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Publication numberUS3892405 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 1, 1975
Filing dateFeb 5, 1973
Priority dateFeb 5, 1973
Publication numberUS 3892405 A, US 3892405A, US-A-3892405, US3892405 A, US3892405A
InventorsManuel C Trevino
Original AssigneeManuel C Trevino
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf game
US 3892405 A
Abstract
Disclosed is a golf game including a hitting board having a playing surface thereon, a set of graphical representations or layouts of respective holes of a golf course, locational indicia on the playing surface corresponding to locational indicia on the graphic representations, a miniature simulated golf ball of multi-faceted configuration, miniature simulated golf clubs, and various playing pieces utilized with the golf game. Superimposed upon the locational indicia of the graphic representation are "hazard" and "green" zones, the location of the golf ball on the hitting board playing surface determining the corresponding location of the ball on the hole layout.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 1 Trevino [451 July 1,1975

[ GOLF GAME [21] App]. No.: 329,713

[52] US. Cl. 273/873 [51} Int. Cl A63 7/06 [58] Field of Search 273/87, 87.2, 87.4, 176 R,

273/176 B, 176 E, 176 F, 176 G, 176 L, 134

FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 1,068,615 2/1954 France 273/872 Primary ExaminerRichard C. Pinkham Assistant Examiner-Harry G. Strappello Attorney, Agent, or Firml(enneth R. Glaser [57] ABSTRACT Disclosed is a golf game including a hitting board having a playing surface thereon, a set of graphical representations or layouts of respective holes of a golf course, locational indicia on the playing surface corresponding to locational indicia on the graphic representations, a miniature simulated golf ball of multifaceted configuration, miniature simulated golf clubs, and various playing pieces utilized with the golf game. Superimposed upon the locational indicia of the graphic representation are hazard and green" zones, the location of the golf ball on the hitting board playing surface determining the corresponding location of the ball on the hole layout.

3 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures GOLF GAME The present invention relates generally to a golf game, more particularly to a golf game realistically simulating the playing conditions of actual golf, and even more particularly to a golf game in which the players actually drive a ball in a manner similar to actual golf.

Many golf games have been designed to attempt to attract the interest of both the professional and amateur golfer. Most of these games employ techniques, such as dice, cards, etc., which introduce a high degree of chance into the game, and thus do not realistically simulate the playing conditions of the game. The greatest deterrent from realism in many of these games is the complete absence of any technique whereby the players actually drive or putt a ball in a manner similar to actual golf. Those games which have introduced this aspect either do not have sufficient versatility to be interesting or require such a large playing area to ac comodate a sufficient number of holes, normally encountered hazards or obstacles, etc. as to be impractical.

It is therefore a primary object of the present invention to provide a new and improved golf game.

It is another object of the invention to provide a golf game which realistically simulates the playing conditions of golf and is primarily based upon the actual skill of the players.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a new and improved golf game in which the players actually drive or putt a ball in a manner similar to regulation golf, and wherein actual obstacles between the tee and the cup are employed.

A still further object of the invention is the provision of a golf game incorporating the hereinbefore defined objects which can be economical to produce, and which can be played and stored in a small area.

In accordance with these and other objects, the golf game of the present invention includes a game or hitting board playing surface along which a miniature golf ball of multi-faceted configuration is driven or putted by miniature golf clubs having configurations corresponding to conventional full size clubs. The playing surface which includes a recessed cup therein, has indicia thereon dividing it into areas or sectors which identify, with respect to distance and position, the relative location of the ball 17 on the playing surface. Additionally, a set ofhole" cards are provided, each card being a graphic representation of the layout of a hole ofa golf course, and having indicia thereon dividing the hole into areas and sectors which correspond to the areas and sectors of the playing surface. By comparing the location of the ball on the playing surface, the corresponding location of the ball on the hole can be determined. Superinposed upon the locational indicia of the hole cards are hazard and green zones, the location of the ball in an area corresponding to these zones thus indicating the situation in which the player may find himself.

Additional features, as well as other objects and advantages, of the invention will become more readily understood from the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. I is a pictorial illustration of the hitting board of the golf game of the invention along with various playing pieces utilized therewith;

FIG. 2 is a detailed representation of the playing surface of the board illustrated in FIG. 1 showing the indicia thereon; and

FIG. 3 is a detailed representation of one of a set of hole cards included with the game specifically illustrating the indicia thereon.

