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Publication numberUS3892220 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 1, 1975
Filing dateDec 28, 1973
Priority dateDec 28, 1973
Publication numberUS 3892220 A, US 3892220A, US-A-3892220, US3892220 A, US3892220A
InventorsFranz Dennis L
Original AssigneeFranz Dennis L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rotary valve
US 3892220 A
Abstract
A rotary valve has a rotor unit having ports for communication between the intake and the cylinders and the exhaust and the cylinders of a four-cycle, internal combustion engine. The rotor unit has a substantial internal cooling cavity which is connected for circulating liquid coolant with inner and outer hollow shafts on which the rotor unit is secured. The rotor unit has a pair of replaceable rings spaced from the cylindrical surface of the rotor unit which is exposed to heat and fire from the combustion chamber. The rings are supported for rotation of the rotary valve in upper and lower replaceable valve seats which are secured to the lower portion of a split head in which the rotary valve is positioned. The gases are sealed in the rotor unit by side seats which are lubricated through oil grooves in the upper valve seat when grooves on the outer shoulders of the rings are adjacent the oil grooves in the upper valve seat.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Franz July 1, 1975 1 ROTARY VALVE 747,540 4/1956 United Kingdom .1 123/190191) [76] Inventor: Dennis L. Franz, Rt. 1, Box ll98-B,

Selah, Wash. 98942 Primary ExaminerCharles .l. Myhre [22] led Dec 28 3 Assistant Examiner.lames D. Liles 5 [2|] Appl. No.. 429,357 ABSTRACT [52] QL "123/190 2390 2390 A rotary valve has a rotor unit having ports for com- [23/190 munication between the intake and the cylinders and [5 H Int Cl F0" 7H6 the exhaust and the cylinders of a four-cycle, internal [58] Field 90 B combustion engine. The rotor unit has a substantial EH90 CA 6 R 190 internal cooling cavity which is connected for circulating liquid coolant with inner and outer hollow shafts 123/80 80 BB on which the rotor unit is secured. The rotor unit has [56] Reerences Cited a pair of replaceable rings spaced from the cylindrical surface of the rotor unit which is exposed to heat and UNITED STATES PATENTS fire from the combustion chamber. The rings are sup- 1,l51,499 8/1915 Schutte 123/190 BB ported f ion of the rotary valve in upper and 167313 123/80 lower replaceable valve seats which are secured to the zg k lower portion of a split head in which the rotary valve 41922 f zi 123]90 ED is positioned. The gases are sealed in the rotor unit by I 6l6 O22 2/1927 aarkeruijiiijj: ".1: 123/190 BD Side seats which are lubricated through grooves in 2:401:63] 6/1946 Gernandt 1. 123/190 BL X the "PP j Seat f grooves the 2,459,936 1/1949 Hasleret al. 123/190 E x; ders of the g are adiacem the grooves the 5/1930 ltaly 123/190 BB- upper valve seat.

18 Claims, l8 Drawing Figures PMEHTERJUU SHEET IlllllllH lllllflllll ROTARY VALVE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to internal combustion engines and more particularly to rotating valves for controlling the intake and exhaust to the cylinders of four-cycle internal combustion engines.

Significant advantages flow from the use of rotary valves instead of reciprocating valves in internal combustion engines. The valve stems, push rods, rocker arms, springs and camming arrangements associated with reciprocating valves are eliminated in favor of a rotating element of simple construction and very few moving parts.

However, rotary valves of known design have suffered from one or more problems which have limited their effectiveness drastically in actual use. These are the problems of cooling, sealing, lubrication and corrosion and resulting wear.

Certain rotary valve designs, when applied to a fourcycle engine soon become unworkable because inadequate provision is made for internal cooling of the valve unit, which becomes overheated and expands and binds.

In other valve designs, improper provision for lubrication allows lubricating oil to enter the combustion chamber. Improper lubrication and resulting corrosion causes rotary valves to deteriorate and lose their seal. Corrosion of the bearing surface of the valve rotor unit is often the pitfall. Corrosion is often appreciably enhanced because rotating valve surfaces, which are exposed to the heat and fire in the combustion chamber will also contact bearing and sealing surfaces, such as the valve seats. The portions exposed to the combustion will corrode and pit in a short time ruining the bearing and sealing surfaces with which they contact and the bearing and sealing of the valve. These problems are compounded in prior valve devices because the valve seats are often difficult to replace or not replaceable at all, in which case the entire head must be replaced in the event of overhaul.

