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Publication numberUS3892003 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 1, 1975
Filing dateMar 16, 1973
Priority dateMar 16, 1973
Also published asCA990019A1, DE2411471A1, DE2411471B2, DE2411471C3, US3979789
Publication numberUS 3892003 A, US 3892003A, US-A-3892003, US3892003 A, US3892003A
InventorsPeabody Ralph C
Original AssigneeTennant Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Power floor treating apparatus
US 3892003 A
Abstract
A floor treating apparatus having improved means for mounting the floor treating member, such as a cylindrical brush or the like, within the apparatus. The floor treating member is mounted within an assembly which is suspended from the main frame by a resilient web, with the resilient web forming the free-floating pivot which impedes transfer of certain vibrational energy from the floor treating member to the main frame, and which also permits the floor treating member to be free-floating in its running contact with the working surface. The mounting assembly for the floor treating member includes a transverse support member with a pair of laterally disposed arms extending from opposed ends thereof, with each of the arms carrying an inwardly extending boss means for supporting and drivingly engaging the floor treating member. Also, one of the laterally disposed arms is laterally flexible so as to permit ease of removal of the floor treating member from the mounting assembly. The apparatus is preferably vacuumized and a separation chamber is provided to remove dust from dust-ladened air, with a filter being provided within the separation chamber, and with the mounting frame for the filter being anchored to the main frame, thereby permitting transfer of certain vibrational energy to the filter to achieve self-cleaning during operation.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Peabody July 1, 1975 POWER FLOOR TREATING APPARATUS mounting the floor treating member, such as a c lin- [75] Inventor Ralphc Peabody Brooklyn Center drical brush or the like, within the apparatus. The Minn floor treating member is mounted within an assembly which is suspended from the main frame by a resilient [73] Assignee: Tennant Company. Minn p i web, with the resilient web forming the free-floating Minn. pivot which impedes transfer of certain vibrational en- [22] Filed Mar 16 1973 ergy from the floor treating member to the main frame, and which also permits the floor treating mem- [2|] Appl. No.: 341,973 her to be free-floating in its running contact with the working surface. The mounting assembly for the floor [52] U S 15/49 15/372, 15/392 treating member includes a transverse support member with a pair of laterally disposed arms extending [51] Int. Cl A47! [1/00 {58] Field Search 15/49 C 82 340 368 from opposed ends thereof, with each of the arms carrying an inwardly extending boss means for supporting and drivingly engaging the floor treating member. Also, one of the laterall dis osed arms is laterall [56] References Clted fl b} y l f h n y exi e so as to permit ease o remova o t e oor UNITED STATES PATENTS treating member from the mounting assembly. The apl,969,805 8/l934 Lang 15/49C X at i preferably vacuumized and a separation 2,859,46l ll/l958 Machovec l5/83 chamber is id to remove dust fI-Om dust 2' 3" et 1 72 1; ladened air, with a filter being provided within the 3'643'276 2H9 "ls/49 C separation chamber, and with the mounting frame for Primary Examiner-Harvey C. Hornsby Assistant ExaminerC. K. Moore [57] ABSTRACT A floor treating apparatus having improved means for the filter being anchored to the main frame, thereby permitting transfer of certain vibrational energy to the filter to achieve self-cleaning during operation.

13 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures P TE ITEH JUL '1 SHEET POWER FLOOR TREATING APPARATUS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates generally to an improved floor treating apparatus, such as a power floor sweeping apparatus, having improved means for mounting the floor treating member within the structure. The apparatus of the present invention provides a mounting arrangement which permits the floor treating member, such as a cylindrical brush, to be freefloating in its running contact with the working surface, and also provides for a significant reduction in the transfer of vibrational energy from the floor treating member to the main frame.

Power driven floor treating apparatus such as power floor sweeper devices are in wide use. These devices find particular utility in cleaning of floors in commercial establishments, such as factories, office buildings, parking ramps and the like. These sweeping devices are normally employed for removal of dust, dirt, as well as other debris from the floor surfaces. Typically, these devices employ a rotating cylindrical brush which is adapted to move large items of debris from the floor or working surface into a debris receiving hopper. in order to reduce the amount of dust raised during the floor treating operation, the housing for the floor treating member is normally vacuumized so as to provide for a controlled flow of dust-ladened air from the housing into a separation chamber. The chamber is vacuumized, with a dust solids-removing filter being interposed within the separation chamber at a point between the housing for the floor treating member and the main vacuum exhaust. Also, in order to reduce the quantity of dust being raised in the ambient, seal means are pro vided to assist in isolating the housing for the floor treating member from the ambient.