Referring now to the drawings, and initially to FIG. 1 thereof, reference numeral 10 generally designates the game or hitting board 10 of the golf game of the present invention. The board 10 includes a base portion 11 surrounded on three sides by vertically extending guard or ball retaining strips 12. At the far end of the board 10, and extending tranverse to the longitudinal dimension of the base 11, is a trough 13. While the board 10 may be of any convenient size or shape, a preferred construction is of a rectangular shape having a length of approximately 3 feet and a width of approximately 1 feet.

Disposed upon the face of the base 11 is a shaped playing surface 14 having a first outwardly sloping portion 15 longitudinally extending from a forward edge 38 to a second circular portion 16. During the playing of the game, the details of which are subsequently de' scribed, a minature golf ball 17 is driven or propelled along the playing surface 14 toward the cup 18; consequently this playing surface is preferably of a texture or formed of a material, such as terry cloth, which simu lates the turf of a conventional golf course.

The miniature golf ball 17 is formed of aluminum or other suitable material and, in accordance with a specific feature of the present invention, has its outer surface formed as a plurality of facets 19 substantially equal surface area and sufficient in number to enable the ball to roll across the playing surface 14 while at the same time retarding excessive rolling movement thereof, thereby to closely simulate the roll of an actual golf ball along the turf of a golf course. To achieve this result, it has been found that the number of facets 19 should exceed 12, but be less than l6, [4 such facets achieving optimum results.

The golf game of the present invention also includes a plurality of miniature golf clubs 20 (capable of being stored within the bag 21), each of the clubs 20 corresponding to, and having club face angles corresponding to, conventional full size golf clubs (irons, woods, wedge, putter, etc.) employed in a regulation golf game. While not critical, each club 20 is preferably from 4 to 6 inches in length.

Additional playing pieces of the game, the respective purpose of which will be more fully understood when the rules of the game are explained hereinafter, include ball markers 22, miniature trees 23, simulated three dimensional bunkers 24 and 25, flagstick 26, and tree and water hazard" cards 27 and 28. Additional playing pieces besides those described may also be utilized in conjuction with the game of the present invention.

A more detailed representation of the playing surface 14 is illustrated in FIG. 2. Accordingly, and in accordance with the unique feature of the present invention. the playing surface 14 has indicia thereon dividing the surface into areas or sectors which identify, with respect to distance and position, the relative location of the ball 17 on this playing surface. Thus, a plurality of lines 30 between the boundary lines 31 extend the length of the playing surface 14 (from the forward edge 38 toward the trough edge 39) and define therebetween a plurality of longitudinally extending areas 82. Each of these areas 82 are conveniently designated by the letters A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, and l for easy identifi cation thereof. While nine such areas are illustrated, a greater or lesser number may be employed, if desired, consistent with the principles of the present invention.

Extending transverse to the lines 30 are a plurality of parallel lines 32 defining therehetween a plurality of adjacently disposed laterally extending areas 40. As depicted in FIG. 2, each of the areas 40 are conveniently designated adjacent to the right side of the playing surface 14 by numbers representing the distance (in yard" increments) from the driver line or forward edge 38 toward the edge 39 of the board (the maximum yardage in this illustrated example being 280). Each of the areas 40 are also conveniently designated adjacent the left side of the playing surface by numbers representing the distance (in 10 yard increments) from the cup 18 toward the driver line 38, the numbers +10, +20, +30, etc, representing the distance beyond the cup 18. It is also significant to note that along with the distance indicia along the left side of the playing surface are designations suggesting the type of club to be employed at that distance. As illustrated in FIG. 2, the distance between adjacent lines 32, i.e. the longitudinal width of the areas generally increases as one proceeds from the driver line 38 toward the cup 18 and thereafter decreases as the end line 39 is approached.

The circular portion of the playing surface 14 has in dieia thereon shown as a plurality of concentric circles radially extending from the cup 18 and defining therebetween circular areas 51. Each of these circular areas 51 have numerical indicia associated therewith representing the radial distance (for example, in 3 yard increments) from the cup 18, the outermost circular area 51 terminating adjacent the line 32a (generally representing the locus of intersection of the first and second portions 15 and 16. Additionally, the portion 16 has radially extending lines 55 defining therebetween a plurality of adjacent pie shaped" portions or sectors. Each sector then provides a convenient designation of the angular position of an object, such as the ball 17, on the playing surface 14 and with respect to the cup 18.

The areas (designated 41 on FIG. 2) of the base 1] outside the playing surface l4 constitute the out of bounds zones. Additionally, numerical indicia is disposed on the base portion and is utilized during the putting portion of the game in accordance with the rules thereof. as subsequently described.