Another critical problem of known rotary valves relates to inadequate sealing of the rotor parts in and between the various cylinders. Improper sealing between cylinders. when not inherent in the original design, develops through corrosion and abrasion of the parts.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a rotary valve system which solves the problems of cooling, sealing, lubrication and corrosion and wear.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a rotary valve system applicable to a four-cycle internal combustion engine.

It is another object of this invention to provide a rotary valve system having advantageous sealing and lubrication features uniquely suitable to acheiving long life in an internal combustion engine.

A further object of this invention 05 to provide a rotary valve unit in which the surfaces of the valve which become pitted and corroded by being exposed to the heat and fires of combustion are isolated from the bearing and gas sealing surfaces of the rotary unit.

These objectives are accomplished in the present invention by the utilization of a shaft comprised ofa pair of hollow shafts, spaced apart one within the other, to

which the valve rotors are secured. The double hollow shaft is positioned in a longitudinal groove at the inter face of upper and lower portions of a split head. The double hollow shaft ensures proper circulation of coolant through all portions of the rotor. The coolant enters the inner shaft from a coolant cavity in the lower portion of the split head, circulates into and through a substantial cavity in each rotor unit via small connecting pipes between the inner shaft and the rotor unit cavities and discharges to a coolant cavity in the upper portion of the head through the outer shaft.

In many known rotary valves the sealing is on the horizontal plane and as a result, the rubbing of the rotor surface against the valve seat has drawn the lubrication oil into the combustion chamber.

In the present invention, gaseous sealing is effected on the vertical plane and the rubbing surface of the valve rotor unit against the side sealing seat in the vertical plane does not draw the oil into the combustion chamber. Moreover, the area of the valve surface which is exposed to the combustion chamber does not touch the bearing and sealing surfaces. Thus, the corrosion on the exposed surfaces will not rub and bind against bearing and sealing surfaces in the horizontal plane.

A pair of replaceable rings fit each end of each cylindrical rotor unit which, together with annular bearing surfaces in replaceable upper and lower valve seats, serve as bearing surfaces for the rotor, as seals in the horizontal plane for gases within the rotor unit, as platforms for lubrication of the bearing surfaces of the rotor and as easily replaceable wear surfaces. The problem of pitting and corrosion of the valve unit is solved by the rings, which hold the surfaces exposed to the heat and fire of the combustion chamber a small distance away from contact with the surfaces of the valve seats.

Gases are sealed within the rotor unit in the vertical plane by a pair of vertical side seats which provide sealing surfaces against the sides of the rotor unit.

Oil under pressure enters annular lubricating grooves in the annular bearing surfaces of the upper and lower valve seats which support the rotor rings for rotation of the entire valve rotor. The oil from these bearing grooves enters side grooves at the top of the upper valve seat, proceeds at small distance towards the outside of the valve seats and then enters a pressure groove near the top of the side seats to lubricate the sealing surfaces of the side seats and the sides of the rotor units. The oil proceeds down this pressure groove to the bottom of the side seat.

Each ring has a small groove on its outer shoulder which commences at the trailing edge of the intake and exhaust ports and runs for l57.5 around the ring, and is absent for the remaining 202.5". While the groove is adjacent the small side groove in the upper valve seat, oil will flow, under pressure, through the side groove into the pressure groove in the side seat at its top, as just described. But, during the 202.5", while the groove is not adjacent the small side groove, the shoulder of the ring blocks the side groove and prevents oil from entering the side seat pressure groove and from entering the combustion chamber under pressure while the intake or exhaust port in the rotor unit is opposite the side seat pressure grooves. In this way the oil is kept out of the combustion chamber intake or exhaust.

Thus, the rotor rings, grooved at their outer shoulders, act as rotary valves themselves for controlling the flow of oil to the sealing surfaces on the side seats and rotor unit sides.

As the rotor turns, the trailing edges of the intake and exhaust ports in the sides of the rotor unit, which are bevelled, act as wedges to hold the oil against the side seat.