In the normal operation and servicing of floor treating apparatus, particularly floor sweeping devices employing a rotating cylindrical brush, it is frequently necessary to remove the brush from the assembly. in certain devices of this type, brush removal is achieved only with a certain degree of difficulty, however, the apparatus of the present invention provides a structure permitting removal of the floor treating member from the assembly with relative ease.

As has been indicated, rotation of the floor treating member is required in order to achieve the desired results. For example, rotation of the cylindrical brush is necessary for removing debris from the floor surface. At the present time, most floor treating devices employ a mounting system for the brush or other implement which is at a fixed elevation relative to the working sur face. In accordance with the apparatus of the present invention, however, the floor treating member or implement is arranged to be freefloating in its running contact with that surface, thus providing for enhanced treatment. Also, the floor treating member or implement such as a cylindrical brush is mounted within an assembly which is suspended from the main frame by a resilient flexible, but non-stretchable web, this web partially absorbing and thus impeding the transfer of certain vibrational energy from the floor treating member to the main frame. It has been found that this impedance of transfer of energy from the floor treating member is desirable for the operator.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In accordance with the present invention, a floor treating apparatus is provided having improved means for mounting the floor treating member or implement, such as a cylindrical brush or the like. The floor treating member is mounted within an assembly which is suspended from the main frame by a resilient flexible, but non-stretchable web, with the resilient web forming a free-floating pivot permitting the floor treating member to be free-floating in its running contact with the working surface. Briefly, the floor treating member mounting assembly includes a transverse support member with a pair of laterally disposed arms extending from the opposed ends thereof, and with each of the arms having an inwardly extending boss means for receiving and drivingly engaging the floor treating member. While both of the laterally disposed arms are longitudinally rigid, one of the arms is laterally flexible so as to permit ease of spreading of the arms for removal of the floor treating member from the mounting assembly. A separation chamber is preferably provided to remove dust from dustladened air, and a filter is provided within the separation chamber, with the mounting frame for the filter being anchored to the main frame. Also, means are provided to enable the operator to gain easy access to the interior of the separation chamber to provide for removal or cleaning of the filter surface.

Therefore, it is a primary object of the present invention to provide an improved means for mounting a floor treating member or implement such as a cylindrical brush within the structure of a floor treating apparatus.

it is a further object of the present invention to provide an improved power floor sweeping apparatus which employs a mounting means for the brush which permits freefloating of the brush in its running contact with the working surface.

It is yet a further object of the present invention to provide an improved power floor sweeping apparatus having means for mounting a cylindrical brush which facilitate simple straightforward removal of the floor treating member from the apparatus.

it is yet a further object of the present invention to provide a floor treating apparatus having improved means for mounting the floor treating member to the structure, with this mounting arrangement utilizing a resilient web to suspend the floor treating member from the main frame by a resilient web so as to reduce the transfer of certain vibrational energy from the floor treating member to the main frame.

Other and further objects of the present invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art upon a study of the following specification, appended claims, and accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRlPTlON OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a side elevational view, of the improved floor treating apparatus of the present invention in the form of a floor sweeping apparatus, with portions of the housing being cut away so as to illustrate details of the brush enclosure;

FIG. 2 is a detail sectional view taken along the line and in the direction of the arrows 2-2 of FIG. 1 and illustrating, partially in phantom, the manner in which brush removal is accomplished;

FIG. 3 is a vertical sectional view of the floor sweeping apparatus as illustrated in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary side elevational view, partially broken away and partially in section, illustrating details of the brush suspension and drive system;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary side elevational view, partially broken away and partially in section, and illustrating the drive means for delivering power to the drive wheel of the apparatus;

FIG. 6 is a vertical sectional view of the floor sweeping apparatus as illustrated in FIG. 1, and showing the solid-air separation chamber in opened disposition in solid line, and in closed disposition in phantom, with this view being taken generally along the central axis of the device;

FIG. 7 is a vertical sectional view taken along the line and in the direction of arrows 7--7 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 8 is a detail sectional view taken along the lien and in the direction of the arrows 88 of FIG. 6, and illustrating the manner in which the filter structure is mounted within the confines of the solid-air separation chamber; and