The golf game of the present invention also includes a set of sheets or cards 66, each card having a graphic representation thereon of the layout of a hole of a golf course. The term hole as it is used herein corre sponds to the conventional reference by golfers to the fairway approach. hazards, green, etc. associated with each cup, there normally being 18 such holes on a golf course. Consequently, the game will normally include a set of [8 such cards, the graphic representation or layout 70 on each card depicting the shape of the fairway, the regions of certain obstacles or hazards nor mally encountered, the green area, out of bounds re gions, etc. of each hole. The layouts on the cards 66 may be arbitrarily drawn or, if desired, may be representations of actual holes of welLknown golf courses.

Referring now to FIG. 3, one such hole 70 is depicted. Circumferentially extending around the hole and defining the out of bounds demarcation is the outline 80. Similar to the playing surface 14, the territory of the hole 70 within the outline has indicia thereon dividing it into areas or sectors which uniquely corre spond to the areas and sectors of the playing surface but identify the relative location of the ball 17 on the hole. Specifically, longitudinally extending areas 82' correspond to areas 82 on the playing surface 14 and are similarly designated by letter designations A, B, C, etc. These areas 82', however, generally correspond to locations on the fairway of the hole 70. For example, in the illustrated example of Fl(]. 3, areas B and G generally designate the fairway "roughs" while the major portion of the areas A and I would lie out of bounds. The major length of the fairway" is also divided into a plurality of laterally extending areas 40' corresponding to the areas 40 on the playing surface and representing the distance between the tee and the cup. Each of the areas 40' also have associated therewith numerical designations 78 and 79 respectively indicating, in yards, the distance on the fairway from the cup 18 and from the tee, as well as designations 77 suggesting the type of club 20 to use at that distance. Additionally, numerical indicia 76 represents the yardage of any one area 40' from a water hazard 73. Similar to the playing surface 14, green approach area (less than 50 yards from the cup) of the hole 70 has indicia dividing it into circular areas 51' (corresponding to the areas 51 on the playing surface 14) and pie shaped portions or sectors 60 (corresponding to the sectors 60 on the playing surface). Numerals also designate the radial distance or yardage of each area 51' from the cup 18.

As a unique feature of the present invention, the graphic representation 71) also include enclosed areas 71, 72, and 73 superimposed over the just-described locational indicia respectively representing tree hazard zones, bunker or sand trap hazard" zones, and water hazard zones. Additionally, an enclosed outline 91 defines a green zone surrounding the cup 18. As more specifically described hereinafter, when the ball 17 is located (with respect to distance and position) on the playing surface 14 in a region corresponding to a region on the hole 70 falling within any one of the zones 71, 72, 73. or 91, this would indicate that the ball 17 has respectively come to rest in the trees. the bunker, the water hazard, or on the green.

Additionally, it is desirable that the radial widths of the areas 51 on the hitting surface be substantially equal to the radial widths of the areas 51' of the hole card 70.

A preferred method for playing the golf game of the present invention is now described. The overall objective of the game is the same as that of conventional regulatim golf, i.e., to hole out" in as few strokes as possible. The game may be played as Medal play" whereby each player adds up the total number of strokes required to hole out all 18 holes; or as "Match Play whereby as soon as one player wins the hole, the players move on to the next hole, the winner deter mined by the player who wins most of the holes.

The game begins by selecting one of the cards 66 corresponding to the first hole to be played (for example, the hole 70 depicted in FIG. 3). Each player, in turn, then places the ball 17 on the playing surface 14 of the hitting board 10 immediately adjacent the driver line 38 and within the confines of the longitudinal area E (center of the playing surface). This then would correspond to the tee" on the hole 70.

By means of one of the miniature golf clubs (preferably the club corresponding to the No. l wood or driver) the ball is driven by each player along the textured playing surface 14 toward the end of the board with the intention of achieving as much distance as possible from the driver line (tee) while remaining generally within the center of the playing surface (center of fairway on hole 70) and within the boundaries of the playing surface 14. If the ball 17 comes to rest within any of the out of bounds zones 41 on the base 11 or drops off into the trough 13, an appropriate penalty is assessed in accordance with the rules of the game. The ball 17 is confined to the hitting board by the guard strips 12. As each of the players hits this first or tee shot. the respective location on the playing surface 14 where the driven ball comes to rest is marked by placing the each players ball marker 22 thereat.