A collection groove in the side seat spaced from the pressure groove in the direction of rotation of the rotor unit, collects the lubricating oil as the rotor unit turns and returns it to the engine.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIGURES In the Drawings:

FIG. I is an exploded schematic representation of a rotary valve system according to the invention.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a rotor ring.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the central portion of a rotor unit.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a rotor unit, partly shown, in section.

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of rotor shaft and rotor unit, shown assembled.

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of a rotor shaft shown partly in section.

FIG. 7 is a plan view of a lower portion of a split engine head.

FIGS. 8 through 10 are plan, center sectional and side views of a lower valve seat.

FIG. 11 is a plan view of a split side seat.

FIG. 12 is a plan view of an installation clip.

FIGS. I3 through I5 are plan, center sectional and side views of an upper valve seat.

FIG. 16 is a view looking up into an upper portion of a split engine head.

FIG. 17 is a partial sectional view through the rotary valve and valve seat assembly.

FIG. 18 is a representational view of the side of a rotor unit showing the location of the intake and exhaust ports in accordance with the firing order of the cylinders when the rotary valve according to the invention is employed in an eight cylinder, four-stroke internal combustion engine.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE ILLUSTRATED EMBODIMENT Referring to FIGS. 1 and 17. a rotor. shown generally as 10, is positioned to rotate at its rotor appendages or units 14 in upper valve seats 11 and lower valve seats 12 and between side seats 16 secured in an upper head portion 13 and lower head portion of a four-cycle internal combustion engine. The rotor units 14 are secured to and spaced along a shaft 17 in alignment with the cylinders of the engine (not shown). It is understood that the lower head 15 is fastened upon an engine block containing cylinders and other engine parts, which do not form part of this invention.

Referring to FIGS. 2 through 6, the principle unit of the rotary valve is the rotor 10. The rotor shaft 17 contains two hollow concentric shafts 18, 19 one inside the other which are connected to the hollow interior 20 of the rotor unit 14 by small connecting pipes 21 and holes 22 respectively. The connecting pipes 21 and holes 22 are provided one for each rotor unit I4 and cylinder of the engine. The outer shaft 19 is kept spaced from but connected with the inner shaft 18 by a pair of rings 53, 56 at each end of the shaft 17 fixed against end rods 52. A hole 54 passes through the ring 53 and into the inner shaft 18 at one end. Another hole 55 passes through the ring 56 and into the space 57 between the inner shaft I8 and the outer shaft 19 at the other end of the shaft 17. The ring 56 at this end is not fitted upon the inner shaft 18 but is spaced therefrom.

The rotor contains a round rotor unit 14 for each cylinder. Each rotor unit 14 has two ports 23, for intake and exhaust of gases to and from the cylinders. These ports are of wedge shape and of 45 in angle. Because the rotor turns at one half the revolutions per minute of the crankshaft and the rotor must turn for each stroke of the piston, ports 23 have a 45 angle.

As stated above, rotor unit 14 contains two ports 23, one for the exhaust opening and one for the intake opening. The center of the intake opening is 90 behind the center of the exhaust opening. Considering a 45 opening for each wedge-shaped port, as the piston completes its exhaust stroke and the exhaust port in the rotor is closed, the intake port opens and the piston begins its intake stroke. The trailing edge 24 of each wedge-shaped port 23 is bevelled for lubrication purposes as explained later. Although ports 23 have been described with reference to this specific embodiment, there is considerable flexibility in design of these ports as to size, shape, and aerodynamic quality and number desired.

Each rotor unit I4 has two rotor rings 25 and between these rings on surface 26 rotor unit 14 is exposed to the combustion violence as it occurs in the burning process. Because of the corrosive effects on the surface 26 of the rotor unit, this surface 26 is designed not to touch the valve seats ll, 12 as the rotor unit 14 turns and is machined a bit smaller than the diameter of the valve seats. Each rotor ring 25 located on either side of the rotor unit provides a bearing surface for the rotors. Each ring also acts as a gas seal. The rotor ring 25 is locked to rotate with the rotor by conventional means, including welding, notching, press-fitting and squeeze or expandable pins.

The rotor ring 25 is circular in nature and is of sufficient thickness and width to insure against any cracking or breakage at any point. The thickness and width are also selected to satisfy the requirement as to the proper amount of gases intended to pass to and from the combustion chamber.