FIG. 9 is a detail vertical sectional view taken along the line and in the direction of the arrows 99 of FIG. 8, and illustrating the details of the seal device which is utilized to retain the filter assembly in position within the solid-air separation chamber.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT In accordance with the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the floor sweeping apparatus generally designated 10 includes a frame means 11 in the form of a structural housing including a top panel 12, a front panel I3, a rear panel 14, and a pair of laterally opposed side panels 15 and 16. The housing further is arranged to receive a removable debris receiving hopper 17, as is illustrated in FIG. 6. The hopper is appropriately sealed into contact with the remaining portions of the structure, as is apparent from the showing in FIG. 6. A control handle 18 is provided, with handle 18 having a pair of laterally disposed arms 18A and 18B secured to top panel 12 (FIG. 3) of the frame means 11, and with a gripping section being provided as at 18C (FIG. 1). The support wheels include a pair of forwardly disposed castors l9 and 20, and a rearwardly disposed drive wheel 21. The forwardly disposed castors are adapted for rotation, as is conventional by means of mounting plate or post as at 22, the castors being secured to a main support plate 23, as indicated in FIG. 1. Rear drive wheel 21 is mounted for rotation on axle shaft 25, with power being delivered to drive wheel 21 by means of a drive assembly to be described in further detail hereinafter. As is apparent in the showing in FIG. 3, drive wheel 21 is offset from the central axis of the structure so as to provide for a proper balance in the device. The concentration of weight due to the location of motor 60 and other heavy components render the off-setting of wheel 21 desirable.

As is apparent from the drawings, the apparatus includes a floor treating means or implement in the form of a cylindrical brush 27 which is journaled for axial rotation within the frame means. The details of the mounting of the cylindrical brush 27 which functions as in implement suspension means are best illustrated in FIGS. 2, 3 and 4, it being noted that the cylindrical brush 27 includes a core 28 which is arranged to receive the hubs 29 and 30 therewithin, with hub 29 preferably being positively engaged within core 28 to provide for positive driving of brush 27. A key or a radial extending rib may be employed if desired with a matching receiving slot being formed in the brush core. For reduction of friction, the core engaging portion of boss 30 is preferably hexagonal. As is apparent in the illustrations of FIGS. 2 and 3, hubs 29 and 30 are arranged along a common axis and support cylindrical brush 27. In order to provide for freedom of rotation of hubs 29 and 30, journal bearings are provided in the mounts as at 31. Also, as is apparent in FIGS. 2 and 3, hubs 29 and 30 are supported on laterally disposed mounting bracket 32 and arm 33. Support fro bracket 32 and arm 33 is obtained from plate 34 which is hingedly secured to frame plate extension 35 as at 36 and 37, plate 34 thus being a transverse support member for bracket 32 and arm 33. Hinge elements 36 and 37 utilize a flexible coupling web such as a web of polypropylene as is illustrated at 38, this web providing hinged support or coupling between plates 34 and 35 and thus permitting free-floating of brush 27 while in use. The flexible web support provides a free-floating support about a support axis". This suspension system has been found to reduce the amount of vibratory energy which is transferred from the rotating cylindrical brush 27 to the remaining portions of the frame.

As is apparent in the drawings. the brush enclosure includes a forward wall such as wall 13, a rear wall at 40, and opposed side walls 15 and 16. A receiving port for air suspended dust or debris is formed in wall 40 as at 41, and a conduit 42 extends from the brush receiving enclosure 43 to the air suspended dust receiving chamber or enclosure generally designated at 44. The air suspended dust receiving chamber 44 acts as a solidair separating chamber with filter 45 being employed to separate the incoming portion of the chamber as at 46 from the discharge portion of the chamber as at 47. Exhaust conduit 48 extends from chamber segment 47 to exhaust port 49 which communicates with ambient. Impeller 50 housed within casing 51 is utilized to generate fluid flow from the enclosure 43 to the air suspended dust receiving chamber 44. Impeller 50 is mounted on shaft 52, with rotational energy being delivered to the impeller by means of belt 53 driving pulley S4, pulley 54 being fast on shaft 52. Suitable journal bearings are provided as illustrated in FIG. 2 of the drawings. Belt 53 is driven from output or counter-shaft 61 which is coupled to the drive shaft 60A of motor 60, through belt 608 and pulleys 60C and GOD. The housing for the floor treating means is preferably vacuumized. The reduction of pressure within this housing reduces the quantity of dust which is raised in the working area, and is accordingly normally preferred for apparatus of this type.