It is again noted that due to the multi-faceted config uration of the ball 17, and the textured nature of the playing surface 14. the movement or roll of the ball along the surface 14 closely simulates the movement of an actual golf ball along the turf ofa golf course. Additionally. the configuration of the club face of each club 20 allows the players to achieve that degree of loft to the ball normally associated with the regulation size golf clubs to which they correspond.

Where the golf ball lands on the hitting surface 14, after being struck, determines the player's ball position on the particular hole being played. Accordingly, the location of the golf ball 17 on the playing surface 14 after coming to rest is then noted with respect to both the distance from the driver line 38 (by observing the yardage designation along the right edge of the playing surface corresponding to the particular area 40 in which the ball rests) and the relative position of the ball on the playing surface (by observing in whicn longitudinal area 82 the ball rests). The corresponding location (distance and position) of this first shot on the hole 70 is then determined by noting the area 40' and area 82' respectively corresponding to the previously noted areas 40 and 82 on the playing surface 14. For example. if the ball 17 comes to rest on the playing surface in the location designated by the triangle in FIG. 2 (being 180 yards from the driver line 38 and within the center area E). the location of the ball of the first shot on the hole 70 (FIG. 3) is illustrated by the triangle thereon (corresponding to the I80 yards from the tee and in the center of the fairway).

As mentioned. the numerical indicia 79 on the hole 70 represents the distance from the tee toward the cup 18, and the numerical indicia 78 represents the distance from the cup toward the tee. Utilizing this relationship. it is noted that the position of the ball (triangle designation of FIG. 3) is not only I80 yards from the tee. but is still 380 yards from the cup, Consequently. for the second shot. the hall I7 is placed adjacent the end line 38 of the playing surface l4 (since the maximum yardage distance thereon is just 280 yards) and within the area 40 designated E (since the ball is presently located in the center of the fairway). The ball is again struck by one ofthe clubs 20 to drive it toward the end line 39 of the hitting board. The suggested choice of the particular club 20 is indicated by the numerical indicia 77, and in this case the club 20 which is utilized for the second shot would correspond to the 2 wood. As before. the location of the golf ball after coming to rest is noted on the playing surface. and again compared in a manner previously described to determine its corresponding location on the hole 70.

This procedure is continued until the ball has been advanced to within a specific distance from the cup, (referred to hereinbefore as the green approach area) in the illustrated example of FIG. 3, that being approximately 45 yards therefromv At this distance, the circular portion 16 (also bearing the 45 yard limit designa tion) of the playing surface [4 will control or determine the location of the ball on the hole 70. In a manner similar to that previously described. the resting point of the ball 17 within one of the sectors will locate the ball within the corresponding sector 60' on the hole 70; and its location within the confines of one of the concentric areas 51 will represent the ball location within the corresponding concentric area 51' on the card 70. Thus. when the ball 17 is disposed within the area 16, its angular relationship to. and distance from. the cup may be determined.

The location of the various shots on the hole 70 is not only important to determine the distance to and from the cup. but also to determine whether the ball has been driven out of bounds. is on the green 90, or has come to rest within one of the hazard zones 71, 72. or 73. Accordingly if, during the course of play. the ball comes to rest within one of the tree hazard zones 7] or within the water hazard 73, the player chooses one of the tree hazard cards 27 or one of the water hazard cards 28 which informs him then as to the result of his misfortune (penalty strokes, etc). As mentioned. the distance to the water hazard 73 is represented by the indicia 76. If, for example, the ball comes to rest within one of the bunker hazard zones 72, one of the bunkers 24 or 25 (corresponding to the designation B. or B, within the zone 72) is placed in front of the ball 17, and the player selects an appropriate club 20 to drive the ball over the bunker. The driving of the ball 17 to an area on the playing surface which corresponds to an out of bounds area on the hole 70 then results in appropriate penalty strokes being assessed.

Once the player reaches the green area 90, the yardage from the cup is determined (by noting the yardage designation associated with the area 51' on which the ball lies); and the ball 17 is moved to a position on the hitting surface 14 in line with the corresponding yard' age designation of the putting indicia 65. The ball is then putted toward the cup 18 on the surface 14 until the player holes out. The and designations of the indicia guide may be used for certain premium shots; for example for establishing the putting distance when a prior drive goes into the cup but the designation l on one of the faces 19 of the ball is not showing. or when a prior drive comes to rest within the area 510 without going into the cup.

It can thus be seen that a golf game is provided which realistically simulates actual playing conditions. is primarily based upon the actual skill of the players. and can be played in a relatively small area.