Each ring 25, two for each rotor unit 14, contains a small oil groove 27 on its outer side of a length equal to the angle of l57.5 around the ring. This groove 27 along with its absence in the remaining 202.5 allows oil under pressure to enter a pressure groove in the side seats 16 to lubricate the sides of the rotor unit I4 and ring 25 with the inner surface of the side seats, as will be more fully described. The groove 27 is limited to l57.5 of arc to stop the oil pressure in the side seat 16 pressure groove when the port 23 in the rotor unit is opposite this pressure groove. This prevents oil from entering the combustion chamber or exhaust manifold while giving proper lubrication.

The two rings 25 on each rotor unit 14 are placed surrounding the rotor on either side and are placed flush with the sides of the rotor unit. The position of the oil groove 27 in the ring 25 has one end 31 of the groove 27 placed opposite to the trailing edge 24 of the port 23 in the rotor. This position assures proper timing of oil pressure in the pressure groove of the side seat 16.

The rotary valve ring 25 serves several functions used in conjunction with the rotary unit 14. These functions are:

I. To serve as a bearing surface between the rotating rotor unit 14 and the valve seats, 11, 12.

2. To serve as a seal between the combustion chamber and the intake and exhaust ports of the head.

3. To serve as a lubrication platform for the bearing surfaces of the rotor as well as acting as a rotary valve itself for lubrication of the side seat or pressure plate 16 through the use of an oil groove 27 on the side of the ring.

4. To serve as a replaceable wearing surface.

5. To hold the surface 26 of the rotor a very small distance away from the valve seats, 11, 12. This prevents wear on the rotor and is one factor in preventing the rotor unit 14 from seizing and binding due to the small corrosive effects on the surface 26 from the exposure to the explosive fire in the combustion chamber.

Each rotor unit 14 has a hollow interior 20 for cooling purposes. The rotor unit can be turned by several alternatives, such as, a timing chain, a timing belt or a gear train.

Referring to FIG. 7, which is a view of the lower portion 15 of the split head, the shaft 17 is arranged to rotate in longitudinal circular groove 30, one half of which is shown in this view, the other half of which is in the upper portion 13 of the split head. The shaft 17 is not supported by the groove 30, directly or by bearing means. The bearing support for the rotor is provided by the rotor rings 25. The seals may be the customary seals for this purpose such as half felt or neoprene seals.

There are several seals around the rotor shaft 17 in the groove 30. Coolant seals. two on each end of the shaft connect the coolant to the lower head with the shaft for the internal cooling function. These seals (not shown) are positioned on the shaft to fit into annular grooves 28 in the head. Seals between the cylinders confine leakage of gases around the shaft to that particular function of the side of the cylinder on which the leakage occurs, be it intake or exhaust. The seals (72 in FIG. 17) are positioned to fit into annular grooves 29.

Referring to FIGS. 7 through 10, the following is the description of the lower head 15. The lower head is cooled by coolant traveling through cooling ducts 32. The lower head has one oil line 33 traveling its length, and also has connecting oil holes 34 positioned under the lower valve seat 12 and in the cavity 35 provided therefor and oil return holes 36 at the sides of the cavity 35 positioned under the side seats 16. Connecting oil holes 34 align with mating oil holes 37 in the lower valve seat 12. Oil return holes 36 align with mating oil return holes 71 in the side seat 16. There are two intake ports 38 on one side of the lower head. These two intake ports 38 are for four cylinders, each port being in between two cylinders. The intake ports 38 are located as close to the block as possible. The lower head has six exhaust ports 39 and three exhaust ducts 40, which extend straight through the lower head. Three exhaust ports are located on one side and three exhaust ports 39 are located on the other side. In each valve seat cavity 35, the lower head has four threaded holes 41 for each set of valve seats, both upper and lower seats, I 1, 12. Holes 42 are provided for the stud bolts that bolt the lower head onto the block.

A square hole 43, is provided at the depressed middle of the cavity 35 for each cylinder in the lower head for the passage of intake and exhaust gases. A head gasket (not shown) is positioned between the lower head 15 and the block and the intake manifold and exhaust manifold are bolted to the lower head.