Attention is now directed to FIGS. 2, 3 and 4 of the drawings for a discussion of the suspension and support system for the rotating brush assembly. As is apparent in this view, arm 33 supports hub 30 which, in turn, is received within the core of cylindrical brush 27. The axial height of brush 27 when raised for transport or other reasons is adjustably controlled by means of threaded control shaft 55 which engages internally threaded coupling 56, and which is provided with a support step or collar as at 57 for engaging a key-hole opening in frame or housing top panel 12. Key-hole bore is formed in top panel 12 as at 58 for receiving the shank of member 55. The phantom view of lever 55 (FIG. 4) is provided to illustrate the free-floating lower or running disposition of cylindrical brush 27, as is also illustrated in phantom in FIG. 4. As is apparent, the solid lines of FIG. 4 indicate the disposition of the brush when in transport position.

Motor 60 is provided in order to deliver power for imparting axial rotation to the cylindrical brush 27. The drive shaft 60A of motor 60 drives output or countershaft 61 (FIG. 4) through a belt with brush drive pulley 62 being fast on shaft 61. Belt 63 is utilized to deliver power to pulley 64 which is, in turn, fast on shaft 29A of hub 29. Idler pulley 66 is provided for maintaining desired tension in belt 63, with idler 66 being mounted on link 67 which is pivotally secured to the frame on shaft 68. Adjustable spring member 69 has one end coupled to link 67, with its other end being secured to the frame. A second spring is shown at 70 for maintaining or regulating the amount of down-pressure on brush 27. Spring 70 has its forward end secured to support plate 34, with its rearward end being adjustably coupled to the frame through eye-bolt 71. The position of eye-bolt 71 is determined by wing nut 72. As is apparent from the description in FIG. 4, the torque delivered to pulley 64 by belt 63 applies an upwardly directed force on arms 32 and 33, thus tending to lift brush 27 modestly in response to increases in rotational resistance between the brush and the surface being worked.

Attention is now directed to FIGS. 5 and 7 of the drawings for an illustration of the drive means. Drive wheel 21 is driven from shaft 61 by means of pulley 74, pulley 74 being fast on shaft 61, with belt 75 engaging pulleys 74 and 76. Adjustable idler pulley 77 is mounted for rotation on a shaft secured to crank arm 78, arm 78 being secured to bracket 80. Bracket 80 and arm 78 are pivotally secured to pin 81. Bifurcated coupling 82 is provided on cable 83 for controlling the disposition of idler 77 and the ultimate tension in belt 75. In the position illustrated in FIG. 5, the arrangement is in drive" disposition, and counter-clockwise motion of bracket 80 about pivot pin 81 will reduce tension in drive belt 75, thus permitting the unit to rest with the engine at idle.

Attention is now directed to the details of the sealing means illustrated in FIGS. 3 and 6. Skirt means generally designated 85 are provided, and are coupled to the wall means at the rear of chamber 43. Skirt means 85, which isolate enclosure 43 from the ambient, include first and second tandomly arranged spaced apart sealing elements 86 and 87. These sealing elements 86 and 87 are cooperatively arranged to form a seal pair and define a sealing chamber 88 therebetween. A pair of vents are provided as at 89 and 90 for providing gaseous fluid communication between the chamber 43 and the sealing chamber 88. The combined area of vents 89 and 90 is preferably substantially equal to the area of port 41. As is apparent in the drawings, vents 89 and 90 are preferably spaced apart and disposed generally adjacent the opposed side walls and 16 of chamber 43. Also, these vents are formed in the skirt which is adjacent that portion of the brush which, in its normal running disposition, forces debris thereagainst.

In addition to the seal means 86 and 87, a further forward seal is provided as at 93 for providing further isolation of the chamber 43 from ambient, seal means 93 also providing a gasket for debris receiving hopper 17. An upper forward seal is shown at 93A, this sea] performing a similar gasketing function. Lateral seals are 6 also provided such as those illustrated at 94 and 95 in FIG. 3.