Various modifications to the above described embodiment. as well as alternate embodiments. of the present invention. may become apparent to one skilled in the art without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the appended claimsv What is claimed is:

l. A golf game. comprising in combination:

a. a hitting board having oppositely disposed ends and a shaped playing surface located thereon longitudinally extending between said ends,

b. said playing surface having a portion adjacent one of said ends defining a driver line and a recessed hole longitudinally spaced from said driver line toward said other end defining a cup; said playing surface additionally having indicia means marked thereon dividing said playing surface into a first set of longitudinally extending areas and a first set of laterally extending areas transversely intersecting said first set of longitudinally extending areas, respective ones of said first set of longitudinally extending areas serving to indicate discrete at rest lateral positions of an object being driven across said playing surface, respective ones of said first set of laterally extending areas serving to indicate dis crete at rest distance positions from said driver line of an object being driven across said playing sur' face,

c. a plurality of cards, each card having a graphic illustration representing the layout of a different hole of a golf course, said graphic illustration including a portion defining a tee and an area longitudinally spaced from said tee defining a cup; each card additionally having indicia means thereon di viding said card into a second set of longitudinally extending areas aand a second set of laterally extending areas transversely intersecting said second set of longitudinally extending areas, respective ones of said second set of longitudinally extending areas serving to indicate discrete lateral positions of an object on said card, respective ones of said second set of laterally extending areas serving to indicate discrete distances from said tee toward said cup on said card,

d. said first and second sets of longitudinally extending areas of said playing surface and said card both having lateral position identifying indicia, the lateral position identifying indicia of the playing surface corresponding to, and being the same as, the lateral position identifying indicia of the card; said first and second sets of laterally extending areas of said playing surface and said card both having distance indicating indicia respectively indicating distances from said driver line and from said tee, the distance indicating indicia of said card indicating distances in excess of that of the distance indicating indicia of said playing surface, whereby each of said cards can be used to continuously plot the movement of a point on said card by distance and lateral position, corresponding to the movement of an object successively driven from said driver line across said playing surface toward said recessed hole,

e. at least one miniature golf club; and

f. object means simulating a miniature golf ball adapted to be driven by said miniature golf club across said playing surface.

2. The golf game as defined by claim 1 wherein said playing surface has additional indicia means thereon dividing the portion of said playing surface surrounding said recessed hole into a first set of concentric circular areas and a first set of adjacent sectors circularly surrounding said recessed hole, respective ones of said first set of concentric circular areas serving to indicate discrete at rest distance positions from said recessed hole of an object being driven across said playing surface, respective ones of said first set of adjacent sectors serving to indicate discrete at rest angular positions of an object being driven across said playing surface with respect to said recessed hole; each of said cards additionally having indicia means thereon dividing the portion of said card surrounding said cup into a second set of concentric circular areas and a second set of adjacent sectors circularly surrounding said cup, respective ones of said second set of concentric circular areas serving to indicate discrete distances from said cup of an object on said card, respective ones of said second set of adjacent sectors serving to indicate discrete angular position of an object on said card with respect to said cup, said first and second sets of concentric circu lar areas of said playing surface and said card both having distance indicating indicia, the concentric circular area distance identifying indicia of the playing surface corresponding to, and being the same as, the concentric circular area distance identifying indicia of said card, the total number, and respective angular position of each, of said first set of adjacent sectors being the same as the total number, and respective angular position of each, of said second set of adjacent sectors.

3. The golf game as defined by claim 2 wherein each card further includes indicia means defining obstacle zones superimposed upon said layout.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4596391 *Nov 1, 1985Jun 24, 1986Carolan Jr Leo PPortable golf game
US5370571 *Jan 14, 1993Dec 6, 1994Tyco Investment Corp.Toy projectile launching devices
US6409607Apr 20, 1999Jun 25, 2002Jeffrey M. LibitGolf courses and methods of playing golf
US6457713Oct 26, 2000Oct 1, 2002Carlos Miguel OppenheimerGolf simulation game apparatus
US8287395Nov 23, 2009Oct 16, 2012Green Stephen WIndoor golf game and training equipment
WO1994015687A1 *Jan 13, 1994Jul 21, 1994Tyco Ind IncToy projectile launching devices
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/108.21, 273/317.2
International ClassificationA63B67/02, A63B69/36, A63F7/06, A63F9/04
Cooperative ClassificationA63F7/0628, A63F2009/044, A63F7/40
European ClassificationA63F7/06A9