The lower head 15 holds the lower valve seats 12. These seats are of a general shape ofa half cylinder of I". They have two bearing surface grooves 44 in which the rotor rings 25 turn and are supported, in turn supporting the entire rotor 10 and providing sealing for the rotor unit 14 at the rotor rings 25. The central portion 47 of the valve seat 12 is raised above the bearing surface grooves and is positioned closely to the central portion 26 on the rotor unit. The bearing surface 44 is thus separated from the central portion 26 of the rotor 14 which becomes pitted and corroded in use. The bearing surface 44 is spared the abrasive effect of contact with the central rotor portion. The horizontal bearing and sealing between the rotor and the valve seat occurs at the bearing surface groove 44, which is separated from the central rotor portion 26 by the shoulder on the central valve seat portion 47. The slight separation between the central rotor portion 26 and the central valve seat portion 47 allows gases to enter the space between the rotor unit 14 and the upper and lower valve seats, 11, 12. The sealing is continued by a pair of asbestos sealing rings 48 fitted in grooves 49 beneath the shoulder of the central seat portion 47 which squeeze against the inner sides of the rotor ring 25. Sealing is completed in the vertical plane by operation of the side seats 16 which seat against the rotor unit 14 at its sides. The lower valve seat has a square hole 45 corresponding with the square hole 43 in the lower head cavity 35 through which the intake and exhaust gases travel.

Each bearing surface groove 44 contains a lubrication groove 46. Oil intake holes 37 lead from the lubrication groove 46 to the underside of the valve seat and there align with oil intake holes 34 in the lower head cavity 35. Each seat has four holes 64 for attachment to lower head. Each seat has two raised arcuate members 51 on each side to act as locks for each side seat 16 against rotation. Valve seats 12 are apart from the lower head 15 and bolted on to it for ease of overhaul because of wear and changes in tolerances.

Referring to FIG. 11, each rotor unit 14 has two sets of side seats 16. As has been described, the function of the side seat 16 is to completely seal in the vertical plane the rotor unit 14 from gases that travel around the minute space between the rings. The side seat 16 is split for installation purposes and has lubrication grooves 58, 59 on its face. One half of each seat has a pressure groove 58 and the other half has a collection groove 59. Each pressure groove terminates at its lower end in oil return holes 71 which open at the bottom of the side seat 16. The side seat 16 has a total arc of 315 with a 45 opening at the bottom for the passage of intake or exhaust gases into the rotor unit ports 23. Two small clips 60 fit over valve seat 11 and then against the sides of side seats 16 to hold the side seats 16 in place while they are installed and remain in place after installation, (FIG. 12).

Referring to FIGS. 13 to 15, the remaining part of the valve seat combustion is the upper valve seat, which is similar to the lower seat and is of l80 in arc. The upper valve seat 11 also contains two bearing surface grooves 61 which are a continuation of the bearing surface grooves 44 in the lower valve seat 12. These grooves contain lubrication grooves 62 which likewise continue the lubrication grooves 46 from the lower seat. Small side lubrication grooves 63 branch from the lubrication grooves 62 a distance towards the sides of the valve seat 11, at about the middle or highest point of the bearing surface grooves 61. Grooves 49 also continue into the upper head for the asbestos sealing rings 48. The upper and lower seats are adjusted in relation to the rotary unit by means of shims, and are bolted solid to the lower head through holes 50 and 64 with the rotary unit 14 contained and freely turning between them.

Referring to FIG. 16, the final part in this total system is the upper head 13. The upper head 13 is cooled by coolant traveling through cooling ducts 65. The upper head 13 is bolted against the lower head 15 by bolts (not shown) through holes 66 and holes 42 in the lower head into the block. In the upper head a steel or plastic cement (not shown) is flowed on the outer sides of the side seats 16 to hold them in place after installation. The cement material is also placed on top and around the upper seats 11. The cement ensures the contact of the seats with the upper head to use its cooling influence on the outer parts of the rotating valve unit 14. The cement also acts as a contact with the upper head to reduce the strain on the seats as combustion occurs. The upper head has one cement expansion hole 68 for each cylinder. A gasket (not shown) is placed between the upper and lower head.

The following is an explanation of the cooling system sequence.