Particular attention is now directed to FIG. 2 of the drawings for a detailed discussion of the manner in which brush 27 may be removed from the assembly. As has been previously indicated, brush 27 is provided with a core 28 which is received on hubs 29 and 30 of the opposed bosses. Arm 33 is resilient and is inwardly biased so as to firmly engage and retain brush 27 in operating disposition. For removal of brush 27, the operator will press arm 33 outwardly, as is illustrated in phantom in FIG. 2, so as to disengage the surface of hub or boss 30 from the core 28 of brush 27, thereby permitting the brush to be dropped.

While the structure has been illustrated as being provided with a gasoline engine 60, it will be appreciated that alternate forms of power may be provided such as by electrical motor means or the like.

In the air suspended dust receiving chamber 44, hinge means are provided as at 97 for enabling the operator to open the chamber and remove accumulated debris therefrom. A lock is provided as at 98 to ensure closure of chamber wall 99 when the unit is in operation. As is apparent in the drawings, filter 45 is received within the confines of a gasketed perimeter as at 100 (FIG. 9), with the gasket employing a pair of generally parallelly disposed lips 101 and 102 for making contact with the outer periphery 103 of filter 45. It has been found that the positioning of filter 45 within the confines of arms 18A and 18B of handle 18 enhances the delivery of vibratory energy to the filter, and thus tends to render it self-cleaning while the unit is in operation.

Hopper 17 is also removable from the assembly. Large items of debris collected in hopper 17 are conveniently transported to a suitable place of disposal, with hopper 17 being removed by either upward lifting from the structure, or by a counter-clockwise pivotal motion of hopper 17 about end portions 17A of gripping rod 178.

For purposes of operating stability, while the three support wheels including castors 19 and 20 and drive wheel 21 are generally sufficient, additional support may be made available to the structure by means of elevated castors or support wheels 105 and 106. These units may assist in preventing the unit from tipping sufficiently far from its normal running disposition so as to protect the integrity of seals 86 and 87.

The materials of construction to be utilized for the device are conventional. For example, seals 86 and 87 are preferably that of reinforced rubber or the like. Such seal material is, of course, commercially available and any of a variety of resilient flexible materials may be employed for this purpose. The polypropylene web for the suspension system is preferably a A; inch web with a total web length of about 8 inches being sufficient for most conventional machines with brushes of up to 21 or 24 inch length. The frame is preferably fabricated from conventional steel with sheet metal or the like being used for the housing members.

I claim:

1. Floor maintenance apparatus having a floor treating means operatively coupled thereto and comprising, in combination:

a. rigid frame means having support wheels coupled thereto, a power source mounted on said frame means and having a powered output shaft, and with at least one of said support wheels being drivingly coupled to said power source;

b. implement suspension means coupled to said frame means for joumably supporting said floor treating means within said frame, said suspension means including a transverse support member having first and second generally longitudinally extending laterally disposed arms secured thereto, each arm terminating in an outwardly disposed free end and being disposed adjacent said opposed side walls;

c. pivotal mounting means coupling said transverse support member to said frame means and arranged to suspend said transverse support member in free dependent disposition for swinging movement about a support axis extending generally across said frame means;

d. said first laterally disposed arm being generally rigid and having bearing means mounted adjacent the free end thereof, said second laterally disposed arm being longitudinally rigid and laterally flexible and having bearing means mounted adjacent the free end thereof and being normally resiliently biased toward said first arm to a normal disposition spaced a certain first predetermined distance from said first arm, each of said bearing means having inwardly extending boss means;

e. said floor treating means being drivingly coupled to said power source and being of generally cylindrical configuration with an axially extending core means forming an opening at opposed ends thereof for receiving said boss means in driving engagemerit therewith, said floor treating means having an axial length which exceeds said first predetermined distance;

f. said second laterally disposed arm being arranged for outward flexure to permit removal of said boss means from one end of the core of said floor treating means.

2. The floor maintenance apparatus as defined in claim 1 being particularly characterized in that said pivotal mounting means includes a generally flexible resiliently compressible coupling web secured between said frame means and said transverse support member for suspension support of said transverse support member.

3. The floor maintenance apparatus as defined in claim 2 being particularly characterized in that said pivotal mounting means arranges said transverse support member and said longitudinally extending laterally disposed arms for free-floating suspension about said support axis.

4. The floor maintenance apparatus as defined in claim 3 being particularly characterized in that said floor treating means is a cylindrical brush with the periphery being arranged for free-floating contact with the surface being treated.

S. The floor maintenance apparatus as defined in claim 4 being particularly characterized in that said frame means has sea] means coupled thereto for isolating said floor treating means from the ambience.

