cam plate having an eccentric cam track opera-.

tively connected to said cylindrical cutter means;

c. means for rotating said cam plate;

d. a crank arm having a cam follower'adapted for engagement and disengagement with said cam track: and

' e. means for moving said crank arm towards said cam plate. said cam follower engaging said cam track when said crank arm is moved towards said cam plate, said cylinderical cutter means being rotated when said cam follower engages said cam track, the multiple sheet stock being severed when engaged by said concave cutting edge.

3. A high speed rotary printer for printing selected symbols on an endless web of multiple sheet stock formed with sprocket holes disposed in spaced parallel relationship with the longitudinal axis thereof, said printer comprising: i

a. a housing; b. a frame pivotably mounted to said housing;

c. a rotatable printing cylinder mounted to said frame, said printing cylinder having rows of raised characters disposed about its periphery in arcuate columns;

d. an impactor assembly mounted to saidhousing,

said impactor assembly including a plurality of actuators, impactors and hammers, one of each said actuators associated with one of each said impactors, one of each said impactors associated with one of each said hammers, one of each said hammer associated with one of'each said rows of raised characters, each said actuator having energized and deenergizedstates, each said impactoropera tive between a rest position and an actuatedposition, each said hammer restrained for reciprocal movement between a rest position and a strike po-' sition, said impactor moved from its rest position to' its actuated position when said actuator associated therewith is momentarily in its energized state, said moved impactor momentarily engaging said hammer associated therewith, said engaged hammer moving from its rest position to its strike position and decoupling from said moved impactor, said rnoved impactorreturning to its rest position, said engaged hammer striking the multiple sheet stock and momentarily forcing the multiple sheet stock against one of said raised symbols in said row in registration with said engaged hammer, said hammer returning to its rest position, said raised symbol pressed against the multiple sheet stock being printed on each of the multiple sheets;

e. first sprocket drive means mounted to said housing; I

f. second sprocket drive means mounted to said housing; i I

g. a belt engaging said first and secondsprocket drive means, said belt including sprocket pins adapted for engagement with the sprocket holes in the maltiple sheet stock, the multiple sheet stock forwardly advancing in a path fromsaid first sprocket drive means to said second sprocket drive means when engaged by said belt;

h. a rotating cutting blade operatively connected to said second sprocket drive means, said rotating cutting blade operative to sever the sprocket holes from the multiple sheet stock;

, rotary cutter means mounted to said housing in said path after said second sprocket drive means, said rotatable printing cylinder disposed in said path between said first sprocket drive means and said rotary cutter means. said rotary cutter meansincluding a cylindrical cutter formed with an opening having a substantially concave cutting edge adapted to engage the multiple sheet stock, a cam plate having an eccentric cam track operatively.

cutter being rotated when said cam follower engages said cam track, the multiple sheet stock being severed when engaged by said concave cutting edge; and

j. tension means mounted to said housing in said path after said rotary cutter means. said tension means including first and second rollers disposed at and engaging opposite faces of the multiple sheet stock. said tensionmeans providing tension on the multiple sheet stock and ejecting the printed multiple sheet stock severed by said rotary cutter means from the printer.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US394274 *Jan 30, 1888Dec 11, 1888 Stamping device for cuff blank
US747009 *Dec 29, 1902Dec 15, 1903John Warren SmithPrinting-machine.
US2177675 *Dec 14, 1936Oct 31, 1939Sherman John QPrinting apparatus
US2290871 *Sep 2, 1939Jul 28, 1942 Machine for dispensing tickets
US2533317 *Jul 13, 1946Dec 12, 1950 Tape control device
US2777386 *Feb 27, 1953Jan 15, 1957Xto T The National Cash Register CompanyMultiple item receipt printing
US2824736 *Apr 21, 1955Feb 25, 1958Hobart Mfg CoTicket printer
US3568556 *Jun 2, 1969Mar 9, 1971Hell Rudolf Dr Ing KgShearing device for web strips
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3977319 *Nov 24, 1975Aug 31, 1976Dataproducts CorporationDrum column printer
US3983805 *Oct 6, 1975Oct 5, 1976Mfe CorporationPrinter with sequentially actuated printing means
US4011811 *Oct 20, 1975Mar 15, 1977Di/An Controls, Inc.Multiple document printing system
US4013006 *Jul 9, 1975Mar 22, 1977Burrellco, Inc.Roll-fed sheet printing apparatus
US4057015 *Mar 4, 1976Nov 8, 1977Di/An Controls, Inc.Bar code printing system
US4273043 *Oct 15, 1979Jun 16, 1981Martino Peter VLabel making apparatus
US4422376 *Jan 30, 1981Dec 27, 1983Teraoka Seikosho Co., Ltd.Printing control apparatus for a label printer
US4471977 *May 13, 1982Sep 18, 1984Harris Graphics CorporationFlexible form assembly
US4533269 *Feb 1, 1984Aug 6, 1985Monarch Marking Systems, Inc.Web feed with incremental advance control for a printer
US4815374 *Jul 21, 1986Mar 28, 1989Hubert RemyComputer peripheral for the treatment of data processing documents
US5437512 *Mar 10, 1992Aug 1, 1995Siemens Nixdorf Informationssysteme AktiengesellschaftTransport device for separated sections of a continuous recording substrate from a recording mechanism
US6138569 *Oct 3, 1997Oct 31, 2000General Credit Forms, Inc.Single-ply imprintable receipt and method of imprinting a receipt
US6626096 *Nov 9, 2000Sep 30, 2003Stephen P. Shoemaker, Jr.Redemption ticket maker
WO1992016377A1 *Mar 10, 1992Oct 1, 1992Siemens Nixdorf Informationssysteme AgTransport device for sections of a recording substrate from a printer
Classifications
U.S. Classification101/69, 101/93.28, 101/227, 83/602, 462/55
International ClassificationB41J15/18, B41J15/20, B41J11/70
Cooperative ClassificationB41J11/70, B41J15/20
European ClassificationB41J11/70, B41J15/20
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
May 26, 1992ASAssignment
Owner name: UNION TRUST COMPANY, CONNECTICUT
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:INTEC CORP., A DE CORP.;REEL/FRAME:006127/0278
Effective date: 19920520
May 26, 1992AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: INTEC CORP., A DE CORP.
Owner name: UNION TRUST COMPANY 300 MAIN STREET STAMFORD, CONN
Effective date: 19920520