1. The coolant travels from the radiator to a pump and into the block.

2. It then travels from the block into the lower and upper heads, entering the lower head at coolant ducts 32' and passing from the lower head from coolant ducts 32" and into coolant ducts 65' in the upper head.

3. The coolant travels to and from the interior of the rotor unit 14 via the lower and upper heads. a. The coolant liquid enters the rotor shaft 17 through its inner shaft hole 54 into the inner shaft l8 from a hole 69 through the longitudinal groove 30 in the lower head.

b. It then travels into the rotor unit interior 20 by the small connecting pipes 21 through the outer shaft 19.

c. The liquid then comes from the rotor unit 14 into the inside space 57 between the outer shaft 19 and the inner shaft 18.

4. The coolant now warmed tends upward and ends up in the upper head through a hole 70 in the longitudinal groove 30 in the upper head, and is con nected at coolant duct 65" through a radiator hose to the radiator.

The following is an explanation of the lubrication sequence through the rotary unit.

1. The oil and oil pressure originates from an oil pump.

2. The oil travels through the oil line 33 in the lower head.

3. It then goes through the connecting hole 34 in the lower head and mating oil holes 37 through the lower valve seats into the lubricating grooves 46 in the bearing surface groove 44.

4. The oil under pressure then travels up into the lubrication grooves 62 in the upper valve seat ll. 5. It then enters the small side lubrication grooves 63 in the upper valve seat.

6. The oil then enters into the long pressure groove 58 in the side seat 16 on the half of the split sidc seat in which the rotor turns upward.

7. The oil pressure in the side seat pressure groove 58 is interrupted for 202.5 of the circumference of the rotor by the absence of a lubrication groove 27 in the rotor ring 25.

a. The grooves 27 in the ring act as a rotary valve in the oil line causing the oil pressure in the side seat pressure groove 58 to be on and off.

b. The oil pressure in the pressure groove 58 is turned off when the opening of the port 23 in the rotor unit 14 is opposite the pressure groove in the side seat.

8. When the pressure is off in the groove 58, oil may run out of the pressure groove 58.

a. The trailing edge 24 of the port 23 is bevelled to act as a wedge to hold the oil against the side seat 16.

b. As the rotor turns, this oil is collected by the small collection groove 59 in the other half of the side seat 16, on the downward turn of the rotor.

9. The oil is then returned from the pressure groove 58 and collector groove 59 by oil return holes 7l in the side seat and mating oil return holes 36 in the lower head and through the block to the crankcase.

The following is the sequence of the movement of gases through the rotary valve.

1. The gas and air mixture enters the intake port 38 in the lower head.

2. The mixture then travels through the rotary valve unit 14 without turbulence.

3. When the piston is at the top of the stroke, the intake port 23 in the rotor unit 14 is just beginning to open, that is, to begin to come into alignment with the intake duct in the lower head, (67 in FIG. 17).

4. As the piston travels down, at 180 turn of the crankshaft, the rotor unit 14 turns 5. The vacuum pressure on the gaseous mixture re mains constant.

a. As the piston moves down it travels the fastest half way through its stroke when the intake port 23 is open at its fullest.

b. At the start and finish of the downward stroke of the piston it is moving progressively faster or slower, respectively, when the rotor port 23 is 7 opening and closing, respectively.

6. Combustion then occurs.

7. The exhaust stroke then occurs with the same principles of pressure as the intake stroke.

What I claim is:

l. The combination of a rotary valve and an internal combustion engine having cylinder openings and intake openings and exhaust openings arranged to communicate with said cylinder openings, comprising rotor means rotatable in the engine adjacent to said cylinder openings, said intake openings and said exhaust openings,

said rotor means comprising rotatable shaft means and rotor units secured to said shaft means for rotation therewith.

said rotor units having sides and portions which are exposed to combustion in the engine cylinders and port means therein for opening and closing communication between the intake and the cylinders and the exhaust and the cylinders of the engine timed with the rotation of the engine,

means at both sides of said rotor units for sealing said rotor units substantially perpendicularly to the axis of rotation thereof.

ring means on said rotor units having a greater diameter than the portions of said rotor units which are exposed to combustion in the cylinders,

said ring means being positioned on both sides of said exposed portions,

bearing means in the engine for supporting said ring means for rotation therein,

said ring means having groove means thereon commencing at the trailing edge of said rotor unit port means and continuing for a substantial arc on said ring means,

groove means in the engine for the passage of lubricant to said sealing surfaces,

said ring means being positioned adjacent said engine groove means to prevent the passage of lubricant through said engine groove means to said sealing surfaces except when the groove means on the ring means is adjacent said engine groove means.