6. The floor maintenance apparatus as defined in claim 1 being particularly characterized in that resilient means are anchored to said frame means and coupled to said transverse support member and arranged to apply a bias force to pivot the free ends of said longitudinally extending laterally disposed arms downwardly.

7. The floor maintenance apparatus as defined in claim 6 being particularly characterized in that adjustable means are provided for said resilient means and being arranged to apply an adjustable bias force to said longitudinally extending arms.

8. The floor maintenance apparatus as defined in claim 1 being particularly characterized in that increases in the delivery of power elevating said boss means applies an upwardly directed force to said floor treating means for lifting said brush upwardly in re sponse to increases in drag load thereon.

9. The floor maintenance apparatus as defined in claim 8 being particularly characterized in that means are provided for releasably elevatinng and retaining said floor treating means to a non-contacting disposition to the surface being worked.

10. The floor maintenance apparatus as defined in claim 1 being particularly characterized in that said floor treating means is a cylindrical brush.

11. The floor maintenance apparatus as defined in claim 3 being particularly characterized in that three support wheels are provided for said frame means, said support wheels including two forward castor wheels and one rearwardly axially fixed drive wheel.

12. The floor maintenance apparatus as defined in claim 11 being particularly characterized in that said rearwardly axially fixed drive wheel is offset from the central axis of said frame means.

13. The floor maintenance apparatus as defined in claim 1 being particularly characterized in that means are provided for controllably interrupting the delivery of power to the support wheel which is drivingly coupled to the power source.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION PATENT NO. 3,892,0(13

DATED July 1, 1975 INVENTORK'S) 3 Ralph C. Peabody it is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

Column 3, line 16, "lien" should read line Column 4, line 12, "fro' should read for Column 8, Claim 6, change the dependency from "1" to 2 Claim 8, change the dependency from "1" to 2 Claim 9, elevatinng should read elevating Claim 11, change the dependency from "3 to l0 Signed and Scaled this ninth Day Of September1975 [SEAL] A ttesr:

RUTH C. MRSON C. MARSHALL DANN Arresting Officer (nmrm'ssirmvr uflarvms and Trademarks

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US5152027 *Apr 2, 1990Oct 6, 1992Shop-Vac CorporationIndustrial sweeper
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US5974622 *May 8, 1998Nov 2, 1999The Hoover CompanyTransmission neutral locking arrangement for a self-propelled vacuum cleaner
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US6131238 *May 8, 1998Oct 17, 2000The Hoover CompanySelf-propelled upright vacuum cleaner with offset agitator and motor pivot points
US6324714 *Nov 7, 2000Dec 4, 2001Alfred Kaercher Gmbh & Co.Sweeping machine
US6505371 *Jan 17, 2002Jan 14, 2003Alfred Kaercher Gmbh & Co.Sweeper
US6934993 *Jul 2, 2002Aug 30, 2005Bissell Homecare, Inc.Extraction cleaning machine with agitation brushes
US8245345Oct 5, 2007Aug 21, 2012Karcher North America, Inc.Floor treatment apparatus
US8302240Jul 29, 2009Nov 6, 2012Karcher North America, Inc.Selectively adjustable steering mechanism for use on a floor cleaning machine
US8402601 *Jan 23, 2008Mar 26, 2013AB ElectronluxVacuum cleaner nozzle
US8438685Jul 20, 2012May 14, 2013Karcher North America, Inc.Floor treatment apparatus
US8528142May 6, 2013Sep 10, 2013Karcher North America, Inc.Floor treatment apparatus
US8678883 *Jan 18, 2008Mar 25, 2014Onfloor Technologies, L.L.C.Riding apparatus for polishing and cleaning floor surfaces
US8720001Apr 25, 2005May 13, 2014Dyson Technology LimitedTool for a surface treating appliance
US20100218339 *Jan 23, 2008Sep 2, 2010Fahlstroem JohanVacuum Cleaner Nozzle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification15/52.1, 15/392, 15/372
International ClassificationA47L11/24, A47L11/00, E01H1/08, E01H1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47L11/4055, A47L11/4069, A47L11/24, A47L11/4027, A47L11/4052, A47L11/4041, A47L11/4077
European ClassificationA47L11/40J4, A47L11/40G, A47L11/40G2, A47L11/40E, A47L11/40F4, A47L11/40M, A47L11/24