2. The combination according to claim 1 in which said side sealing means has first groove means for introducing lubricant to said sealing surfaces and second groove means spaced from said first groove means in direction of rotation of said rotor unit for the collection of lubricant from said sealing surfaces with the rotation of said rotor unit.

3. The combination according to claim 2 in which the trailing edges of said rotary unit port means are bevelled to hold the lubricant from said first groove means against said sealing surfaces.

4. The combination according to claim 2 in which the first and second groove means have return ports for returning the lubricant to the engine.

5. The combination according to claim 2 in which said first groove means is positioned on the surface of said side sealing means so that said rotor unit is turning upwards with respect to it and said second groove means is positioned on the surface of said side sealing means so that said rotor unit is turning downwards with respect to it.

6. The combination according to claim 1 in which each of said rotor units has a substantial internal cavity for receiving circulatory coolant liquid therein,

said shaft means comprising a pair of hollow shafts spaced apart one within the other,

passage means communicating between said rotor unit cavities and one of said hollow shafts for transporting coolant liquid into said internal cavities and, passage means communicating between said rotor unit cavities and the other of said hollow shafts for transporting coolant liquid out of said internal cavities.

7. The combination according to claim 6 comprising means for admitting coolant liquid from the engine into the inner one of said hollow shafts for circulation into said rotor unit cavities and means for discharging coolant liquid from the space between the inner and outer hollow shafts into the engine.

8. The combination according to claim 6 comprising an engine block,

5 a lower head portion arranged to be secured upon the engine block and having said openings therein to the cylinders, said for the intake and exhaust,

an upper and lower head portions having elongated groove means for receiving said shaft means and a plurality of cavities for receiving said rotary units,

said lower head portion having cavity means for coolant liquid, port means for admitting coolant liquid into said cavity means and port means for discharging coolant liquid from said cavity means into said shaft means,

said upper head portion having cavity means for coolant liquid, port means for admitting coolant liquid from said shaft means and port means for discharging coolant liquid out of said head.

9. The combination according to claim 1 in which said groove means on said ring means continues for l57.5 along said ring means.

10. The combination ofa rotary valve and an internal combustion engine comprising rotor means rotatable in the engine adjacent to open ings to the cylinders and for the intake and the exhaust of said engine,

said rotor means comprising rotatable shaft means and rotor units secured to said shaft means for rotation therewith,

said rotor units having port means therein for opening and closing communication between the intake and the cylinders and the exhaust and the cylinders of the engine timed with the rotation of the engine,

each of said rotor units comprising a cylindrical wall means which is exposed as it turns to the combustion heat of the engine through the openings to the cylinders,

a pair of spaced apart cylindrical wall means of greater diameter than said first mentioned cylindrical wall means, and a pair of side wall means at the sides of said pair of cylindrical wall means,

intake port means communicating between one of said side wall means and said cylindrical wall means,

exhaust port means communicating between the other of said side wall means and said cylindrical wall means and spaced along said cylindrical wall means from said intake port means,

valve seat means secured in the engine for supporting said pair of cylindrical wall means in bearing contact for rotation of said rotor units and for sealing gases within said rotor units at said pair of cylindrical wall means,

said first mentioned cylindrical wall means being spaced a small distance from said valve seat means by said pair of cylindrical wall means,

means for lubricating the bearing surface of said valve seat means and said pair of cylindrical wall means,

a pair of side seat means for sealing gases within rotor units at said side wall means and having port means therein for communication with the intake and exhaust port means in said rotor units,

means for lubricating the sealing surfaces on said side seat means and said side wall means,

openable and closeable passage means for carrying lubricant between said valve seat bearing lubricating means and said sealing sigjgce dubricating' means, means on said rotor units for opening said passage means and for closing said passage means when said port means in said side seat means are exposed to the lubricating means for the side seat sealing surfaces with which said passage means communicates. 11. The combination according to claim in which the center of said intake port means is spaced 90 behind the center of said exhaust port means in the direction of rotation of the rotor units.

12. The combination according to claim 10 in which said pair of cylindrical walls are positioned adjacent said passage means to close the flow of lubricant therethrough and have groove means thereon which commence adjacent the trailing edge of said port means in said side wall means and continue for approximately 157.5" behind said trailing edge in the direction of rotation, to open said passage means when said groove means are adjacent said passage means.

13. The combination according to claim 10 in which said pair of cylindrical wall means on each of said rotor units comprises a pair of replaceable rings spaced apart on said rotor unit,

said openable and closeable passage means comprises groove means in said valve seat means, and

said lubricating means in said side seat comprises groove means extending a substantial distance on said side seat means.

14. The combination according to claim 10, comprising replaceable upper valve seat means secured over said rotor unit in an upper portion of the engine head,

replaceable lower valve seat means secured under said rotor unit in a lower portion of the engine head, said lower valve means having an opening therein leading to an engine cylinder,

annular bearing groove means in said valve seat means for rotatably supporting said rotor unit rings,

annular lubrication groove means in said bearing groove means for lubricating said ring means, said lubrication groove means communicating with oil distribution means in the engine head,

side groove means in the upper portion of said upper valve :seat for carrying lubricant from the annular lubrication groove a small distance towards the outside of said valve seat, lubrication groove means in the side seat means commencing in the upper portion of said side seat means near to said side groove means and extending a substantial distance towards the bottom on the portion of said side seat means with respect to which the rotor unit is turning upwards. and

collection groove means in the portion of said side seat means with respect to which the rotor unit is turning downwards,

said lubricating groove means and said collection groove means communicating with oil distribution means in the engine.

15. The combination according to claim 2 in which said side sealing means have port means for intake and exhaust which are arranged to align with said rotor unit port means and said first and second groove means are arranged to lie at least with a portion thereof near to said sealing means ports and on opposite side thereof from each other.

16. The combination according to claim 1 in which said side sealing means comprises first and second ports which are separated at least at a portion thereof to provide port means for intake and exhaust aligned with said rotor unit port means.

17. The combination according to claim 16 comprising clip means for holding said side sealing means in place at the sides of said rotor units during installation.

18. A rotary valve according to claim 1 in which said rotor unit port means on said rotor unit side sealing surfaces is a wedge-shape having radial sides arranged about 45 to each other.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4333427 *Aug 5, 1980Jun 8, 1982Antonio BurilloInternal combustion engine
US4370955 *May 11, 1979Feb 1, 1983Ruggeri John RRotary valve for an internal combustion engine
US4852532 *Jan 23, 1987Aug 1, 1989Bishop Arthur ERotary valve for internal combustion engines
US4879979 *Mar 29, 1988Nov 14, 1989Triguero Felix OIntake and exhaust system through rotatory ports shaft, in four-stroke motors
US5249553 *Apr 30, 1991Oct 5, 1993Guiod James JRotary valve shaft indent system
US5255645 *Feb 18, 1992Oct 26, 1993Templeton George WRotary valve for an internal combustion engine
US5372104 *Oct 8, 1993Dec 13, 1994Griffin; Bill E.Rotary valve arrangement
US5529037 *May 5, 1995Jun 25, 1996A. E. Bishop Research Pty. LimitedLubrication system for rotary valve
US5878707 *Sep 22, 1997Mar 9, 1999Ballard; DonaldRotary valve internal combustion engine
US5941206 *Sep 18, 1996Aug 24, 1999Smith; BrianRotary valve for internal combustion engine
US7371265 *Mar 25, 2005May 13, 2008Gerfast Sten RContinuous hydrogen and alcohol generator from coal
EP0293335A2 *Apr 27, 1988Nov 30, 1988Alviero MontagniTiming device for reciprocating positive-displacement engines, such as endothermic reciprocating engines, with a rotary valve in the shape of a solid of revolution, particularly a sphere
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/190.17, 123/190.1, 123/190.16, 123/190.6
International ClassificationF01L7/16, F01L7/00
Cooperative ClassificationF01L7/16
European ClassificationF01L7/16